Show/hide main menu

News

News Highlights

Martin Meyer receives Wellcome award

Posted on 12/01/2017
MartinMeyer-puff

Martin Meyer has been awarded a prestigious Investigator Award in Science by Wellcome.

With this new award, the Centre for Developmental Neurobiology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has a total of five Wellcome Investigators. These awards offer flexible funding support to researchers at all career stages, enabling them to tackle the most important questions in their field.

The funding, worth £1.6 million, will support research that aims to understand how information about the visual world is encoded by populations of neurons in the brain and how these populations are assembled into neural networks that control visually-guided behaviours. A central goal of sensory neuroscience is to understand how the brain builds internal representations of the external world and how these representations guide decision making and behaviour. For example, what patterns of activity in the brain allow an animal to distinguish prey from predator and how does this activity trigger the appropriate behavioural response? To address this fundamental problem Dr Meyer will use the optic tectum of larval zebrafish which converts visual information from the retina into hunting and escape behaviours.

Dr Meyer said: ‘The duration and level of support that a Wellcome Investigator Award provides will give my lab the time and freedom to develop the tools and techniques necessary to answer ambitious questions. Over the next five years we will use these techniques to reveal how the brain builds internal representations of the external world and how these representations guide decision making and behaviour.’

To find out more about Wellcome Investigator Awards, visit their website.

Rss Feed Atom Feed

News Highlights:

News Highlights...RSS FeedAtom Feed

A molecular switch helps interneurons find their way in the cortex

A molecular switch helps interneurons find their way in the cortex

Description
Researchers from King's College London have identified a molecule which attracts interneurons as they migrate within the developing cortex.
Stimulating the brain with electricity may reduce bulimia symptoms

Stimulating the brain with electricity may reduce bulimia symptoms

Description
Key symptoms of bulimia nervosa, including the urge to binge eat and restrict food intake, are reduced by delivering electricity to parts of the brain using non-invasive brain stimulation, according to new research by King's College London.
Study reveals for first time that talking therapy changes the brain's wiring

Study reveals for first time that talking therapy changes the brain's wiring

Description
A new study from King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has shown for the first time that cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later.
Categories:
Press Release

Share this story:

 

Follow Us

@kingscollegelon

Live Twitter feed...

@kingscollegelon
Join the conversation
Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions Privacy policy Accessibility Modern slavery statement Contact us

© 2017 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454