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Module descriptions

7AAN4021 General Philosophy

THIS MODULE IS RUNNING IN 2017-18          

Credit value: 40
Module tutor: Dr David Galloway
Lecturers:

Assessment 

2017-18

  • Summative assessment: one three-hour exam (100%)
  • Formative assessment: two 2,000-word essays

2016-17

  • Summative assessment: one three-hour exam (100%)
  • Formative assessment: two 2,000-word essays

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.

Teaching pattern: one ninety-minute weekly lecture/seminar, followed by a one-hour logic class
Pre-requisites: none
Sample syllabus: Please note that module syllabus and topics covered may vary from year to year.
Additional information:

  • This module, although not strictly required, is normally expected of students who are converting from another subject into Philosophy at Master’s level
  • Philosophy graduates are not eligible to take this module
  • Part-time students who take this module at all are required to take it in the first of their two years

This module is intended for students who are converting into Philosophy at Master's level, and is designed to offer them a broad overview of the general state of play in four key branches of the discipline: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology. In essence, it will teach people who might opt to specialise in one area of Philosophy the kinds of basic things that they are likely to be expected to know about the others; as well as providing an appreciation of the interconnected, systematic nature of Philosophy as a whole. There will be a five-week block devoted to each of these four areas. In addition, students will receive training in elementary Symbolic Logic through separate classes, following the main lectures across all twenty weeks. 

Further information

Module aims

To provide students with a general overview of the current state of Philosophy as a discipline, and to familiarize them with the central theories, arguments, concepts, techniques and key texts that define its main branches: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology. The knowledge they acquire will serve as a foundation for further, more specialized research in specific fields. Students will also be introduced to the formalism and techniques of Symbolic Logic, which they will then be able to apply to their work in other areas of Philosophy.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, the students will be able to demonstrate intellectual, transferable and practicable skills appropriate to a level-7 module and in particular will be able to demonstrate that they have:

  • Awareness and understanding of the central concepts, theories and arguments of the main areas of Philosophy: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology.
  • The ability to apply valid critical and argumentative techniques in an original way, to these and other areas of the subject.
  • A firm grasp on the formalism and techniques of elementary Symbolic Logic which can, again, then be reapplied in the context of debates belonging to more the discursive areas of Philosophy.
  • Familiarity with selected key texts, with the ability to summarize and analytically criticize the arguments and positions of others.
  • The ability to develop original philosophical views of their own, which they are prepared to defend or amend in the light of criticism from others.
Past syllabi

7AAN4021 module syllabus 2012-13 (pdf)
7AAN4021 module syllabus 2013-14 (pdf)
7AAN4021 module syllabus 2014-15
(pdf)
7AAN4021 module syllabus 2015-16 (pdf)

Please note that module syllabus and topics covered may vary from year to year.

More detailed information on the current year’s module (including the syllabus for that year) can be accessed on KEATS by all students and staff. 

Blank spaceThe modules run in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand so there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary depending between years.
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