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Dr Nils Kürbis

Dr Nils KurbisTeaching Fellow

Tel +44 (0)20 7848 2351
Email nils.kurbis@kcl.ac.uk
Address Room 509, Philosophy Building
King's College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS

 

 

Biography

Dr Nils Kürbis received his PhD from King’s a few years ago and has since taught at Birkbeck College, University College London, Sheffield University and Canterbury University. His research is mostly in formal and philosophical logic, but he is also interested in philosophy of mind and ancient Greek philosophy.

You can find some more information about Dr Kürbis’ research, as well as papers to download, on his webpage.

Research interests and PhD supervision
  • Formal and philosophical Logic
  • Philosophy of Mathematics
  • Philosophy of Language
  • Metaphysics

Much of Dr Kürbis’ research is focused on the strengths and limits of Michael Dummett's and Dag Prawitz' proof-theoretic semantics. His interest is mostly logical, but sees their project as firmly embedded in Dummett's conception of a theory of meaning and thus the philosophy of language. A central part of Dr Kürbis’ PhD thesis contained an argument that the meaning of negation cannot be specified by rules of inference in Dummett's and Prawitz' framework. An updated version is forthcoming in Grazer Philosophische Studien under the title “What is wrong with classical negation?”. A satisfactory account of the meaning of negation is mandatory for a theory of the logical constants. He is in the process of putting together a short book in which he will assess various options of extending their framework by adding primitive notions of negation, denial or falsity. He concludes that the last one is the best and most in the spirit of the original theory. His main long term future research project is to provide a proof-theoretic semantics for modal operators. This builds on research of his PhD but develops it into a new direction that hasn't had much attention in the literature on proof-theoretic semantics. Philosophically, Dr Kürbis’ account of the semantics for modal operators in terms of the rules of inference governing them promises to provide a satisfactory account of the meaning of modal operators, which does not appeal to possible worlds. Formally, natural deduction for modal logic is a topic that deserves more attention, and he aims to develop new proof systems that fall into the area of natural deduction rather than sequent calculi. The fundamental philosophical idea has been published in my article “Proof-Theoretic Semantics, Problems for Negation and Prospects for Modality” in the Journal of Philosophical Logic.

Dr Kürbis is also working on formal issues in proof-theory relating to the extension of intuitionist logic to classical logic.

Further research concerns epistemological questions concerning the choice of logical primitives, in particular whether negation should be defined in terms of incompatibility, and issues arising in the philosophy of language in connection with Dr Kürbis’ work in philosophical logic, in particular assertion and denial. 

For more details, please see his full research profile.

Selected publications
  • Bilateralist Detours: From Intuitionist to Classical Logic and Back, forthcoming in Logique at Analyse
  • Some Comments on Rumfitt’s Bilateralism, forthcoming in Journal of Philosophical Logic, published online, DOI: 10.1007/s10992-016-9395-9 
  • What is wrong with Classical Negation? Grazer Philosophische Studien 92 (2015), pp.51-86
  • Proof-Theoretic Semantics, a Problem with Negation and Prospects for Modality, Journal of Philosophical Logic 44 (2015), pp.713-727 
  • Review of Bob Hale: Necessary Beings Disputatio Vol. VII, No. 40 (2015), pp.92-100
  • Some Comments on Rumfitt’s Bilateralism, forthcoming in Journal of Philosophical Logic
  • What is wrong with Classical Negation, forthcoming in Grazer Philosophische Studien 92 (2015)
  • Proof-Theoretic Semantics, a Problem with Negation and Prospects for Modality, forthcoming in Journal of Philosophical Logic, published online, DOI: 10.1007/s10992-013-9310-6
  • Review of Bob Hale: Necessary Beings, Disputatio Vol. VII, No. 40 (2015), pp.92-100
  • How Fundamental is the Fundamental Assumption? Teorema XXXI/2 (2012), pp.5-19

For a complete list of publications, please see Nils' full research profile.

Teaching

Dr Kurbis teaches undergraduate and postgraduate modules in Logic.

 

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