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Centre for Hellenic Studies Public Events

Through its regular weekly seminars, colloquia, public lectures and international conferences, the Centre for Hellenic Studies is a concentrated force for the advancement of research in all aspects of Hellenic culture.

All its activities are free, open to the public and designed to be accessible to a wide audience.

Public Events Diary 2016-17

Weekly CHS seminars in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies and in Modern Greek Studies take place at the Strand Campus as follows:

Alternate Tuesdays during teaching terms at 17.30
Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series

Alternate Mondays during teaching terms at 17.30
Modern Greek Studies seminar series

Semester 2 

Wednesday 24 May, 16.00-18.00
Exploring, Interpreting and Understanding the Body in the fourth and third centuries BC by Dr Orly Lewis
Anatomy Museum, 6th Floor, King's Building, Strand Campus
Join the Centre for Hellenic studies and Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine for 'Exploring, Interpreting and Understanding the Body in the fourth and third centuries BC', a talk lead by Dr Orly Lewis, which will depict the contours of Praxagoras' ideas on the vascular system, the heart, blood and air and their implications for Greco-Roman theories concerning body and mind.

Tuesday 13 June, 18.00
Lentakis Award presentation, with Anglo-Hellenic League
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
Includes the annual report from the director.

Saturday 23 September, 09.30- 19.45
Cyprus, Female Voice and Memory: Literature, Arts and History in the work of Niki Marangou
British School at Athens, Souedias 52, 10676 Athens
This workshop aims to assess the multifaceted work of Niki Marangou (1948-2013) by placing it within the broader context of modern Cypriot literature, history and art

Friday 10 November
Modern Classicisms: Classical Art & Contemporary Artists in Dialogue
The Great Hall

Past Events

Semester 2

Thursday 27 – Friday 28 April, refer to programme for timings
'New Light on Tony Harrison' Conference - convened by Professor Edith Hall (King's College London)
British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH
CHS is delighted to be among the sponsors of this landmark conference.  It aims to illuminate previously neglected aspects of the work of one of Britain’s greatest living poets, who among his many other achievements has a distinguished record as a translator from classical Greek.  For further details including a provisional programme and booking information, see the conference webpage.

Tuesday 28 March, 17.30
Perceptions and understanding of the Greek schism in the Latin pilgrimage literature of the Late Middle Ages
SW-2.07, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
This paper will seek to examine how late medieval Latin pilgrims understood the issues of contention between the Roman and the Greek Churches at the end of the Middle Ages (13th – 15th centuries). Nicky Tsougarakis is a historian of the late Middle Ages. He studied for his MA and PhD in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds, where he wrote a thesis on the Latin monastic orders in medieval Greece. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 20 March, 17.30-19.00
Ottoman diplomacy, humanist fiction and diplomatic poetics in the 18th-century Balkans
Event postponed from 2016. A seminar with Miltos Pechlivanos (Freie Universität Berlin). Part of the Modern Greek Studies seminar series and also part of the Greek-Turkish Encounters series, with SOAS.

Wednesday 15 March, 18.00-19.30
The Fourth Annual Rumble Fund lecture, with Professor Liz Prettejohn
Great Hall, King's Building, Strand Campus
This lecture explores the ways in which modern artists may help us not merely to understand, but genuinely to see the beauty of classical form. It takes as a test case the art of Frederic Leighton. The lecture argues that the seriousness of Leighton’s engagement with classical form may be seen as progressive and forward-looking.

Tuesday 14 March, 17.30
“They barked like dogs”. A case of Kynanthropy in Amida, 560 AD, and the dangers of retrospective diagnosis
SW-2.07, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
Instead of retrospective diagnosis, the paper seeks to contextualize and interpret the significance of dog-like behaviour for the people of the sixth century. Nadine Metzger is a medical historian whose research focuses on psychopathological phenomena in Late Antiquity and their reception, i.e. lycanthropy, epilepsy, possession, kynanthropy and psychological trauma. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 6 March, 17.30-19.00
C. M. Woodhouse’s war in Greece in fiction and history
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
A seminar with David Roessel (Stockton University, New Jersey). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Tuesday 28 February, 17.30
Between China and the Viking North: A group of 9th/10th-century Byzantine silverware as evidence of mediaeval cross-cultural interchange
SW-2.07, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
This talk will examine a group of Byzantine silver vessels datable to the 9th/10th centuries from the perspective of cross-cultural interchange between the Byzantine empire and foreign polities. Natalija Ristovska is a D.Phil. student in archaeology, University of Oxford. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 13 February, 17.30-19.00
History, time and economic crisis in Central Greece, with Daniel Knight
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
Daniel M. Knight is a Lecturer and Leverhulme Fellow in the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of St Andrews, Visiting Fellow at the Hellenic Observatory, London School of Economics and Political Science, and co-editor of History and Anthropology journal. He works in central Greece, writing on time, temporality, and extractive economies in the context of the on-going financial crisis. Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Tuesday 7 February, 17.30
The Byzantium that could have been? Learning and the transmission of classical texts around the year 800
SW-2.07, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
This paper explores if in the seminal decades around the year 800, i.e. in the period following the so-called first Iconoclam and prior to the second Iconoclasm, Byzantine culture might perceivably have gone down an altogether different path – one of rhetorical paideia based on the writings of the ‘three hierarchs’, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, and Gregory of Nyssa, and of slightly later Christian figures, such as John Chrysostom. Niels Gaul has taught Byzantine Studies and Greek Palaeography at the University of Oxford and the Central European University Budapest and is now the A. G. Leventis Professor of Byzantine Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Thursday 2 February, 18.00
The 26th annual Runciman lecture: Greece in the Balkans: A Cohabitation of Past, Present and Future
Great Hall and Entrance Hall, King's Building, Strand Campus
On modern Balkan history, by Professor Thanos Veremis (University of Athens). The lecture is preceded by Orthodox Vespers in the Chapel at 17.15. The event is sponsored by Nicholas and Matti Egon.

Monday 30 January, 17.30-19.00
Deconstructing patriarchy in post-war Greek cinema and society: A socio-historical reading of Cacoyannis’ Stella (1955)
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
A seminar with Achilleas Hadjikyriacou (Cyprus High Commission and CHS). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Tuesday 24 January, 17.30
Reuse, relocation and reinterpretation of pagan statuary in the sixth century: Sagalassos and beyond
SW-2.07, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
This paper will examine case-studies from Sagalassos as well as other cities of the Roman East and attempt to reconstruct the various meaning and purposes of pagan gods and mythological personae in the sixth century. Ine Jacobs is Associate Professor of Byzantine Archaeology and Visual Culture at the University of Oxford. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 16 January, 17.30-19.00
Greek-Alphabet English: Multilingual writing and trans-scripting in digital communication
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
A seminar with Tereza Spilioti (Cardiff University). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

 

Semester 1 events

 

Tuesday 27 September, 18.30-20.00
Book launch for John II Komnenos: Emperor of Byzantium with the presentation of the Schilizzi Scholarships for 2016 at 18.30
Council Room (K2.29), King's Building, Strand Campus
Edited by Alessandra Bucossi and Alex Rodriguez Suarez (volume 17 in the series Publications of the Centre for Hellenic Studies, King’s College London). This event is part of the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar series. Please note later start time.

Saturday 1 October
Libya Matters: Safeguarding Libyan Heritage 
K0.16, King's Building, Strand Campus
In 2012 the Centre for Hellenic Studies and the Society for Libyan Studies held a one day event, drawing attention to the value for world history of the heritage of Libya. Four years later, that heritage is threatened in many ways. We are therefore organising a second event, presenting the work which we and others, in the UK and abroad, are doing to support our Libyan colleagues in confronting the current challenges.

Monday 3 October, 17.30-19.30
Book launch for Byron: The Poetry of Politics and the Politics of Poetry
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
Edited by Roderick Beaton and Christine Kenyon Jones, based on a selection of papers given at the 39th International Byron Conference in 2013 (volume 18 in the series Publications of the Centre for Hellenic Studies, King’s College London) with the editors Lord Robin Byron and Dr Alan Rawes (University of Manchester). This event is part of the Modern Greek Studies seminar series.

Tuesday 11 October, 17.30
A (narrative) history of early Palaiologan imperial rhetoric: trends and traditions
SW1.09, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
Using the rhetorical output of the Constantinopolitan orators Manuel/Maximos Holobolos, George/Gregory of Cyprus, Maximos Planoudes and Nikephoros Gregoras as case studies, this paper will examine the composition, context and reception of imperial rhetoric in the first hundred years of the Palaiologan rule. Ida Toth is Senior Instructor and Lecturer at the History Faculty and Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, where she teaches Byzantine Greek language and literature and Byzantine epigraphy. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 17 October, 17.30-19.00
Solar Acclivity: Irish Poets in Paros
SW1.09, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
A seminar with Joanna Kruczkowska (University of Lodz, Marie Curie Intra-European Fellow). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Monday 24 October, 17.30-19.30
Of emigrants and immigrants: the literary construction of expectation and disillusionment in Mann, Sebald, Valtinos, Karystiani and Papamarkos
Council Room, King's Building, Strand Campus
A seminar with Michalis Chryssanthopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and King’s College London). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Tuesday 25 October, 17.30
The evolution of a Byzantine craft: Greek-Orthodox church embroidery in Ottoman Constantinople
Council Room (K2.29), King's Building, Strand Campus
The objective of this lecture is to present the various stages of development of ecclesiastical embroidery in Constantinople after 1453, showing some special technical features, discussing the artistic tendencies and revealing information about the organization of the various workshops. 

Monday 7 November, 17.30-19.30
What is an Author in Nineteenth-Century Greece?
Council Room (K2.29), King's Building, Strand Campus
A seminar with Sotirios Paraschas (King’s College London). Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

Tuesday 15 November, 17.30
Art, politics and eschatology in the burial chapel of lay monastic founders in Byzantium, 11th-14th c.
SW1.09, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
The purpose of this presentation is to unravel the unexpectedly rich array of concepts—historical, political, eschatological and broader spiritual—of the image in a particular kind of building in Byzantium: the burial chapel of lay monastic founders between the 11th and 14th centuries. Dimitra Kotoula studied history, art and archaeology at the University of Ioannina, Greece and the Courtauld Institute of Art, London. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Tuesday 22 November, 19.00
Greek Archaeological Committee UK Annual Lecture
Great Hall, King's Building, Strand Campus
Dr Dimitris Kourkoumelis discusses recent research and new finds from the MENTOR shipwreck at Cythera (1802). 

Wednesday 23 November, 16.30
Of related interest - “But laughter too can help to win the day”: political satire from Mikhail Bulgakov to Marios Hakkas
VWB6.01, Virginia Woolf Building, 22 Kingsway
Michalis Chrysanthopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki) will present this seminar as part of the Comparative Literature Research Seminar Series.

Thursday 24 November, 19.00
Of related interest - "Freedom or Death": a commemoration of the Cretan uprising and the Arkadi holocaust of 1866
Great Hall, King's Building, Strand Campus
The Society for Modern Greek Studies and the Cretan Association of Great Britain are jointly organising a commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Arkadi holocaust. Speakers include Sir Michael Llewellyn-Smith (King's College London), Dr Manos Perakis (University of Crete) and Dr Maria Karaiskou (University of Crete).

Tuesday 29 November, 17.30
Alexios among the heretics: ethnic and religious violence in the Komnenian era
SW1.09, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus
This seminar explores the transformation of state violence during the period of the Komnenoi (1081-1185) against the backdrop of the evolving nature of imperial authority in both domestic and foreign settings. Teresa Shawcross is Associate Professor of History and Hellenic Studies at Princeton University. Part of the Late Antique & Byzantine seminar series.

Monday 5 December, 18.30
Cyprus Lecture: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment – The Case of Cyprus
Anatomy Lecture Theatre (K6.29), King's Building, Strand Campus
A lecture by Mary Koutselini (Professor of Curriculum and Instruction in the Department of Education, University of Cyprus; UNESCO Chair Holder for Gender Equality, and Women's Empowerment and President of the Cyprus Agency for Quality Assurance in Higher Education), in collaboration with the Cyprus High Commission Cultural Section sponsored by the Cultural Services of the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus under the auspices of the High Commissioner for the Republic of Cyprus in the UK, Euripides L. Evriviades. Part of the Modern Greek seminar series.

 

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