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Academics join Fellowship of The Academy of Medical Sciences

Posted on 09/05/2013

Four academics from the School of Medicine are among 44 new Fellows elected by The Academy of Medical Sciences last week. They are:

The Fellowships, which recognise excellence in medical research, innovative application of scientific knowledge and service to health care, will be formally awarded at a ceremony on Wednesday 26 June 2013. Steven Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Head of the Department of Neuroimaging at the Institute of Psychiatry, was also elected, bringing the total number of King’s academics to five.

The expertise of the 44 new Fellows spans pharmacology, cell biology, biomedical engineering, childhood cancers, suicide prevention and international health.

Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health) and Executive Director, King’s Health Partners said: ‘I am delighted that the Academy has recognised the talent that we have here at King’s and pass on my warmest congratulations to colleagues. The Academy includes the UK’s leading medical scientists and these new fellowships are recognition of the contribution of these individuals to cutting edge science and its translation into health benefits for society.’

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