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Visiting staff

Visiting Staff

Dr Samuel Alberti
Visiting Senior Research Fellow
Professor Peter Barber

Visiting Professor

Biography

Peter Barber, OBE, FSA, FRHistS, graduated in international relations at Sussex University and did postgraduate research in international history at the London School of Economics (MA, 1971). In 1975 he became a curator in the Department of Manuscripts at the British Library where, between 2001 and 2015 he was Head of Map Collections. He has written extensively on a wide range of aspects of the history of pre-modern maps, particularly on medieval mappae mundi, the map collections of the British Library, English maps in the sixteenth century, and maps at European courts between 1500 and 1800, especially at the courts of King Henry VIII, Queen Elizabeth I, and King George III. He has curated or acted as consultant to numerous exhibitions both in the UK and abroad and has acted as consultant to and appeared in several radio and television documentaries.  Since 2015 he has been a visiting professor in the Department of History, King’s College London.  In 2012 he was appointed an OBE for services to cartography and topography.

Research interests

The history of cartography with particular reference to medieval European mapping; English mapping 1110-ca. 1780; maps and government; the history of the British Library’s map collection with particular reference to the Cotton Collection and King George III’s Topographical Collection; 20th century political and satirical mapping.  the iconic use of maps.

History of Italian-Swiss immigration to Great Britain 1847-1980.

History of Austrian Jewry.

History of Highgate and Hornsey. 

Select list of publications

  • Tales from the Map Room (BBC Books,1993)
  • The Lie of the Land (British Library, 2001)
  • The Queen Mary Atlas (Folio Society, 2005)
  • The Map Book ( Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2005)
  • ‘Mapmaking in England ca. 1470-1650’ in The History of Cartography.iii.  Cartography in the European Renaissance  ed. David Woodward, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007)  pp. 1589-1669
  • King Henry’s Map of the British Isles.  BL Cotton MS Augustus I.i.9 : Commentary  ( Folio Society, 2009)
  • Magnificent Maps (British Library, 2010)
  • London: A History in Maps (LTS & British Library, 2012)
  • Continental Taste. Ticinese Emigrants and their Café-Restaurants in Great Britain, 1847-1987  (London: Camden History Society, 1997).
  • Edited with introduction and afterword: Gin and Hell-Fire: Henry Batchelor’s memoirs of a working class childhood in Crouch End 1823-1837  (London: Hornsey Historical Society, 2004)

Expertise and public engagement

Committee member, Reviewing Committee for the Export of Works of Art and Objects of National Interest; Trustee, Hereford Mappamundi Trust; Trustee, Imago Mundi Ltd; member, academic steering committee, Georgian Papers; vice-president, Hakluyt Society; council member, London Topographical Society; member,   library and museum committee, Society of Antiquaries and management committee of the Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical Research.  President, Hornsey Historical Society; President, Unione Ticinese di Londra.

Professor Paul Bew

Visiting Professor

Dr Michael Carter-Sinclair

Visiting Research Fellow

Email michael.carter-sinclair@kcl.ac.uk
Address Department of History
King's College London
Strand
London WCR 2LS

Biography

Michael studied for a BA in European Studies at the University of Hull, after which he followed a career in business and IT, where he worked mainly as a consultant to a variety of public and private sector organisations. He has an MSc with distinction in Business Administration & Information Technology, as well as an MBA.  He obtained his PhD – Viennese Culture And Politics, 1861 To 1938: Everyday Expressions Of ‘German’ Identity – from King’s College, London, in 2012, under the supervision of Dr Michael Rowe.  Michael is a regular contributor of book reviews to the European Review of History. Apart from English mother tongue, Michael speaks French, German and Spanish.

Research Interests

Michael’s research interests sit within the broad history of Europe in the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century.  He has specialised in studying the development of extreme nationalist and antisemitic expressions of German identity in Vienna, from the beginnings of constitutional government in the 1860s through to Austria’s absorption into the German Reich in the Anschluss of 1938.  He is particularly interested in the interaction of culture and politics beyond formal political activity – from so-called ‘high’ culture to everyday activities – and how these interactions affect and influence opinion and behaviour.  This includes opinion on identity formation, extremist practices of  arbitrary divisions of people into “us” and “them” and questions, of otherness, assimilation and tolerance of diversity, which continue to have a relevance across a wide range of current political and social issues.  He is currently preparing the results of his PhD for submission to publishers for consideration as a monograph.

 

For more information, please see my full research profile.

Expertise and public engagement

  Michael has presented papers at a number of conferences and seminars, including Queen Mary, University of London, the University of Swansea, Oriel College, Oxford, the Institute of Historical Research and, most recently, the Austrian Cultural Forum    He believes strongly that academic research should be communicated both within and outside the academic community.   To this end, he has presented at the King’s College public lecture series, So What?, to members of the public who are interested in understanding the goals of academic research. He has also contributed to a King's College video on the impact of the First World War, designed to reach beyond the academic community to the wider public.

Dr Gianmarco de Angelis

Visiting Research Associate

Dr Ralph Desmarais

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Eliza Filby

Visiting Research Fellow

FilbyEmail: eliza.filby@kcl.ac.uk 

Mobile
: 07590121474  

Address: 
Department of History
King's College London
Strand, London
WC2R 2LS

Biography 

Eliza read history  at Durham University before completing her masters at UCL and her PhD at Warwick. Between 2011-2014 she was a lecturer in Modern History at King’s and was a fellow at Renmin University Beijing in 2013 before leaving full-time academic life to run her own business 'Grad Train' helping graduates and postgraduates prepare for the job market. www.gradtrain.co.uk

Her first book, God and Mrs Thatcher (Biteback, 2015) explores Margaret Thatcher’s religious faith showing how it was central to her political outlook. It also examines the conflict between the Tory party and the former ’Tory party at prayer’, the Church of England in the 1980s. Eliza regularly acts as a historical commentator on the TV and radio, speaking on contemporary religion and politics. She has written for The Church Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator and has reviewed for The Tablet.

Her website is www.elizafilby.com

Twitter: @ElizaFilby

Research interests 

Eliza is currently researching her new book which is a history of Generation Y/millennials. 

Books 

God and Mrs Thatcher: The Battle for Britain’s Soul (Biteback, 2015) 

Dr Jacqueline Glomski

Senior Research Fellow

Email   jacqueline.glomski@kcl.ac.uk
Address  Department of History
King's College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS

Biography

  • PhD, University of Chicago, 1985
    • Slavonic Languages and Literatures/Renaissance Studies
  • Hertford College, Oxford, 1982–84
    • Starun Scholarship in Polish Studies
  • MSc, Columbia University, 1992
    • Rare Books/Academic Librarianship
  • MA, University of Michigan, 1974
    • Comparative Literature

Jacqueline Glomski taught the ‘Latin for Graduates’ module in the History Department from 2001 to 2010. Before coming to teach at King’s College, she worked as Assistant Librarian at the Warburg Institute, University of London, where she also lectured on Neo-Latin Poetry; and before migrating to the UK, she was the Curator of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at the University of Toronto.

During the academic year 2012–13, Dr Glomski directed, in collaboration with Dr Isabelle Moreau (University College London), a research group,Seventeenth-Century Fiction: Text and Transmission, which was supported by a grant from the British Academy.

Dr Glomski is co-convenor of Early Modern Forum, an informal seminar for staff and postgraduate students working in the area of Early Modern studies at King’s. In 2014, she will take on the coordination of Early Modern Fiction, a new seminar at the Warburg Institute, having already acted as co-convenor there of the seminars Literature, Ideas and Society and Forum on Early Modern Central Europe.  

Dr Glomski is presently a member of the editorial board of Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Monasteriensis: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies. She served for five years (1998–2003) as Reviews Editor of The Library: Transactions of the Bibliographical Society.

 

Dr Glomski is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. She was the founding vice-president of the Society for Neo-Latin Studies (2005–07) and also the UK national coordinator for the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (2007–12). 

Research Interests

 

  • Neo-Latin Literature
    • 17th-century fiction in Latin
    • Late-Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Latin in central Europe 
  • History of the Book
    • British and Continental bibliography of the 16th and 17th centuries 
    • Notions of book rarity in 17th-century London and Paris

    For more information, please see my full research profile.

Selected Publications

Book

  • Patronage and Humanist Literature in the Age of the Jagiellons: Court and Career in the Writings of Rudolf Agricola Junior, Valentin Eck, and Leonard Cox. University of Toronto Press, 2007 (for which the author received a British Academy Exchange Fellowship, a British Academy Personal Research Grant, and a Scouloudi Historical Award). 

Articles

  • ‘Epistolary Writing’. In Cambridge Guide to Reading Neo-Latin Literature, ed. Victoria Moul (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming, 2014).
  • ‘Science Fiction in the Seventeenth Century: The Neo-Latin somniumand its Relationship with the Vernacular’. In Der neulateinische Roman als Medium seiner Zeit/The Neo-Latin Novel in its Time, ed. Wolfgang Kofler and Stefan Tilg (Tübingen: Narr, forthcoming, 2013).
  • ‘Fifteenth-Century Humanism at Cracow’. In Humanism in Fifteenth-Century Europe, edited by David Rundle (Oxford: Medium Aevum Monographs, 2012), pp. 119–146.
  • ‘Cox, Leonard’. In Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature, edited by Alan Stewart and Garrett Sullivan (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011), pp. 227–229.
  • ‘Patronage, Poetry, and the Furnishing of a Nobleman’s House: Valentin Eck’s Supellectilium fasciculus (1519)’. In Syntagmatia: Essays on Neo-Latin Literature in Honour of Monique Mund-Dopchie and Gilbert Tournoy, ed. Dirk Sacré and Jan Papy (Leuven University Press, 2009), pp. 261–69.
  • ‘Careerism at Cracow: The Dedicatory Letters of Rudolf Agricola Junior, Valentin Eck, and Leonard Cox (1510-1530)’. In Self-Presentation and Social Identification: The Rhetoric and Pragmatics of Letter Writing in Early Modern Times, ed. T. Van Houdt, J. Papy, G. Tournoy, and C. Matheeussen (Leuven University Press, 2002), pp. 165–82.
  • Incunabula Typographiae: Seventeenth-Century Views on Early Printing’. The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, vii, 2 (December, 2001): 336–48. 

 

Dr Mark Hay

Visiting Research Associate

Dr Mark Edward Hay

Email: markedwardhay@gmail.com

Address: Department of History
King’s College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS

 

 

 

Biography

Dr Mark Edward Hay read history in Amsterdam, Leiden, Paris and Oxford. Most recently he held Arts and Humanities Research Council award for a doctorate in history at King’s College London. His doctoral research, Calculated Risk. Collaboration and Resistance in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic era, 1780-1806, studied Dutch power projection and strategies of international conflict in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic era. Current research focuses on the financial and fiscal integration of the Napoleonic Empire, Napoleonic war financing and the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleonic on the European financial economies.


Research interests

  • Revolutionary and Napoleonic History
  • Dutch History
  • Power Projection and Diplomacy
  • Financial & Fiscal History

Selected publications

  • Mark Edward Hay, ‘The House of Nassau between France and Independence, 1795-1814. Lesser Powers, Strategies of Conflict Resolution, Dynastic Networks’, The International History Review 38/3 (June, 2016), 482-504.
  • --, ‘The Légion Hollandaise d’Orange. Dynastic Networks, Coalition Warfare and the Formation of the Modern Netherlands, 1813-14’, Dutch Crossing 39/1 (March, 2015), 26-53.
  • --, ‘The Dutch Experience and Memory of the Campaign of 1812: a Final Feat of Arms of the Dutch Imperial Contingent, or: the Resurrection of an Independent Dutch Armed Forces?’, Napoleonic Scholarship Journal 1/5 (December, 2013), [8p]. Notable mention in the Press Review of the Fondation Napoléon Bulletin n° 704, 7-13 March, 2014. Forthcoming
  • --, ‘The Historiographical Legacy of Pieter Geyl for Revolutionary and Napoleonic Studies’, in the proceedings of the symposium ‘Pieter Geyl in Britain: 1914-1935’ of 17 November 2016 at University College London.
  • --, ‘French Strategies of Resource Extraction in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era’.
Dr Michael Hoeckelmann

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Tom Hulme

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Jane Levi

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Lorelei Kury

Visiting Research Fellow

Biography

Lorelai Kury holds a Ph.D. in History from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (1995). She is a professor of  historiography at the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) and professor of history of science at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), where she supervises PhD students. Her research is supported by a grant from the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq). She is currently writing a book on the French naturalist and traveller Auguste de Saint-Hilaire.

Research interests

Her research interests include: scientific travels in the 18th and 19th centuries; history of biogeography; history of Botany and Zoology in Europe and in Brazil; scientific practices, as fieldwork, collecting, drawing, reading, writing and publishing; medicinal plants and their use.

Selected publications

L. KURY. O naturalista Veloso. Revista de História (USP), v. 172, p. 243-277, 2015. (article)

L. KURY. Saint-Hilaire: viagem e botânica filosófica. In: Gesteira, Heloisa; Carolino, Luís Miguel; Marinho, Pedro (dir.). Formas do Império. Ciência, tecnologia e política em Portugal e no Brasil, séculos XVI ao XIX. Rio de Janeiro: Paz e Terra, 2014. (chapter and edition)

L. KURY. As mil vozes da natureza (The Thousand Voices of Nature). In: Lorelai Kury (dir.). Representações da Fauna no Brasil, séculos XVI-XX. English version included in the appendix. Rio de Janeiro: Andrea Jakobsson Estúdio Editorial, 2014. (chapter and edition)

L. KURY. Plantas sem fronteiras: jardins, livros e viagens, séculos XVIII-XIX (Plants without Frontiers: gardens, books, and travels - 18th. and 19th. centuries). In: Lorelai Kury (dir.). Usos e circulação das plantas no Brasil. English version included in the appendix. Rio de Janeiro: Andrea Jakobsson Estúdio, 2013. (chapter and edition)

L. KURY. La nature de la nation: le climat et les gens du Brésil (1780-1836). Annales Historiques de la Révolution Française, v. 3, p. 129-152, 2011. (article)

For a complete list of publications see: http://lattes.cnpq.br/3230173359064082 

Dr Jelle Lisson

Visiting Research Associate

Dr Jelle Lisson

Email jelle.lisson@kuleuven.be

Address: Department of History
King’s College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS

 

 

 

Biography

From 1 January 2017, Jelle Lisson is working as a postdoctoral researcher, affiliated to the University of Leuven (Belgium). In October he has finished his PhD thesis, supervised by Prof. Dr. Brigitte Meijns at the University of Leuven, titled Ut pastorem commodum eligatis. Episcopal sees, kinship and local aristocratic networks in the church province of Rheims (888-1049). In the autumn of 2016 he stayed at the University of Cambridge as visiting scholar, supervised by Prof. Dr. Rosamond McKitterick.

Research interests

  • Episcopal Appointments
  • Family and kinship
  • Aristocratic networks

The PhD thesis zooms in on the appointment of bishops and the social, familial, educational and ecclesiastical background of episcopal office holders in post-Carolingian Western Francia. His research interests include the episcopate, kinship ties and the interaction between social and legal norms in the Early and High Middle Ages. For example, he has published on the formation of diocesan borders in Liège (8th-13th century), the influence of canonical legislation on the eleventh-century Gesta Episcoporum Cameracensium, and the biased representation of authoritative individuals in medieval chronicles. Furthermore, in 2015 a monography on the spatial development of the medieval town of Zoutleeuw (one of the capital cities of the duchy of Brabant in present-day Belgium) was published by Academia Press, Ghent.

Selected publications

  • Lisson, J. (2016). Les Gesta des évêques de Cambrai, le droit et les élections épiscopales. Revue du Nord, 97 (410), 283-301.
  • Lisson, J. (2016). The dark side of remembrance: how medieval chroniclers demonized Bishop Adalbero of Laon (977-1033). In: Leemans J. (Eds.), bookseries: Lectio Studies in the Transmission of Texts & Ideas, Shaping Authority. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers.
  • Lisson, J. (2016). Edges of Episcopal Power: local society and the evolution of diocesan borders in Liège (c.900-c.1200). In: Coss P. (Eds.), In the hands of God’s servants. Episcopal power and local society in medieval Europe (1000-1400). 2016: Brepols Publishers
Dr Xiaoyan Lyu

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Lisbet Rausing

Visiting Senior Research Fellow

Dr Edward Roberts

Visiting Research Fellow

Email    edward.c.roberts@kcl.ac.uk
Telephone  020 7848 1885 
Address  Department of History 
Room K 4U.18 
King's College London 
Strand 
London WC2R 2LS

Biography

Edward was born in Cumbria and raised in Denver, Colorado. He first studied at Manchester, where he gained a BA in History (2009) and an MA in Medieval Studies (2010). He then moved to St Andrews, where he wrote his PhD thesis on the tenth-century historian Flodoard of Reims under the supervision of Professor Simon MacLean (2013).

Research interests

Edward’s research interests lie in the political, social and cultural history of the Carolingian Empire and its successor states, with particular emphases on historical writing, property and ownership, bishops and episcopal power. He is currently writing a book based on his PhD thesis which will reappraise the work and world of Flodoard of Reims.

Selected publications

‘Flodoard, the will of St Remigius and the see of Reims in the tenth century’,Early Medieval Europe  22.2 (2014), pp. 201-30. 

Dr Rachel Stone

Visiting research Fellow

Email    rachel.stone@kcl.ac.uk
Address  Department of History 
King's College London 
Strand 
London WC2R 2LS 

Biography

Rachel's first degree was in mathematics; she then trained as a librarian and worked in a variety of specialist and academic libraries. She did an MPhil in Medieval History at Cambridge in 1998-1999 and then completed her PhD at King's College London (on "Masculinity, nobility and the moral instruction of the Carolingian lay elite") in 2005. Since then she has taught in London and Cambridge and most recently worked as a librarian in the Department of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Research interests

Her current research interests include Carolingian gender and women's history, and the legal activities of Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims. 

Selected publications

Morality and Masculinity in the Carolingian Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

‘Masculinity without conflict: noblemen in eighth and ninth century Francia’, in Sean Brady and John Arnold (eds.), What is Masculinity? Historical Dynamics from Antiquity to the Contemporary World (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 76-93.

‘“In what way can those who have left the world be distinguished?” Masculinity and the difference between Carolingian men’, in Kirsten Fenton and Cordelia Beattie (eds.), Intersections of Gender, Religion and Ethnicity in the Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), 12-33.

‘The rise and fall of the Carolingian lay moral elite’, in François Bougard, Régine Le Jan and Rosamond McKitterick (eds.), La culture du haut moyen âge: une question d’élites? (Brepols, 2009), 363-375.

‘The invention of a theology of abduction: Hincmar of Rheims on raptus’,Journal of Ecclesiastical History 60 (2009), 433-448.

‘In search of the Carolingian “dear lord”‘, in Paul Fouracre and David Ganz (eds.), Frankland: the Franks and the world of the early Middle Ages. Essays in honour of Dame Jinty Nelson (Manchester University Press, 2008), 152-166.

‘“Bound from either side”: the limits of power in Carolingian marriage disputes, 840-870’, Gender and History 19 (2007), 467-482.

‘Kings are different: Carolingian mirrors for princes and lay morality’, in Frédérique Lachaud and Lydwine Scordia (eds.) Le Prince au miroir de la littérature politique de l’Antiquité aux Lumières (Publications des Universitiés de Rouen et du Havre, 2007), 69-86.

Dr Frank Thorn

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Kate Wiles

Kate_WilesEmail: k.wiles@historytoday.com

Address: Department of History 
King's College London 
Strand 
London WC2R 2LS 

Biography

Following undergraduate and Masters degrees in English Language and Linguistics and Historical Language Studies at the University of Sheffield, I did my PhD at the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds as part of the AHRC-funded The Production and Use of English Manuscripts, 1060-1220 project. Following this, I was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of the Basque Country, working on the The Languages of Early Medieval Charters: Anglo-Saxon England and Eastern Francia, c.700–c.1100 project. 

I am currently producing a catalogue of the Winchester Pipe Rolls, held at the Hampshire Record Office, thanks to a small research grant from AMARC. 

Alongside this, I have developed a strong portfolio in public history. I am Senior Editor for History Today, Britain’s oldest and most respected history magazine. I have written for a number of publications, including the Guardian, Times Higher Education and the New Statesman, and have appeared on BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking as well as other, smaller shows. I also consult for film and television on topics relating to the Anglo-Saxons and Old English, most notably providing the Old English dialogue for the History Channel/MGM drama, Vikings.

Research interests and PhD supervision

  • Old English
  • Anglo-Saxon scribal practice
  • Anglo-Saxon charters

 My current research is interested in the uses of Old English in the corpus of Anglo-Saxon charters, thinking about how and why it came to be used in a typically Latin environment, and its development as a language of documentary culture. In particular, I am interested in how Old English was used to describe the landscape. Related interests include the training scribes receive in learning to copy and how this is realised in the manuscripts they produce. 

Selected publications

New Medieval Literatures, ‘The Treatment of Charter Bounds by the Worcester Cartulary Scribes’, 13 (2011), pp. 113-37

The Production and Use of English Manuscripts, 1060-1220, ‘Charters and Cartularies: 1060-1220’, http://www.le.ac.uk/ee/em1060to1220/

Expertise and public engagement

I have extensive experience in public engagement and media work.

General areas I am happy to talk on are Anglo-Saxon England, Old English and the history of English. In particular, Anglo-Saxon charters, place-names, scribes, manuscripts, the history of swearing and taboo language, and the fields of public history and public engagement.

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