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Kramer Pollnow Prize for Prof Kuntsi

Posted on 23/02/2016
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Professor Jonna Kuntsi from the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC SGDP) has been awarded the prestigious Kramer Pollnow Prize (KPP) for excellent clinical biological research in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry, especially attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
 
The award underlines Professor Kuntsi's particularly significant contribution to increasing knowledge about basic and clinical aspects of ADHD. Jonna is professor of developmental disorders and neuropsychiatry at the MRC SGDP, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London.
 
Past IoPPN recipients include Professor Katya Rubia from the Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, who received the prize in 2013.
 
Find out more on the European Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry website.

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