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Inaugural King's Gollancz Lecture: Stephen Greenblatt

Location
Anatomy Lecture Theatre (K6.29), King's Building, Strand Campus
Category
Culture, Lecture, Other
When
16/02/2017 (18:30-20:00)
Contact

This event is open to all and free to attend, but Eventbrite booking is essential.

As tickets to our events are free, not everyone who asks for tickets uses them. To make sure we have a full house we allocate more tickets than there are places. We do our best to get the numbers right, but unfortunately we occasionally have to disappoint people. We can't guarantee entry, and admission is on a first come, first served basis, so please arrive in good time for the start of the event.

Please forward any enquiries on to ahri@kcl.ac.uk.

Registration URL
https://stephengreenblatt.eventbrite.co.uk
Description

This is the first lecture in an annual series co-sponsored by three Arts & Humanities Research Institute Centres: the London Shakespeare Centre (LSC), the Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies (CLAMS) and the Centre for Early Modern Studies (CEMS). The series has been established in memory of Sir Israel Gollancz: King's professor, medievalist, early modernist, founding member of the British Academy and leading light in the Shakespeare Tercentenary of 1916.

 Shakespeare’s Life-Making

This talk will focus on Shakespeare’s uncanny ability to confer the effect of life upon his characters, even on those who appear only briefly or in subordinate roles.  The pigeon-bearing clown in Titus Andronicus, young Flute the bellows-mender (“I have a beard coming”) in A Midsummer Night's Dream, the drunken criminal Barnadine in Measure for Measure, the monstrous Caliban in The Tempest, along with dozens of others, possess a presence, a compelling immediacy, far in excess of the strict necessity of the plots in which they appear.  In some instances, Shakespeare’s plots almost collapse under the force of this vehement, insistent life.  The greatest example is the villainous Shylock in The Merchant of Venice.  And Shylock, Professor Greenblatt will argue, offers us insight into the Humanities’ special contribution to the challenge of living together with those whom we may distrust and dislike.

Photo Stephen Greenblatt Two edit1.1

Stephen Greenblatt is John Cogan Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, and author of many influential books including Will in the World, Hamlet in Purgatory, Shakespearean Negotiations and Renaissance Self-Fashioning. He is general editor of The Norton Anthology of English Literature and The Norton Shakespeare.

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