Show/hide main menu

News

News Highlights

Flagship MSc Psychiatric Research re-launched for 2014-15

Posted on 29/04/2014
Books3

Following two years of redevelopment, the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London is re-launching its flagship MSc Psychiatric Research for the academic year 2014-15 with a new structure and new modules. 

The MSc Psychiatric Research is the most comprehensive MSc course in psychiatric research methods, ethics and statistics worldwide. It is one of only 2 MScs in Psychiatric Research in the UK, and the only such programme to provide both full-time and part-time study options.

The MSc Psychiatric Research provides in-depth training in the conduct of psychiatric research from inception to completion to critical appraisal and to application. It provides an unparalleled route to a PhD within the mental health disciplines, as well as opportunities for clinical placements in the NHS for those interested in applying for a doctorate in Clinical Psychology. 

Dr Eugenia Kravariti, Programme Director for the MSc Psychiatric Research at the IoP at King’s, says: “We have substantially updated our world-class programme to ensure that the course not only reflects the latest developments in psychiatric research, but also provides strong student support.”

Professor Susan Lea, Vice-Dean for Education at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s commented: “Mental health research is at the forefront of policy developments and effective clinical practice. Our MSc Psychiatric Research is uniquely placed for fostering the development of the next generation of pioneers in psychiatric research and clinical practice.”

The redevelopment of the course involved extensive consultation with students, academics and employers, as well as extensive restructuring and updating of the academic programme itself. The new features of the course include: 

  • Comprehensive training in the ethical and scientific principles common to all mental health disciplines, together with skills in statistics and epidemiology, offered as part of the core module ‘Research Methods, Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health’.
  • New modules reflecting the latest developments in psychiatric research, including ‘Clinical Trials in Psychiatry’, ‘Translational Research in Psychiatry’, ‘Psychopharmacology’, ‘Advanced Statistics’ and ‘Designing, Funding and Publishing a Study’, and updates to popular modules including ‘Brain-Behaviour Interface’, ‘Psychiatric Genetics’ and ‘Neuroimaging’. 
  • Individually-tailored programme based on the student’s own interests and a balanced approach to the development of theoretical and practical research skills.  
  • New approaches to student academic support, including the electronic ‘Question and Answer Helpdesk’, the small group tutorial scheme and the programme’s participation in the ‘effective assessment and feedback’ scheme. 

For further information about the course please visit the prospectus or contact Dr Eugenia Kravariti eugenia.kravariti@kcl.ac.uk or (+44) 020 7848 0331

Rss Feed Atom Feed

News Highlights:

News Highlights...RSS FeedAtom Feed

Online therapy could improve student mental health

Online therapy could improve student mental health

Description
A new approach to treating university students' mental health problems, using an online intervention, has been tested by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, and was found to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.
Provision for mental capacity in Assisted Dying Bill 'not robust enough'

Provision for mental capacity in Assisted Dying Bill 'not robust enough'

Description
New research by King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry suggests that the Assisted Dying Bill for England and Wales is not robust enough in its definition of mental capacity, and therefore may not sufficiently protect patients.
Impact of childhood bullying still evident after 40 years

Impact of childhood bullying still evident after 40 years

Description
The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to new research by King's College London.

Share this story:

 

Follow Us

@kingscollegelon

Live Twitter feed...

@kingscollegelon
Join the conversation
Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions Privacy policy Accessibility Modern slavery statement Contact us

© 2017 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454