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MSc IDI Modules

IDI Module Listings 2014-2015

Please click on the titles below to see more information about King's IDI modules:  

7YYD0001: Great Transformations, Pseudo-Miracles and Arrested
Development: Emerging Economies and Development Theory, Concepts
and Strategies

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the history of thinking on what is development and how it is pursued. This covers questions such as what is a developing country and what is an emerging economy and critically introduces students to various sources of development data and indicators used extensively in studies of development to assess change. These include indicators of structural change and economic development, of political change and of poverty reduction and social development.

The course then provides students with an introduction to the key development theories, concepts and strategies from both orthodox and heterodox development theorists. And the (disputed) impasse in development theory during the 1980s is introduced as an entry point to the emergence of the Neo-liberal/Washington Consensus counter-revolution and the contemporary debate on the post-Washington Consensus and the Beijing/Seoul Consensus. 

7YYD0002: States, Markets and the Institutional Bases of Growth

The 2008 financial crisis has called into question the 'hegemonic' belief in fully liberalized markets. The developed world is still struggling to return to economic growth while much of the developed world is prospering. This disparity has raised anew the question of whether state or markets are the best mechanism for advancing development. This course examines state, markets and the bases of economic development and rapid growth.

Part one of the module compares states and markets as alternative mechanisms for decision making and solving problems of resource allocation. Virtually all high-growth economies today mix both state and market and therefore the course will explore critical examples drawn from diverse cases including the BRIC countries, but also successful examples such as Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, South Africa, South Korea and Turkey.

Part two of the module will explore a series of specific policy areas critical to promoting growth. Again, the course will draw on contrasting case studies to illuminate both the theoretical questions and the range of empirical responses to managing policies such as trade, financial market regulation, exchange rate policy, and the regulation of utilities. Finally the course will focus attention on the critical role of institutions as bases for successful development. Institutional development includes property rights and legal systems as well as government agencies. Thus this part of the course will consider the theoretical underpinning s of how governments structure incentives efficiently and promote and support effective public policy. Case examples will explore how different developing countries have overcome unproductive legacies of weak institutions and corruption.

7YYD0003: Poverty, Inequality and Inclusive Development in Emerging
Economies

This course introduces students to conceptual and theoretical constructs and empirical study of inclusive development. Specifically this entails discussion of the conceptualisations of poverty, inequality, insecurity and policy responses with particular reference to emerging economies.

Students will engage with key debates in inclusive development, understanding different types of inequalities, the meaning and measurement of extreme and moderate income and multi-dimensional poverty; the meaning and measurement of insecurity and vulnerability, contemporary trends and patterns in inclusive development and causes of persistent poverty, insecurity and inequalities, the nature of emergence of new 'middle classes' implications and debates on inclusive development and political regimes, fiscal policy and taxation and social protection and cash transfers measures.

7YYD0004: Political Economy of Market Reform

This course introduces students to the analysis of the politics of economic reform. The economic reform process is always politically contentious. Policy always produces winners and losers and as a result always provokes resistance from those who believe they will lose wealth, status or power.

Today's emerging economies have found success rising out of a long process of struggle over economic reforms, beginning in the 1980s. Market oriented reforms, often called 'neo-liberalism' dominated the reform agenda and reforms were passed despite tremendous political conflicts and channels. Ultimately, the reform agenda delivered less than promised and newly emerging economies have embarked on new reform experiments.

The course invites students to think about how newly emerging economic powers have faced the challenge of passing difficult economic reforms; what affects the ability of policy makers to mobilize support or to overcome resistance; what explains the variations across cases of degrees of success as well as the differing patterns of success in some policy areas and failure or at best partial gains in others.  

7YYD0008: Health Policy and Healthcare Systems in Emerging
Economies

This course introduces students to the empirical and theoretical study of contemporary health policy and healthcare systems, exploring topics of particular relevance to populations in emerging economies.

Students will engage with key debates and issues within the social sciences and public health disciplines including: key concepts of underlying health policy and systems analysis; the contemporary global health landscape; theories and typologies for understanding healthcare systems; the dynamics of poverty and ill-health and policy responses; the consequences of rapid urbanisation for emerging economies and the challenges posed for collective health and wellbeing; the new ‘middle classes’ and health policy; trade and the global healthcare economy; emerging biotech and biomedical services; and methodologies for researching health policy and systems.

7YYD0009: Foundations, Methods and Practices of International Development Evaluation

Growing public pressure to demonstrate that international development initiatives generate valuable results have triggered a growing demand for development evaluation. High quality, rigorous, independent evaluations are increasingly being commissioned to ascertain whether development policies, programmes and projects contribute to social learning and improved decision making in different countries, contexts and cultures. Against this background, the course module aims to introduce students to the antecedents, rationale and tools of the contemporary development evaluation discipline. The module will sketch how evolving conceptions of development have influenced development evaluation theory and practice. The diversity of evaluation approaches available to development evaluation practitioners as well as their relative strengths and limitations will be examined. In particular, the distinct waves of dominant evaluation doctrines (democratic, neo-liberal, evidence based, experimental, developmental, etc.), their philosophical underpinnings and the implications of emerging web-based and “big data” evaluation approaches will be probed. Turning to practice students will secure an overview of evaluation principles, standards, norms and ethics and how ethical principles can enhance the validity of evaluations. Practical tools to design evaluations by structuring the programme logic, identifying evaluation questions, securing and interpreting relevant evidence will be demonstrated. Next, the module will help students gain a critical awareness of the distinctive contributions to knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods to rigorous evaluation. In particular it will illustrate by dint of examples and case studies the circumstances in which theories of change, evaluation rating systems and impact assessments can demonstrate whether or not development projects and programmes “work” and for whom. Finally, students will be exposed to the governance conditions, implementation processes and reporting practices that make for a high quality evaluation function geared to the improved design and implementation of policies, programmes and projects in the zones of turmoil and transition of the developing world.

7YYD0010: Gender and Social Policy in Emerging Economies

This module discusses gender and social policy in the emerging economies around the world, with emphasis on Latin America. Under the influence of international gender and development discourse and practice, grass roots women’s organising over livelihood issues, and feminist activism, gender has been included one way or another in most government policy since the 1970s. In different countries and regions policies were developed as part of gender mainstreaming or specific governmental women’s agencies or ministries. This module offers a critical perspective upon trade-offs between developmental and emancipatory goals, between feminist perspectives and mainstreaming, and between bottom-up versus top-down. The module will look at the evolution of gender and policy, regional and country comparisons, social and political rights (including health, education, nutrition, labour), and civil society participation (grass roots organising, feminist activism, NGOs).

7YYD0011: Comparative Public Policy Analysis in Emerging
Economies

The aim of this course is to provide students with a strong foundation in the theoretical frameworks associated with comparative policy analysis, the comparative methodology involved, as well as the lessons that can be learned from emerging economies. The first half of the course will focus more on learning what comparative public policy is, the theories associated with this kind of approach as well as the method for selecting and comparing case studies. Towards the end of the course, students will read several case study examples from emerging economies in Latin America, South Asia, and Africa, and to what extent the theoretical frameworks learned in the course do - or do not - help to explain and predict policy outcomes. We will close the course by discussing the extent to which policy implementation and designs matter in explaining policy outcomes as well as how and if formal and informal institutions matter in the emerging economies.

7YYD0012: Industrial Development: Strategy and Competitiveness of
East Asian Firms

Both the increasing trend and the perils of de-industrialisation for emerging economies have been highlighted by the international development community. While there is a need to think ambitiously about ways in which the productive capacity in emerging economies can be developed in a sustainable way, industrial development has been (and continues to be) viewed narrowly in terms of trade and industrial policies, with a strong emphasis on the management of foreign direct investment (FDI) as a major source of skills and technology transfer. Hence, policy solutions are circumscribed to the realm of FDI by both the neoliberals and state interventionists alike. In this module, we go beyond the “market vs. state” debate, and take on a more structuralist approach to studying the institutional foundations and path-dependent dynamics of industrial development.

This module aims to understand the theoretical and conceptual foundations for studying the processes of industrialisation and firm growth, and examines the challenges of committing to long-term industrial development that provides durable conditions for local firms to grow and attain competitiveness. By investigating the experiences of successful late industrialisers - known as the East Asian Newly Industrialised Countries (NICs) - and in particular, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan - the module explores the constraints and opportunities that today’s emerging economies – both BRICs and non-BRICs - face in developing their industries and firms.

7YYD0013: Commodities, Credit and Crises: Topics in
Macroeconomics of Development

Emerging economies face a variety of distinct challenges that set them apart from their rich-world counterparts. They tend to be more dependent on commodity exports and often struggle to industrialize, they are more integrated into global trade, and they are more dependent on international finance. As a consequence of these and other distinctive features they tend to suffer from high volatility and relatively frequent economic and financial crises. This module describes the distinguishing features of emerging economies’ macroeconomies and present a rigorous analytical framework for studying them. We analyse economic dualism, natural resource dependence, and industrialization; the role of credit and debt, both national and international; and the variety of financial crises that bedevil emerging economies.

** There is a requirement for this course, namely that students have studied undergraduate intermediate macroeconomics, unless given special permission by the convenor **

7YYD0014: The Politics of Managing Public Finances in Emerging
Economies

The responsible management of public finances is widely considered to be one of the cornerstone conditions to facilitate sustained growth, equitable distribution and long term investment of resources in developing countries. In a globalised economy, the management of public finances has become an area of increased technical expertise, because it requires knowledge of complex issues such as the administration of foreign direct investments, external aid from donors and cooperation agencies, debt management, tax policy and tax administration, and the allocation and distribution of government spending. These issue areas have inherently political implications, as it generates redistributive consequences, creates long term winners and losers, and have a direct influence over development outcomes in society. These political transactions are reflected in the structure of a country’s budget process, in the bargaining of different tax regimes and in the choice of government spending and saving instruments. In this light, a comprehensive understanding of PFM and reforms has to reconcile the knowledge about technical constraints with the political coalitions that make reforms sustainable in the long run.

This module aims to introduce students to the technical and political dimensions of public finance management in a) the generation of revenues, b) the budget process, and c) government spending; and to introduce students the most relevant debates of the specialised literature and discuss policy implications of reforms using case studies.

7YYD0015: Development and Democracy in Mexico - NOT ON OFFER 14/15

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the non-linear processes of economic development and state formation in Mexico, exploring the deep roots of the challenges and opportunities facing the country today. Topics to be covered include: the legacies of Spanish colonial rule; the difficulties of the construction of a nation state in the nineteenth century; Mexico’s insertion in the world economy after 1880; the disintegration into civil war and revolution in the 1910s; the political and economic crises faced by the revolutionary governments amid the Great Depression and World War Two; the so-called ‘post war economic miracle’ and the role of the state in it; the institutionalization of an authoritarian regime under a single dominant party, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI); the economic troubles that destabilized the PRI’s rule; the role of growing discontent, popular movements, and the political opposition in the protracted democratic transition; the recent descent into violence; and the current optimism about economic reform and growth. This module provides students with a thorough grounding in Mexican history and prepares them to engage critically with contemporary challenges of development. 

7YYD0016: Latin America in the 20th Century and Beyond

This module explores the economic, social, and political history of Latin America from the early twentieth century to the present. Through the analysis of structures of production and exchange, political systems, and social struggles, as well as of regional and country-specific reactions to international economic and political contexts, we assess the region’s democratic record and explain why poverty and inequality have been so persistent.

Topics of discussion include: political sovereignty and foreign interventions; electoral participation, authoritarianism, and state formation; the role of the military; economic liberalism and state-led development; debt, inflation and economic crisis; revolution and counterrevolution; the Cold War; and drug wars.

The central aims of this module are to provide students with a solid understanding of Latin America’s past, and to prepare them to engage critically with contemporary challenges of development.

7YYD0017: Politics of Public Finances in Latin America

The responsible management of public finances is one of the cornerstone conditions to facilitate sustained growth, equitable distribution and long term investment of resources in developing countries. In a globalised economy, the management of public finances has become an area of increased technical expertise, because it requires knowledge of complex issues such as the administration of foreign direct investments, external aid from donors and cooperation agencies, debt management, tax policy and tax administration, and the allocation and distribution of government spending. These issues have inherently political implications, as they generate redistributive consequences, create long term winners and losers, and have a direct influence on development outcomes. The ensuing political transactions are reflected in the structure of a country’s budgetary process, in the bargaining of different tax regimes and in the choice of government spending and saving instruments. In this light, a comprehensive understanding of PFM and reforms in Latin America has to reconcile the knowledge about technical constraints with the political coalitions that make reforms sustainable in the long run.

This module aims to introduce students to the technical and political dimensions of public finance management in a) the generation of revenues, b) the budget process, and c) government spending; and to introduce students the most relevant debates of the specialised literature and discuss policy implications of reforms using Latin American case studies.

7YYD0018: Commodities, Credit and Crises: Topics in the
Microeconomics of Latin America

Latin American economies face a variety of distinct challenges that set them apart from other regions of the world. They tend to be more dependent on commodity exports and often struggle to industrialize, they are more integrated into global trade, and they are more dependent on international finance. As a consequence of these and other distinctive features they tend to suffer from high volatility and relatively frequent economic and financial crises. This module describes the distinguishing features of Latin American economies’ macroeconomies and present a rigorous analytical framework for studying them. We analyse economic dualism, natural resource dependence, and industrialization; the role of credit and debt, both national and international; and the variety of financial crises that bedevil emerging economies.

** There is a requirement for this course, namely that students have studied undergraduate intermediate macroeconomics, unless given special permission by the convenor **

7YYD0021: Gender and Social Policy in Latin America

This module discusses gender and social policy in Latin America. Under the influence of international gender and development discourse and practice, grass roots women’s organising over livelihood issues, and feminist activism, gender has been included one way or another in most government policy since the 1970s. In different countries policies were developed as part of gender mainstreaming or specific governmental women’s agencies or ministries. This module offers a critical perspective upon trade-offs between developmental and emancipatory goals, between feminist perspectives and mainstreaming, and between bottom-up versus top-down. The module will look at the evolution of gender and policy, regional and country comparisons, social and political rights (including health, education, nutrition, labour), and civil society participation (grass roots organising, feminist activism, NGOs).

7YYD0023: Multinational Enterprises, Global Value Chains & Local Development

This module introduces students to the role of multinational enterprises in the world economy, their way of functioning, and their impact on economic and social development. Its objective is to help students understand the global structure of production of multinational enterprises, and its effects on local development in different countries, areas and sectors. It explores the managerial challenges of operating in emerging markets, and the innovations the private sector is deploying to adapt, ranging from inclusive business models to strategies for the base of the pyramid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Policy and Healthcare Systems in Emerging Economies

This course introduces students to the empirical and theoretical study of contemporary health policy and healthcare systems, exploring topics of particular relevance to populations in emerging economies.

Students will engage with key debates and issues within the social sciences and public health disciplines including: key concepts of underlying health policy and systems analysis; the contemporary global health landscape; theories and typologies for understanding healthcare systems; the dynamics of poverty and ill-health and policy responses; the consequences of rapid urbanisation for emerging economies and the challenges posed for collective health and wellbeing; the new ‘middle classes’ and health policy; trade and the global healthcare economy; emerging biotech and biomedical services; and methodologies for researching health policy and systems.

Foundations, Methods and Practices of International Development Evaluation

Growing public pressure to demonstrate that international development initiatives generate valuable results have triggered a growing demand for development evaluation. High quality, rigorous, independent evaluations are increasingly being commissioned to ascertain whether development policies, programmes and projects contribute to social learning and improved decision making in different countries, contexts and cultures. Against this background, the course module aims to introduce students to the antecedents, rationale and tools of the contemporary development evaluation discipline. The module will sketch how evolving conceptions of development have influenced development evaluation theory and practice. The diversity of evaluation approaches available to development evaluation practitioners as well as their relative strengths and limitations will be examined. In particular, the distinct waves of dominant evaluation doctrines (democratic, neo-liberal, evidence based, experimental, developmental, etc.), their philosophical underpinnings and the implications of emerging web-based and “big data” evaluation approaches will be probed. Turning to practice students will secure an overview of evaluation principles, standards, norms and ethics and how ethical principles can enhance the validity of evaluations. Practical tools to design evaluations by structuring the programme logic, identifying evaluation questions, securing and interpreting relevant evidence will be demonstrated. Next, the module will help students gain a critical awareness of the distinctive contributions to knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods to rigorous evaluation. In particular it will illustrate by dint of examples and case studies the circumstances in which theories of change, evaluation rating systems and impact assessments can demonstrate whether or not development projects and programmes “work” and for whom. Finally, students will be exposed to the governance conditions, implementation processes and reporting practices that make for a high quality evaluation function geared to the improved design and implementation of policies, programmes and projects in the zones of turmoil and transition of the developing world. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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