Press cuttings

A summary of the latest media coverage for King's College London and Higher Education including headlines from national and international newspapers, specialist journals, television and radio programmes, with a link to the article where possible.

There is also a searchable Archive going back to 2004.

Please submit any media mentions to the Public Relations Department pr@kcl.ac.uk, 020 7848 3202.

King's stories

Air raids and the crowd - citizens at war

The Psychologist 1st June 2016

Edgar Jones, Professor of the History of Medicine and Psychiatry at King's College London explores how British people responded to air raids during the Second World War, and what this tells us about coping under extreme stress.

BBC Horizon: E-Cigarettes: Miracle or Menace

BBC Two 22nd May 2016

In this documentary, Michael Mosley investigates the dramatic rise in e-cigarettes and what 'vaping' really does to your health. Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience shares findings from research.

Does city life pose a risk to mental health?

Scientific American 20th May 2016

The article covers research conducted by Dr Helen Fisher of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Using 2,232 twin children in the UK, her analysis revealed that growing up in the city nearly doubled the likelihood of psychotic symptoms at age 12, and that exposure to crime along with low social cohesion (that is, a lack of closeness and supportiveness between neighbours) were the biggest risk factors.

Cardiff University dementia genes study breakthrough hope

BBC News 20th May 2016

The article mentions statistics from King’s which shows the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease in Wales.

Adults can get ADHD

Daily Mail 19th May 2016

People can develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as adults without having shown any signs of the condition as children. It has been thought that ADHD always develped in childhood and became more severe with age. Scientists at King's College London found however, that 67.5 per cent of those aged 18 with the disorder did not meet the diagnostic criteria for the condition as children. Also reported by Times, BBC Radio Five Live, Reuters, Wall Street Journal, Daily Beast, Hindustan Times, Times of India, O Globo, Scientific American and Quartz.

King's press release related to 'Adults can get ADHD'

Chronic fatigue may prompt you to suppress emotions

Times of India 19th May 2016

Research carried out by Dr Kate Rimes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown "Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome often tell us that stress worsens their symptoms, but this study demonstrates a possible biological mechanism underlying this effect". Also reported by Hindustan Times.

Mental illness blights Asian nations

The Guardian 19th May 2016

New research published in the Lancet has found that one third of the world's cases of mental illness occur in India and China, where millions of people go untreated. Less than 1% of the national health budget in either country is allocated to mental health care. Graham Thornicroft, professor of community psychiatry (Centre for Global Mental Health, King's College London) comments, "...the under-treatment of people with mental illness is a major scandal and governments must recognise not just the direct impact of mental illness, but also the indirect ways it harms people's lives."

Do our genes 'remember' pain?

The Washington Post 19th May 2016

Franziska Denk from the Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience shares findings from recent research published earlier this month in Cell Reports, “We already knew that chronic-pain patients have nerves that are more active, and we think this is probably due to various proteins and channels in those nerves having different properties. We want to know why these proteins and channels should maintain their altered function over such a long period of time.” Denk and her colleagues found that certain crucial proteins were “being replaced by malfunctioning versions of themselves.”

King's press release related to 'Do our genes 'remember' pain? '

Grant winners – 19 May 2016

Times Higher Education 19th May 2016

Dr Federico Caprotti, Geography has been awarded a grant to research urban transformation in South Africa through co-designing energy services provision pathways.

Times Higher Education pay survey 2016

Times Higher Education 19th May 2016

Times Higher Education have ranked universities by the pay of vice-chancellors and detailed any increases in pay. King’s is mentioned in the article.

There are more connections in the human brain than there are stars in our Milky Way Galaxy...

Huffington Post UK 19th May 2016

Professor Nikolas Rose, Social Science, Health & Medicine, discusses the complexity of the human brain and the historic debate on mind vs. brain. ‘The debate on mind vs. brain has figured prominently in the recent public press. But the debate is misleading: few dispute that mental life is grounded in the complex circuits of connections between neurons (brain cells) and in their constant interaction with the world outside,’ he said.

ADHD may emerge after childhood for some people

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

While it is well established that childhood ADHD may continue into adulthood, new research by King’s suggests that for some people the disorder does not emerge until after childhood.
Dr Jessica Agnew-Blais, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘We were very interested by this large ‘late-onset’ ADHD group, as ADHD is generally seen as a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder. We speculated about the nature of late-onset ADHD: the disorder could have been masked in childhood due to protective factors, such as a supportive family environment.’ This was also reported by Times, Daily Beast, Hindustan Times, Times of India, O Globo and Quartz.

King's press release related to 'ADHD may emerge after childhood for some people '

Hard water linked to risk of eczema in infants

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King’s. Eczema affects around a fifth of children in the UK. Skin barrier impairment and dry skin are thought to be triggers of eczema in early life, partly through genetic predisposition. Dr Carsten Flohr, lead author from St John’s Institute of Dermatology at King’s, said: 'Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood. This was also reported by Mirror, Hindustan Times, Times of India, Xinhua and Sina.

King's press release related to 'Hard water linked to risk of eczema in infants '

Environmental Research Group (ERG)

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

Dr Ben Barratt, ERG, discussed on ITV an air pollution report that London Mayor Sadiq Khan has accused Boris Johnson of hiding. ‘Back in 2010 nitrogen dioxide levels were at their peak and certainly air pollution across the whole London Borough was well above legal standards,’ he said. Andrew Grieve, ERG, also discussed this topic on BBC Radio 4 where he used an air pollution monitor to test air pollution on a busy road in London. ‘On the day people were asking drivers to switch their cars off, peaks we saw in the data were lower and there were less levels of air pollution,’ he said. Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, discussed in the London Evening Standard Sadiq Khan’s new plans to introduce a charge for vehicles which emit the most toxic fumes. ‘The new Mayor, Sadiq Khan’s, announcement…is very welcome news,’ he said. A study by the ERG group has also been mentioned in the Guardian, which showed that a third of primary and secondary schools in London are situated in areas where nitrogen dioxide levels are above the legal limits.

Unconventional entrepreneurs inspire an audience at King's

King's Press Release 18th May 2016

Heston Blumenthal, Jo Malone MBE, Joe Wicks (‘The Body Coach’) and EatAbout Co-founders, Philip Källberg and Felix Bråberg, inspired an audience of budding entrepreneurs last night, at a panel event hosted by King’s Entrepreneurship Institute as part of their Enterprise Connect series of events for entrepreneurs. Speaking before the event about the importance of entrepreneurship at King’s, Professor Edward Byrne, President and Principal said: ‘Entrepreneurship is people having the ambition and energy to follow their dreams. To come up with something great, which is going to work in the market place and build a business that will make life better for people and hopefully be successful to those who develop it.’

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Eating too many potatoes 'raises the risk of high blood pressure'

London Evening Standard 18th May 2016

New research published in the British Medical Journal suggests that eating potatoes four times a week raises blood pressure. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, who was not involved in the study, said: ‘I don't think this study should be used to discourage people from eating potatoes. They make an important contribution to the intake of vitamin C and potassium.’ This was also reported by Independent, Mail Online, Telegraph and Sun.

World insight: Think beyond ‘narrow academic pursuits’ to tackle global problems

Times Higher Education 18th May 2016

Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University (ASU), has written a piece calling for universities to take responsibility for the betterment of society. President Crow mentions the recent collaboration, the PLuS Alliance, between King’s, ASU and University of New South Wales, as an example of a commitment to collaboration. ‘This multidisciplinary endeavour allows us to extend the range and depth of brain power by tapping into qualified learners from around the world,’ he said.

Teenage alcohol poisoning

BBC Radio 4 Today 17th May 2016

Dr Sally Marlow from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed about adolescent drinking following a sharp rise in alcohol poisoning over the past 20 years. Dr Marlow discussed the causes of excessive drinking among adolescents, saying it could be a manifestation of 'adolescent distress' and a form of self-harm. Begins at 02.48.22.

There are more connections in the human brain than there are stars in our milky way galaxy...

Huffington Post 17th May 2016

Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discussed the link between the mind and the neurons of the brain.

No link between eating dinner after 8pm and obesity in children

Various media outlets 17th May 2016

Researchers at King’s have found no significant link between eating the evening meal after 8pm and excess weight in children, according to a paper published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition. The lead author of the study, Dr Gerda Pot, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, said: ‘The findings of our study are surprising. We expected to find an association between eating later and being more likely to be overweight but actually found that this was not the case. This may be due to the limited number of children consuming their evening meal after 8pm in this cohort.’ This was also reported by Independent, CNBC, Times of India and Deccan Chronicle.

King's press release related to 'No link between eating dinner after 8pm and obesity in children '

Inaugural visiting professorship to give insight into unique UK historic archive

King's Press Release 17th May 2016

Historian and award-winning winning author Andrew O’ Shaughnessy has been appointed as the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor at King’s to contribute to the Georgian Papers Programme. Dr Joanna Newman Vice Principal (International) said: ‘We are so pleased to have Professor O’ Shaughnessy join us on this fantastic project.’

King's press release related to 'Inaugural visiting professorship to give insight into unique UK historic archive '

Medieval kings were no wielders of absolute power

Guardian 17th May 2016

Professor Dame Janet Nelson, History, has written a letter on the power of medieval kings. ‘Medieval kings were constrained by formal oaths and by the need to keep the consent of aristocrats and gentry, churchmen, city councils, and defenders of local customs – all with rights and privileges, which, over time and with multiple inputs including not least those of lawyers, grew into human rights,’ she said.

Book interview

BBC Radio 4 Front Row 17th May 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, reviews an exhibition called ‘Sunken cities’ at the British Museum. ‘The exhibition brings to life extraordinary ancient culture in the Mediterranean where civilisations flourished and fed off each other to produce a new hybrid art form,’ she said.

The battle for Rio

The i paper 17th May 2016

Professor Mariano de Carvalho, Brazil Institute, discusses the consumption of crack cocaine in Rio de Janeiro. ‘It’s a very cheap drug. Dependence on crack easily moves into physical violence and addicts robbing people to buy drugs. People will see that on the streets,’ he said.

Panic Attack

Guardian 16th May 2016

Nick Grey from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the rise of anxiety and that people are more attuned to it in terms of recognising it as a problem.

South Korean author Han Kang wins Booker international book prize

Financial Times 16th May 2016

South Korean author Han Kang is the winner of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for her novel The Vegetarian. Dr Ruth Padel, English, was one of the judges who selected the winner.

No straight people allowed: Students share views on LGBT-only halls

Guardian 16th May 2016

The article discusses homophobia in higher education and whether universities should introduce LGBT-only halls. Travis Alabanza, King’s LGBT President, said: ‘For LGBT students, particularly those on the margins of that community, LGBT-specific housing gives them an accessible way to attend university, meet other queer students, and feel like they are in a safe environment.’

Gordon Brown could knock out Boris Johnson in a Brexit bout

Guardian 15th May 2016

The article mentions an event at King’s, where the Irish ambassador, Dan Mulhall, gave a lecture. He discussed the economic impact to Northern Ireland should the UK exit the EU.

The beauty of blindsight

Guardian 15th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about a woman in America who regained her sight after she fell and hit her head. ‘Different neural pathways in the brain are responsible for our perception of what something is, and our sense of where something is. Sometimes if only one of these pathways is damaged, a rare phenomenon known as ‘blindsight’ can occur,’ he said.

Maths school has Oxbridge’s number

Times 15th May 2016

The article focuses on King’s Maths School, which has 11 students going to Oxbridge. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, said: ‘This is a place where you can bring together incredibly bright kids. Maths is like music: by the time someone’s in their early teens it’s clear if they’re going to be really good at it.’

The beauty of blindsight

Guardian 15th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about a woman in America who regained her sight after she fell and hit her head. ‘Different neural pathways in the brain are responsible for our perception of what something is, and our sense of where something is. Sometimes if only one of these pathways is damaged, a rare phenomenon known as ‘blindsight’ can occur,’ he said.

Gordon Brown could knock out Boris Johnson in a Brexit bout

Guardian 15th May 2016

The article mentions an event at King’s, where the Irish ambassador, Dan Mulhall, gave a lecture. He discussed the economic impact to Northern Ireland should the UK exit the EU.

World's last survivor from 19th century puts long life down to raw eggs

Guardian 13th May 2016

Professor Karen Glaser, Institute of Gerontology, comments on the death of Susannah Mushatt Jones, the world’s oldest person who died at the age of 116. ‘One hundred years of research shows if you’re married, you’re more likely to live longer than if you’re not married,’ she said.

China deploys amnesia on 50th anniversary of Cultural Revolution

Financial Times 13th May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution in China. ‘The Cultural Revolution has always sat uneasily in Chinese popular memory, partly because there has never really been a credible historical assessment of this bizarre period,’ he said. Professor Brown has also written a piece for the Conversation.

Why a nap is bad for you

Express 13th May 2016

Article looking at the possible health risks associated with sleeping in the day. Professor Adrian Williams, Allergy, Respiratory, Critical Care, Anaesthetics and Pain Therapies Clinical Academic Group, said: ‘Daytime napping suggests possible nocturnal sleep disruption, most commonly obstructive sleep apnea, which is known to cause hypertension.’

Gaining in confidence to boost your job chances

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Dr Jennifer Lau of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who produced the report 'Social Intelligence and the Next Generation, says: 'online interaction is positively linked to a young person's social intelligence, but is no substitute for real life'

Why DOES chronic pain exist? Study investigates why agony persists long after the injury has gone

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Chronic pain leads to an overly sensitive nervous system which responds much more than it normally would. Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) examined immune cells in the nervous system which are known to be important for the generation of persistent pain, and found that nerve damage changes epigenetic marks on some of the genes in these immune cells. Dr Franziska Denk, lead author, said: 'Cells have housekeeping systems by which the majority of their content are replaced and renewed every few weeks and months - so why do crucial proteins keep being replaced by malfunctioning versions of themselves? Our study is the very first step towards trying to answer this question by exploring the possibility that changes in chronic pain may persist because of epigenetics. We hope that future research in this area could help in the search for novel therapeutic targets.'

King's press release related to 'Why DOES chronic pain exist? Study investigates why agony persists long after the injury has gone'

As seen on screen: Collaborative efforts

Times Higher Education 12th May 2016

Article discussing the Creativeworks London Festival, which was held at King’s in April.

Hamza bin Laden: Could Osama's son be the future leader of al-Qaeda?

Independent 12th May 2016

After months of silence, Osama bin Laden’s son has resurfaced in an audio message, urging Syrian jihadist groups to unite and liberate Palestine. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies said: ‘Although his father still has a prominent role in jihadist circles as a mastermind, godfather and inspiration, Hamza has not yet done anything of prominence.’ Dr Krieg’s comments were also reported in USA Today.

King’s College London fight for pay secrecy costs £250,000

Times Higher Education 12th May 2016

The article focuses on the disclosure of senior salaries at King’s and the cost of the three-year appeal process.

Gaining in confidence to boost your job chances

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Social skills are considered highly important when students apply for jobs. Dr Jennifer Lau, IoPPN, said: ‘Online interaction is positively linked to a young person’s social intelligence, but is no substitute for real life.’

Science in the news

BBC Radio 4 12th May 2016

Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, discusses science events which take place in bars and pubs across the UK and other countries. ‘It is a lot of fun and a great way to meet people who you wouldn’t normally meet and are interested in science,’ he said. Interview starts at 25 minutes.

Do you inherit your parent's mental illness?

BBC News 11th May 2016

Professor Cathryn Lewis of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the genetic basis of mental health illnesses. She notes: It's really hard to identify the genetics for mental health disorders. We learn at school about simple Mendelian [relating to the laws of Gregor Mendel] diseases - like Huntington's or cystic fibrosis - where there is the gene, a single gene that contributes to it. Mental health disorders are not about a single gene but about a collection of genes. We need to start thinking about this as a cumulative loading of genetics."

Link between weekend hospital staffing and patient deaths represents 'major oversimplification'

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

The ‘weekend effect’ – that patients admitted to hospital over the weekend are at an increased risk of death – overshadows a much more complex pattern of weekly changes in quality of care, which are unlikely to be addressed by simply increasing the availability of hospital doctors on Saturdays and Sundays, according a study led by King’s and University College London. Lead author Dr Benjamin Bray, Health & Social Care Research, said: ‘Much of the current discourse on reducing the weekend mortality effect has occurred in the absence of a detailed understanding of why changes in quality of care occur.’ This was reported by Buzzfeed, Telegraph, Independent, Mirror, ITV Online and i Paper.

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Top 10 universities for getting a job

Telegraph 11th May 2016

King’s is named as one of the top universities with a high employment rate for graduates.

The Rev Prof Dennis Nineham, scholar – obituary

Telegraph 11th May 2016

Article notes that Reverend Professor Dennis Nineham, formerly the chair of Biblical and Historical Theology at King’s, has passed away.

The Queen's China comments: Unanswered questions

BBC News 11th May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses recent comments made by the Queen about visiting Chinese officials. ‘In terms of the atmospherics between diplomats in China and the UK, it is not an easy relationship and that comes through in the emotion that was in her comment,’ he said. This was also reported by Financial Times, BBC Radio 4 Today, Sky News, Daily Mail, BBC, Huffington Post, Washington Post and Sina.

Historical perspective on EU Referendum

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke to an audience at King’s, considering the historical context of the EU referendum in comparison to 1975. This was reported by Times.

King's Open Doors project launched

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

King’s has launched its new Open Doors Project, a visual display of some of the university’s Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) staff and students and their achievements on door panels across King’s campuses. The project is led by the Diversity and Inclusion team. Debbie Epstein, Diversity & Inclusion Manager said: ‘We hope that public recognition of the achievements of those featured will inspire both existing and future staff and students as well as allowing us all to benefit from an insight in to their contributions and experiences.’

Pacific Islands disappeared

Sky News 10th May 2016

Dr Helen Adams, Geography, comments on five Pacific Islands which have disappeared due to rising sea levels. ‘I think it is important to look at it in the bigger context. Although you have lost five islands and one is rapidly eroding, there are actually 33 islands and so only a third of it is eroding,’ she said.

The best ways to stop a wildfire

Guardian 10th May 2016

Professor Bruce Malamud, Geography, suggests the best way to stop wildfires. ‘You need to remove one of the following: the heat of the fire, the fuel that feeds the fire or the oxygen that allows combustion to take place,’ he said.

Damaged Environment

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th May 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, discusses the effects that wildfires in Alberta, Canada will have on the environment. ‘Fires when they move through forests, consume lots of biomass in the trees or in the forest floors. Half of that biomass is made up of carbon. Rough calculations suggest that this fire is two thousand squares kilometres and might have burnt 10 million tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere,’ he said. Interview starts at 02:49:00.

Royal Ballet

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th May 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (London), comments on an article by a Principal dancer of the Royal Ballet, who received negative comments on his appearance. ‘If you read the article, what he is talking about is what happens to an artist as you grow up and start to accept who you are. So the dancer is saying that he has put to bed his own concerns about being different and that it is a shame other people have not,’ she said. Interview starts at 02:55:14.

King's Historian receives prestigious A.H. Heineken Prize

King's Press Release 10th May 2016

Professor Judith Herrin, Arts & Humanities Research Institute, has received the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History awarded by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences for her outstanding contribution to historical research. Professor Herrin received the prize in recognition for her research into Medieval cultures in Mediterranean civilisations and for establishing the crucial significance of the Byzantine Empire in history.

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What you need to know about vaping

Buzzfeed 9th May 2016

Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses vaping, following the Cochrane Review which found that there was evidence to say that e-cigarettes help people stop smoking. Professor McNeill's research found that vaping was much less harmful than smoking tobacco. Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 constituents and about 70 are known to cause cancer,” said McNeill. “E-cigarettes have a much smaller number of constituents – it’s largely glycerin, propylene glycol, nicotine, and flavourings".

Impeachment in Brazil

Various media outlets 9th May 2016

Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff will face trial after senators voted to impeach and suspend her. Academics from King’s have been discussing the issue. Speaking to Al Jazeera, researcher Diogo Costa, Political Economy, said: ‘To restore economic trust is the main challenge for this government. The big challenge is to boost productivity, restore growth and also to fight unemployment,’ he said. He also spoke to BBC Mundo. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, commented in US news. ‘I don’t think the grounds for impeachment are very robust. That worries me. The bar is too low and may subject future presidents to impeachment for similar reasons,’ he said. Professor Pereira also spoke to Globo about the relationship between the US and Brazil.

Environmental Research Group

Various media outlets 9th May 2016

Academics from the Environmental Research Group (ERG) have commented widely in the media this week. Dr Gary Fuller, discussed diesel car emissions for the Guardian. ‘Compared with stricter standards applied to petrol cars, the average diesel sold between 2009 and 2015 emitted 19 times more nitrogen oxides,’ he said. Dr Fuller also commented for the Guardian in another article about particulate matter (PM). ‘A lot of PM2.5s has a long residence time in the air, a week or more, therefore it’s not just what you generate locally, it’s all the other cities around you,’ he said. This was also reported by Times. Professor Frank Kelly, spoke to the Independent about harmful microplastics in the environment. ‘There’s a real possibility that some of those microparticles will be entrained into the air and they will be carried around and we will end up breathing them,’ he said. Professor Kelly also commented in Express on whether eco-cars produce as much air pollution as diesel cars, which was also reported by Guardian and London Evening Standard. An article in the Guardian mentions a study carried out by a number of universities, including academics from ERG, which looked at the impact of a type of paint on the reduction of nitrogen dioxide. London Mayor Sadiq Khan cited research by the ERG, which was reported by Bloomberg.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/kellyoakes/what-we-know-about-e-cigarettes?utm_ter&utm_term=.ilMve95Xza#.exYv6YqjK5

Buzzfeed 9th May 2016

A recent review has suggested that e-cigarettes help people stop smoking. Comparing e-cigarettes versus cigarettes, Professor Ann McNeill, IoPPN, said: ‘Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 constituents and about 70 are known to cause cancer. E-cigarettes have a much smaller number of constituents – it’s largely glycerin, propylene glycol, nicotine, and flavourings.’

Eight proven ways to prevent cancer

Telegraph 9th May 2016

Research suggests that small lifestyle changes can lower the risk of cancer by up to 40 per cent. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments on the role bacteria plays in lowering the risk of cancer: ‘Microbes help break down some of the toxins in the gut that might normally cause cancer, and they keep the immune system in great shape generally so it beats off cancer cells,’ he said.

Asia business leaders in fundraiser celebrations

King's Press Release 9th May 2016

A series of exclusive events across the Asia Pacific region are being held to celebrate an illustrious group of Hong Kong and Asia business leaders who have helped fund a ground-breaking fundraising campaign for King’s. The global campaign has enabled the university to achieve some significant milestones in neuroscience and mental health, cancer, child health, society and international relations. The group of major donors has helped King’s to substantially surpass its original £500million target. This was reported by South China Morning Post.

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Prof. Greenberg speaks at Invictus Games 2016

King's Press Release 9th May 2016

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), joined figures from the worlds of royalty, sports, entertainment and politics, to speak at an international Invictus Games symposium hosted by the Bush Institute in Orlando, Florida. ‘The biggest challenge facing our communities is finding ways to encourage those affected by mental health problems to take the courageous step to seek treatment in the first place,’ he said. This was reported by Fox.

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Mixed response as university declares Wednesdays 'lecture-free'

Independent 9th May 2016

Goldsmiths University of London’s students’ union announced that there will be no lectures between 12-5pm on a Wednesday at the university. The article mentions King’s as being one of the universities which does not have Wednesday afternoon lectures.

Why picturing yourself winning is important in sport

Guardian 8th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery discusses the importance of imagining yourself winning in order to succeed. ‘Neuroscientists and sports psychologists agree that the way a team imagines itself performing is just as important as the strength of the players,’ he said.

Juicing is a health risk, say experts

Daily Mail 6th May 2016

Experts warn that there are risks associated with juicing. Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘There are many juicing books and it is widely promoted on social media as an approach to promote health, induce weight loss and flush 'toxins' from the body. Clearly removing food from the diet can potentially help with weight loss, but juicing is not a sustainable and sensible approach to doing so,’ he said.

'Guys and gals: The European dating market will still be open post-Brexit'

Telegraph 6th May 2016

First year Politics student, Jack Elsom, has written a piece on the uncertainty surrounding the EU referendum. ‘Nobody really knows what Britain’s future would be like… and trying to conjure up an exact model of what a Brexit would look like is pointless, in the same way one can’t predict the future,’ he said.

Robotics at King’s

Various media outlets 6th May 2016

There have been a number of pieces about robotics research conducted at King’s. Dr Thrish Nanayakkara, Informatics, spoke to the Financial Times about how industries can benefit from a robot assisted workforce. BBC Breakfast and BBC Radio London also reported on the robotics training centre at King’s, where urologists, along with some help from robots, can treat patients with severe bladder conditions and prostate cancer.

London’s new mayor needs to lobby for more powers – or risk being left behind

The Conversation 6th May 2016

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece about the mayoral elections. ‘Whoever has won will gain command of a budget worth £17 billion to be spent mainly on fire services, transport and policing. They will also take on responsibilities for culture and the environment, addressing health inequalities, urban regeneration and development,’ he said.

Islamic students hid guests’ radical links

Times 6th May 2016

The article mentions comments made by David Cameron about controversial speakers on university campuses. King's is mentioned.

Air pollution warnings issued as UK temperatures set to soar

Guardian 6th May 2016

Air pollution warnings have been issued with temperatures forecast to climb towards 27C (80F) in south-east England and the Midlands this weekend. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘As spring is moving towards summer the sun is getting stronger, and able to drive chemical reactions between pollutants that cause ozone to be formed, along with the particles [of unburned fuel].’

Ketamine could hold key to side-effect free antidepressant, scientists reveal

Independent 5th May 2016

Dr James Stone of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on new research showing that ketamine can relieve the symptoms of depression faster than commonly prescribed drugs. He notes: "This paper predicts that it would have a similar very rapid onset of action and efficacy against treatment resistant depression to ketamine, but that it would lack some of the undesirable side effects such as perceptual distortion and addiction potential. Although these findings are very promising, clinical trials in patients with depression are required".

Weight loss happens in your head, not your stomach

Huffington Post UK 5th May 2016

The article mentions a study by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, which showed that the key to losing weight is to keep the microbes in our gut healthy.

'Perfect storm' of El Niño and warming boosted Alberta fires

BBC News 5th May 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, comments on El Nino not being the only factor increasing the likelihood of fire in Alberta. ‘Some of the changes can be ascribed to improvements in reporting but there are datasets which show the fire season has lengthened,’ he said.

The week in higher education

Times Higher Education 5th May 2016

The article discusses an invitation sent from a student society to Boris Johnson, but since purportedly rescinded. This was also reported by Huffington Post UK , Times Higher Education Supplement and Guardian.

Why Brexit would make the UK less secure

Telegraph 5th May 2016

Professor Christoph Meyer, European & International Studies, discusses the implications for the UK’s security and foreign policy if it leaves the EU. ‘Outside of the EU, the UK would still bear the consequences of EU policies without being at the table when they are formulated,’ he said.

UK universities slip in world rankings - is your old uni in the top 100?

Mirror 5th May 2016

King’s is ranked in the top 100 in the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rakings. This was also reported by BBC Online, Independent, Times Higher Education Supplement, Huffington Post UK, Times, Telegraph, Times Higher Education, London Evening Standard, Express, Times Higher Education, Xinhua and People’s Daily.

Having an overactive immune system may prime you for depression

New Scientist 4th May 2016

A new King’s College London study reveals why some - but not all - people have depression that appears to be caused by blood inflammation.
These insights could help researchers to develop novel treatment strategies for the many depressed patients who do not get better using current antidepressants. Professor Carmine Pariante from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience was interviewed by New Scientist and Metro.

King's press release related to 'Having an overactive immune system may prime you for depression'

Care discussion

BBC Radio 4 Woman's Hour 4th May 2016

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing, discusses the role of nurses within the NHS and the role played by nurses from overseas. ‘Nurses from overseas were needed before the 60’s because the viability of the NHS was threatened by the shortage of nurses. Therefore, the officials from the National Labour Service recruited from abroad,’ she said.

Celia Coburn interview

BBC Radio 2 4th May 2016

Former King’s staff, Celia Coburn, discusses her life and employment at King’s after 25 years. ‘I spent 25 years at King’s because I liked working with students and enjoyed it,’ she said.

Scientists make test tube embryo breakthrough

Financial Times 4th May 2016

New research has found a technique that scientists say may allow the study of human embryos for 14 days instead of seven. Professor Peter Braude, Women’s Health, said: ‘The research demonstrated that good science still can be achieved within the limits set by the UK parliament.’

Shockwave therapy to stop mouth pain spoiling your meals

Daily Mail 3rd May 2016

Many people in Britain suffer from salivary stones, which cause painful facial swelling when eating. Professor Mark McGurk, Tissue Engineering & Biophotonics, comments: ‘Around one in 100 people has salivary stones. No one knows exactly why they occur, but we think minerals and calcium found naturally in saliva build up around tiny bits of debris in the glands.’

Air pollution has been lost in the murk of the London mayoral campaign

Guardian 3rd May 2016

Research by King’s is mentioned in this article that shows the health impacts of air pollution, including diseases such as asthma and bronchitis.

Shockwave therapy to stop mouth pain spoiling your meals

Daily Mail 3rd May 2016

Many people in Britain suffer from salivary stones, which cause painful facial swelling when eating. Professor Mark McGurk, Tissue Engineering & Biophotonics, comments: ‘Around one in 100 people has salivary stones. No one knows exactly why they occur, but we think minerals and calcium found naturally in saliva build up around tiny bits of debris in the glands.’

Baby-faced rapper who fled Britain to join ISIS 'killed in Syria'

Mirror 2nd May 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comments on the death of Raphael Hostey who fled the UK to join the Islamic State (IS). ‘Raphael was the last remaining member of a cluster of fighters to join ISIS from Manchester and Portsmouth in 2013,’ he said. This was also reported by Independent and Sun.

Gummy Gripes

Daily Mail 2nd May 2016

Dr Mark Ide, Mucosal & Salivary Biology, discusses why having sore, sensitive gums can be a sign of the skin condition lichen planus. ‘It mostly appears in middle age and affects more women than men. There is some speculation that it may be down to hormone changes,’ he said.

Kidman & Co and Huawei decisions mean mixed messages for Chinese investors The

The Conversation 2nd May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses Australian and China business relations. ‘Turning its back on investment from a source with the potential and importance of China would be a huge strategic decision for Australia,’ he said.

Heartburn meds alter the gut

Scientific American 1st May 2016

In 2014 more than 170 million prescriptions in the US were completed for acid blockers, known as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat gastric conditions. Research from King’s is mentioned, which looked at individuals’ gut bacteria before and after patients took PPIs for four to eight weeks.

What's your booze binge trigger?

Sun 1st May 2016

Professor Colin Drummond of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) features in an article on alcohol consumption. He notes: 'It only takes two units of alcohol to start impairing your judgement in a process called the priming effect, triggering your desire for more.'

How drawing focuses the mind

Guardian 1st May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on a museum not allowing visitors to take photographs or sketch. ‘Sketching something close up and looking at it from afar are approached in quite different ways by the brain. However, it’s easy to miss details this way, because the brain is already satisfied that it knows what it has seen, and so doesn’t look any closer to find out,’ he said.

Europe is moving ever closer to Britain

Financial Times 1st May 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece on what will happen if Britain votes to remain in the EU. ‘With the EU moving in a “British” direction, the UK is in a strong position to help shape its future — unless, of course, it decides on June 23 to cut itself off from the continent,’ he said.

Who knew HRT could give you such saucy dreams?

Daily Mail 1st May 2016

Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, discusses the stigma attached to women who take drug hormones during menopause to help with symptoms such as hot flushes and mood swings. ‘If your status was raised by menopause, if you were treated as a wise woman and older men still found you attractive, what would be the problem?’ she said.

Ditch tobacco sponsors, health experts warn institutions

Guardian 30th April 2016

More than 1,000 health experts have signed an open letter to London’s leading cultural institutions to abandon their financial links with the tobacco industry. Professor John Moxham, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, comments: ‘Tobacco advertising has now been banned along with sponsorship of sport. However, tobacco companies continue to use sponsorship of some high-profile arts organisations to promote the spurious idea that they are responsible corporate citizens.’ Also reported in the Observer.

Leadership research in HE is ‘theoretically weak’

Times Higher Education 30th April 2016

A new study has revealed that current literature on how to improve leadership in higher education is ‘small scale, fragmented and often theoretically weak.’ Professor Ewan Ferlie, School of Management & Business, said: ‘A lot of the research is very weak, very small-scale, local and theoretical. You could track the case of a university going through major change and see how leadership factors compared to other factors at play.’ This was also reported by Times Higher Education Supplement.

Universities borrow £3bn for new boom

Times 29th April 2016

Leading universities such as University College London, Edinburgh University and King’s are set to borrow more than £3 billion to fund expansion and meet demands of the increasing student population. It also mentions King’s acquiring the Bush House building at the Strand.

Universities are booming but there are warning signs

Financial Times 29th April 2016

The article mentions that King’s is ranked in The Times Higher Education and QS rankings 2016 as one of the top 20 global institutions.

Revealed: The 20 blackspots for toxic air in London

Evening Standard 29th April 2016

Campaign group ClientEarth has published a list of 20 pollution blackspots where air pollution exceeds EU limits. Data captured by King’s monitoring equipment found that air pollution levels on Putney High Street were beyond EU regulations. This was also reported by Guardian.

‘Science, the State, and the City: Britain’s Struggle to Succeed in Biotechnology’, by Geoffrey Owen and Michael Hopkins

Financial Times 29th April 2016

Professor David Edgerton, History, reviews ‘Science, the State, and the City: Britain’s Struggle to Succeed in Biotechnology’ by Geoffrey Owen and Michael Hopkins. ‘This book asks why it was that, despite everything being in place…Britain has not produced any large new biotechnological enterprise,’ he said.

Boom time for UK universities as fee income encourages expansion

Financial Times 28th April 2016

The article mentions that King’s is ranked in The Times Higher Education and QS rankings 2016 as one of the top 20 global institutions.

Writing letters for free isn’t a Capital idea

Guardian 28th April 2016

Professor Clive Coen, Women’s Health, discusses letter writing and capitalism. ‘Promote accountability by rejecting pseudonymous contributions. Only whistleblowers merit anonymity,’ he said.

First non-STEM Athena SWAN winners named

Times Higher Education 28th April 2016

King’s is named as one of the institutions to win an Athena SWAN award for its work on equality in the workplace.

What is Ed Balls doing now? Life after parliament for the self tweeting ex-MP

Mirror 28th April 2016

The article focuses on Ed Balls’ post-political career and his role as a Visiting Professor at the Policy Institute.

How Brazil hurtled into a preordained political tragedy

The Conversation 28th April 2016

PhD student, Geraldo Canterino, Brazil Institute, has written a piece on the impeachment of Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff. ‘If found guilty of the crimes of which she’s accused, Rousseff will be permanently removed from the presidency. If acquitted, she will return as president to finish her mandate – but with more than two thirds of the lower house having voted to investigate her, her position would be untenable,’ he said.

We are all farcically in the dark about what would happen after a vote for Brexit

Telegraph 28th April 2016

In the run up to the EU referendum Bernard Jenkin speaks at an event at King’s about the uncertainty on what will happen if Britain leaves the EU.

The Evening Standard speaks for the Conservatives

Huffington Post UK 28th April 2016

The article argues that the Evening Standard newspaper has produced pro-Conservative bias in its coverage of the London mayoral election. The article mentions recent research by King’s that looked at monopoly news providers, and found that this was not confined to London.

Mindfulness can control depression as well as drugs, study shows

Telegraph 27th April 2016

Professor Sir Simon Wessley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research from the University of Oxford co-authored by Professor Sarah Byford of the IoPPN. The meta-analysis found that across the nine trials, 38 per cent of those who received MBCT had a depressive relapse within 60 weeks’ follow-up, in contrast to 49 per cent of those who did not receive MBCT. Taking the time to relapse into account, people who received MBCT were 31 per cent less likely to relapse during the 60-week follow-up compared with those who did not receive MBCT. Sir Simon Wessley said: “ this study confirms that mindfulness is an effective talking therapy, probably about the same as antidepressants, and that both together reduces relapse.“ Professor Byford notes: 'The results of this meta-analysis add to the growing body of evidence supporting the value of MBCT in preventing depression relapse, not just in comparison to usual care but also when compared to other active treatments.’ Also reported in Evening Standard.

King's press release related to 'Mindfulness can control depression as well as drugs, study shows'

MPs: UK air pollution is a 'public health emergency'

Guardian 27th April 2016

A new scrappage scheme has been introduced for diesel vehicles which will allow only the cleanest buses to drive on key polluted roads. This scheme is also being supported by the Environmental Research Group at King’s.

Environment discussion

BBC Radio 4 27th April 2016

Dr Heather Walton, Environmental Research Group, discusses measures which can be taken to reduce air pollution and the risks of air pollution. ‘There are significant health impacts and figures show that 29,000 deaths were as a result of air pollution. Recently there has been research showing that the level of nitrogen dioxide has increased and this may have an impact on the number of deaths caused by air pollution,’ she said.

Why you should be worried about the trade union bill

Huffington Post UK 27th April 2016

The trade union bill proposed by the government has faced harsh criticism. Professor Keith Ewing, Law, describes it as: ‘A living death by a thousand cuts to trade unions, only stopping short of banning them altogether.’

Doctors look after our mental health but who looks after theirs?

Independent 26th April 2016

The article mentions a meta-analysis of 144 studies involving more than 90,000 people conducted by Sarah Clement and Professor Graham Thornicroft of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Their resulting global report showed that although one in four people – both inside and outside the healthcare profession – in Europe and the USA have a mental health problem, as many as 75% of people do not receive treatment.

Award for SlowMo at AXA PPP Health Tech & You Awards

Evening Standard 26th April 2016

The article mentions the AXA Health Tech & You Awards in which Winner of the One To Watch section was the SlowMo app developed by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). SlowMo is a “friend in your pocket” that can help some sufferers of mental illness who often experience paranoid thoughts about others wanting to harm them. SloMo was created by Amy Hardy from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Anna Wojdecka of the Royal College of Art, and mental health service users.

Mozart's Requiem

BBC Radio 4 26th April 2016

Professor Cliff Eisen, Music, explores how Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives. Professor Eisen said: ‘I think that the Requiem is one of the greatest pieces written. Mozart’s command of how to express something is extraordinary; I always find and learn something new when I listen to it.’

EU referendum

Various media outlets 25th April 2016

A number of King’s academics have been commenting in the run up to the European Union (EU) referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies spoke to Bloomberg about the EU in general. On CBC Dr Walter Ladwig III, War Studies, discusses Barack Obama urging Britain to remain in the EU, during a three-day state visit to the UK. King’s student Vageesh Jain has written a piece for Independent on the impact Britain leaving the EU will have on the NHS. Professor David Jones and Professor Michael Rainsborough, War Studies, have written a piece for Telegraph on the political and economic impact leaving the EU will have on Britain.

Barack Obama issues Brexit trade warning

Guardian 25th April 2016

The article highlights the withdrawn invitation issued from a student society to Boris Johnson. This was also reported by Times, Telegraph, Independent, Huffington Post UK, Sky News, Victoria Derbyshire Show, BBC Radio London, Reuters and Daily Mail.

How women can deal with periods in space

The Conversation 25th April 2016

Dr Varsha Jain, CHAPS, has written a piece on the female physiology in space. ‘The fact that women can get periods in space was once used as an argument that women shouldn’t be astronauts. However, we now know that periods don’t impair an astronaut’s ability,’ she said. This was also reported by BBC World and Globo.

Junk food not harmful to heart when eaten with Mediterranean diet, study finds

Telegraph 25th April 2016

New research shows that eating a Mediterranean diet of fresh fish, fruit and vegetables lowers the risk of a heart attack and stroke and that eating a Western diet did not increase the risk. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘The study found no relationship between deep-fried foods, refined carbohydrates and sugar sweetened beverages (characteristic of a Western dietary pattern) and risk; this is of note given the recent furore over sugar but is hardly surprising as older people are not major consumers of pop.’ This was also reported by Guardian.

Depleted local media threatens ability to hold those in power to account

The Conversation 25th April 2016

Dr Martin Moore and Dr Gordon Ramsay, Policy Institute, discuss their study which focuses on the increasing dominance of local news. ‘The findings show how strong publishing monopolies may be emerging in local news, leading to a dearth of plurality in many UK regions,’ they said.

Rise in dangerous 'smog fever' damaging city dwellers' health

Express 25th April 2016

Health experts give their advice on how people can reduce the risk of being affected by ‘smog fever’. The article mentions a study by King’s which showed that 9,500 people died in London due to air pollution.

St George’s, Imperial and Cambridge have the highest graduate prospects

Independent 25th April 2016

King’s has been ranked as one of the universities with the highest graduate prospects when they finish university.

Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved

BBC News 24th April 2016

A new study reveals areas that the immune system attacks which cause type 1 diabetes. This research is being used in a trial at King’s which aims to slow down the progression of type 1 diabetes.

Barack Obama: ‘He has such power … yet such humility’

Guardian 24th April 2016

King’s student, Khadija Najefi comments on introducing Barrack Obama at an event during his visit in London. ‘My dad came with me and was in the audience but I was terrified. I met him and the ambassador backstage. I asked how he was and he did the same,’ she said. This was also reported by Daily Mail, Express and Scottish Daily Mail.

Trying to tame our imaginations

Guardian 24th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why our imagination is very powerful. Dr Glaser comments: ‘Our brains have to construct a virtual machine to think logically, which is easily undermined by our more basic processes to which “elephant” and “not elephant” look roughly the same.’

Why is Shakespeare more popular than ever?

BBC News 23rd April 2016

Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of London Shakespeare Centre, discusses Shakespeare’s plays and why he describes him as an adapter. ‘Romeo and Juliet is a centuries-old story Shakespeare took and rewrote. I'm not saying he was a plagiarist, but he did rely heavily on pre-existing works,’ he said. This was also reported by Sky News.

Students threaten to split from union over anti-Israeli president

Daily Express 23rd April 2016

Students from various universities including Oxford University and King’s have said that they want to cut ties with the National Union of Students after it elected a woman accused of anti-Semitism as president. This was also reported by Daily Mail, London Evening Standard, Telegraph, Times, Guardian and Times Higher Education Supplement.

Impeachment in Brazil

Prospect 22nd April 2016

The lower house of Congress in Brazil has voted to impeach its president, Dilma Rousseff. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, provided comment for USA Today twice: USA Today1; USA Today2 and O Globo. He also wrote opinion pieces for Fortune and Prospect. Dr Sónia Gonçalves, Brazil Institute, spoke on BBC World Service; Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, provided comment for BBC Brazil; and research student, Diogo Costa, Political Economy, wrote a piece for the Telegraph.

Menstruation in spaceflight: Options for astronauts

New York Times 22nd April 2016

A new paper in the journal npj Microgravity explores the options for astronauts who want to prevent menstrual bleeding during their space missions. The paper, written by authors at King’s and Baylor College of Medicine, reviews contraceptive devices available including those already used by military and aviation personnel, and calls for more research into the effect of hormone treatments on bone mineral loss in space. This was reported by The Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, NBC Today, VICE Motherboard, Mail Online and the International Business Times.

Earth Day 2016: Five simple things you can do to help the environment

Independent 22nd April 2016

The article focuses on Earth Day and how we can protect the environment. It also highlights research by King’s which revealed that in 2009, almost 10,000 people died as a result of air pollution.

Oxford University students seek to cut ties with NUS after 'anti-Semitism' row

Telegraph 22nd April 2016

Oxford University students have said that they want to cut ties with the National Union of Students after it elected a woman accused of anti-Semitism as president. Students at King’s are mentioned to be considering disaffiliation. This was also reported by Times and Daily Mail.

Don’t blame young voters for not bothering about the EU referendum

The Conversation 22nd April 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, explores some of the reasons why young people are not interested in the EU referendum. ‘Young people in particular, who have more at stake than anyone else, have the least interest in, and least knowledge about, the EU,’ he said.

IS-inspired terror plotters had police station and army barracks as targets

Daily Mail 22nd April 2016

The article mentions former King’s student, Suhaib Majeed, who was found guilty of offences under the Terrorism Act.

Middle-class IS recruits in moped plot to kill troops are jailed for life

Daily Mail 22nd April 2016

Former King’s Physics student Suhaib Majeed has been sentenced to life in prison for an attempted terrorist attack. This was also reported by The Sun, Express, Telegraph, Times, Independent and Guardian.

Will real-world emissions tests clean up diesel cars?

Guardian 22nd April 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on whether new world emissions tests will help reduce diesel emissions. ‘These standards came in in 2010 [but were enforced by laboratory tests]. Finally when it’s been recognised by governments and the EU, the industry has been given another four and a half years before it really needs to comply. In my mind, that’s too long,’ he said.

Will power

London Evening Standard 22nd April 2016

The article focuses on events happening in London to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. It also mentions the London Shakespeare Centre at King’s holding events and exhibitions.

Mental health goals may not be met, audit office warns

Guardian 21st April 2016

The article discusses research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), showing no association between weekend admission to psychiatric hospital and increased risk of death. Also reported by Press Association.

King's press release related to 'Mental health goals may not be met, audit office warns'

Smartphone app to help Londoners cope with paranoia

Evening Standard 21st April 2016

The article refers to research led by Professor Philippa Garety and Dr Amy Hardy of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which investigated the use of an app called SlowMo which provides a 'digital therapy platform'. It helps people visualise troubles using on-screen thought bubbles and slows their thinking to ease distress. The app offers tips for coping, encourages people to come up with their own reassuring alternatives and keeps a record of what has been helpful during times of stress.

Eat right to save your eyesight

Deccan Herald 21st April 2016

Article that discusses recent research by King’s that looked at the impact of vitamin C on the development of cataracts. The study found that those who had reported consuming more vitamin C in their diet had a 33% lower risk of their cataracts progressing that those who consumed less vitamin C. This was also reported by Huffington Post US.

India responds to a changing West Asia

Hindustan Times 21st April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on India’s Middle East policy. ‘The certainties of the past with which New Delhi has lived so far are coming to an end and a new uncertain landscape will challenge Indian foreign policy in the coming years. New Delhi will have to move away from the ideological trappings of the past where domestic political imperatives continue to constrain India’s options,’ he said.

Smartphone app to help Londoners cope with paranoia

London Evening Standard 21st April 2016

A new app has been developed to help people who fear that others want to do them harm. A separate study by King’s found that one in three Londoners often experienced such thoughts.

What would Brexit mean for European security?

Telegraph 21st April 2016

PhD student, Alexander Clarke, War Studies, discusses the impact Britain leaving the EU will have on European security. ‘If the UK leaves the EU, Nato will not fall apart, Russia will not magically become stronger and neither would Isil, al-Qaeda or the myriad of other terrorist organisations that seek to threaten our way of life,’ he said

How much water should you drink during a marathon?

Express 21st April 2016

In the run up to the London Marathon, Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, advises that staying well hydrated throughout training is important. ‘If you sweat more than you drink while exercising, you can start to become dehydrated, which can affect performance and can also have negative effects on the body,’ he said.

Sleeping away from home? Half your brain is still awake

New Scientist 21st April 2016

The article highlights research which found that people find it difficult to sleep in unfamiliar surroundings due to the left brain refusing to switch off. King’s researcher Adrian Williams, Allergy, Respiratory, Critical Care, Anaesthetics and Pain Therapies Clinical Academic Group, said: ‘The first night effect contrasts with the experience of my patients with insomnia, who often sleep better away from home since they associate their own bedroom with not sleeping. But the results are convincing and intriguing.’

Ancient Greek

BBC Radio 4 Borders 21st April 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, discusses the qualifications that were required to compete in the Olympic games in ancient Greece. ‘People from everywhere came to Olympia for the games every four years, but when they wanted to compete with each other they had to prove that they had taken a Greek language test before they were allowed to take part,’ she said.

Menstruation in spaceflight: Options for astronauts

King's Press Release 21st April 2016

A new paper in the journal npj Microgravity explores the options for astronauts who want to prevent menstrual bleeding during their space missions. The paper, written by authors at King’s and Baylor College of Medicine, reviews contraceptive devices available including those already used by military and aviation personnel, and calls for more research into the effect of hormone treatments on bone mineral loss in space. This was reported by The Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, NBC Today, VICE Motherboard, Mail Online and the International Business Times.

Britain wants the Queen to continue her long reign over us

Independent 21st April 2016

A poll conducted by King’s and Ipsos MORI shows that support for the monarchy is higher than it was two decades ago. The survey reveals that 75 per cent of people think the monarchy plays an important role in Britain, up from 66 per cent at the beginning of the 21st century. This was reported by Telegraph, Times, Independent, Yahoo news, Newsweek, Sina, Globo, Deccan Chronicle, The New Indian Express, Economic Times of India, Folha de S.Paulo and Estadao.

What is it like to be a child with depression?

BBC Radio 4 Today 20th April 2016

Professor Emily Simonoff from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed about autism and depression in childhood. She discussed symptoms of depression that parents should look out for and some of the treatments and therapies available to children (begins at 02:10).

Reacting to a terrorist attack

BBC Radio 4 Today 20th April 2016

Police are aiming to get public limited companies which operate in busy areas such as city centres and sports and entertainment venues to teach their staff how to react in the case of a terror attack. Professor Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said that plans to train decisiveness and communication skills in the event of an attack are 'good news.' He said there is good evidence regarding how people respond to attacks - a few people take decisive action, some show high anxiety and the majority are 'befuddled' and 'don't know what to do.' Begins at 02.50.

Climate change: Is the 1.5C target a mirage

Times of India 20th April 2016

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a report in 2018 to evaluate efforts set at a recent summit to cap global warming at 1.5 degrees. Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, commented that two years may not be enough for new data to emerge.

Obama in Saudi Arabia: Chilly reception likely as old allies face new pressures

CNBC 20th April 2016

Barack Obama’s visit to Saudi Arabia comes in the midst of disagreements between the two countries over US policies in the Middle East. Commenting on the relationship, student Manal Faisal, War Studies, said: ‘I think that he [Obama] is coming to salvage a relationship that he has spent most of his time as president neglecting.’

Demystifying the harmony test for Down's syndrome

Huffington Post UK 20th April 2016

New research by academics at King’s has led to the development of a new simple blood test, which screens for Down’s syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities such as Edwards syndrome and Patau syndrome.

NUS to encourage students to ‘wreck’ the TEF with NSS boycott

Times Higher Education 20th April 2016

The National Union of Students (NUS) is encouraging students not to complete the National Student Survey unless the government drops its plans for the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF). The article includes comments from KCSLU Vice President for activities and development. This was also reported by Guardian.

Cameron says Britain owes 'debt of gratitude' to retiring Help For Heroes founders who raised £280 million

Sun 20th April 2016

The article mentions a study by King’s which shows that 83,000 former servicemen and women are still suffering from physical and mental injuries upon their return from war.

90 stunning photographs marking the Queen's 90th birthday

Mirror 20th April 2016

To mark Queen Elizabeth’s 90th birthday the article has selected a variety of photographs, one of which shows the Queen attending an official function at King’s in 2012.

'We are now caught in a classic stand-off over bursaries'

Nursing Times 20th April 2016

The article discusses a debate held at King’s over nursing bursaries, attended by more than 100 students.

Identity and migration

BBC World Service 19th April 2016

Baptist Coelho, Leverhulme Artist-in-Residence, War Studies, spoke on a panel discussing identity, migration, and his current work at King’s. ‘With the projects I’m doing at the moment at the department of War Studies, looking at soldiers and the identities…behind the uniform they wear, there is also a human being,’ he said.

Tribal living cured my self-obsession

Times 19th April 2016

The article mentioned research carried out by King’s that polled more than 1000 12 to 17-year-olds, and found that six out of ten said they were lonely.

Shakespeare’s Will

BBC One The One show 19th April 2016

One Show presenter David Olusoga visited the exhibition: By me, William Shakespeare: A life in writing, hosted at King’s, to discover new clues to Shakespeare’s life. Segment is at 11 mins 25 secs.

Boots revelations are a bitter pill to swallow

Guardian 19th April 2016

Professor Kennedy Cruickshank, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on an investigation which revealed that the retailer Boots is forcing its staff to overuse an NHS scheme intended to help sick people. ‘Less obvious profiteering by Boots is the instruction of their pharmacists on private prescriptions,’ he said.

Impeachment in Brazil

Prospect Magazine 19th April 2016

The lower house of Congress in Brazil has voted to impeach its president, Dilma Rousseff. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, provided comment for USA Today twice: USA Today1; USA Today2 and O Globo. He also wrote opinion pieces for Fortune and Prospect. Dr Sónia Gonçalves, Brazil Institute, spoke on BBC World Service; Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, provided comment for BBC Brazil; and research student, Diogo Costa, Political Economy, wrote a piece for the Telegraph.

The limits of US engagement

Wall Street Journal 18th April 2016

US Defence Secretary Ashton Carton visited India for a three-day trip, meeting with Indian prime minister Narendra Modi. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, wrote an opinion piece on the visit. ‘The visit to India made great strides in bilateral cooperation but remained underwhelming,’ he said.

Woman fights Russian law on organ removal without consent

Fox news 18th April 2016

Russian law states that doctors are allowed to take organs from deceased patients without informing their families. Commenting on the controversial ruling, Professor Robert Wintermute, Law, said: ‘My sympathies lie more with the governments that are trying to save lives through transplantation of healthy organs that are absolutely of no use to the deceased or their families.’

Anti-pollution groups cover London statues with masks

Deccan Chronicle 18th April 2016

Greenpeace campaigners put pollution face masks on the faces of famous statues in London to draw attention to the problem of air pollution. The article mentions recent research from King’s, which found nearly 10,000 Londoners die prematurely every year as a result of air pollution. Also reported in NDTV and AFP.

A cold-eyed view of allies has left Obama with few overseas friends

Washington Post 18th April 2016

As part of a series of overseas visits, US president Barack Obama visited Saudi Arabia, to be followed by trips to Britain and Germany. Discussing the US-UK relationship, Dr Walter Ladwig III, War Studies, said: ‘When you get under the hood of intelligence networks, for instance, in some respects the British and American operations are inseparable. And that kind of cooperation continues irrespective of whether Barack and Dave are grilling hot dogs together.’ This was also reported by NDTV.

How the World Health Organization's cancer agency confuses consumer

Economic Times of India 18th April 2016

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has come under criticism for its rankings of carcinogenic substances. Professor Richard Sullivan, Cancer Epidemiology & Population Health, said: ‘IARC is purely there to do the science. And the science is absolutely fine. But there is a disjunction between the pure science and the policy and public health messaging.’ This was also reported by Reuters

Practical Focus

Times of India 18th April 2016

Paul Spence, Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities, discussed the topic of digital humanities in higher education. ‘Digital humanities is a transdisciplinary field that looks at how we create and disseminate knowledge in an age where much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology. It provides us with the critical and practical tools to assess and, if appropriate, integrate new innovations into our analytical toolkit.’

Is war with China inevitable?

Telegraph 18th April 2016

War Studies student, Riccardo Cociani, explores the relationship that China has with other countries such as Japan. ‘Since 2010, tensions between China and Japan have risen like dragons to fight against each other. The reason? Territory. The dragons have clashed repeatedly, diplomatically and politically, ever since a Chinese fishing trawler rammed two Japanese coast guard vessels near the disputed islands, known as ‘Diaoyu’ in China, and ‘Senkaku’ in Japan,’ he said.

Will new university admissions procedures boost social mobility?

Guardian 18th April 2016

The article highlights that universities are seeking fairer ways to select students from different socio-economic backgrounds. Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, discusses why GCSE results and AS -levels are important and that it can be a good alternative for students to find out where their strengths and interests lie.

Philosophy: Understanding personal identity with Professor Bill Brewer

Guardian 18th April 2016

On Tuesday 14 June, Professor Bill Brewer, Philosophy, will host an event exploring the topic of personal identity. The seminar will seek to help people gain a fresh perspective of who they are and enable them to have complex philosophical discussions with more confidence.

7 steps to student safety

Independent 18th April 2016

The article discusses how students can stay safe at university. It mentions that King’s advises its students to inform their friends or flatmates when they are going out and where they are going.

Call of duty: The war that made a country

Deccan Chronicle 17th April 2016

Review of India’s War: The Making of Modern South Asia, a new book by Dr Srinath Raghavan, India Institute. Discussing the book, Dr Raghavan said: ‘The most difficult part was to capture the voices and feelings of Indian soldiers. So few letters have survived.’

Slain newsagent 'not real Muslim', claims academic

Sunday Times 17th April 2016

The article mentions comments made by Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), regarding the Islamic sect Ahmadiyya. This was also reported by Express and Daily Mail.

Karen Brady: Why does success spark envy in some when it should inspire us all to better things?

The Sun 17th April 2016

The article mentions a King’s student who had been part of the West Ham Community Programme, and is now studying medicine.

Feminists mock Green Party young women's group for invite to 'non-men'

Independent 17th April 2016

The Green Party has been criticised for use of the term ‘non-men’ on an invitation to an event. PhD researcher, Scarlett Brown, Management, comments: ‘They are emphasising, without even realising it, that we live in a society that defines by not being a man. That's been a big feminist critique for a long time.’

Are we getting too used to seeing thin women?

Guardian 17th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on whether we have become used to seeing underweight women in the media. ‘In the brain, visual detectors often come in pairs, such as clockwise and anticlockwise motion. When one of these receptors is ‘saturated’, our perception can be distorted,’ he said.

Is intelligence hereditary?

Scientific American 15th April 2016

Professor Robert Plomin, IoPPN, discusses the role that genetics plays in intelligence. ‘Researchers are now looking for the genes that contribute to intelligence. In the past few years we have learned that many, perhaps thousands, of genes of small effect are involved,’ he said.

Not one, but thousands of body clocks make us tick. Can we take control of them?

New Scientist 15th April 2016

The article looks at research by Dr Gerda Pot, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, in the field of chrononutrition, and the relationship between our body clock, diet and health. Dr Pot said: ‘Even though it’s individual, I think consuming regular meals is beneficial for everyone.’

Hedge fund boss in £1bn inquiry

Times 15th April 2016

A former King’s alumnus is at the centre of an investigation for an alleged £1 billion tax fraud in Denmark.

Birthday present for the Queen in new poll

Times 15th April 2016

A poll conducted by King’s and Ipsos MORI shows that support for the monarchy is higher than it was two decades ago. The survey reveals that 75 per cent of people think the monarchy plays an important role in Britain, up from 66 per cent at the beginning of the 21st century. This was reported by Telegraph, Times, Independent, Yahoo news, Newsweek, Sina, Globo, Deccan Chronicle, The New Indian Express, Economic Times of India, Folha de S.Paulo and Estadao.

ALS researcher wins Sheila Essey award

CNBC 15th April 2016

The American Academy of Neurology and The ALS Association will be awarding the 2016 Sheila Essey Award to PhD student Ammar Al-Chalabi, IoPPN. The award recognises significant contributions in the search for the causes, prevention and cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This was also reported by Reuters.

The China-Pakistan axis gains momentum and could pull India into a war on two fronts

Daily Mail 15th April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discusses China-Pakistan relations and a new port built in Pakistan, which is part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). ‘The port will process about one million tonnes of cargo next year, most of which will be incoming construction materials to be used in projects related to CPEC,’ he said.

Human trafficking report: Victims reveal devastating impact of abuse with 80 per cent suffering mental health problems

Independent 14th April 2016

The study, led by Dr Siân Oram of the Institute of Psychiatry (IoPPN), found that of 150 people trafficked to the UK from more than 30 different countries, nearly 80 per cent of women and 40 per cent of men reported high levels of depression, anxiety or PTSD. Dr Oram said: "Because of the clear evidence that human trafficking has devastating and long-lasting effects on mental health, there is an urgent need for evidence on the effectiveness of psychological therapies and treatments to support this highly vulnerable population.” Also reported by Daily Mail and Reuters.

King's press release related to 'Human trafficking report: Victims reveal devastating impact of abuse with 80 per cent suffering mental health problems'

How to stay young

BBC 14th April 2016

The programme follows an experiment conducted by Matthew Kempton of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which explores the effects of two different types of exercise (walking and table tennis) on cognitive functioning and wellbeing in elderly adults.

What exactly is going on in Brazil? Take your choice

Newsweek 14th April 2016

Research student Diogo Costa, Political Economy, has written an article on the current political and economic crisis in Brazil. ‘An unpopular government fighting for survival against impeachment. The worst recession in a century. And the largest corruption scandal in its modern democracy,’ he summarised.

High levels of mental illness reported by victims of human trafficking in the UK

King's Press Release 14th April 2016

New research reveals the severe mental health problems experienced by men and women trafficked to the UK for sexual exploitation, domestic servitude and forced labour, including high levels of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr Siân Oram, lead author of the study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: ‘Although it is very difficult to estimate the true scale of human trafficking, we know that it is a huge global problem.’ This was also reported by Independent, Reuters and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'High levels of mental illness reported by victims of human trafficking in the UK '

Want to slim? Get stuck into the chocolate and red wine: Key to weight loss is the bugs in YOUR gut rather than counting calories

Daily Mail 14th April 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that the key to losing weight is to eat cheese, chocolate and drink wine in moderation. ‘Avoid processed foods. They are limited in microbe levels because they are mainly made up of chemicals,’ he said. This was reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Telegraph, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio 2 and Express.

The week in higher education

Times Higher Education Supplement 14th April 2016

Looking at issues faced by Higher Education institutions, the article mentions the attempted rebrand of King’s in 2014.

How LSD helped us probe what the ‘sense of self’ looks like in the brain

The Conversation 14th April 2016

Dr Nicholas Crossley, IoPPN, discusses how a person’s sense of self is expressed in the brain. ‘Our sense of self is something so natural that we are not always fully aware of it. In fact, it is when it is disturbed that it becomes the most noticeable,’ he said.

Top 100 universities 2016 – as rated by students

Telegraph 14th April 2016

King’s has been ranked as one of the top 100 universities in the world in a new league table.

Face of the day

Metro 14th April 2016

The article focuses on British actress and King’s alumna Ayisha Hart, who is currently acting in the police drama Line of Duty on BBC Two.

Books interview: Deirdre N. McCloskey

Times Higher Education 14th April 2016

The distinguished American professor, Deirdre N. McCloskey, revealed that a book by PhD student, Anton Howes, Political Economy, is one of her favourite books to read.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 14th April 2016

Dr Edina Rosta, Chemistry, has received a research grant for her study on energy calculations for biomolecular catalysis of electron transfer.

Pollution ‘has created no-go areas in capital for lung disease sufferers’

London Evening Standard 14th April 2016

Research by King’s argues that Londoners could live at least a month longer if air pollution measures are introduced. The article also interviews a Londoner who receives daily emails on air quality from academics at King’s. This was also reported by LBC Radio and BBC Radio London.

Who are the candidates for next UN secretary-general?

Xinhua 13th April 2016

Article profiling the eight candidates for the position of the next secretary-general of the United Nations. One of the candidates, Natalia Gherman, completed an MA at King’s in the war studies department. This was also reported by People’s Daily.

Get in on the ground at Canada Water

London Evening Standard 13th April 2016

More people are investing in properties in Canada Water. The article mentions that King’s may build a campus in the area.

Songs in the key of Shakespeare

Financial Times 13th April 2016

As part of Shakespeare 400 celebrations, there will be a conference called ‘Shakespeare’s Musical Brain’ at King’s on Saturday 16 April 2016.

Alan Moses launches defence of Ipso in a trenchant and witty lecture

Guardian 13th April 2016

The chairman of the Independent Press Standards Organisation, Sir Alan Moses, spoke at King’s on effective regulation. ‘Effective regulation requires enforceable powers. Enforceable powers require a legally binding contract enforceable in court...an agreement between the regulated and the regulator,’ he said.

London School of Economics graduates are earning more than those from any other UK university

Independent 13th April 2016

According to recent research, graduates from London School of Economics, Imperial College and King’s earn significantly more than other graduates when they go into employment. This was also reported by BBC Online and Sky News. According to recent research, graduates from London School of Economics, Imperial College and King’s earn significantly more than other graduates when they go into employment. This was also reported by BBC Online and Sky News.

'Flaws' on dementia

Sun 12th April 2016

Professor Dag Aarsland of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) highlights two common dementia types that are frequently misdiagnosed, patients with Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's. He calls for more research and a specific strategy to tackle them. Also reported by Yahoo.

How a Japanese pinball maker helped the FBI crack the San Bernardino iPhone

Bloomberg 12th April 2016

The forensics unit of a Japanese pinball company, Cellebrite Mobile Synchronization Ltd, is said to have worked with the FBI to hack an iPhone connected with a terrorist attack in California. Commenting on the company, Dr Richard Overill, Informatics, said: ‘The general opinion is that Cellebrite’s digital forensics products for mobile devices are leading edge state-of-the-art. They have put more effort, experience and expertise into studying the potentially exploitable vulnerabilities in these systems than other companies, and as a result have been able to produce superior products.’

Ways to engage employers amid a corporate crisis

Wall Street Journal 12th April 2016

29.8 per cent of respondents in a recent poll believe that employees may be the most overlooked stakeholder when their organisation is dealing with a crisis. The article mentions a study by King’s, Deloitte UK and Public Health England, which looked at the challenge of how people are able to work when faced with a significant threat during a major crisis.

Want to slim? Get stuck into the chocolate and red wine: Key to weight loss is the bugs in YOUR gut rather than counting calories

Daily Mail 12th April 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that the key to losing weight is to eat cheese, chocolate and drink wine in moderation. ‘Avoid processed foods. They are limited in microbe levels because they are mainly made up of chemicals,’ he said. This was reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Telegraph, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio 2 and Express.

Putting names to your phone numbers

BBC News online 12th April 2016

Dr Nishanth Sastry, Informatics, comments on the privacy issues of a newly developed app called Truecaller, which can tell people who they are receiving a call from if it is an unfamiliar number. ‘If a phone user shares the names and numbers in their contact book with an app, that then relays those details to the world,’ he said.

War crime

BBC Radio 4 Justice Across Borders 12th April 2016

Dr Rachel Kerr, War Studies, discussed the history of the International Criminal Tribunal. ‘It was established by the security council as a measure for the restoration and maintenance of international peace and security,’ she said.

'Flaws' on dementia

The Sun 12th April 2016

Professor Dag Aarsland, IoPPN, highlights two common dementia types that are frequently misdiagnosed: Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's. He calls for more research and a specific strategy to tackle them.

EU referendum

Various media outlets 11th April 2016

A number of King’s academics have been commenting in the run up to the European Union (EU) referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, spoke to BBC Radio 4 The World at One a number of times: about the EU in general; about the EU budget; and about the importance of economic trade. Professor Christoph Meyer, European & International Studies, wrote a piece for the Conversation on media coverage around the vote. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece for the Conversation about the Vote Leave campaign. Comments by Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, about the impact of the recent tax avoidance scandal and steel crisis on David Cameron’s reputation ahead of the referendum were reported by AFP, Yahoo News and New Indian Express.

Genetics breakthrough helps to predict whether breast cancer will spread

London Evening Standard 11th April 2016

Researchers at King’s have found that a family history of cancer could be important to assess whether it is likely to develop into an invasive cancer. Dr Elinor Sawyer, Research Oncology, said: ‘We now hope to carry out a larger study assessing more genetic changes.’

Our obsession with Trident is blinding us to the real nuclear danger

Telegraph 11th April 2016

Senior Research Fellow, Ian Stewart, War Studies, has written a piece about the nuclear dangers facing the UK. ‘The risk that terrorists might seek to acquire nuclear materials cannot be discounted. Acquiring materials that could be used in nuclear weapons would be catastrophic,’ he said.

Eastern Ukraine

Al Jazeera 10th April 2016

The Ukrainian Prime Minister announced this week that he will be resigning. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, said: ‘I think this resignation is symptomatic of many of the problems that Ukraine is facing. I think that part of the problem is that he’s not being able to move ahead with the reforms as fast as people had expected to.’

Why drink driving is so dangerous

Guardian 10th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on the dangers of drink driving. ‘Alcohol is a depressant which slows down the reactions of cells in the brain. It affects a whole slew of neurochemical pathways, but some of the first neurons to be affected control judgment,’ he said.

Wake up to campus jihadists

Times 10th April 2016

The article discusses extremism at universities and mentions former King’s student, Suhaib Majeed, who was found guilty of offences under the Terrorism Act.

Why cultural institutions should accept oil money

Financial Times 10th April 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece on whether oil companies should fund cultural institutes. ‘In my view, business sponsorship of the arts, culture and academic work is a good thing and I am proud that when I worked for John Browne — when he was both chief executive of BP and a trustee of the museum — I helped in a small way to build the link between the two institutions,’ he said.

Week ahead

Financial Times 10th April 2016

The Financial Times, Centre for European Reform and King’s are hosting a high-profile conference on the refugee crisis and EU referendum. The FT Future of Europe Summit will debate Europe’s choices in the face of challenges.

The rites and wrongs of spring

Guardian 10th April 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, discusses why spring is the most polluted time of the year in the UK. ‘Traffic in our cities is much the same each week, but in the countryside, spring is very different to autumn. Crops are planted, fields are fertilised, farm animals are let out of their barns and their manure, stored over the winter, is spread on the land,’ he said.

Incompetent bosses wrecking NHS, says trouble-shooter

Times 9th April 2016

Dame Julie Moore, a senior figure in the NHS, has discussed why she believes the NHS to be failing. A comment from Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health) is included in the article. ‘We have an unsustainable healthcare system and just doing more of the same is not going to deliver solutions,’ he said.

It’s in their genes

Deccan Herald 8th April 2016

Researchers at the German Research Centre for Environmental Health have provided evidence that the health effects of a bad diet can carry over to offspring. Commenting on the study, Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: ‘Their design means that previous possible confounders like maternal bonding, feeding and the microbiome are ruled out.’

Vaginal seeding: Could this birthing trend protect your baby from disease?

Telegraph 8th April 2016

A new book highlights a new technique in which mothers use swabs to help their babies come into contact with essential bacteria. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments: ‘Babies are born with no microbes. The first seeds that colonise the gut with bacteria are important because they set the scene for those that follow.’

Kevin Patrick Dawes: Missing American photographer released by Syrian authorities 'after three years of torture'

Independent 8th April 2016

American photographer Kevin Dawes who was held hostage in Syria for three years has been released by Syrian authorities. Visiting Research Associate, Eliot Higgins, War Studies, said: ‘I really hope he gets the serious mental health help he needs, especially after two years in an Assad torture site.’

NHS to recruit Indian doctors to plug gaps in GP services

Telegraph 7th April 2016

Health Education England (HEE) has signed a contract with Apollo Hospitals in India to recruit more Indian doctors in the NHS. The article also highlights that in a separate study conducted by King’s, patients showed a high level of dissatisfaction when treated in hospitals with high numbers of foreign nurses and doctors.

Looking beyond the labels

Times Higher Education 7th April 2016

A study published by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education highlights the role ‘prestige’ plays in higher education. Professor Paul Blackmore, Policy Institute, said: ‘What happens when the demand for global players in the world knowledge economy meets the need to support access for white working-class boys and the reduction of drop-out rates for black students?’

Mike Hulme: New Head of Geography

Times Higher Education 7th April 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, has been appointed Head of Geography at King’s.

Despite crackdown, Chinese news outlet looks for more readers abroad

International New York Times 6th April 2016

The Paper, a publication overseen by the Chinese Communist Party, has prospered at a time when China’s leaders are increasingly restricting the media on what it can say about China’s environmental and economic problems. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘There’s this very modern infrastructure, all these apps and very modernised packages that they’re disseminating, and it’s like a beautiful house where the electrical wiring is missing.’

Combat stress report

BBC News 24 6th April 2016

The Victoria Derbyshire programme explores post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in British military veterans, and speaks to Professor Neil Greenberg, former MoD psychiatry specialist and expert in PTSD at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

The shortage of robust research into mental health issues could be addressed by nurses contributing their unique views

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

Professor Dame Til Wykes, IoPPN, encourages more nurses to consider a career in mental health research. ‘It is important that nurses are involved because they have a different view of the kind of research that needs to be carried out,’ she said.

Combat stress report

BBC Victoria Derbyshire Show 6th April 2016

Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, discusses post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in British military veterans.

Focus on research

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

Professor Ruth Harris, Nursing, comments on the importance of funding for researchers. ‘You have to understand that one can only fund so many applications that come in. You have to keep on trying,’ she said.

Warwick business students give London learners a run for their money at SWIFT's Institute Challenge

City AM 6th April 2016

Students from King’s took part in the SWIFT Institute Challenge, a competition open for students who are interested in banking. Winners of the challenge will win £15,000 and will be announced at an event later this month.

Two UK schools of nursing are world-beaters

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

King’s Nursing has been named by QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016 as the best institution at which to study the subject. Professor Ian Norman, Executive Dean of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, said: ‘This achievement recognises the major contribution of the faculty to the research base of nursing and midwifery, and the high quality of education and career preparation.’ This was also reported by Nursing Times.

A desperate search for the jihadi profile

Financial Times 6th April 2016

A study by the ICSR found that around 70 per cent of people who joined the Islamic State (IS) had real-world connections to Salafis -proponents of an ultra-conservative form of Sunni Islam - and were not radicalised online.

Maths, a Merc and the import-export business

Financial Times 6th April 2016

Professor Michael Singer, Law, has written a piece about his career as a lawyer and now law Professor. ‘Many years ago, before I trained as a lawyer and became a law professor, I was a mathematics professor,’ he said.

Chemist who enhanced understanding of the properties of molecules

Guardian 6th April 2016

The article focuses on the work of Chemist Professor John Murrell whose research focused on methods to understand the wavelengths of molecules. Professor Murrell started his research at King’s.

Muslim women much less likely to be employed than non-Muslim women with same qualifications, research suggests

Independent 6th April 2016

Research by Dr Shereen Hussein, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, suggests that Muslim women are less likely to be employed compared to non-Muslim women even if they have the same qualifications. The study found out that the unemployment rate for Muslim women is between 5.9 per cent and 27 per cent depending on the woman’s ethnic background in contrast to white non-Muslim which is 3.5 per cent.

Why do many of us develop a fear of heights as we age?

Daily Mail 5th April 2016

Kevin Gournay, emeritus professor at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and author of The Sheldon Short Guide To Phobias And Panic discusses acrophobia - a fear of heights. He notes that it often develops in later life, which is largely due to our sense of balance. 'As you get older, your organ of balance tends to deteriorate and you're likely to feel more physically vulnerable.' Older adults also tend to have people who depend on them, and this can make them more troubled by the possibility of falling.

The jab that could end the misery of migraines: New 'holy grail' drug slashes the number of attacks by up to 75%

Daily Mail 5th April 2016

Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on a new drug to treat migraines. The drug tackles a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which triggers pain and nausea by causing the swelling of blood vessels intertwined with nerve endings on both sides of the head. Researchers have found that monoclonal blood proteins – antibodies specifically engineered to bind to CGRP – were able to ‘mop up’ the chemical, meaning it did not trigger a migraine. Professor Peter Goadsby says: ‘This is a huge development for migraine sufferers. There is no current specific treatment that has been developed for migraine.'

Can electric shocks really make you fitter?

BBC News 5th April 2016

The article investigates whether wearing a padded suit with electrodes can stimulate muscles during exercise. The article highlights that Professor James Timmons, Medical & Molecular Genetics, took part in the BBC show The about truth about exercise, which focused on high intensity interval training (HIIT) and its impact.

Menopause

BBC Radio 4 5th April 2016

Dr Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, discusses menopause in women and why it is a natural process requiring minimum intervention. ‘Why are scientists, mainly male scientists, trying to cure us from being women? I think the menopause is a natural life event just like adolescence,’ she said.

Wellcome Image Awards 2016 winners

Huffington Post UK 5th April 2016

Among the two winning pictures from King’s in the Wellcome Image Awards is one of a human stem cell by Dr Sílvia A Ferreira, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, Cristina Lopo and Dr Eileen Gentleman, Dental Institute.

Night of Errors

BBC Online Shakespeare on tour 5th April 2016

Dr Hannah Crawforth, English, comments on Shakespeare’s acting company which performed plays including the ‘Night of Errors’. ‘Shakespeare and his company were invited to perform their play at the Gray’s Inn Hall on numerous occasions, particularly during the annual Christmas festivities. It was a prestigious gig for Shakespeare and his company and a lucrative thing for them to do,’ she said.

Welsh rugby player Joseph Phelps banned for four years for steroid use

BBC News 5th April 2016

Welsh Rugby player Joseph Phelps has been banned from playing rugby after testing positive for steroids. A report by Professor David Cowan, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, used at the tribunal suggests that ‘the human body does not naturally produce nandrolone in measurable quantities and that nandrolone is a drug administered via deep intra-muscular injection.

Stem cell injections could be used to mend broken bones and bad backs

Sun 5th April 2016

New research suggests that stem cells injections could be used to heal bones, cartilage and muscle. Commenting on the study, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘Only time and more effort would show whether we could apply a similar strategy in humans.’ This was also reported by Telegraph.

Manifesto causes rift between Brazilian experts

Folha (Brazil) 4th April 2016

A manifesto that suggests Brazilian democracy is threatened by the current political crisis has generated a rift between experts. Commenting on the manifesto, which was presented at the conference of the Brazilian Studies Association, Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, said: ‘It is interesting that the same conflicts that divide Brazil now also divide the community of researchers studying Brazil.’

Tissue-damaging fungal toxin discovered in pioneering study

Bloomberg 4th April 2016

Scientists have discovered a toxin in the fungus Candida albicans, which plays a crucial role during human mucosal infection. The article mentions that the discovery started from a research group at King’s, who were looking at how human oral cells respond to fungal infections.

Is food the cure for food allergy?

CNN 4th April 2016

Recent studies by researchers at King’s looked at how to prevent food allergies in young children. Professor Gideon Lack, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, said: ‘For decades we have been focusing on avoidance and that didn’t seem to work. Active avoidance of food allergens in baby's diets did not protect them from developing food allergies, and may even have contributed to the large increase we've seen.’

Meningitis

The Sun 4th April 2016

A new study reveals that people who regularly take antibiotics are more likely to suffer from meningitis. Professor David Armstrong, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘A strong association was observed between meningitis and antimicrobial prescribing in the previous year.’ This was also reported by Times.

Doctors and nurses do not need more stress

Guardian 4th April 2016

Professor Jill Maben, Nursing, has contributed to a piece which states that budget cuts in the health sector will not only put patients at risk but also nurses and doctors. ‘Acknowledging that many health professionals have been engaged in political action already, we propose “Action Nursing” which should encourage the wider body of nurses, and their health colleagues, into organised, confident civic and political action on their own working lives and the lives of the people they work with and for,’ she said.

Revealed: From ping pong to taking your dog to work, these are the weirdest and wackiest ways to stay young

Daily Mail 4th April 2016

The BBC show How to stay young suggests that playing ping pong regularly can improve co-ordination, muscle strength and can make your brain grow. In the TV show Dr Matthew Kempton, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), performs brain scans to evaluate the impact playing ping pong has on the brain.

Why did European intelligence agencies fail to stop the Brussels attacks?

New Statesman 4th April 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), has written an article on security in Europe after the Brussels attacks. ‘In the UK, intelligence officers have long grumbled about the incompetence of their Belgian counterparts, complaining about a lack of sophistication to their tradecraft and approach,’ he said.

Security breaches uncovered at European bases storing US nuclear warheads

Express 4th April 2016

Dr Robert Downes, War Studies, discusses security breaches at a number of airbases where nuclear weapons are stored. ‘It is fair to say that if environmental activists could gain access to the area of the site where nuclear weapons were being stored then security was indeed compromised at that time despite protestations from the Belgian military,’ he said. Dr Downes also wrote on this topic for The Conversation.

How we see words

Guardian 3rd April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, discusses how we read signs. ‘When we read, the eyes don’t focus on individual letters in turn - this would take far too long. Instead we learn to recognise the general shape of words, or familiar phrases, allowing us to speed through texts and understand church signs at a glance,’ he said.

Ericsson's Hans Vestberg: The clean-cut Swede with a need for mobile speed

Telegraph 3rd April 2016

CEO of Sony Ericsson, Hans Vestberg, argues that in the next 10 years we are more likely to have chips in our body which will connect to our homes and mobile phone. The article also mentions the possibility of Ericsson working in partnership with King’s to develop a surgical glove for keyhole operations.

British Museum must sever its links with BP

Guardian 3rd April 2016

Dr Kate McMillan, Culture, Media and Creative Industries, along with various academics and celebrities, has written a letter to the British Museum asking that it does not renew its sponsorship contract with BP.

Book review: From Aryabhata to Vivekananda

Indian Express 2nd April 2016

The article reviews a recent book written by Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute: Incarnations: India in 50 Lives. The reviewer said: ‘Khilnani, rather admirably, is able to do justice to his subjects in comparatively short but crisp essays.’

Russia vs the West: The information war over Palmyra

Al Jazeera 2nd April 2016

Media coverage of the Syrian conflict differs between the West and Russia. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘Russian media does tend to get better access from the Assad regime to some of the frontline, and that allows them to show sides of the conflict that others aren’t able to.’

Universities 'fail to ban radicals': 27 lectures featuring guests with extremist views take place in London in just five months

Daily Mail 2nd April 2016

The article reports that universities are failing to combat extremism on campus. It mentioned a recent speaker at King’s. This was also reported by Express.

Researchers build software that can predict your lifespan

CNN 1st April 2016

Researchers from the University of East Anglia have started creating a piece of software that will be able to predict a person’s lifespan. Commenting on the vast amounts of information required for the project, known as Big Data, Dr Richard Siow, Cardiovascular, said: ‘Big Data is great…to try and get an overall trend. But to apply Big Data to an individual is unrealistic…you may get overgeneralisations.’

Where the vocabulary of autism is failing

The Atlantic 1st April 2016

Often, labels used to describe children with autism: low-functioning or high-functioning, can be misleading. Professor Tony Charman, IoPPN, said: ‘Parents often ask around the time of diagnosis, ‘where on the spectrum is my child; is he at the high or low end?’

Europe’s growing challenge

Deccan Herald 1st April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece about the growing challenge of terrorism in Europe. ‘The carnage and the chaos have exposed Belgium as the hub of Islamist extremism in Europe, and have raised troubling questions over the competence of the country’s police and intelligence services,’ he said.

Discovery, settlement or invasion? The power of language in historical narratives

The Conversation 1st April 2016

Dr Peter Kilroy, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, has written a piece in reaction to the backlash against guidelines written by University of New South Wales on appropriate terminology. ‘Language matters, and emphasising a change of terminology – or, more importantly, emphasising that there is more than one position and term – demonstrates how much language is implicated in structures of power,’ he said.

Kinba the robot lands job on reception at King's College

Independent 1st April 2016

Kinba, a new robot receptionist for the Strand Campus was unveiled last week. Dr Matthew Howard, Informatics, who is leading the project with Dr Hongbin Liu, also Informatics, said: ‘This gives us a unique platform where a robot can interact with ordinary people. We can find out what things make them comfortable and uncomfortable and – with a human receptionist sitting by – will they always choose the human over the robot?’ Also reported by Gulf Today.

Thames cruise ships will push pollution levels over EU limits, say campaigners

Newsweek 31st March 2016

Campaigners have warned that cruise ships planned for the River Thames will make air pollution in London so high it will exceed the EU’s legal limits on deadly emissions. Research from King’s is mentioned, which stated that approximately 10,000 deaths a year are attributed to air pollution in London.

Here’s what led to the Lahore terrorist bombing — and what to do next

Washington Post 31st March 2016

Dr Adnan Naseemullah, India Institute, discusses the recent terror bombings in Lahore, Pakistan. ‘Sunday’s attack reveals the sectarian, religious and, above all, class fractures that led members of one of Pakistan’s most marginal groups to be targeted so viciously and effectively,’ he said.

Modern humanities teaching: Brought on by the chicken or the egg?

Times Higher Education 31st March 2016

Dr Lucy Munro, English, discusses changes to degree courses, and if these shifts are a reflection of motivations in our society. ‘We do still teach the big canonical texts, but alongside that we’ve become interested in how they relate to alternative voices,’ she said.

A disarming approach

Economist 31st March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, discusses three requirements in the process of deradicalisation, or prevention of radicalisation. ‘He must already have inner doubts; trusted people, whether imams, friends or relatives, must be involved; and he must be offered an alternative peer group. He may also be more concerned with personal problems or geopolitical grievances than matters of theology,’ he said.

Imagine if Google or Facebook took a line on the EU referendum

The Conversation 31st March 2016

Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, has written a piece on the impact Google, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter would have if they had a stance on the EU referendum. ‘But tech giants are not neutral, nor are they simply conduits. My new study suggests they are increasingly taking on civic roles, raising questions about their societal responsibilities – responsibilities beyond those to their customers or shareholders,’ he said.

Engineers are telling the truth about Hinkley Point

Financial Times 30th March 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece about the nuclear project Hinkley Point. ‘Hinkley has never had the support of a majority of the EDF board. The difference now is that the doubts are out in public and can hardly be dismissed as coming from anti-nuclear campaigners or people hostile to all things French,’ he said.’

Is Belgium’s nuclear security up to scratch?

The Conversation 30th March 2016

Robert Downes, War Studies, and Daniel Salisbury, War Studies, have written a piece on whether Belgium’s counter-terrorism efforts are good enough. ‘The US repeatedly has voiced concerns about Belgium’s nuclear security arrangements since 2003. That year, Nizar Trabelsi, a Tunisian national and former professional footballer, planned to bomb the Belgian Kleine-Brogel airbase under the aegis of Al-Qaeda,’ they said.

East Africa’s used-clothes trade comes under fire

The Economist 30th March 2016

By 2019, governments of the East African Community want to outlaw imports of second-hand clothes. The hope is that this will help boost local manufacturing. Dr Andrew Brooks, Geography, argues that it would not be implausible for better jobs to be created in a new textile industry.

Anonymous call for Xi to quit rattles party leaders in China

New York Times 29th March 2016

An anonymous letter calling on President Xi Jinping to resign appeared briefly on Chinese news and social media websites, before being removed by censors. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘The response has shown how jittery they are.’ Also reported in Economic Times of India

Universities vie for the metric that cannot be measured: Prestige

Guardian 29th March 2016

The article focuses on how universities set about building prestige and mentions a research report about higher education, that will be published on Tuesday 5 April after a seminar at King’s.

1594 Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors turns into ‘A Night of Errors’

BBC London 29th March 2016

Dr Hannah Crawforth, English, discusses the importance of the Inner Temple Hall as a 'club' and then about the tradition of seeing plays at Christmas, particularly Shakespeare.

Terror networks crisscrossing Europe shock officials

Foreign Policy 28th March 2016

Security services in Europe continue in their efforts to expose the complex web of Islamic State networks. Research by Professor Thomas Rid and Daniel Moore, War Studies, is mentioned, which looked at possible links between the terrorist network and the ‘dark web’.

Controversial religious comments

NPR 28th March 2016

Dr Marat Shterin, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on the controversial comments made by Viktor Krasnov who claims that the Bible is a ‘collection of Jewish fairy tales’. This case is very random and does not happen very often in Russia but this didn’t come out of anywhere. It is as a result of the cold relationship between the leader of the Russian orthodox church and the state,’ he said.

Scientists should not take sides in political debates

Financial Times 28th March 2016

Professor Robert Picciotto, Political Economy, has written a piece on why scientists should not get involved in political debates. ‘In order to remain rigorous and objective the scientific endeavor should be shielded from politics. Nor are value-free scientists best placed to interpret evidence for use by policymakers,’ he said.

Defence groups take aim at cyber security

Financial Times 28th March 2016

The article focuses on growing cyber-attacks on corporate companies including BAE Systems. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: ‘They have a proven record in being able to handle confidential information. The trust advantage they get is higher than other companies.’

Could pills for heartburn give you kidney problems?

Daily Mail 28th March 2016

New research suggests that taking heartburn pills can have negative health effects. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘These microbes have a much more important role in human health than previously thought.’

Archbishop warns of campus anti-Semites

Sunday Times 27th March 2016

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has voiced his concern on the increase of anti-Semitism on British campuses. The article mentions incidents at King’s, Oxford, and Cambridge University.

Diesel fumes poison babies in the womb

Sunday Times 27th March 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on research which claims that diesel fumes damage the brains of inner-city children. ‘The ever-accumulating evidence that so many components of air pollution contribute to a diverse set of diseases confirms the urgent need to manage air quality,’ he said.

EU-India summit to give ‘political impetus’ to stalled FTA talks

Hindustan Times 27th March 2016

A key deliverable of the 13th EU-India summit is the resumption of stalled talks on Bilateral Trade and Investment Agreement (BTIA). Commenting on the talks, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘There are too many outstanding issues to allow for a full deal to be struck. Whilst the EU is in favour of a comprehensive agreement, New Delhi prefers signing even an imperfect accord and amending it as relations progress.’

A new king of weather: Tracking protest movements

The Economist 26th March 2016

Academics in the ICSR are carrying out research to find out if British IS followers who left for Syria use social media differently from those who stayed at home. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, discussed the project, which recorded, analyses and categorises social media conversations by followers of Islamic State. ‘If we can find patterns, we can perhaps predict when somebody is about to go,’ he said.

Disgrace: Fury as work-shy MPs skip debate about veterans' care to slope off on holiday

Express 26th March 2016

MPs have been criticised for missing a crucial debate about long-term care for wounded veterans. The article mentions a study by King’s which showed that that there are 83,000 veterans still suffering from physical or mental injuries in the last 25 years.

A new kind of weather

The Economist 26th March 2016

The article focuses on social media posts by active followers of the Islamic State (IS). Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘It took months to classify each of the 50,000-odd messages and posts under headings such as “yearning for the afterlife”, “religiosity” and “desire to migrate”. If we can find patterns, we can perhaps predict when somebody is about to go.’

Why is it so hard to quit smoking?

Guardian 26th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about why people find it difficult to stop smoking. ‘Over time, smokers adapt to the presence of nicotine and develop a tolerance, leading to cravings,’ he said.

What do Islamist extremists believe? Salafi-Jihadism by Shiraz Maher and Crusade and Jihad by Malcolm Lambert – review

Guardian 26th March 2016

The article reviews a book written by Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR: Salafi – Jihadism: The History of an Idea. The reviewer describes the book as ‘fascinating.’

The Bard, fact or fiction: That is the question

Times 26th March 2016

The article highlights a number of events happening to mark 400 since Shakespeare’s death, and mentions ‘Shakespeare and the Law’ moot competition organised by the Dickson Poon School of Law and the English department.

Prairie style: Queens of the wild frontier

Telegraph 26th March 2016

Dr Janet Floyd, English, discussed the meaning behind the term pioneer woman. ‘The pioneer woman is a real cultural icon in America. All kinds of feminist arguments have focused on her. She doesn’t just sit around doing bloody embroidery all day. She gets out there and has a physical life,’ she said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 25th March 2016

Dr Martin Navias, War Studies, discussed terrorists gaining access to nuclear facilities. ‘Terrorists for years have made efforts to acquire radiological items. What they want to do with this is to set up a radiological dispersal,’ he said.

Fuelling terror: How extremists are made

Scientific American 25th March 2016

The psychology of group dynamic could explain what drives people towards radicalisation. Commenting on the actions by terror group ISIS, Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘ISIS actively seeks to incite Western countries to react in ways that make it harder for Muslims to feel that they belong in those communities.’

Zapping the brain with magnets may ease anorexia

Daily Mail 24th March 2016

Core symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including the urge to restrict food intake and feeling fat, are reduced after just one session of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, according to King’s College London research published today in PLOS ONE. Dr Jessica McClelland said: 'We found that one session of rTMS reduced the urge to restrict food intake, levels of feeling full and levels of feeling fat, as well as encouraging more prudent decision-making. Taken together, these findings suggest that brain stimulation may reduce symptoms of anorexia by improving cognitive control over compulsive features of the disorder.’ Also reported by the Conversation, Independent, Yahoo News, Deccan Chronicle and U.S. News & World Report.

King's press release related to 'Zapping the brain with magnets may ease anorexia'

Increased vitamin C in the diet could help protect against cataracts

King's Press Release 24th March 2016

In a study led by King’s, higher dietary intake of vitamin C has been found to have a potentially preventative effect on cataract progression, in the first twin study of cataracts to examine to what degree genetic and environmental factors influence their progression with age. This was reported by Metro, Telegraph, Express, Sun and CNBC.

King's press release related to 'Increased vitamin C in the diet could help protect against cataracts'

King’s College London: Reaching out to the cultural sector

Times Higher Education 24th March 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), spoke to the Times Higher Education magazine about her role at King’s, and the Cultural Institute. Discussing institutions King’s has worked with, she said: ‘They are more 21st Century, more fleet of foot and, perhaps, project based.’

Distance learning bridges gap

Independent 24th March 2016

The delivery of postgraduate degrees has been significantly impacted by digital technology, online content and distance learning. A recent partnership between King’s and Pearson Online Learning is mentioned, where a range of online Masters degrees have been launched intended to provide more flexible study options.

Two students guilty of London shooting plot

Guardian 24th March 2016

A former King’s student has been convicted of planning a terror attack in London. This was also reported in the Metro, Evening Standard, BBC News, Yahoo UK, ITV, Press Association, Times, Sun, Mirror, Independent, Daily Mail, Newsweek and Xinhua.

Aurora Leigh

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time 24th March 2016

Professor Karen O’Brien, English and Vice Principal (Education), discusses Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s epic ‘Aurora Leigh’, published in 1856. The poem was celebrated by other poets and was Browning's most commercially successful. Professor O’Brien said: ‘Aurora Leigh is an extraordinary compendium of cultural and textual references. It draws on a huge range of ancient biblical and modern literature.'

Geography in the World

Times Higher Education 24th March 2016

Professor Nick Clifford, Geography, has written a piece on the importance of geography in society and higher education. ‘The ultimate fate of geography over the next decade may rest on it having the confidence and the means to take ownership of some of the big issues of the day,’ he said.

Bank refunding

Sky News 24th March 2016

The decision by banks to refund cyber-crime victims has recently come under debate. Commenting on the topic, Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, said: ‘The police are fighting a crime which has become a worldwide issue…The question is: Who has it the easiest to track these criminals?’

Radovan Karadzic

Sky News 24th March 2016

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, discussed the news that former Bosnia Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has been sentenced to 40 years in jail. ‘I think this is very significant as it will not only help the victims but will also serve as a process of cleansing,’ she said.

Antioxidants that your body needs - and the 'myth' of supplements

Globo 24th March 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, is mentioned in an article discussing the value of antioxidants. The article questions the effect that antioxidants can have on prevent disease, and also the ‘myth’ of supplements.

New Zealand flag

BBC World Service 24th March 2016

New Zealand has voted to keep its original flag, with results showing 56.6% of voters wanted to keep the Union flag-centred emblem. Professor Carl Bridge, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, said: ‘I think the New Zealanders and the Australians have had unique identities for a long time.’

Cannabis smokers end up in worse jobs and have less money than average, study finds

Mirror 23rd March 2016

Professor Avshalom Capsi of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on a report that links cannabis use to economic and social problems in middle age. He notes from his own research: "These findings did not arise because cannabis users were prosecuted and had a criminal record. Even among cannabis users who were never convicted for a cannabis offence, we found that persistent and regular cannabis use was linked to economic and social problems."

Brussels attacks

BBC Newsnight + others 23rd March 2016

Following tragic events in Brussels this week, various academics from departments across King's have commented for a wide range of global media. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) appeared on BBC 2 Newsnight, CNN, National Public Radio and BBC Radio 4 Today. Dr Shiraz Maher, also ICSR, has commented widely for BBC Radio 4 , Hindustan Times, New Statesman and Daily Mail among others. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commented on security issues relating to the attacks for Daily Mail, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sky News and ITV. Professor Andrew MacLeod, Policy Institute, wrote a piece for Independent; Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, was also mentioned in Independent.

The future of Europe after the Brussels attacks

Al Jazeera 23rd March 2016

Dr Emmanuel Karagiannis, Defence Studies, discussed the future of Europe following terror attacks in Brussels. ‘It may be too early to draw conclusions about how the Brussels attacks were organised by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), but it is more than obvious that they were highly coordinated,’ he said.

Cannabis smokers end up in worse jobs and have less money than average, study finds

Mirror 23rd March 2016

Professor Avshalom Capsi, IoPPN, comments on a report that links cannabis use to economic and social problems in middle age. He notes from his own research: ‘These findings did not arise because cannabis users were prosecuted and had a criminal record. Even among cannabis users who were never convicted for a cannabis offence, we found that persistent and regular cannabis use was linked to economic and social problems.’

Palmyra and the logic of loss

BBC News 23rd March 2016

Dr David R Roberts, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the destruction of historical sites as a result of conflict in the Middle East. ‘Sites can act as potent symbols of a united past that may cross ethnic, tribal, linguistic, or cultural lines. In essence, their importance can be seen and used as a low common denominator to promote reconciliation in a post-conflict environment,’ he said.

‘Londoners would live a month longer with cleaner air’

Evening Standard 23rd March 2016

A study by King’s and the think tank Policy Exchange has called for more to be done in the way of air ‘pollution-busting measures’. These include ‘Clean Bus Corridors’ for Oxford Street, Brixton Road and Knightsbridge.

A quandary for Europe: Fighting a war on ISIS within its borders

New York Times 23rd March 2016

Commenting on the rise of radicalisation in Europe, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘There are parts of Europe, especially in France and Belgium, where over the past two decades you’ve seen the emergence of essentially ungoverned spaces, nearly akin to Yemen or Libya.’

Brussels attacks

Various media outlets 22nd March 2016

Following tragic events in Brussels this week, various academics from departments across King's have commented for a wide range of global media. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) appeared on BBC 2 Newsnight, CNN, National Public Radio and BBC Radio 4 Today. Dr Shiraz Maher, also ICSR, has commented widely for BBC Radio 4 , Hindustan Times, New Statesman and Daily Mail among others. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commented on security issues relating to the attacks for Daily Mail, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sky News and ITV. Professor Andrew MacLeod, Policy Institute, wrote a piece for Independent; Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, was also mentioned in Independent.

UK universities top for maths and English in world rankings by subject

Guardian 22nd March 2016

King’s has come fourth in dentistry, pharmacy and pharmacology in a recent international league table for Mathematics and English.

Andrew Adonis on the evolution of Blairism Independent

Independent 22nd March 2016

Lord Adonis gave a talk to students at King’s about his political career with the Labour Party. Discussing the talk, Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, said: ‘It was a fascinating dissection of radicalism versus caution and a fitting way to bring the course to an end.’

Why giving up bread is half baked: Many shun bread in the belief it makes you fat and bloated. But experts insist it's a health food that’s wrongly demonised

Daily Mail 22nd March 2016

Research has found whilst sales of white bread have fallen, sales of artisan loaves such as sourdough have increased. The article mentions research by King’s which found that slow-fermented bread produced ‘significantly lower cumulative gas.’

Brussels attack

CNN 22nd March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, commented following the terror attacks in Brussels. ‘I don’t think that the Belgium authorities are incompetent…I think for a number of years they have been overwhelmed.’

Report highlights loneliness and lack of social integration amongst young people

King's Press Release 21st March 2016

A new report into social intelligence by King’s and National Citizen Service (NCS) identifies a gap in young people’s ability to interact with people from different backgrounds. Dr Jennifer Lau, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘It is surprising to see that online interaction is positively linked to a young person’s social intelligence levels.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail, Guardian, Scottish Daily Mail, Independent, LBC Radio, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sunday Times and the Sun.

Too good to be forgotten - why institutional memory matters

BBC News 21st March 2016

Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, and a team at King’s have started working with the government to conduct a unique study of the Treasury under Alistair Darling. This was also reported by BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 5 Live.

Could eating nuts and vegetable oil help slow progress of type 2 diabetes?

Express 21st March 2016

A new study by King’s shows that replacing saturated fat with the polyunsaturated fat may slow the progression of diabetes, in those with pre-diabetes. Dr Nicola Guess, Nutrition, said: ‘The findings suggest that increasing dietary intake of polyunsaturated fats may have a beneficial effect for patients with a certain type of pre-diabetes.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Scots seek to join university tables

Times 21st March 2016

King’s, along with other London universities including University College London, has received a low student satisfaction rate in a recent analysis by The Times/ Sunday Times.

Isis claims dozens of Iraqi troops killed by British suicide bomber

Guardian 21st March 2016

Research by King’s shows that over 50 British people have died fighting for militant groups in Iraq and Syria in the past three years. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, commented that the total number of British fighters killed so far is 62. This was also reported by Times and Daily Mail.

Wanted: More universities to sponsor free schools in England

Guardian 21st March 2016

The government wants to open 500 new schools by 2020, and has urged universities to help build the new institutions. The article mentions successful specialist schools such as the King’s Mathematics school.

Lonely teenagers 'too scared to answer the door'

Sunday Times 20th March 2016

A report led by Jennifer Lau at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) indicates that teenager loneliness means that they are not developing the social skills needed for the workplace. She says: 'Loneliness in teenagers is an issue because they are starting out towards independence. It affects how much you interact with and it is associated with anxiety and depression.... There can be lifelong repercussions. Social skills are crucial in the workplace.' Also reported by Independent, Guardian, Mirror and Yahoo.

King's press release related to 'Lonely teenagers 'too scared to answer the door''

New private universities risk a ‘catastrophe’

Guardian 20th March 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, comments on government plans to expand opportunities for private providers to become universities. ‘Sweeping general legislation might make it easier to set up a really small, innovative, educationally wonderful institution, but it’s much more likely to mean we end up with the American-style catastrophe,’ she said.

The benefits of distraction

Guardian 20th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why distractions can be beneficial. ‘Research shows that being distracted can improve creativity, memory and, paradoxically, focus. This is because when you concentrate, your brain ignores all irrelevant stimuli to narrow its attention,’ he said.

India’s genuine concerns

Deccan Herald 19th March 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed the recent sale of eight fighter jets to Pakistan by the USA. ‘India’s reaction was strong. It disagreed with the US stand that this sale would help in the fight against terrorism and instead has argued that it would be used against India,’ he said. This was also reported in Telegraph of India.

Towards the decisive fight

Estadao 19th March 2016

Brazilian Supreme Court Justice Rosa Weber upheld a decision barring former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva from taking a ministry post. Commenting on the current political situation, Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, said: ‘It’s a showdown.’

Terrorist captured

BBC Radio 5 Up All Night, 19th March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, comments on the arrest of Salah Abdul Salam by Belgian authorities. ‘His brother died in the attacks and one of his school friends was the mastermind of the attacks,’ he said.

People with autism die 16 years earlier than expected, study finds

Telegraph 18th March 2016

Professor Patrick Bolton, who is head of Autism and Related Disorders (ARD) at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that links autism with early death. One cause of this is that 40% of those with autism have epilepsy. He notes the reasons for this could be that people with autism are predisposed to getting it or it may be a side effect of their medication, but says more research is needed to understand why.

Molecule found that helps the spinal cord heal

Independent 18th March 2016

Professor Elizabeth Bradbury of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has co-led research with Oxford University uncovering a molecule that could potentially restore movement and sensation to people paralysed with spinal injuries. Professor Bradbury said: 'Existing treatments are largely ineffective, so there is a pressing need for new regenerative therapies to repair tissue damage and restore function after spinal cord injury. These new findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which may orchestrate the body's remarkable capacity for natural repair. By enhancing this spontaneous response, we may be able to significantly improve spinal cord function after injury.' Also reported in Sun, Metro and Yahoo.

King's press release related to 'Molecule found that helps the spinal cord heal'

American IS fighter: I made a bad decision

Deccan Chronicle 18th March 2016

The article mentions a report by the ICSR which showed that there are 3,300 western Europeans and Americans fighting with the Islamic State. This was also reported by India Today and ABC News

The Club

BBC World TV Impact Asia 18th March 2016

A new film will be released about four ex-priests who are trying to purge their sins. Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology & Religious Studies, commented on the film. ‘I think one of the things that is so interesting about the film, is that the expressed intent is to try to understand but without imposing any type of moral judgement.’

Excitement grows as Large Hadron Collider hints at new particle

Guardian 18th March 2016

Professor John Ellis, Physics, comments on brief flashes of light found in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ‘I would love for it to persist, but I’ve seen so many effects come and go that I have to say in my heart of hearts I’m not very optimistic,’ he said. This was also reported by Globo and BBC Mundo.

Dina Asher-Smith can take Britain to new heights, says Asha Philip

Telegraph 18th March 2016

Athletic sprinter Asha Phillip, has praised the success of King’s undergraduate History student and athlete Dina Asher-Smith. Asha Philip said that Dina’s success in athletics will inspire and motivate other female sprinters to do well.

Student law societies are much more than fancy balls and networking

Guardian 18th March 2016

King’s Law society has won the award for ‘best society for non-law students’ at the 2016 LawCareers.Net student law society awards.

How social workers and carers can make foster placements more stable

Guardian 17th March 2016

The article refers to a systematic review of research on foster care instability carried out by Daniel Michelson of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). The evidence showed a good long-term relationship with a social worker is vital for managing the transition to, and placement in, a new family.

In sweet-toothed Britain, sugary soda levy may have limited impact

Fox news 17th March 2016

British Chancellor George Osborne announced an increased tax on sugary drinks in his recent budget, however experts are sceptical about its likely real-life effect. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Whether it will have any impact on sugar intake is uncertain.’ Also reported by Reuters.

Refugees suffer a higher rate of psychotic disorders

Scientific American 16th March 2016

Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that links refuges to psychotic disorders. He emphasises that although trauma has been shown to increase the risk of psychosis, so have discrimination and racism. “Is it because these refugees are coming from somewhere where they’ve seen their families butchered and suffered some kind of trauma?” he asks. “Or is it because as refugees they had to wander across half of Africa for a couple years before they ever got to Europe? Or is it because that when they got to Europe and eventually Sweden, they lived in fear of being kicked out of the country?”

Visual Snow

BBC Radio 4 15th March 2016

Interview begins at 21.19. Headache expert and Psychiatrist, Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses the phenomenon of visual snow. Patients describe a constant visual disturbance of moving dots resembling an old, un-tuned analogue television. It is a condition experiences globally across all ages, but the eye and brain are normal. Being accustomed to migraine aura, Professor Goadsby has seen over 1000 patients experiencing this vision issue, and is seeking to determine a common biological pathway that can account for the condition.

Researchers operate on human body with soft robot for first time

Xinhua 15th March 2016

A team from King’s operated for the first time on a human cadaver using a soft surgical robot. Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Informatics, lead researcher of the project, said: ‘We look forward to taking soft robotics beyond surgical robotics into other areas such as repairing underwater pipelines or search and rescue operations.’

Peering into war’s foggy future

Huffington Post 15th March 2016

CNN and Defense One co-hosted a conference looking at the future of war. Speaking at the conference, Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, said: ‘The best guide to future wars is past wars.’

Turkey launches airstrikes at Kurds after deadly blast

The Hindu 15th March 2016

The Kurdish militant group TAK has taken responsibility for an attack in Ankara, Turkey, which killed 37 people. Bill Park, Defence Studies, said: ‘Bombings in Turkey now look like a campaign and we have to assume that there will be more.’

Anorexia and depression

LBC 14th March 2016

A PhD Student from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) speaks about the causes and differing experiences of eating disorders.

Xi makes party faithful toe line as China nears key juncture

Bloomberg 14th March 2016

China’s annual legislative meetings have placed even more emphasis on conformity. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, explained: ‘The leadership is beset by challenges. The greatest asset their predecessors had was good growth. This is now no longer the case. So the tactical tightening is as much a sign of nerves as strength.’ Professor Brown was also quoted in China Daily.

Immorality and inequality

Folha (Brazil) 13th March 2016

Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, discusses the ethics of inequality. ‘What level of inequality would be right…and what makes inequality an evil are questions that do not achieve the same degree of consensus,’ he said.

India and the US must collaborate on South China Sea

Hindustan Times 13th March 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, looks at the evolving position of India in the South China Sea dispute. ‘Last month, it was reported that the US and India held talks about conducting joint naval patrols that could include the disputed South China Sea. The US and India were quick to dismiss the report,’ he said.

Cannabis and psychosis

BBC Radio 4 12th March 2016

Interview begins at 5.45. Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses research into the link between cannabis use and Psychotic illness. He explains the effects of the cannabis substance THC on normal volunteers, who develop a transient psychosis and paranoia. He discusses whether it can help to treat schizophrenia, and if it's less dangerous than alcohol and smoking.

A new momentum sets in

Telegraph of India 12th March 2016

Following a visit to India by Nepalese prime minister K.P. Sharma Oli, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, says that the trip highlights the importance Kathmandu attaches to restoring normalcy in its ties with India. ‘Indo-Nepal ties had been strained in the wake of the agitation by communities who were opposing Nepal's Constitution for failing to address their concerns over representation and homeland,’ he said.

Jewish students subjected to increasing anti-Semitic incidents at universities

Huffington Post UK 11th March 2016

The article focuses on anti-Semitic attacks on Jewish students at universities such as Oxford University. The article mentions that on a King’s society Facebook page, a post complained of British politicians being on a ‘Jewish payroll’.

Gum disease in elderly linked to dementia

Times 11th March 2016

A new study jointly led by King’s College London and the University of Southampton has found a link between gum disease and greater rates of cognitive decline in people with early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease. First author Dr Mark Ide, Dental Institute, said: ‘If someone with early Alzheimer’s has an infection, there are elevations in certain circulating molecules indicating inflammation, and that is followed by an acceleration in that person’s cognitive decline.’ This was reported by Times, Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Sun, Independent and BBC News.

Trace of Paris attackers to be found in IS data leak

Telegraph of India 11th March 2016

Debate has arisen over the authenticity of leaked documents from the terror group Islamic State. Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, is mentioned to have believed the authenticity of the documents.

ISIS is the real winner in Libya

Newsweek 11th March 2016

Dr Amir Kamel, Defence Studies, argues in this opinion piece that recent comments made by Barack Obama on failures in Libya show a broader misunderstanding of the region. ‘If not enough credence is given to the complexity of Libyan society…then it may ultimately continue to be a hindrance rather than assistance to any form of peace in the country,’ he said.

Banned research on deadly disease MERS, bird flu, and SARS could be making a comeback

IBT 11th March 2016

Academics will debate how to proceed with research into deadly diseases, such as anthrax, bird flu, smallpox, MERS and SARS, where investigation with live pathogens of the diseases has been banned after a series of accidents. Dr Filippa Lentzos, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘Following this meeting, a final set of recommendations will be drawn up for the US government on how to proceed.’ Dr Lentzos also spoke on the subject for BBC World Service Science Hour, BBC Mundo and BBC News.

Death of Mikhail Lesin

BBC World Service 11th March 2016

The announcement that a former advisor to Vladimir Putin, Mikhail Lesin, was bludgeoned to death in his hotel room in Washington, has been followed by a number of hypotheses and conspiracy theories. Describing the former advisor, Dr Sam Greene, Russia Institute, said: ‘He was…an extremely important media magnate…He was very important in helping Putin take control over state television.’

EU debate

BBC 2, Newsnight 10th March 2016

Dr Khuloud Al- Jamal, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, discusses the advantages and disadvantages that leaving the EU will have on science. ‘Being in the EU enriches medicine because we no longer have borders, we can send and receive students around the continent,’ she said.

Daily catch-up: What do you want to be when you graduate? A suicide bomber

Independent 10th March 2016

In his daily article, Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, discusses what attracts people to violent jihadism, and the role of education and career frustration.

Terrorism threat

Sky News 10th March 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, commented on the leak of documents identifying members of terror group Islamic State. ‘One of the most important things coming out of this is that some of the information doesn’t hold much value, such as blood type. However the significant information on the document is the people who gave them references or vouched them in,’ he said.

Children on happy pills up 50%

Daily Mail 10th March 2016

According to research the number of children prescribed to antidepressants in the UK has risen by more than 50 per cent. The research was led by scientists at King’s and University College London.

Number of kidney stone cases increases by 115% in 10 years

Guardian 10th March 2016

Figures show that the number of emergency hospital admissions for kidney stones have risen by 115 per cent in 10 years. Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments: ‘The increased prevalence of obesity ¬probably explains why kidney stones and chronic kidney disease are increasing.’ This was also reported by Express, Huffington Post UK, NPR and Independent.

Stanford president skeptical on global university partnerships

Times Higher Education 10th March 2016

The President of Stanford University, John Hennessy, discussed challenges universities face in creating effective global alliances with other institutions. The article mentions King’s recent partnership with Arizona State University and University of New South Wales.

Reality Check: Did the UK lose its sovereignty in 1972?

BBC News 10th March 2016

Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, discusses British sovereignty within the context of the Brexit debate. ‘What is not on offer is selective compliance with EU law, i.e. a situation where Parliament picks and chooses which provisions of EU law to follow and which not to follow on a case-by-case basis. This is not on offer under any international agreement,’ he said.

UK leads European university rankings – Top 100 list

Telegraph 10th March 2016

King’s ranks eighth in new European university rankings by the Times Higher Education and nearly a quarter of universities in the UK are also on the list. This was also reported by Times higher Education, Telegraph, Independent, London Evening Standard, BBC 1 and Huffington Post UK.

Fats

BBC World Health Check 10th March 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional sciences, has outlined the ‘classical’ understanding of saturated fats, suggesting we should eat only small amounts. ‘If you swap from a high saturated fat to a low saturated fat diet…you would lower your blood cholesterol levels by up to 10%,’ he said.

Welfare dependency can be bred out

Guardian 9th March 2016

The article comments on the controversy surrounding a cancelled lecture on the book 'The Welfare Trait' by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). It critiques his data and the argument that there are problematic links between the state, personality and employment. Also reported by Independent.

Sexual harassment

LBC Radio 9th March 2016

In the aftermath of sexual attacks in Germany on New Year’s Eve, Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, discusses what could be done to prevent sexual harassment. ‘There should be some preventive education among young male refugees who are coming from countries where it may be uncommon for women to leave their home at night without a male relative’, he said

Look south-east for a new urban centre

London Evening Standard 9th March 2016

The article focuses on new building plans being made in Canada Water and reports that King’s may be building student flats and teaching facilities in the area.

Medicine story

BBC Radio4, Thinking Allowed 9th March 2016

Dr Nicola Mackintosh, Women’s Health, discusses how hospitals deal with acutely ill patients. ‘There is a system of regular monitoring of patients and that is determined on how stable they are and this is what I was interested in when I was doing my research,’ she said.

'Ban' on most hazardous virus experiments could be lifted this week

Guardian 9th March 2016

A ban on experiments that make viruses more dangerous than natural strains could be lifted if experts in the US reach an agreement. Dr Filippa Lentzos, Social Science, Health and Medicine, said: ‘There will definitely be cases where the risks outweigh the benefits, and there are some experiments which simply should not be done. An example would be making Ebola airborne. There needs to be recognition that certain experiments should not be done.’ This was also reported by BBC Radio 4.

EU referendum: Palace complains over Queen 'Brexit' story

BBC News 9th March 2016

Buckingham Palace has complained to the press watchdog over the Sun newspaper's article claiming the Queen backed ‘Brexit’ from the European Union. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Contemporary British History, told the Press Association it was "absurd" that the Queen would break from her tradition of political impartiality after decades as monarch. Dr Andrew Blick, Contemporary British History, was also interviewed on BBC News about the newspaper article.

Welfare dependency can be bred out

Guardian 9th March 2016

The article comments on the controversy surrounding a cancelled lecture on the book 'The Welfare Trait' by Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN. It critiques his data and the argument that there are problematic links between the state, personality and employment.

Roy Greenslade: Baffled by Brexit? Here’s where to get facts ahead of the EU referendum London

London Evening Standard 9th March 2016

Looking at where the public can get impartial information about ‘Brexit’, the article references ‘UK in a Changing Europe’, a group based at King’s and led by Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies. The article said: ‘The group boasts an impressive list of “explainers” who provide unbiased insights and analysis about UK-EU relations.’ This was also reported in the Guardian.

New mothers in Britain are being 'pushed out of hospital too early': Only 7 countries in the world - including Uganda and Zambia - have shorter stays

Daily Mail 9th March 2016

Research suggests that mothers in the UK are sent home from hospital quicker after giving birth compared to other countries. Professor Debra Bick, Nursing & Midwifery, comments: ‘Traditionally Britain was able to discharge new mothers more quickly than its continental counterparts because it ensured they had frequent visits from midwives.’

'Stunning' operation regenerates eye's lens

BBC News 9th March 2016

A procedure to regenerate the eye has successfully treated children with cataracts. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, said: ‘The study is one of the finest achievements in the field of regenerative medicine until now.’ His comments were reported by BBC News, Mirror, Telegraph, Guardian, Daily Mail, The Sun, Independent and Globo

Boldly going where few have gone before: Meet space gynaecologist Dr Varsha Jain

Huffington Post 9th March 2016

The work of Dr Varsha Jain, Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences (CHAPS), has been profiled in this article. Commenting on her career and work, Dr Jain said: ‘Within a month of starting ob/gyn training, I found out about a Master's degree in space physiology and health at King's College London. Undertaking that MSc was one of the best decisions I have ever made. My thesis project saw me return to NASA Johnson Space Center to investigate the health systems on board the international space station.’

Psychosis statistics

Radio 5 Live 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 17.45. The programme looks at research carried out by academics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that 1/4 of psychosis cases were linked to cannabis. It discusses whether regulating the cannabis market would have a positive effect.

King's press release related to 'Psychosis statistics'

Alcohol discussion

BBC Radio 4 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 12.53. Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the effects of drugs on the brain and how to communicate with the public about drug-taking.

Psychosis statistics

BBC 5 Live 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 17.45. The programme looks at research carried out by academics at the IoPPN, which found that 1/4 of psychosis cases were linked to cannabis. It discusses whether regulating the cannabis market would have a positive effect.

Alcohol discussion

BBC Radio 4 8th March 2016

Dr Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses the effects of drugs on the brain and how to communicate with the public about drug-taking.

Brazil looks almost ungovernable – but it’s more robust than it seems

The Conversation 8th March 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Director, Brazil Institute, has written a piece about the current political state of Brazil. 'Rousseff is now dealing with five major problems: Brazil’s worst economic recession in over a century; a congressional push to impeach her; a review of her campaign finances by the Federal Electoral Court (which could see the annulment of her electoral victory); the Car Wash investigation, and the spread of the Zika virus,’ he said.

International Women's Day - universities' pay gaps highlighted

Times Higher Education 8th March 2016

King’s and other institutions such as University of Leicester have been criticised by the University and College Union for having one the largest gender pay gaps in higher education.

History in the making for Dina Asher-Smith

BBC News 8th March 2016

The article focuses on History student, Dina Asher-Smith who is training to compete in this year’s Rio Olympics whilst balancing her degree at King’s. ‘At times it is about balancing both my career and education simply because they’re both so demanding and I really want to do well in both,’ she said.

Public Health campaign

BBC Radio 4, You and Yours 8th March 2016

Honorary Professor Alan Maryon Davis, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences, comments on public health campaigns to help people stop smoking and drink less. ‘The whole point of a campaign is about getting the right tone, not being nagging. The campaigns we found nowadays are all about getting people to think about their lives,’ he said.

International Women’s Day 2016: The pioneering feminists you might not have heard of

Independent 8th March 2016

Dr Red Chidgey, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discusses on International Women’s Day some feminists who the public may not be familiar with. ‘Helen Brook was a pioneer in the field of sexual health advice for young people – something that is evident by the Brook sexual health charity centres, founded by Brook, which still exist today,’ she said, of one of the women discussed in the article.

Can you really trust a robot surgeon? With worrying malfunctions and scant evidence that they're better for patients

Daily Mail 8th March 2016

The number of robots in UK hospitals has increased since 2000. Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Informatics, who has been part of the team developing a robot at King’s for surgical operations said: ‘We have taken inspiration from the octopus, which has very flexible arms that can be squeezed into tight spaces.'

Indian soldiers in World War One

Telegraph of India 8th March 2016

The 1.5 million Indians who fought for Allied forces in World War One were the subject of a talk in Kolkata. Speaking at the session, Dr Santanu Das, English, said: ‘In accordance with a British theory of martial races, soldiers were chosen from Punjab and the Northwest Frontier provinces where people were depoliticised and the poorest. Bengalis were deemed effeminate and unfit to fight, which possibly also had to do with the fact that they were so politicised.’

Feminism

BBC World Service 8th March 2016

Dr Christina Scharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries (CMCI), discussed her previous research investigating perceptions of the term ‘feminism’, and how attitudes have changed since. ‘Since the 70s the media’s relationship with feminism has always changed. Currently we definitely see a moment where some parts are being endorsed.’

Medical marvels among the winning

Times 7th March 2016

Among the two winning pictures from King’s in the Wellcome Image Awards is a human stem cell by Sílvia A Ferreira, Cristina Lopo and Eileen Gentleman, which is a representation of the back of a human eye in 3-D. This was also reported by Financial Times and BBC News.

U.N. panel: North Korea used Chinese bank to evade nuclear sanctions

Foreign Policy 7th March 2016

Researcher Nick Gillard, War Studies, argues that China is growing serious about needing to ‘rein in’ North Korea with regards to its nuclear proliferation efforts. ‘I think there is certainly political will at the central level. The open question is whether Beijing can compel its banks and rural ports to vigorously enforce the sanctions,’ he said.

The mystery of when to stop antidepressants

Wall Street Journal 7th March 2016

A study conducted by researchers at the IoPPN scanned the brains of patients who had been in remission from major depressive disorders for 14 months, looking at different regions of the brain responsible for certain behaviours. Lead author, Dr Roland Zahn, IoPPN, said: ‘The right superior anterior temporal cortex is believed to be involved in representing social meaning and may be at the root of depressed people’s tendency to overgeneralize the interpretation of [their] behaviour.’

Diesel pollution warning

BBC Radio 4 6th March 2016

Dr Benjamin Barratt, ERG, explains the new devices which can measure how much diesel pollution a person is exposed to. ‘A pump takes in air from the side of the tube through a white filter, a laser then measures the rate at which carbon particles in the air turn the filter black,’ he said.

May we have fresh air to breathe – please

Guardian 6th March 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group (ERG), has written a piece on air pollution and the effect it has on a city and its people. ‘Having allowed for smoking and other factors, people lived shorter lives in the most polluted cities, showing, for the first time, that the particle pollution that we experience every day affects our health,’ he said.

Does our social behaviour hold us back?

Guardian 6th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why our responses to situations are often influenced by the actions of others. ‘In fact, humans are so attuned to social behaviour that we are the species with the largest whites around our irises, so that we can see where others are looking,’ he said.

Hassan al-Turabi, Sudan's Islamist idealogue, dies at 84

Telegraph 5th March 2016

King’s alumni Hassan al-Turabi has died at the age of 84 in Sudan. He completed his Masters degree at King’s.

Leading social scientists honoured

Times Higher Education 5th March 2016

Professor Richard Laughlin, School of Management & Business, has been recognised by the Academy of Social Sciences for his work on accounting and behaviour responses to societal controls.

After two black holes collide, a puzzling flash

Wired 5th March 2016

After two black holes collided, a burst of gamma rays – a high-energy form of light – was logged 500 kilometres above the surface of the earth. Professor John Ellis, Physics, said: ‘To produce a gamma-ray burst you need some conventional matter like an accretion disk around the merging object.’ Also in the Daily Mail.

Psychosis plus pot could mean more hospital time

Fox News 4th March 2016

Marijuana users who were diagnosed with a psychotic illness for the first time were 50 percent more likely to be admitted to the hospital and also had longer hospital stays compared with people who suffered a first episode of psychosis and did not use weed, according to research by Dr Rashmi Patel of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). "For this reason, people with an established psychotic disorder should avoid cannabis use," he said.

King's press release related to 'Psychosis plus pot could mean more hospital time'

Film directors taken for a ride

Times 4th March 2016

Dame Margaret Hodge, the first woman to chair the public accounts committee, spoke at King’s about her five years in charge of parliament’s spending watchdog.

King's College London to sell Strand building

Telegraph 4th March 2016

The article focuses on King’s selling the Macadam Building on Surrey Street. According to the article the building has already received interest from developers wanting to turn it into a hotel, flats, offices or a cultural centre.

How much diesel pollution am I breathing in?

BBC News 4th March 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, discusses how much air pollution people are exposed to. ‘For all sources of air pollution the value which we believe is associated with early mortality is the equivalent of 29,000 deaths per year in the UK. And diesel tends to produce more pollutants than, say, petrol would. So it is quite a sizeable public health challenge,’ he said.

EU Referendum

Various media outlets 4th March 2016

King’s academics have commented on a variety of topics relating to the recently announced EU referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, was quoted by the Guardian, Daily Telegraph, AFP, Economic Times of India, NDTV, The Hindu and Xinhua. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke on BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC World News. Comments from Dr Eliza Filby, History, were reported in the Sun. Academics have also commented on the legal disagreement between Cabinet Minister Michael Gove and Prime Minister David Cameron. Professor Alexander Türk, Law, was reported in the Independent, and Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, spoke to BBC News.

'Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World’, by Leif Wenar

Financial Times 4th March 2016

The article focuses on a book authored by Professor Leif Wenar, Law, called ‘Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World’ which focuses on the global trade in natural resources.

Eating peanut early reduces risk of allergy even with later abstinence

King's Press Release 4th March 2016

The early introduction of peanut to the diets of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy significantly reduces the risk of peanut allergy until 6 years of age, even if they stop eating peanut around the age of five, according to a new study led by King’s. Professor Gideon Lack, Head of Department of Paediatric Allergy and lead author, said: ‘The longer term effects of stopping eating peanut following introduction early in life are not known, and further studies are needed.’ This was also reported by Reuters, Associated Press, Agence France-Presse, BBC News, Guardian, Independent, Telegraph, Times, New York Times, TIME, CBS, Washington Post, Daily Express, Daily Mail, Hindustan Times, NPR, US News, Fox News, ABC News, Yahoo UK, Huffington Post and Sina.

King's press release related to 'Eating peanut early reduces risk of allergy even with later abstinence'

Let's think the unthinkable on the welfare trap

Times 3rd March 2016

The article comments on the cancellation of an LSE lecture by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) where he was to talk about his book 'The Welfare Trait'. This proposed that unemployed people, through a mixture of genetics and upbringing, tend to be more antisocial than the general population, which in turn affects their children. As result the welfare state has become a production line for personality traits that reduce the motivation to work. In the face of a 'savage' response to this, the columnist argues that Dr Perkins' aim is for the welfare system to support the unemployed without reducing incentives to work and to increase the chances of a satisfying life. 'Perkins is at least daring to think the unthinkable, pointing out that good intentions don't necessarily lead to good outcomes... his critics should challenge his arguments rather than seek to silence him'.

Access all areas: the push to show outreach efforts pay off

Times Higher Education 3rd March 2016

Anne-Marie Cunning, Director of Widening Participation, discusses widening participation at King’s and at other institutions. ‘Widening participation practitioners were in the past seen as people who ran summer schools; now we are seen as a core part of the policy environment and we know that means being evidence-led,’ she said.

Couples choose to keep it all in the family

Financial Times 3rd March 2016

Professor Sabine Rau, School of Management & Business, comments on why family members choose to set-up businesses together. ‘We are going back to the way we used to live and spend time together. Corporate jobs don’t allow as much flexibility to juggle life and work.’

Dina Asher-Smith: 'I work hard balancing uni, training five times a week, going through so much pain...' Britain's fastest ever woman on her remarkable rise to the top of athletics

Daily Mail 3rd March 2016

King’s History student, Dina Asher-Smith, talks about balancing her studies and her athletics career. Dina said: ‘I work hard balancing uni, training five times a week, going through so much pain and I want to be able to go out there and perform to the best of my ability and finish in the place I deserve.’

Identical but not the same: the usefulness of twins

Independent 3rd March 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, discusses some of the research done so far about identical twins. ‘Twins are a ‘unique natural experiment’, which allow scientists to study nature versus nurture. There's no other way of getting this information, identical twins can have the same DNA and the same genes but in one twin a gene might be switched off.’

Let's think the unthinkable on the welfare trap

Times 3rd March 2016

The article comments on the cancellation of an LSE lecture by Dr Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) where he was to talk about his book 'The Welfare Trait'.

China, gateway to the world for future leaders

Times Higher Education 3rd March 2016

The article mentions President & Principal Professor Edward Byrne setting up international partnerships at the University of New South Wales and Arizona State University.

The dilemmas of the diplomats tasked with saving the European Union

Guardian 3rd March 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, comments on the role European diplomats and other politicians will play in the European referendum. ‘Brussels, senior figures in all the institutions have been told not to denigrate Cameron’s deal, or suggest it is not binding in law. There was a bit of that after the summit, but it has now stopped,’ he said. This was also reported by The Economist.

The Great Land Rush: China’s Pengxin hits overseas hurdles

Financial Times 3rd March 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses Pengxin, a little-known Shanghai real estate developer who want to gain control of the lands of the S Kidman & Co cattle empire. Professor Brown said: ‘China is a real problem for Australia and New Zealand — the perfect partner on the surface with huge markets, huge growth potential and very clear needs from these countries.’

Spice history

BBC Radio4, In Our Time 3rd March 2016

Dr Anne Goldgar, History, discusses the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie who dominated the spice trade between Asia and Europe for two hundred years. ‘In the 16th century the Portuguese were dominant in the spice trade, they started in the late 15th century by discovering a route around Africa.’

Experimental vaccine raises hopes of a cure for cancer

Times 2nd March 2016

British cancer patients have received the world’s first dose of experimental vaccine which could cure the disease. The vaccine was developed by a team of scientists from King’s and the Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust.

Refugee crisis

LBC Radio 2nd March 2016

Research fellow Thomas Withington, Defence Studies, discusses Vladimir Putin's stance on the refugee crisis. ‘The issue with migration presently as it affects Europe really chimes with Putin’s strategy quite closely as it benefits his administration. It is a benefit to Putin because the more migrants arrive the more fears are stoked amongst portions of the population.’

Changing how economics is taught

BBC News 2nd March 2016

The article focuses on how Economics is taught at universities and mentions King’s as one of the universities which teaches the course.

Anti-inflammatory drugs can fix some signs of depression in mice

New Scientist 2nd March 2016

The article discusses the link between depression and inflammation. Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) thinks inflammation could be responsible for the lack of new neurons. Pariante and his colleagues have just started a trial using both standard antidepressants and anti-inflammatory drugs to treat people with depression and raised levels of inflammation. He cautions against people taking both types of drug together at this stage. In the meantime, there are other ways to reduce inflammation, such as eating healthily and exercise.

The judges' decision: shortlist for the Guardian University Awards

Guardian 1st March 2016

King’s has been shortlisted in the Student diversity and widening participation category for the Guardian University Awards. The Awards will take place on Wednesday 16 March.

Classical music

BBC Radio4, Black, White and Beethoven 1st March 2016

Dr Christina Sharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discusses the relationship between race and classical music in Britain. ‘Classical music is a modern day thing and the world is changing as our country is more diverse. I think that we should be actively seeking to engage all the people in our society to enjoy and appreciate classical music,’ she said.

Reading

BBC Radio4, A Good Read 1st March 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), discusses some of the favourite books she likes to read such as ‘Mr Pye’ by Mervyn Peake. ‘I think this is one of his not so well-known books but I read this book in my early 20s and I thought that it was brilliantly funny,’ she said.

NATO commander: Isis ‘spreading like cancer’ among refugees

Guardian 1st March 2016

According to NATO’s top commander refugees from the Middle East and North Africa are masking the movement of terrorists and criminals. Counter-terror experts argue that most terror suspects and perpetrators have been homegrown radicals and sympathisers. Professor Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, said: ‘There is a huge reservoir of sympathizers who all have western or European passports and who were born or raised there.’

Daily catch-up: Ministry of Defence mandarin on liberal interventionism

Independent 1st March 2016

The article focuses on the course ‘Blair Years’ at the Policy Institute and the guest speaker Sir Kevin Tebbit, former Permanent Under Secretary at the Ministry of Defence and Visiting Professor at King’s.

Cyber criminals from across the world target UK victims

Telegraph 1st March 2016

According to cyber security researchers cyber criminals are targeting UK victims' financial and personal information. The article also mentions a different research by King’s which found that 47 per cent of hidden Tor sites facilitate criminal activity.

The Myth of the Neurotic Creative

Atlantic 29th March 2016

The article comments on a paper produced by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which suggested that there is a link between neuroticism and creativity.

All in the genes

Guardian 29th March 2016

Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on nutrigenetics services offering dietary advice tailored to an individual’s DNA. Professor Whelan explains: ‘Some people who don’t produce lactase can consume milk because their gut bacteria will ferment lactose.’

Young Jews reject top universities over antisemitism

Times 29th March 2016

According to reports more Jewish students are concerned about the growing antisemitism on campus. The article mentions the protest at the joint event hosted by King’s and LSE Israel societies. This was also reported by Telegraph and BBC News 24.

Shakespeare's grave scanned in 400th anniversary

BBC News 29th March 2016

To mark 400 years since Shakespeare’s death, his grave will be scanned and excavated. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of London Shakespeare Centre, said: ‘There are also excavations this year in London, which would reveal more about Elizabethan theatre.’

EU debate

BBC Radio 5 29th March 2016

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the government’s decision to not allow civil servants to help ministers who want Britain to leave the EU. ‘This arrangement may seem peculiar to the outsider but it arises from an unusual position that normally all cabinet and ministers are required to unite behind all government policy,’ he said.

Nursing recruitment crisis

BBC Radio 5, 5 Live Breakfast 29th March 2016

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery, discusses the current recruitment crisis in Nursing across the UK. ‘We haven’t been training and educating sufficient numbers of nurses to secure the supply and demand,’ she said.

'Britain is peddling a broken exam system'

Telegraph 29th March 2016

First year Politics student, Jack Elsom, has written an article about the British education system and how students are examined. ‘What are exams actually for? Are they simply an instrument to transpose a student’s intellectual capability into a meaningful value?’ he asked.

Which way will you be voting on Europe?

Observer 28th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article on whether Britain will vote to leave the EU. ‘Will you vote to remain in the EU on 23 June, or could you be convinced by Boris Johnson and his posse that Britain should leave,’ he said.

Geeks, gurus, saints and cut-throat tycoons

Times 27th February 2016

The article focuses on a book written by Dr Sunil Khilnani, Director of India Institute, called ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on the top leading figures in Indian history. This was also reported by Telegraph, Times Higher Education, and Outlook India, amongst others.

Referendum contagion that threatens to paralyse Europe

Telegraph 27th February 2016

The article focuses on the EU Referendum and other European countries such as Finland and Greece who want to have more say in their terms of EU membership. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘It’s a function of the EU getting more intimately involved in areas of national life that are considered hugely salient and important, such as budgets, the composition of your society through migration.’

Bit of a dimwit? You can't blame your genes

Daily Mail 26th February 2016

The article suggests that it has been established that character and mentality is not caused by genes, but due to nurture. It quotes Professor Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN): 'I’ve been looking for these genes for 15 years and I don’t have any.’ It also suggests that the 2013 IoPPN study of the genes of twins found: ‘No genetic influence for childhood behaviour problems from DNA analysis’.

‘History’s People’, by Margaret MacMillan

Financial Times 26th February 2016

Dr Eliza Filby, History, reviews Margaret MacMillan’s book ‘In History’s People: Personalities and the Past’. Dr Filby said: ‘The book collects her five Massey Lectures broadcast last year (the Canadian equivalent of the BBC’s Reith Lectures), in which she arranges history’s characters into some more recognisably modern types: persuaders, darers and observers.’

Sperm grown in lab could allow infertile men to have children

Daily Telegraph 26th February 2016

Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said that a new study that has created sperm in the lab for the first time is a ‘great step forward’, as the study could lead to new infertility treatments. This comment was also picked up by the Sun.

Anger as Christian lawyer paraded on Chinese state TV for 'confession'

Guardian 26th February 2016

Supporters of a prominent Christian lawyer, who was taken into secret detention after opposing a Communist party cross-removal campaign, are demanding his release after he became the latest Chinese human rights defender to be shown on television for an alleged ‘confession’. In a recent online essay, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said China’s Communist party leaders were deliberately parading distraught prisoners on television so as to spread fear among potential opponents.

Sperm grown in lab could allow infertile men to have children

Daily Telegraph 26th February 2016

Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said that a new study that has created sperm in the lab for the first time is a ‘great step forward’, as the study could lead to new infertility treatments. This comment was also picked up by the Sun.

Anger as Christian lawyer paraded on Chinese state TV for 'confession'

Guardian 26th February 2016

Supporters of a prominent Christian lawyer, who was taken into secret detention after opposing a Communist party cross-removal campaign, are demanding his release after he became the latest Chinese human rights defender to be shown on television for an alleged ‘confession’. In a recent online essay, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said China’s Communist party leaders were deliberately parading distraught prisoners on television so as to spread fear among potential opponents.

Bit of a dimwit? You can't blame your genes

Daily Mail 26th February 2016

The article suggests that character and mentality is not caused by genes, but due to nurture. It quotes Professor Robert Plomin, IoPPN, who said he had been researching these genes for 15 years, but ‘had not yet found one.’ It also mentions a 2013 IoPPN study looking at the genes of twins, which found ‘no genetic influence for childhood behaviour problems from DNA analysis.’

Mary Magdalene

BBC Radio4, In Our Time 25th February 2016

Professor Joan Taylor, Theology & Religious Studies, discusses the religious and historic aspect of Mary Magdalene. ‘We first meet Mary Magdalene in the Gospel of Mark which is the first Gospel to be written. At the end of the gospel of Mark there is a reference to a group of women who are looking at Jesus’s crucifixion from a far and she is mentioned first.’

EU debate

BBC Radio4, BBC Inside Science, 25th February 2016

Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health), discusses the impact that Britain leaving the EU will have on Science. ‘The UK does very well on the research funding allocation, we’ve focused on the structural funds and in terms of the research funding we put in 11 per cent of the budget and get back 16 per cent.’

Processed meat

BBC 1, Food: Truth or Scare 25th February 2016

According to the World Health Organisation 50g of processed meat a day could increase cancer risk. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, comments: ‘We have to distinguish between red meat and processed meat. So red meat is fresh meat and processed meat is of similar origin but has been preserved.’

Air pollution: How strong is the link to cancer?

Independent 25th February 2016

Discussions about the role that air pollution plays in causing cancer have increased over the last few years. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘As other health hazards like smoking come under control, urban air pollution becomes more of a problem.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBc Radio 4 24th February 2016

Interview begins at 15:35. Dominic Ffytche of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Organic industry funded studies claim healthier milk and meat – independent scientists say no evidence

Huffington Post 24th February 2016

Academics have criticised media coverage of recent research that claims organic milk and meat are healthier food choices. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘In my opinion, the press release contains headline-grabbing speculative health claims that stretch credibility to the limit.’

Will a ceasefire in Syria hold?

Al Jazeera 24th February 2016

The United States and Russia have agreed to a ‘cessation of hostilities’ in Syria. Commenting on the ceasefire, Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘There are lots of loopholes in this agreement…you have a problem of definition – who are the parties on the ground that are willing to comply?’

Sedition arrests in India inflame old free-speech tensions

International New York Times 24th February 2016

The BJP party in India has criticised protestors at Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi, who traditionally are politically ‘left’, giving rise to a broader debate over freedom of speech in the country. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘It was hard for leftist opponents of the BJP to aggressively defend freedom of speech because past governments, including those led by the Congress party, had undermined it before to further their own agendas.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBC Radio 4 24th February 2016

Dr Dominic Ffytche, IoPPN, discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Air pollution: How strong is the link to cancer?

Independent 24th February 2016

Discussions about the role that air pollution plays in causing cancer have increased over the last few years. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘As other health hazards like smoking come under control, urban air pollution becomes more of a problem.’

Defence Intelligence and imagining the 'unlikely but disastrous'

Independent 24th February 2016

The new Chief of Defence Intelligence, Air Marshal Phil Osborn, spoke at the ninth meeting of the Strand Group, the public seminar series of the Policy Institute at King’s. He discussed 'the mysteries of personality-based grand strategic decision-making.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBC Radio 4 24th February 2016

Dr Dominic Ffytche, IoPPN, discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Defence Intelligence and imagining the 'unlikely but disastrous'

Independent 24th February 2016

The new Chief of Defence Intelligence, Air Marshal Phil Osborn, spoke at the ninth meeting of the Strand Group, the public seminar series of the Policy Institute at King’s. He discussed 'the mysteries of personality-based grand strategic decision-making.’

Britain's 'first black and white twins' born from same egg

Daily Telegraph 24th February 2016

A pair of twin sisters born in the UK are thought to be the first ever genetically identical twins born with different skin tones, eyes and hair colour. Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Multiple genes control skin colour and while identical twins are very likely to share them completely, it is not definite.’ Also reported by FOX and Globo

Disease linked to smoking causes 25 Brits a day to have legs amputated

Mirror 24th February 2016

According to figures, 25 British people have their legs amputated every day due to diseases linked to smoking. Researchers from King’s and St Thomas’ Hospital are developing new scanning techniques to predict whether limbs affected by peripheral arterial disease could be saved through surgery. This was also reported by Express.

Weather Eye

Times 23rd February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution in the UK and the number of deaths causes by pollution. The article mentions a study by King’s that shows that up to 9 per cent of winter pollution is caused by the smoke from wood-burning stoves.

Super slim 'Bloom' inhaler will fit inside your wallet

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

A new compact inhaler that has been designed to fit inside a wallet could help people with asthma. Professor Chris Corrigan, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, comments: 'It would be necessary to be certain that the device reproduced the dosage and delivery of the original medication precisely, not only in terms of the total amount of the drug delivered but also the particle size distribution.’

Syria conflict: Truce, cessation or ceasefire?

BBC News 23rd February 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, has written an article about the conflict in Syria, and the recent announcement by the US and Russia of a ceasefire. ‘The cessation of hostilities faces the task of pulling apart combatants that have been at each other's throats in years of bitter war,’ he said.

Why skipping breakfast may be GOOD for you! 'Grazing' to avoid spikes in blood sugar which lead to over-eating is a myth

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that not eating breakfast does not have a negative impact on health. ‘Part of the same dogma is that we should eat smaller amounts of food at regular intervals - 'grazing' - to avoid spikes in blood sugar and the subsequent lows, which lead to over-eating and weight gain. But these are nutritional myths unsubstantiated by any good trials. The fact is: skipping breakfast is perfectly fine,’ he said.

Why walking by a main road is as bad for you as smoking. And beware of your air freshener, too

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, discusses increasing levels of air pollution and how this can affect health. ‘Chemical toxins dissolve within the lungs or pass through the lungs into the blood. These chemicals interact with blood vessel walls and cause damage that can lead to heart attacks,’ he said. This was also reported by Guardian.

The scale of the UK’s mental health challenge has been underestimated

Guardian 22nd February 2016

Paul McCrone, Professor of health economics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) writes an open letter about the report of the mental health taskforce.

Living in cities

BBC World Health Check 22nd February 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, discussed the impact that pollution has on people who live in cities. ‘We’re getting that repeated exposure to pollution on a daily basis. There are two pollutants that we really worry about. The first is tiny particles…the second is a gas called nitrogen dioxide,’ he said.

Haryana State in India proposes new caste status in bid to quell protests

International New York Times 22nd February 2016

A government in India has promised to introduce a bill to grant a ‘backward status’ to the Jat caste group, following protests lasting four days in the country. Being granted such a status makes members of the group eligible for quotas in some job sectors. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence studies, commented on why the group have asked for this. ‘There’s a disillusionment…the private sector is now passing them by,’ he said.

Play nice! How the internet is trying to design out toxic behaviour

Guardian 22nd February 2016

The article focuses on online-abuse and whether Facebook can use behavioural psychology and persuasive design to control cyber bullies. Facebook has begun working with academics at King’s to tackle extremism online.

Can you eat to beat arthritis and ditch the medication for good?

Mirror 22nd February 2016

According to researchers at King’s, eating a lot of garlic can lower the risk of osteoarthritis. Arthritis affects 10 million people in the UK. Researchers found that allium vegetables – a group that also includes leeks and onions – appear to have a protective effect by limiting the amount of cartilage-damaging enzymes.

The scale of the UK’s mental health challenge has been underestimated

Guardian 22nd February 2016

Professor Paul McCrone, IoPPN, has written an open letter about a recent report on mental health and care in the UK. ‘Surely the major issues uncovered by this report necessitate funds in addition to those already pledged,’ he said.

Moderates shut out as Iran’s hardliners await poll victory

Sunday Times 21st February 2016

MacArthur Fellow and Research Associate, Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, discusses Iran’s nationwide election and current attitudes of the conservatives towards President Rouhani. ‘For them this is a wonderful opportunity to create a barrier against Rouhani’s reforms and make it difficult for him to achieve his goals,’ she said.

Referendum in Britain carries risk of exit from EU

Xinhua 21st February 2016

A referendum to decide whether the UK remains in the EU will be held on 23 June. Discussing the lead-up to the vote, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘The referendum is going to be a depressingly negative campaign.’

The left's problem with Jews has a long and miserable history

Financial Times 20th February 2016

The article discusses anti-Israel demonstrations, and mentions recent protests at a King’s and LSE Israel society event. This was also reported by BBC Radio 4.

Speech on benefits by expert is cancelled over fears of offence

Telegraph 19th February 2016

The article refers to a talk scheduled at LSE by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), where he was to discuss his book 'The Welfare Trait'.

State of minds

The Economist 19th February 2016

The article focuses on China’s ageing population and the increasing rate of dementia. According to a study led by Dr Ruoling Chen, IoPPN, many cases of dementia are undetected because many families do not have a full understanding of the condition.

Speech on benefits by expert is cancelled over fears of offence

Telegraph 19th February 2016

The article refers to a talk scheduled at LSE by Adam Perkins, IoPPN, where he was to discuss his controversial book The Welfare Trait, was cancelled over fears of protests. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Terror case

ITV News 19th February 2016

A former King’s undergraduate student is on trial at the Old Bailey accused of plotting a terror attack.

What is gluten and is it bad for you?

Express 19th February 2016

Article looking at the health benefits of gluten. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Gluten-free has become very fashionable, but gluten is a protein naturally found in bread. The question you have got to ask yourself is, why have people eaten bread for thousands of years and why has it sustained generations?’

‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, by Sunil Khilnani

Financial Times 19th February 2016

The article reviews the new book by Professor Sunil Khilnani’s, India Institute: ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on 50 significant figures from Indian history. The review said: ‘Khilnani’s aim in Incarnations is not to construct a celebratory national pantheon…rather, he hopes to illuminate, in some way or another, pressing contemporary questions.’

Is there a link between autism and anorexia?

Atlantic 18th February 2016

Professor Janet Treasure of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)comments on the theory that links autism and anorexia: “I must admit I was sceptical at first when I read about the links, but when we were looking at various aspects of vulnerability to anorexia, such as thinking styles and emotional styles, they were actually very similar.” Emerging research shows that people with either condition have difficulties understanding and interpreting social cues, and tend to fixate on tiny details that make it difficult to see the big picture. What’s more, both groups of people often crave rules, routines, and rituals. Genetic studies also suggest overlaps between autism and anorexia.

Elite universities 'going backwards' on widening access

Times Higher Education 18th February 2016

Figures show that Oxford, Cambridge, and Russell Group universities have a lower proportion of students from poorer background compared to 10 years ago. However, the number of students from poorer backgrounds at King’s has increased by 5.7 per cent. This was also reported by Guardian, Huffington Post and Times.

Calorie counting won’t solve the obesity crisis

Times 18th February 2016

The article focuses on negative effects of obesity and how it can be reduced. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments: ‘The solution is simple: replace processed food with the natural foods we used to eat, particularly spices, herbs, fermented foods and fibre-rich plants.’

Are treatment guidelines on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder just plain wrong?

The Conversation 18th February 2016

Dr Sameer Jauhar, IoPPN, has written an article on whether the treatment guidelines on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are effective. ‘The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has become a byword for unbiased, evidence-based healthcare advice. Its recommendations strongly influence which treatments are made available on the NHS,’ he said.

UCL Institute of Education names Becky Francis new director

Times Higher Education 18th February 2016

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, is the first woman to be appointed as the next director of the UCL Institute of Education. ‘The merger with University College London has enhanced the Institute’s already world-leading reputation, and I look forward to working with staff and students to deliver on the next stage of our ambitious plans,’ she said.

Social discussion

Sky News 18th February 2016

Jacob Diamond, former President of King’s Conservative Society, discusses some of the barriers students face from disadvantaged backgrounds. ‘There a lot of factors and problems that affect poorer students being able to access a fair education and I believe that everyone deserves an equal education,’ he said.

Cannabis use linked to higher risk for substance use disorders

Telegraph 17th February 2016

The article highlights an American study that linked cannabis use with later substance misuse. Amir Englund of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)comments: "They found that use of cannabis was related to increased risk of later addiction to alcohol, cannabis and other drugs. Cannabis was not related to anxiety or depression at follow-up. Of course a study such as this is unable to ascertain causality between cannabis use and later drug addiction, merely that a relationship exists." Also reported by Press Association.

What does progress in resolving Syria’s war look like?

Telegraph 17th February 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, has written an article on the current state of the Syrian war. ‘Last week the 17-member International Syria Support Group (ISSG) announced that a “nationwide cessation of hostilities” would soon commence to allow humanitarian aid access to several war-ravaged Syrian cities,’ he said.

Poems found

BBC Radio London 17th February 2016

Dr Jon Day, English, comments on unpublished poems by J.R.R. Tolkien, which have recently been discovered. ‘I haven’t read the poems themselves but I think that there is a romantic investment in the idea of rediscovering a lost classic that is often a real interest to people,’ he said.

Cannabis use linked to higher risk for substance use disorders

Telegraph 17th February 2016

The article highlights an American study that linked cannabis use with later substance misuse. Amir Englund, IoPPN, comments: ‘They found that use of cannabis was related to increased risk of later addiction to alcohol, cannabis and other drugs. Cannabis was not related to anxiety or depression at follow-up. Of course, a study such as this is unable to ascertain causality between cannabis use and later drug addiction, merely that a relationship exists.’ This was also reported by Press Association.

Why brains are beautiful

BBC News 16th February 2016

As part of the "In the Mind" series, Professor Shitij Kapur, Executive Dean of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is interviewed about advances in Neuroscience: "The brain used to be like a black box. Now we can explain why treatments work, and when you know that you can begin to design better ones." Although many genes are known to increase a person's vulnerability to mental illness, what actually causes it is everything else - the experiences of life. Prof Kapur put it like this: "It is humbling to know that genetics do not determine the outcome. You can have many of the genes of risk and not get the disorder and have none of them yet succumb to it."

Why brains are beautiful

BBC News 16th February 2016

Why brains are beautiful 16 February 2016
As part of the BBC ‘In the Mind’ series, Professor Shitij Kapur, Executive Dean of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the advances in neuroscience. ‘The brain used to be like a black box. Now we can explain why treatments work, and when you know that you can begin to design better ones,’ he said. This was also reported by BBC News Online, BBC Radio 4, BBC News at Six, BBC World Service and BBC World News.

Daily catch-up: 'The whole point of setting a target is to distort activity' – Sir Michael Barber

Independent 16th February 2016

Former head of the Governmental Delivery Unit, Sir Michael Barber, visited King’s students studying the ‘Blair Years’ at the Policy Institute, to discuss public service reform. ‘Tony Blair wanted public services to be so good that people who could afford to go private would choose to use them,’ he said.

Organic food healthier than farmed products, says new research

Independent 16th February 2016

According to a new study, organic farmed meat and milk is healthier than non-organic food as it contains more omega-3 fatty acids. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Meat and milk remain poor sources of polyunsaturated fatty acid and contain large amounts of potentially harmful saturated and trans fats.’ This was also reported by Telegraph, BBC Radio 5 and Times.

Oxford University's Labour club embroiled in anti-Semitism row

Telegraph 16th February 2016

Oxford University’s student society, the Labour club, has been accused of anti- Semitism and sympathising with terrorist groups. The article also mentions the protest that took place at King’s following the event organised by King’s and LSE Israel Societies. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Dirty habits that do you good!

Mirror 15th February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that not washing your hands and biting your nails can be good for your health. ‘We’re all far too scared of bacteria, but actually bacteria are our friend. The more you come into contact with it, the more your body builds up an immunity to it, allowing it to protect you against the odd bad bacteria,’ he said.

Mothers warned eating too much fish 'can increase chances of obesity-prone baby'

Independent 15th February 2016

According to recent research, eating too much fish during pregnancy can increase a mother’s chance of giving birth to an obesity-prone baby. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Breastfed infants grow more slowly than bottle-fed infants, who are more likely to show accelerated growth because they are overfed. This analysis did not adjust for infant feeding practice, which is likely to be serious confounding factor.’ This was also reported by the Mirror.

Drivers 'exposed to highest levels of pollution'

BBC News 15th February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution and how people can decrease the amount of toxic air to which they are exposed. Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘There is a growing awareness of the dangers of air pollution. As well as respiratory problems, it can have effects on mental health, cardiovascular conditions and child development. So the urgency behind this issue is becoming much greater.’

UK's first pollution cameras trialled in Birmingham and London

BBC News 15th February 2016

Britain’s first pollution cameras are being trialled on roads in Birmingham and London as part of a trial by the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds and King's, and funded by the Department for Transport. This was also reported by London Evening Standard, BBC News, ITV, LBC Radio and BBC Radio London.

Brussels summit

Fox News 14th February 2016

King’s academics comment on the summit in Brussels, where European Union leaders have met to try to reach a deal on EU membership. Professor Anand Menon, European & International relations, spoke to the Associated Press. ‘The European project is probably in trouble. The EU is where it's been for the last few years; very big crises without the tools to address them,’ he said. His comments also appeared in ABC and Fox. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke to BBC World News. ‘I think a very important part of the European Issue is are we a European country, or are we something different? There’s often been a tension in British culture as to what we actually are; are we a global player in our own right or part of a bigger continental body,’ he said. Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, discusses the UK’s EU membership renegotiations on BBC News. ‘At the moment we have a draft agreement which needs to be approved by the representative of the other members of state,’ he said.

How to overcome your inhibitions

Guardian 14th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article on how a magnetic brain-stimulating device can temporarily ‘zap’ the cells responsible for inhibition. ‘While some may choose to turn to alcohol to lower their inhibitions, disruptions from the norm, like Valentine’s Day, can offer the perfect opportunity for your subliminal desires to make themselves known,’ he said

Coconut...is it all it's cracked up to be?

Telegraph 13th February 2016

According to latest figures in the past three years the annual spending on coconut water has increased from 3.9 million to almost 33 million due to reported health benefits. Dr Scott Harding, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on whether there are any health benefits of using coconut oil. ‘From a strictly cooking perspective, as long as total calorie intake is healthy and people are eating a balanced diet with good variety, there is no reason to fear any cooking fat or oil,’ he said.

Keep convicted Islamist terrorists in one prison, says review

Telegraph 13th February 2016

According to a prison review, convicted terrorists could be placed in a top security prison in an attempt to stop them from radicalising or recruiting inmates. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘A policy of concentration may inadvertently help to create the kind of hierarchical organisation that the terrorists found it impossible to create outside.’

Street Triage reduces police detentions at no additional cost

London Live 12th February 2016

The Government’s ‘street triage’initiative - which sees mental health nurses accompany police officers to incidents where people need mental health support - could reduce police detentions without increasing cost to the public purse, suggests a new study by researchers from King’s College London. They found that the total number of Section 136 detentions to either hospital or police custody fell by 39 per cent (from 194 to 118 detentions). Looking just at detentions in police custody, there was a fall of 53 per cent (from 119 to 56 detentions).

King's press release related to 'Street Triage reduces police detentions at no additional cost'

Bernie Sanders’s ill-defined foreign policy

Huffington Post 12th February 2016

King’s undergraduate student James Resnick, War Studies, critiques US presidential candidate Bernie Sander’s foreign policy. ‘Bernie Sanders has built a campaign primarily on a single-minded focus of economic inequality. It may be able to sustain him for now, but if Sanders does become the eventual Democratic nominee, he won't attract independent voters with evident foreign policy ambiguity,’ he said.

Why are men less happy than women?

Telegraph 12th February 2016

The article investigates recent neuroimaging evidence that men may be led happy than women, and quotes Dr Michael Craig, a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN). Michael believes that it might be a mistake to simply look at the brain's mechanisms to pinpoint the reason behind the happiness gap: "From my research, I have found that men are predisposed to neurodevelopmental problems, such as autism, ADHD and addiction, and women tend to be more susceptible to affective disorders, such as Alzheimer’s or depression. But socially it would seem that women are more likely to present these symptoms to their doctors. herefore, although it seems that more women suffer from depression, the ‘stiff upper lip’ male mentality may be skewing these statistics. Rather than seeking help, men deal with their emotional pain through drug use and addiction – which can then exacerbate the issue further."

LSE talk on welfare state postponed over disruption fears

Times Higher Education 12th February 2016

A controversial event hosted by London School of Economics (LSE) has been postponed over concerns that left-wing activists were threatening to disrupt the event. Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN, who was due to speak at the event said: ‘It is difficult to judge whether such threats would be carried out, hence the organisers decided more time would be needed to manage the event properly than was available.

‘Realpolitik: A History’, by John Bew

Financial Times 12th February 2016

In a review of a book by Dr John Bew, War Studies, ‘Realpolitik: A History’, the author says: ‘To understand Realpolitik is simply to understand politics, no more, no less. Are we all clear now then?’

Medical student plotted drive-by terror

Times 12th February 2016

Terror suspect Tarik Hassane who was accused of plotting a terror attack has pleaded guilty halfway during his trial. Hassane and former King’s undergraduate student Suhaib Majeed are both on trial at the Old Bailey on conspiracy to murder.

Why teaching pupils grit and determination is a waste of time: Ability to persevere accounts for less than 1% of exam success

Mail Online 11th February 2016

Personality characteristics have previously been shown to have a significant but moderate influence on academic achievement. However, a new study by researchers at King’s suggests that ‘grit’, defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals, adds little to the prediction of school achievement. Kaili Rimfeld from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said: ‘This does not mean that teaching children to be grittier cannot be done or that it is not beneficial. Clearly children will face challenges where qualities of perseverance are likely to be advantageous. However, more research into intervention and training programmes is warranted before concluding that such training increases educational achievement and life outcomes.’ Also reported by The Conversation and Times of India.

King's press release related to 'Why teaching pupils grit and determination is a waste of time: Ability to persevere accounts for less than 1% of exam success'

Incarnations by Sunil Khilnani, book review: The history of a subcontinent in 50 people

ndependent 11th February 2016

The article discusses a new book by Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, called ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on 50 key historical figures in India.

Gravitational waves

Sky News 11th February 2016

Professor Bobby Acharya, Physics, comments on a breakthrough discovery proving the gravitational waves theorised by Einstein. ‘It was exactly 100 years ago that Einstein proposed the existence of gravitational waves. Gravity is all about the bending and stretching of time and gravitational waves is a ripple which goes out through space and time,’ he said.

Big Question: What does the Julian Assange case have to do with human rights?

Telegraph 11th February 2016

Professor David Martin Jones, War Studies, has written an article on the trial of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. ‘On February 5 2016 the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) found that the UK and Swedish governments had ‘arbitrarily deprived’ WikiLeaks founder, and alleged rapist, Julian Assange, of his liberty,’ he said.

It's no wonder universities want to curb freedom law! Dozens of vice chancellors' pay packets soar by 10% in past year while they also spend thousands on flights and hotels

Daily Mail 11th February 2016

The article focuses on latest figures which show that many Vice-Chancellors have had a 10 per cent pay increase in the past year. The article mentions the salary of President & Principal Professor Ed Byrne.

Chevening Gurukul Fellowships

Hindustan Times 10th February 2016

Applications are being invited for the Chevening Gurukul Fellowship Programme hosted at King’s by the King’s India Institute. The fellowship aims to provide fellows the opportunity to engage with policy makes, academics and opinion leaders in the UK.

How the hell of chronic fatigue drives sufferers to suicide

Daily Mail 9th February 2016

People suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome are six times more likely to commit suicide than those unaffected by the condition, a major study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has concluded. Professor Matthew Hotopf said: ‘Chronic fatigue syndrome can be a debilitating disorder, which impacts patients’ lives substantially, so we need to ensure that patients are being offered the correct assessment and treatment." Also reported by Daily Telegraph.

King's press release related to 'How the hell of chronic fatigue drives sufferers to suicide'

Child abuse has damaging effects on bipolar patients

Times of India 9th February 2016

Child maltreatment could predict a range of negative outcomes in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), according to new King’s College London research, which adds to growing evidence on the enduring mental health impact of childhood abuse and neglect. Also reported by USN.

King's press release related to 'Child abuse has damaging effects on bipolar patients'

Indonesian Fires

BBC World Service 9th February 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, flew to Indonesia in October 2015 to verify data on Indonesian wildfires he’s received from satellites. ‘I think the worst danger is breathing in the stuff being produced by the fires…so we took full face gas marks as we were right at the source of these fires. We were trying to obtain data to calculate fire emissions,’ he said. This was also reported in NPR.

Air pollution raises risk of death 'for decades after exposure'

Guardian 9th February 2016

A recent study suggests that air pollution increases the risk of death for many years after people have been exposed to it. Dr Gary Fuller, ERG, comments: ‘It feeds into the developing body of evidence about air pollution affecting us throughout the course of our lives. It increases the imperative for action to reduce the way in which the air that we breathe today can compromise our health and our children’s health later in life.’

Shakespeare may have stolen an entire theatre

Xinhua 8th February 2016

A new exhibition at King’s College London reveals the life of William Shakespeare. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director, London Shakespeare Centre, said: ‘We have a number of documents that show Shakespeare's day-to-day life in London and particularly his day-to-day life as a sharer in the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the King's Company (both are troupes of actors).’

Business and education experts questioned on careers advice

Bloomberg Business 8th February 2016

A governmental sub-committee, Education, Skills and the Economy, has heard from experts as part of its inquiry into careers advice, information and guidance. Professor Louise Archer, Education & Professional Studies, was called upon to provide expertise to the committee.

Innovative wound-healing technique could save limb

Fox news 8th February 2016

Experts from King’s have reviewed the use of medical products made from human amniotic membrane tissue to treat chronic wounds. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘When you put membrane on the wound, the wound starts to heal faster…What actually helps the healing is that intricate network of the proteins.’

Anti-terror laws risk 'chilling effect' on academic debate – Oxford College head

Guardian 8th February 2016

According to Kerry McDonald, former Director of Public Prosecutions, the government’s anti-terrorism laws aimed at universities such as King’s will have a negative impact on academic debate and research. ‘The government’s decision to pick out universities such as University College London and King’s College, London, was unfair, ignorant and philistine,’ he said.

An unethical, imprecise, potentially illegal x-ray practice

The Hindu 7th February 2016

A number of children were reported to have received certificates of age determined by dental x-ray methods. The article mentions upcoming work by Professor Graham Roberts, Paediatric Dentistry, which will provide an up-to-date and comprehensive report on the applicability of Dental Age Estimation.

North Korea

BBC World News 7th February 2016

Defying warnings of sanctions by the West, North Korea launched a long-range rocket on Sunday that experts believe is part of a programme to develop missile technologies. Dr Martin Navias, War Studies, said: ‘North Korea is a threat to its neighbours and to peace and stability internationally. It has a nuclear programme, which is steadily gaining pace and we do expect a new nuclear test in the next few months.’ Dr Navias also commented on BBC Radio 2.

Pillow talk: Waking up with Wogan

Guardian 7th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece about the death of Terry Wogan and the effect his death will have on people who listened to his radio show. ‘As the day went on, listeners may have found Wogan’s words returning to them, subconsciously triggered by other thoughts or spontaneously arising, without quite remembering having heard them earlier,’ he said.

Want a degree? You won't need to sit exams to get one

Daily Mail 7th February 2016

The article highlights that more students are being awarded degrees without having to sit exams, as assessment through examination has increasingly been replaced with coursework. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, comments: ‘It is very bad practice to have degrees which only use one sort of assessment. But many universities and colleagues believe coursework is a better way of judging students.’

The deadly toll of city smog

Guardian 7th February 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, ERG, has written a piece on the negative effect smog has on a city. ‘January used to be a peak month for smog. Between 1952 and 1962 this killed nearly 15,000 Londoners and many people in other cities including Glasgow and Manchester,’ he said.

Pollution cameras to snap toxic cars

Sunday Times 7th February 2016

A new device which measures the toxins emitted by cars to see if they breach legal limits will be introduced in the UK. The cameras will be placed near Oxford Circus and Blackheath. The trials will be sponsored by King’s, Department of Transport, Leeds and Birmingham University.

As Syria rebels face rout, Saudi Arabia and Turkey may send troops

NDTV 6th February 2016

Analysts have said that Saudi Arabia and Turkey may send a limited number of ground troops to Syria to support opposition forces, which are facing the prospect of defeat. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘I think Saudi Arabia is desperate to do something in Syria…Turkey and Saudi need to turn this war around. So any Saudi engagement would be in cooperation with Doha and Ankara.’

Israel society protest

Times 6th February 2016

Article comments on the findings of a report into the Israel society event hosted at King’s. President and Principal of King’s, Professor Ed Byrne said: ‘Intimidating behaviour is completely unacceptable and goes against everything that we stand for at King’s.’ This was also reported by Independent.

e-cigarettes: can they help people quit?

BBC Radio 4 5th February 2016

Discussion at 16:31 about the safety of e-cigarettes where there is mention of research carried out by Anne McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Also reported in BBC World Service and NPR.

UK scientists get green light to genetically modify human embryos

Independent 5th February 2016

Scientists from the Francis Crick Institute have been given permission to begin research altering the DNA of embryos in the first seven days after fertilisation. Professor Peter Braude, Women’s Health, commented on the announcement in the Independent. ‘I am delighted to hear that the HFEA have had the good sense to approve this important project. Gene editing tools will allow fresh insights into the basic genetic mechanisms that control cell allocation in the early embryo,’ he said. His comments were also reported by London Evening Standard, Mirror, BBC Radio 4, Economic Times of India and BBC World News. Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, also commented for Al Jazeera. ‘It’s very important that this research goes ahead,’ she said.

William Shakespeare's will featuring his last signatures goes on show

Guardian 5th February 2016

To mark 400 years since his death, Shakespeare’s will and other documents are on display at an exhibition held at King’s for the first time. The exhibition entitled ‘By me: William Shakespeare’, is currently on at the Indigo Rooms, Somerset House East Wing, until May 29 2016. This was reported by the Guardian, Financial Times, London Evening Standard, Times Higher Education, Independent, Express, BBC London and People’s Daily.

Julian Assange

BBC World News 5th February 2016

A United Nations report has said that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arbitrarily detained by the UK and Sweden and should be released immediately. Considering whether legally this is a case of arbitrary detention, Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, said: ‘I think the working group got it wrong. I would describe his stay as self-inflicted.’

Invisible menace in cities threatens thousands of lives say campaigners

Guardian 5th February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution in London and the health risks it poses to Londoners. Professor Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘The public health message is that you can’t hide from air pollution inside a car. We advise the public to leave the car at home whenever possible. This exposes you and your family to lower levels of air pollution, you’re not contributing to the problem, and you’re also getting the benefits of exercise.’ This was also reported by LBC Radio and Huffington Post.

Kids don't like physics and maths: Study finds out why

Telegraph 5th February 2016

According to a study conducted by King’s, University College London and AT Kearney, the consultancy firm, more young people are dropping out of subjects such as Maths, Physics and other STEM subjects. The study suggest that falling popularity is caused by inadequate advice from careers experts to explain the range of jobs for which science subjects are relevant.

King’s College head: Ignoring online education is big danger

Times Higher Education 5th February 2016

The article focuses on the launch of Pearson and King’s new online learning platform. President & Principal of King’s, Professor Ed Byrne said: ‘If I look ahead and think of the range of things universities do, we’re going to have to have superb technological environments everywhere – whether it’s in education or on campus.’

Protesters silencing speakers like me won’t solve the Israeli-Palestinian problem

Guardian 5th February 2016

Former Israeli security Chief Ami Aylon commented on the impact that violent protesting has on speakers. He discusses the event jointly hosted by King’s and LSE Israel Society at King’s where students protested.

Tomb Raider creator to open two free schools with digital focus

Guardian 5th February 2016

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, argues that there should be more research into free schools. ‘Given the government’s commitment to expanding the free school programme we need urgently to explore their quality and outcomes for pupils, and, given changes in the programme over time, whether indeed free schools are distinctive from other schools in either content or origin,’ she said.

Oil companies need to tailor strategies to claw back lost profits

Financial Times 5th February 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece on how oil companies need fresh ideas to increase profit. ‘The real disappointment, however, lies in the poverty of the strategic thinking in such companies. Forward thinking appears to be limited to the view that prices must rise again,’ he said.

Global mental health illness widespread, undercounted

Voice of America 5th February 2016

The article comments on research carried out by Graham Thornicroft at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). This found that the number of people living with mental illness worldwide is underestimated by more than a third, and that mental illness accounts for 32 percent of all disability worldwide.

America wages war-by-bureaucracy, and it is killing our chances to win

Foreign Policy 4th February 2016

Christopher D. Kolenda, War studies, commented on the effectiveness of American military strategy and the lack of attention given to it by candidates in the 2016 Presidential campaign. ‘War-by-bureaucracy is undermining America’s ability to wage war. National security reform has not yet been a major topic in the 2016 Presidential campaign. It is time to put it on the agenda,’ he said.

Chromatography

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time 4th February 2016

Dr Leon Barron, Forensic Science, discusses the origins, development and use of chromatography. ‘Almost everyone has had chromatography affect their lives. Here in front of me, I have a bottle of drinking water and if you look at the labels of the bottle, you generally see a list of compounds in there,’ he said.

Zac Goldsmith and Sadiq Khan unite to commit to pedestrianisation of Oxford Street

London Evening Standard 4th February 2016

London 2016 Mayoral candidates Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith have committed to the pedestrianisation of Oxford Street in order to reduce pollution and congestion. A study by Dr David Carslaw, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, is mentioned, which looked at levels of pollution on Oxford Street.

Even Greeks can get more medicines than Britons, Pfizer boss claims

Guardian 4th February 2016

According to the owner of the world’s biggest drug company, Pfizer, Greece has more access to a variety of medicines than the UK. Professor Richard Sullivan, Director of the Institute of Cancer Policy, commented on the issue of access to healthcare. ‘Indeed any country wishing to deliver affordable and equitable cancer care needs health technology assessment procedures make rational decisions,’ he said.

Demonising Russia won’t give us security

Guardian 4th February 2016

Dr Anna Matveeva, War Studies, has written an article on how Russia is negatively portrayed in the media. ‘The country’s portrayal as an aggressive power increases its perception of threat, accelerating a military and ideological escalation. Irresponsible talk of conflict is risky and mistaken,’ she said.

Oneline therapy better than face-to-face for body issues

Times 3rd February 2016

In the largest clinical study of body dysmorphia, and first to investigate internet-based CBT, researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)found that 12 weeks of regular online sessions can eliminate symptoms.

Body Dysmorphia

Times 3rd February 2016

In the largest clinical study of body dysmorphia, and first to investigate internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) found that 12 weeks of regular online CBT sessions can eliminate symptoms.

Syria

Al Jazeera 2nd February 2016

The UN held talks in Geneva to discuss the current situation in Syria. James Denselow, Geography, described progress in the area as ‘slow’. ‘I don’t think we have a peace process yet; we have a peace plan. A very ambitious one,’ he said.

The Dark Web

BBC World Service 2nd February 2016

A new study at King’s has examined the ‘Tor Browser’ – a web browser also known as the dark web – which aims to masks the identity of who is browsing on the internet and what they’re looking at. PhD student Daniel Moore, War Studies, who was involved in the study said: ‘We were looking to integrate ourselves into the large encryption debate…The debate around the ‘snoopers charter’ is quite polarised at this point.’ Professor Thomas Rid, War studies, co-author of the paper, also spoke to the Independent. ‘The Tor Browser is used for criminal services, fraud, extreme, illegal pornography, cyber-attacks and computer crime,’ he said. Also reported by VICE Motherboard.

EU debate

BBC News 2nd February 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, commented on the topic of migration in the UK, a topic that has come under scrutiny during recent negotiations of Britain’s EU membership. ‘Many of the economic studies I’ve seen have argued that even if you stop migrants in the EU getting benefits, the overall impact of the number of people coming to the UK will be minimal,’ he said.

Labour figures swap politics for prominent business roles

Financial Times 2nd February 2016

The article focuses on the careers of former Labour politicians such as Ed Balls, who is now a Visiting Professor at the Policy Institute.

Student grants were my lifeline; How the Tories are punishing working-class kids

Mirror 2nd February 2016

The article focuses on the government’s plans to get rid of maintenance grants and the impact it will have on students who come from low-income households. One of the professions with high educational and economic barriers is classical music. A report by King’s is quoted, which showed that only 55 per cent of children from the poorest families receive a musical education.

For NREGA, Tamil Nadu is the only hope

NDTV 1st February 2016

On its 10th anniversary, the NREGA (National Rural Employment Guarantee Act 2005) in India has been criticised by members of government. Commenting on these criticisms, Professor Reetika Khera, Visiting Fellow in the India Institute, said: ‘The Rajasthan Chief Minister questioning the need for a law, the then Rural Development minister's suggestion to limit NREGA to a few districts, and the Prime Minister's speech in Parliament in 2015 reveal the BJP's hostility.’

Law student demands lifetime supply of KitKats over waferless multipack

Independent 1st February 2016

Second-year Law student, Saima Ahmad, is demanding a lifetime supply of KitKat after she bought a pack of the chocolate bars without any wafer. She wrote a letter to the company saying: ‘Clearly, if I wanted to purchase a confectionery item that is purely chocolate, I would have purchased a bar of Galaxy. I wouldn't rule out taking this further if Nestlé do not apologise or compensate me adequately.’ This was also reported by Mirror, Daily Mail, Express, ITV Online, Huffington Post and Time.

Drive for more women in medical research

London Evening Standard 1st February 2016

A new initiative to get more women into medical research has been launched by King’s and Oxford University. The biomedical research centres run by Guy’s and St Thomas’ have pledged to help women get into senior positions.

Drive for more women in medical research

London Evening Standard 1st February 2016

A new initiative to get more women into medical research has been launched by King’s and Oxford University. The biomedical research centres run by Guy’s and St Thomas’ have pledged to help women get into senior positions.

Science and Stalin’s crap grab: Can excrement reveal the secrets of our personalities?

The Conversation 1st February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, has written an article on whether excrement gives insight into a person’s personality. ‘The researchers, tasked with analysing stool samples from a number of foreign leaders, believed that high levels of brain chemicals such as the amino acid tryptophan were a sign of someone likely to be calm and easy to deal with,’ he said.

Oxford University tops list for animal testing

Independent 1st February 2016

Figures show that Oxford University and other institutions such as Edinburgh and King’s use the most animals to conduct tests in its laboratories. A spokesperson from King’s said: ‘Animal research at King’s is ethically reviewed and we only use animal models where there is no other viable alternative.’ This was also reported by Mirror, Metro and Times of India.

Hair dryer science

Channel 4 Supershoppers 1st February 2016

Professor Bobby Acharya, Physics, takes part in an experiment which looks at the ‘science of hot hair’. ‘Inside the hair dryer there is an ionic generator and a fan which blows the air through. In the centre are capacitors that create ions which help generate hot air,’ he said.

The route to West Asia

Telegraph of India 30th January 2016

The Indian president, Pranab Mukherjee, visited Israel and Palestine in 2015, followed by a visit to West Asia by Indian external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj. Professor Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The visit has paved the way for a possible visit by the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, to India later this year and it is also likely that the Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, would pay a return visit to Tel Aviv.’

Why state schools should stream their pupils

Telegraph 30th January 2016

The article argues that students in streamed schools are more likely to perform better and excel in school. In order to find out more on the effectiveness of streaming, the Sutton Trust has commissioned Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, to research the impact streamed schools have on students.

How autism changes the brain

Mail Online 29th January 2016

Research at King’s College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder.

King's press release related to 'How autism changes the brain'

Study reveals subtle brain differences in men with autism

King's Press Release 29th January 2016

Research at King’s has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. Dr Marco Catani from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘White matter provides key insights which allow us to paint a precise picture of how different parts of the brain develop during critical periods in childhood.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail and Hindustan Times.

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Translated: The baffling world of business jargon

The Conversation 29th January 2016

Tony Thorne, Director of Slang and New Language Archive, has written an article on the jargon used in business and in various jobs. ‘Most often labelled ‘jargon’, this language category includes the management buzzwords uttered above: blamestorming is a free-for-all discussion which identifies scapegoats; the more familiar blue-sky thinking means going beyond the obvious in the search for solutions,’ he said.

China

Valor Economico 29th January 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, discussed the importance of China in the global economy. He commented that whilst the policies of the government have aroused criticism, countries in the West are increasingly dependent on China.

Keen to be healthier in old age? Tend your inner garden

The Conversation 29th January 2016

Following the death of the world’s oldest man, Professor Tim Spector and Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, have written an article on how people can live for a long time. ‘Many previous attempts have approached this question by looking for differences between young and old people, but this approach is often biased by the many social and cultural developments that happen between generations, including diet changes,’ they said.

Civil Partnership

BBC Radio London 29th January 2016

Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, comments on the case of a heterosexual couple not being allowed to have a civil partnership. The current legislation only allows same sex couples to have a civil partnership. ‘The UK is the only country in the world where the legislators have not allowed different sex couples to have a civil partnership,’ he said.

Diplomatic immunity hearings in London courts on the rise

Financial Times 29th January 2016

The article focuses on the increasing number of people claiming diplomatic immunity in London. Dr Philippa Webb, Law, comments: ‘In the past, most cases where diplomatic immunity has been said to have been abused have been settled behind closed doors. What is unusual about these cases is they are coming to court and the UK is clarifying the law in this area.’

Principal's inaugural lecture

King's Press Rlease 28th January 2016

President & Principal Professor Ed Byrne AC, revived King's near century old Commemoration Oration address on 27th January to deliver his Inaugural Lecture. The lecture, entitled ‘Learning to thrive: How can leading universities make a greater contribution to society and the economy in an increasingly connected world?’, was introduced by the Chairman of the College Council, The Duke of Wellington.

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Daily catch-up: Labour diverts attention from a pro-Labour story

Independent 28th January 2016

Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, has written an article on the current landscape of UK politics, mentioning a lecture at King’s by Visiting Professor, Ed Balls, Policy Institute.

Post-colonial studies: Time to step out of the comfort zone?

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

Professor Ziad Elmarsafy, Comparative Literature, discusses how post-colonial studies may have to change its research agenda. ‘The default position seems to be that the state is there to oppress and exploit, which is sadly true in a lot of cases; but it does not explain the persistence of the state and the insistence with which people, post-colonial or not, adhere to it,’ he said.

Role models pave the way for women to build STEM careers

London Evening Standard 28th January 2016

Dr Filippa Lentzos, Policy Institute, discusses how to recruit young people, particularly women into STEM careers. ‘I followed what I was interested in. I did a degree in human sciences, which covers all aspects of biology,’ she said.

Priced out: Housing cost headaches for universities and staff

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

The article focuses on the effects rising housing costs has for academics and students. Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice-Principal (Arts & Sciences), said: ‘We welcome any opportunity and government support that will ensure we are able to attract and retain world-class academic talent in a city like London.’

Parents don’t understand A-levels ‘are not the only route into university’, Ucas says

Metro 28th January 2016

The article highlights that alternative qualifications such as the International Baccalaureate and Btec can be used to get into university. Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, said: ‘It is crucial that universities have a good understanding of the structure, content, examination method, grades and grading distributions for all qualifications which they accept.’

It’s 2016, and no time to rest on our laurels

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

President & Principal Ed Byrne has an opinion piece on how universities have evolved over time to meet the needs of students and society. ‘Universities must be more attuned and responsive in real time to challenges facing their communities, countries and planet. They must be bridge-builders between cultures, governments and key institutions and opinion-formers of global civil society. And they must be more ambitious in fostering an entrepreneurial, change-making spirit in students and staff,’ he said.

Overactive brain pruning in teens could cause schizophrenia

New Scientist 27th January 2016

Dr Oliver Howes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Pscyhology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the theory that schizophrenia can result from a normal stage of teenage brain maturation gone wrong. “It’s really exciting because it could lead to new ways of treating the disorder,” he says. Research suggests that there are genomes that lead to higher levels of a component called C4, which binds to neurons at the points they connect to other neurons and signals that they should be engulfed by immune cells. As teenagers go through a developmental stage called pruning, in which they lose synapses, overactivity in C4 caused by these genes could lead to schizophrenia, as post-mortem examinations have shown fewer synapses in patients experiencing this disorder. Professor Robin Murray, also of the IoPPN, comments that this may explain why, for some people, the first signs appear in adolescence, when pruning peaks.

Zika virus

BBC News 27th January 2016

Women in countries affected by the Zika virus in South America have been advised against getting pregnant, as the virus is believed to be linked to birth defects. Dr Eduardo J. Gómez, International Development Institute, commented on the response of officials in the affected countries. ‘I really don’t think Brazil was entirely ready; they’ve been having problems with their public health system for a while,’ he said. Dr Gómez commented for CNN, BBC Brazil and O Globo. Professor Stuart Neil, Infectious Diseases, also spoke on the Zika virus outbreak for Channel 5 News. ‘It’s a very concerning situation, this virus seems to have appeared under the radar and now we are looking at millions of cases,’ he said.

Angelo Ogbonna: Life at West Ham is so much more relaxed than at Juventus

London Evening Standard 27th January 2016

Italian football player Angelo Ogbonna talks to King’s Italian society on his move from Juventus to West Ham. ‘Here it is more relaxed. We worked more with sessions every day and double [sessions] once a week, while here we sometimes get Wednesdays off,’ he said.

Implications of another delay to Hinkley nuclear reactor project

Financial Times 27th January 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, discusses the postponement of the Hinkley Point nuclear reactor project. ‘The Chinese have not formally signed up to the financing agreement and now it has become clear that the EDF board is unwilling to go ahead with a decision that would add to its financial problems by adding debt and risk to its already shaky balance sheet,’ he said.

The time has come for a new party

New Statesman 27th January 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discusses the Labour party and whether there should be a new political party. ‘The Labour Party is composed of three main elements – the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP), the trade unions and the members. But the PLP is the most important, given that it represents the nine million people who voted Labour in 2015,’ he said.

Overactive brain pruning in teens could cause schizophrenia

New Scientist 27th January 2016

Dr Oliver Howes, IoPPN, comments on the theory that schizophrenia can result from a normal stage of teenage brain maturation gone wrong. ‘This could lead to new ways of treating the disorder,’ he said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 The Best of Four Thought 27th January 2016

Dr Benedict Wilkinson, Policy Institute, discussed the impact of 19th Century German-American philosopher Johann Most on society. ‘He moved away from communism and as he did, he became an impassioned, fiery anarchist,’ he said.

New particle

BBC Radio 4 Science Stories 27th January 2016

Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, comments on the experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which took place at the end of last year. According to the LHC the experiments showed that there is a new particle, one not predicated by any previous theory. Over 100 research papers have been published since then, proposing new theories about the discovery. Dr Fairbairn said: ‘I think right now there is a fairly well established scientific method which is that you make observation, you get data then you come up with a theory that fits that data.’

How your smartphone is changing cinema

The Conversation 27th January 2016

Dr Sarah Atkinson, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, has written an article about how smartphone technology is changing cinema. ‘Smartphone technologies are increasingly playing a major part in film production, distribution and reception. This month sees the launch of what is being billed as the world’s first selfie movie,’ she said.

Varoufakis warns that Britain should remain in EU

King's Press Release 26th January 2016

Professor Yanis Varoufakis, the former Greek Finance Minister who earned notoriety when negotiating with the International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank to prevent his country becoming bankrupt, warned at an event at King’s that despite the financial breakup of Europe, Britain should remain part of the EU.

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King's kicks off Shakespeare celebrations

King's Press release 26th January 2016

King’s Shakespeare Festival, a year-long celebration of the life and work of William Shakespeare, kicks off with a special weekend of free events in February. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of the London Shakespeare Centre and academic director, Shakespeare400, said: ‘The Shakespeare Festival weekend of exciting events marks the start of our Shakespeare Festival, which runs throughout the year.’

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Medical Miscellany

Daily Mail 26th January 2016

Dr Laura Andreae, IoPPN, comments on facial features and the role they play in shaping our choice of ‘mate’. ‘Humans naturally focus on other people’s facial features – even as babies we respond to shapes that look like faces,’ she said.

Environmental campaigners to face jail

LBC 26th January 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, discusses whether environmental campaigners should go to prison if protests turn violent. ‘A protest is entirely appropriate and legitimate in an open society, but they do have to realise the consequences of protests,’ he said.

James Clerk

BBC 4 James Clerk Maxwell: The Man Who Changed the World, 26th January 2016

A documentary focusing on James Clerk Maxwell looks at his life and work at King’s which led to the discovery of the theory of electromagnetism.

Mother’s ruin? New guidelines for alcohol consumption during pregnancy

British Medical Journal 25th January 2016

Dr Sally Marlow and Dr Sadie Boniface of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discuss recent proposed alcohol guidelines relating to pregnancy. These recommend abstinence during pregnancy, in contrast to conflicting and confusing previous advice that said small amounts have not been shown to be harmful. They argue: "as the saying goes, absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Taking all of this into account, we would argue that when the stakes are high, and in a context where conclusive evidence may always be elusive, taking a cautious approach is the right thing to do."

Mother’s ruin? New guidelines for alcohol consumption during pregnancy

British Medical Journal 25th January 2016

Dr Sally Marlow and Dr Sadie Boniface, IoPPN, discuss recent proposed alcohol guidelines relating to pregnancy. They recommend abstinence during pregnancy, in contrast to conflicting and confusing previous advice that said small amounts have not been shown to be harmful.

Losing weight

Channel 4 How to Lose Weight Well 25th January 2016

Dr Jayne Lawrence, Biophysical Pharmaceutics, tested the number of potentially deadly chemicals present in diet pills. ‘It’s really shocking to learn that the amount of one chemical - DNP - varied from about 90 to up to 150 per cent and that’s very dangerous,’ she said.

The hazards of texting at work

Guardian 24th January 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about why we are more likely to say something we regret in writing than we would face to face. ‘In a private conversation, all of our senses are alert to signs of a possible eavesdropper. So you may find yourself whispering, looking over your shoulder and thinking more carefully about your choice of words,’ he said.

After the horror

Sunday Times 24th January 2016

Dr Lara Feigel, English, discusses German history and culture after the defeat of the Third Reich. Dr Feigel explores the experiences of writers, artists, intellectuals and German exiles such as Marlene Dietrich and novelist Thomas Mann.

Security of Israel event

BBC 1 News 22nd January 2016

King’s has launched an investigation regarding the ‘Security of Israel’ event with external speaker Ami Ayalon. President & Principal Professor Ed Byrne AC commented: ‘Disagreement is fine. Without disagreement you don’t have the university and peaceful protest is fine because it is a democratic right. But violent behaviour is completely unacceptable.’ This was also reported by LBC Radio. Professor Byrne has also written a piece for the Jewish Chronicle following the event.

Setback for Heathrow as nearby pollution hits an eight-year high

London Evening Standard 22nd January 2016

Plans to build a third runway at Heathrow have been delayed following research by King’s, which showed that air pollution close to the airport has hit an eight year high. A monitoring station at Keats Way, Hillingdon, recorded nitrogen dioxide 228mg per cubic metre – the highest since the end of 2007.

British Empire: Students should be taught colonialism ‘not all good’, say historians

Independent 22nd January 2016

Historians argue that schools should take a balanced approach to teaching students about the British Empire. Professor Ashley Jackson, Defence Studies, notes: ‘We do need better education...What’s important is that we should understand our past, and that means a ‘warts and all’ understanding.’

The Strange (But Effective) Way I Stick to Hard Goals

Huffington Post 21st January 2016

The article mentions research carried out by Dr. Benjamin Gardner, a psychologist focusing on habit research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). He says: "habit works by generating an impulse to do a behaviour with little or no conscious thought." Habits are simply how the brain learns to do things without deliberation. These impulses can be put to good use, but only certain behaviours can become habits. Also reported in Time.

Neutral Territory

London Evening Standard 21st January 2016

Professor John Howard, English, discusses transgender rights and the views people have on gender. The idea that gender is constructed is not new. But since the 1970s, second-wave feminism, queer theory, LGBT activism and intersex organising have proven crucial in broadening our understanding,’ he said.

A mantra for the next REF cycle? Keep calm and carry on

Times Higher Education 21st January 2016

The article focuses on the Research Excellence Framework and a review by King’s and Digital Science Show on the effectiveness of the framework, which ranks all of the leading research universities in the UK.

Generation Uphill

The Economist 21st January 2016

The article focuses on why millennials are considered the most educated generation, and why sometimes they are not able to reach their full potential. Aditi Shorewal, Editor of King’s student newspaper Roar, said: ‘My generation has a huge interest in political causes but a lack of faith in political parties.’

British, Egyptian universities sign partnership agreements

Bloomberg Business 21st January 2016

Universities from the UK and Egypt have signed partnerships on collaborative work and research during the Education World Forum. The partnerships will link Cairo University with King’s.

Pearson

Bloomberg 21st January 2016

John Fallon, CEO of the world’s leading educational company Pearson discussed recent changes in the company. Mr Fallon mentioned a partnership launched with King’s, which will offer online masters degrees.

Russia-UK relations

Al Jazeera 21st January 2016

Diplomatic relations between Britain and Russia were placed under strain, following the inquiry of the death of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko, which suggested links to the Kremlin. Commenting on the political impact of the report, Dr Anna Matveeva, War Studies, said: ‘It is a bit of an old story because British-Russian relations have already deteriorated over the decade.’

The British public couldn't care less about Brexit and the EU referendum

Telegraph 20th January 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, discusses the possibilities of the UK leaving the EU and whether the public is interested. ‘Those of us in the campaign bubble are kidding ourselves that these things mean a lot more to the public than, in fact, they really do,’ he said.

Davos: Historians dream of fourth industrial revolutions

The Financial Times 20th January 2016

The article focuses on the significance of the fourth industrial revolution. Dr Hannah Dawson, History, noted: ‘There’s very little in life that’s good that doesn’t come from activity and creation.’

Call for licence fee to be set independently

Telegraph 20th January 2016

A new report by the Policy Institute calls for a change in who is responsible for setting the licence fee. Currently the responsibility is with MPs, but the report called for this responsibility to be given to an independent regulator.

Brief Psychotic Breaks Remain a Mystery

Yahoo 20th January 2016

Not all psychotic episodes signal the beginning of a long-term mental health disorder like schizophrenia. In fact, when patients experience one of these short-term breaks with reality, it's not precisely clear how the individuals should be diagnosed. Dr Paolo Fusar-Poli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) carried out research on patients, and found that there was no difference between the variations of diagnosis of brief psychotic breaks and the chance of experiencing another psychotic event in the future (50-50) compared with patients that had first-episode schizophrenia where nearly all had future psychosis.

Why hasn't the mystery of Gulf War Syndrome been solved?

BBC News 19th January 2016

The term Gulf War Syndrome refers to US and British soldiers reporting unusual symptoms on their return home from the gulf war. However, research carried out by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) couldn't find any physical differences between them and a control group, despite being two to three times more likely to report 53 different symptoms, including chronic fatigue and nerve pain, compared with soldiers deployed to Bosnia. Professor Neil Greenberg believes mental strain has played an important role; 'When we're stressed we have a tendency to turn psychological distress into physical symptoms,' he says. 'And there's no doubt going to war is very stressful. We've seen medically unexplained physical symptoms in all other conflicts, just not to the same extent.'

Rethinking Anorexia Nervosa

BBC Radio 4 19th January 2016

Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) presents a programme on anorexia nervosa, the most lethal of psychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging has given clues as to the changes happening in areas of the brain that affect reward processing, sensing of pain or hunger, and body image perception, that become more deeply entrenched over time. Dr Marlow interviews Professor Ulrike Schmidt of the IoPPN to find out more about treatment being developed using electrical stimulation to reset the circuits in the brain that appear to be abnormal in these patients.

Daily catch-up: Tony Blair, the lawyer, 'thought winning the argument was the same as making the change'

Independent 19th January 2016

In an event hosted by the Policy Institute at King’s, Baroness Margaret Jay talked to students studying ‘The Blair Years’ about the Labour party and the Iraq war. Baroness Jay also discussed some of her achievements and successes she was part of.

Employees may be your best asset in time of crisis

CNBC 19th January 2016

A recent poll suggests that employees may be the most overlooked stakeholder when their organisation is dealing with a crisis. The report was published by Deloitte UK in partnership with Public Health England and King’s College London.

US Treasury Chief has a new phone friend of Yuan in China

Bloomberg 19th January 2016

The US Treasury Secretary has been speaking to an advisor of President Xi Jinping; something which experts say is a sign of Xi’s increasing influence at the expense of the Chinese cabinet led by Premier Li Keqiang. Professor Kerry Brown, Director of Lau China Institute, said: ‘It does underline this idea which has taken grip over the last couple of years that Li Keqiang is somewhat sidelined and weak as a premier.’

The strange (but effective) way to stick to hard goals

TIME 19th January 2016

In a discussion on the definition of habits, research by Dr Benjamin Gardner, IoPPN, which focused on habit research, is mentioned. ‘Habit works by generating an impulse to do behaviour with little or no conscious thought,’ he said. Also reported in Huffington Post.

The threat of technological progress

BBC World News 19th January 2016

Professor Stephen Hawking recently said that in the next thousands of years, technological progression, nuclear war, global warming and genetically engineered viruses would be a huge threat to the existence of humanity. Discussing his comments, Professor Karen Yeung, Law, said: ‘With expanded technological capacities come great responsibilities.’

‘Pathankot can happen again, talking to Pakistan an exercise in futility’

Economic Times of India 19th January 2016

At an event at the India International Centre, attendees discussed whether Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s attempts to improve diplomatic ties with Pakistan would have success. PhD candidate Zorawer Daulet Singh, India Institute, said: ‘India should concentrate on using means to serve our ends, including use of counter-proxies and counter-coercion instruments.’

The mysterious link between Autism and extraordinary abilities

MSN 18th January 2016

The article discusses Savant syndrome, a term that refers to people who have a combination of significant cognitive difficulties, often stemming from autism, and profound skills. It refers to research carried out by Patricia Howlin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that in 93 individuals with autism, parent reports and test scores indicated that 39—roughly 40 percent—had exceptional skills, both in comparison with their other abilities and with skill levels found in the general population. The study found that most either had a 'savant' skill such as superior mathematical or musical abilities, or exceptional cognitive skill, but few fit both categories. Howlin says: 'The trouble is that we don’t know an awful lot about people with autism who manage well in the world because we study the individuals who haven’t managed too well'.

Operation Desert Storm: Last of its kind

BBC News 18th January 2016

Professor Michael Clarke, War Studies, comments on the first Gulf War and the effect it had on the world. ‘In many ways it was the NATO war the West had prepared for, but never fought in Europe. It was also the beginning a military revolution - the first time we really heard of "smart bombs" and precision guided munitions,’ he said.

Consumption

BBC World Service 18th January 2016

Global levels of consumption have drastically increased. Dr Eduardo J Gómez, International Development Institute, discussed the increased consumption of fatty foods in the BRIC economies. ‘We’re really talking about a lot of imported cheap foods…In Brazil, India and China the percentage rate of obesity has escalated in recent years,’ he said.

Terrorist attacks

Sky News 17th January 2016

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, discusses the various terrorist attacks which have occurred around the world. ‘There is always the danger when an attack occurs, which has some similarities in terms of the tactics, we are then inclined to see it as part of the pattern,’ he said.

Why random acts of kindness make us all feel good

Guardian 17th January 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about why random acts of kindness make us feel good. ‘The chemistry of the brain’s reward system means that when you receive a favour, like a cup of tea or a lift to work, dopamine is released, and this makes us feel good,’ he said.

History repeats itself as UK's Cameron risks party schism over EU vote

Daily Mail 17th January 2016

The article focuses on Britain’s EU membership. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘If they carry on working for the minister it will be very difficult to separate out what is legitimate work ... from what is campaigning.’

Carriage and horse

The Economist 16th January 2016

Carriage and horse The Economist, 16 January 2016
The article highlights that the number of countries where births are out of wedlock have increased. Professor Robert Wintermute, Law, comments that this could be due to the number of couples getting married decreasing.

Sibling start-ups: What it's really like mixing business and family

BBC Radio 5 Live Science 16th January 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments on the different procedures of doing a poo transplant. ‘There are several ways of doing these transplants,’ he explained.

China cracks down on rights figures with subversion charges

Wall Street Journal 15th January 2016

Chinese authorities have formalised the arrests of several long-detained human-rights lawyers and activists on suspicion of subversion. Dr Eva Pils, Law, said: ‘A political decision was made that lawyers doing their job in this way was something the authorities couldn’t tolerate. It’s incompatible with the goals of the state.’

One small step: A paraplegic undergoes pioneering surgery

The New Yorker 15th January 2016

Surgeons have used a highly complex technique in an attempt to repair the functions to a patient with a permanently damaged spinal cord. Discussing the surgeon who led the operation, Dr Adrian Pini, IoPPN, said: ‘If Geoff does this, he’d be on track to win the Nobel Prize.’

AIIB to open Saturday amid high expectations

People's Daily 15th January 2016

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), established at the end of 2015, started operations on January 16th. Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International studies, commented on the extent to which Britain can benefit from the bank.

E-cigarettes lower the odds of quitting successfully, contested study claims

Guardian 14th January 2016

Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) critiques a recent review that suggest e-cigarette use lowers the odds of quitting smoking, saying that it was “not scientific”. It included data from two studies she had co-authored, but used in ways she claimed was “either inaccurate or misleading”. She said: “I believe the findings should therefore be dismissed.” Also reported by Daily Mail, Yahoo and NDTV.

Air pollution in London

BBC Today 14th January 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, explains why pollution levels in parts of London have already exceeded their legal maximum for the year, linked to the widespread use of diesel in public and private transport. ‘London is the largest city in the UK and we’ve got the biggest transport and congestion problem, so London has the highest and largest concentration of pollution,’ he said. (Interview starts at 55:00).

Ed Balls interview: ‘When the dust settles, people see the truth’

Times Higher Education 14th January 2016

The article focuses on the career of Ed Balls, Policy Institute, and refers to his current role at King’s as a Visiting Professor at the Policy Institute. ‘The Policy Institute’s vision is really interesting and exciting. That bridging between the practice of policy and academia and the deep study of our society and trends and ideas – that’s a really good project,’ he said.

Ebola cases

Sky News 14th January 2016

Dr Oliver Johnson, King’s Sierra Leone Partnership, discusses the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone and what he and the rest of the team at King’s Health Partners experienced during the outbreak. ‘The team I was part of in the main hospital in Freetown before the Ebola outbreak started. So we were there when we heard the news of the first cases in Guinea and we were there when it really got out of hand in Freetown,’ he said.

E-cigarettes lower the odds of quitting successfully, contested study claims

Guardian 14th January 2016

Professor Ann McNeill, IoPPN, critiques a recent review that suggest e-cigarette use lowers the odds of quitting smoking. It included data from two studies she had co-authored, but used in ways she claimed was ‘either inaccurate or misleading’. ‘I believe the findings should therefore be dismissed,’ she said. This was also reported by Daily Mail, Yahoo Bloomberg Business and NDTV.

Rugby star's widow backs heart campaign after husband dies from tragic health condition

Express 13th January 2016

The death of rugby player Danny Jones has helped to raised awareness about undiagnosed heart conditions. Professor Mathias Gautelis, Cardiovascular, is part of a research team helping to discover how changes in genes can lead to faulty heart proteins that can cause the condition. ‘By continuing our research looking at exactly what goes wrong with these proteins, some of which are yet poorly understood, we hope to be able to design new ways to treat people with this often life-threatening disease,’ he said.

National anthem traditionalists should note that ‘God Save the Queen’ was once one of many

New Statesman 13th January 2016

Dr Oskar Cox Jensen, Music, has written an article about the current national anthem ‘God save the Queen’. ‘The song has a particularly complex and mixed history, beginning as a Scottish song in defiance of the English, and it is only the tendency of the past two centuries to sift and to canonise that has seen it become a song apart,’ he said.

Mixed market messages: The cost of reforming British universities

The Conversation 13th January 2016

Professor Jonathan Grant, The Policy Institute, has written an article about the government’s recent proposal to reform higher education. ‘In its ‘Fulfilling our Potential’ green paper, the government set out how it wants to both control the price of higher education, through tuition fees, and determine the quality of teaching through a proposed Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), which plans to reward universities with the best quality teaching,’ he said.

Your gut’s trick for controlling the bacteria that live in it

New Scientist 13th January 2016

Research shows that cells lining the gut produce short strands of genetic material called microRNAs. These strands can get inside bacteria and switch on certain genes, which encourages the growth of specific types of bacteria. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments: ‘The concept is interesting. This emphasises our symbiotic relationship with microbes.’

Paris attacks

BBC Inside Out 13th January 2016

In reaction to the Paris attacks Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, discusses how Europe and France have responded to the attack. ‘There are large domestic security agencies in France, they have overlapping mandates and they tend to step on each other’s turf quite a lot,’ he said. (Interview starts at 04:00)

Attenshunned: Britain’s wars have left 83,000 troops mentally or physically scarred in past 25 years, study reveals

Sun 12th January 2016

Almost one in 11 UK military veterans who served in the regular Armed Forces between 1991 and 2014 will need significant physical or mental health support now or in the years to come, according to a new report by King’s College London and Help for Heroes. Professor Neil Greenberg said: 'More work needs to be done by the MoD to count these figures and make them more available to the public. It is very hard for the Government to know how to address the problem if they don't know the scale of it, and don't even know how many are at risk. Every country must be able to know the human costs of the wars it wants to fight'. Also reported by BBC Radio 4 Today, Radio 1, Express and RT.

King's press release related to 'Attenshunned: Britain’s wars have left 83,000 troops mentally or physically scarred in past 25 years, study reveals'

Terror stalks the Academy: Why does the study of terrorism often deny religious motivation?

Telegraph 12th January 2016

Professor David Martin, War Studies, has written an article, which focuses on religion, particularly Islam and radicalisation. ‘For the past decade, grants, and chairs in terror or peace and conflict studies have been dedicated not only to showing modern terrorism has no Islamic association but even if it does, it is part of a wider, anti-capitalist ‘resistance’ by the rest to the West,’ he said.

Dark matter and dinosaurs: Meet Lisa Randall, America’s superstar scientist

Guardian 12th January 2016

According to scientist Lisa Randall, dark matter could potentially be responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs. Dr Malcom Fairbairn, Physics, comments: ‘This is a bit more off the wall but it is not completely unreasonable. If everybody just gets stuck inside their own little valley and nobody tries to see what’s over the nearest hill then things don’t progress as quickly as they might do otherwise.’

Looking for a match

BBC Radio 4 The Long View 12th January 2016

Online dating has become increasingly popular, however experts argue that it has existed for centuries although advertised differently. The interviewer and expert are at the King’s Institute of Contemporary History looking at the history of online dating.

The spy who hired me

Guardian 12th January 2016

In light of the Paris attacks, David Cameron announced that intelligence agencies will be recruiting more staff. The article refers to a wide range of degrees such as the King’s masters programme: Intelligence and International security which helps students to learn more about intelligence agencies.

Lessons from a would-be suicide bomber on how to defeat terrorism

The Conversation 12th January 2016

Professor Andrew McLeod, Public Policy, has written an article discussing how terrorism can be defeated. ‘Long-term education support programs for susceptible communities, foreign and domestic, need to be followed. A ruthless crackdown on fundamentalist social media recruiting, like with anti-pedophilia programs, must occur,’ he said.

More than 55 UK females went to Syria in 2015, data shows

Guardian 12th January 2016

Data shows that last year 56 women have travelled from the UK to Syria. A report by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) argues that counter-terror programmes aimed at preventing women joining the Islamic State (IS) are ill-informed and under-resourced.

'If mutated viruses were released they could create pandemics we're unable to treat'

Guardian 12th January 2016

Dr Filippa Lentzos, Social Science, Health and Medicine, has written an article about gene editing and China’s controversial experiment, which involved genetically modifying human embryos. ‘This has major social, ethical and legal implications, and some scientists have called for a moratorium to allow for debate before the science races ahead,’ she said.

The Tory grandee who says David Cameron’s EU migrant deal ‘will make no difference at all’

Telegraph 12th January 2016

Former Conservative Chancellor, Nigel Lawson, attended an event at King’s which discussed the EU referendum and the possibility of the UK leaving the EU. This was also reported by Daily Mail and Scottish Daily Mail.

A matter of life and death

Guardian 12th January 2016

Professor Bronwyn Parry, Social Science, Health & Medicine, discusses some of the issues doctors encounter in healthcare. ‘Outbreaks such as Ebola or swine flu won’t be resolved by people working on their own. We need collaborative interventions, ’she said.

North Korean’s N-test may work in China’s favour

New Straits Times 12th January 2016

Experts suggest that China could play a key role in attempting to resume disarmament talks with North Korea. Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, said: ‘If talks are resumed, at the very least there will be a slowdown in North Korea’s nuclear programme.’

China’s Wanda buys Hollywood studio

BBC World News 12th January 2016

The Chinese group Dalian Wanda has announced it will buy a controlling stake in Hollywood film studio Legendary Entertainment. Professor Chris Berry, Film Studies, said: ‘I think it is a good fit, because those kinds of big action pictures are the pictures that have been doing extremely well in China.’

Wife of Chinese human rights lawyer missing for six months tells of despair

Guardian 11th January 2016

To mark the sixth month anniversary of the disappearances of civil rights lawyers in China, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said: ‘Their absence is keenly felt. It does diminish the vibrancy of China’s human rights movement; and I know that unfortunately, some part of a person who ‘went in’ may never be back.’ In another article which focuses on the missing human right lawyers, Dr Pils comments: ‘It is basically about as serious as it gets for human rights advocacy. It is awful. At the moment there is really a sense of shock and people slightly reeling from this.’ This was also reported by Guardian.

London's mayor seems to struggle with science. Time for a chief scientific adviser

Guardian 11th January 2016

The article focuses on the current air pollution problem in London and the health risks it poses for the London population. It also mentions the research by King’s which shows that more than 9,000 in London die from toxic air pollution each year. This was also reported by Express.

Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ is back in German bookstores after 70 years

NPR 11th January 2016

A reprint of Adolf Hitler’s autobiography is for sale in German bookstores for the first time in 70 years. In response to the announcement, Emeritus Professor Jeremy D Adler, German, said: ‘In principle, I am against reintroducing seditious, racist texts and spreading them around.’ Also reported by BBC World News.

India’s terror dilemmas: Responding to the Pathankot atrocity

Diplomat 11th January 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, considered India’s response to the recent terrorist attacks at the Indian Air Force base in Pathankot, Punjab. ‘In the wake of the Pathankot attack, the debate once again is about whether India should talk to Pakistan or not. This is a puerile debate and has little bearing on India’s management of terrorism,’ he said.

Queen’s Counsel in England and Wales: 2015 to 2016

Bloomberg Business 11th January 2016

Professor Robert Blackburn, Law, has been announced as being appointed to Queen’s Counsel. In the announcement, Professor Blackburn was noted to have been recommended for: ‘his constitutional law work and in particular for his report on how a written constitution might work.’

Islamic State

O Globo (Brazil) 11th January 2016

Iranian protests over executions in Saudi Arabia led to a breakdown of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Comparing the two states, Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, said: ‘In this particular confrontation, there is not a clear good or clear bad guy. Both regimes have very nasty reputations, a human rights record that is dodgy to say to least, and what we see at the moment is a power play that has been going on for decades, if not centuries.’

Dust from distant lands

Guardian 10th January 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group has written an article about how the dust from the Sahara Desert is blown across the Atlantic, affecting countries such as Italy, Spain and Portugal. ‘The UK’s air pollution monitoring networks can detect Saharan dust, but it is difficult to distinguish it from other pollution sources,’ he said.

How to deal with a medical emergency on the Space Station

BBC News 10th January 2016

The article focuses on the medical services available on the International Space Station (ISS) and what would happen if there was a medical emergency. Dr David A. Green, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, comments: ‘They have limited resources on the ISS but there are no life support facilities on Soyuz either. If it's a good flight back they could experience a g-force of four g to five g on re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. That's pretty unpleasant for a healthy individual, never mind someone who's critically ill.’

Are you living with low-level sadness?

Telegraph 10th January 2016

Professor Dinesh Bhugra, IoPPN, discusses what low level sadness is and how symptoms such as feelings of hopelessness, tearfulness, a lack of motivation, worrying and changes in appetite are indicators of the condition. ‘These are the physical changes that take place in our body over a 24-hour period, responding to the sun rising and setting,’ he said.

Heartburn pills are linked to more infections, and this may be why

Huffington Post 10th January 2016

Research conducted at King’s suggest that popular heartburn pills know as proton pump inhibitor (PPIs) may be making some people more prone to bacterial infections. Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘By reducing the natural barrier of stomach acid, PPIs appear to let more bacteria from the skin, nose and mouth into the gut – and this can be detected in the stool samples.’ Also reported by Reuters and Fox News.

Arms race puts Asia-Pacific in the centre of global defence

O Globo (Brazil) 10th January 2016

A recent estimate suggests that by 2020, countries in the Asia-Pacific will make up 1/3 of the world’s spending on defense, up from 1/5 in 2010. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discusses the influence of Chinese military growth. ‘Chinese growth has caused a movement of action and reaction in the region,’ he said.

Recession will not take away the importance of Brazil, says political scientist

Folha (Brazil) 10th January 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, conducted an in-depth interview on the current state of Brazilian politics and economics. ‘Investigations of corruption are a possible ray of light in the cloud that is the current economic and political crisis in Brazil. It is too early to make a judgement on the impact that will have,’ he said.

How easily can a parent psychologically damage their child?

Independent 9th January 2016

The article looks at the effects parents can have on the mental health of their children. Dr Matt Woolgar of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) notes: “Trust your instincts about what you know about your child. You will always be saying things that aren’t helpful, but you’ll hopefully be saying more things that are helpful. You can’t be a perfect parent. You have to keep telling yourself as a parent you’re doing your best and there are lots of opportunities for change and nothing is definite. There are lot of opportunities to make things better.” Also reported by MSN.

Paris attacks aftermath

BBC Radio 4 9th January 2016

Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, comments on how the French government has responded to the Paris terror attacks and argues that the way France is tackling radicalisation may be counterproductive. ‘If you take one section of the population and subject them to higher scrutiny than others, then what you get is alienation and division in society between groups,’ he said.

How easily can a parent psychologically damage their child?

Independent 9th January 2016

The article looks at the effects parents can have on the mental health of their children. Dr Matt Woolgar, IoPPN, notes: ‘Trust your instincts about what you know about your child. You will always be saying things that aren’t helpful, but you’ll hopefully be saying more things that are helpful.’

Genes

BBC Radio 5 Live 9th January 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, discusses how much control we have over our genes. ‘I think genes are overrated, so it’s more about what you do with your genes rather than the number and type of genes,’ he said.

Mats G L Gustafsson (1960 – 2011)

Sina 9th January 2016

Following the death of physicist Mats Gustafsson in 2011, his former colleagues remember his life and work. Dr Rainer Heintzmann, Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, said: ‘If you asked him a question that wasn’t easy, he’d think a little bit and after some time come up with an answer that made it clear that you hadn’t been thinking about the question in the right way.’

You can’t ignore all that road noise: It could shorten your life

LA Times 9th January 2016

Research by King’s College London, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found that long-term exposure to moderately loud or very loud traffic sounds during the daytime contributed to the risk of a shorter life expectancy.

Unwanted Thoughts: The Dangers Of 'Pure O'

Sky News 8th January 2016

Professor David Veale of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses fears that some people with a little known form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – or OCD – are being wrongly diagnosed as a danger.

The slog of war

The Economist 8th January 2016

A book written by Dr Niall Barr, Defence Studies, has been reviewed by the publication. The book, which explores the complexities of British and American military co-operation during the second world war, is praised: ‘Niall Barr…triumphs; his is an authoritative and highly readable account.’

Low blood sugar, hallucinations and tiredness all symptoms of this dangerous condition

Express 8th January 2016

The article focuses on the effects of cutting down on alcohol. Professor Roger Jones, General Practice said: ‘Excessive drinking causes damage to many body systems, notably the liver and brain, and alcohol is a major risk factor for the development of many cancers.’

Daily catch-up: The Blair-Clinton transcripts and another genuine shop name

Independent 8th January 2016

Transcripts of conversation between Bill Clinton and Tony Blair have been made public. In light of this the article refers to the book ‘The Blair Years’, written Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute.

Why we need to take action before obesity really is the new normal

Telegraph 8th January 2016

The article focuses on obesity in the UK and highlights research by King’s which showed that the chance of an adult returning to normal weight after becoming obese is only one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women.

GM foods: Big biotech is quietly winning the war

The Conversation 8th January 2016

Dr Vivian Moses, Biotechnology, has written an article on the popularity of the anti-GM movement in the UK. ‘You can trace the anti-GM movement to two things. First, increasing disillusion, especially in Europe, with the progress of left-wing ideologies in the former Soviet Union and its allies. And second, a growing awareness of environmental problems in the years following the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson’s landmark attack on synthetic pesticides, Silent Spring,’ she said.

London takes just one week to breach annual air pollution limits

Guardian 8th January 2016

According to reports, London has already breached annual pollution limits for nitrogen dioxide. Andrew Grieve, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘It’s just that central London, and London as a whole, have a really huge problem with NO2. Breaching so early in the year really just illustrates how big a problem it is.’ Also reported by Bloomberg Business.

Unwanted Thoughts: The Dangers Of 'Pure O'

Sky News 8th January 2016

Professor David Veale, IoPPN, discusses fears that some people with a little known form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – or OCD – are being wrongly diagnosed as a danger. (Interview starts at 3:10).

Financial reforms get thumbs-up

China Daily 8th January 2016

Experts have analysed the Chinese government’s proposal for financial reform in the country, namely the 13th Five-Year-Plan (2016-20). Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘As China opens up its capital accounts and liberalises the renminbi, it would be helpful to know how quickly China plans to make the renminbi an international currency.’

‘Mein Kampf’ on sale in Germany

BBC World News 8th January 2016

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, discussed how defeated countries acted in the aftermath of the Second World War, in order to process their involvement. ‘There is a substantial difference between the way Germany had to deal with its past, than Japan,’ he said.

Just say no to stolen oil

Wall Street Journal 8th January 2016

Professor Leif Wenar, Law, questioned the morality of the global oil trade in this opinion piece. ‘These regimes control oil, and we need it. But we too often look past the troubling moral reality of the global oil trade, which is based on the archaic principle that ‘might makes right’, he said.

ICS security expert and SANS instructor, Robert M. Lee named to Forbes’ 30 under 30

Bloomberg Business 7th January 2016

PhD student Robert M. Lee, War Studies, has been named in Forbes Magazine’s 2016 ‘30 under 30’ list in the enterprise technology category. Mr Lee cofounded Dragos Security, which states it has produced a better way to protect Industrial Control Systems (ICS) and passively monitor networked assets.

Reducing sugary drinks cuts calories, but only a few, studies find

Fox news 7th January 2016

Studies have suggested that reducing sugar in sweetened drinks or taxing it to cut consumption can help people limit their calorie intake and lower their risk of developing diabetes, but not by that much. Commenting on the findings, Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘This study shows a fall of 36 millilitres per head per day…This is equivalent to about 1 sugar cube (16 calories), which is a drop in the caloric ocean.’ This was also reported in NDTV.

Forest fires

BBC Radio 4 Inside Science 7th January 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, comments on the effects of the El Nino weather in Indonesia and what he experienced in the country. ‘It was absolutely extreme, I was unprepared by the conditions. When we landed in South Indonesia, the aircraft went through two kilometers of smoke, but that was nothing to what experienced the next day,’ he said. (Interview starts at 17:40).

Heartburn pills may help grow infection-causing bacteria in gut

Reuters 7th January 2016

A study shows that a popular heartburn pill known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can cause changes in the gut. Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘By reducing the natural barrier of stomach acid, PPIs appear to let more bacteria from the skin, nose and mouth into the gut – and this can be detected in the stool samples.’

Radicalisation research

BBC One This Week 7th January 2016

A panel discussion about terror and radicalisation mentions research by the ICSR. The research suggested that radicalisation is not driven principally by poverty and social deprivation, as many people who join the Islamic State come from high achieving backgrounds.

Does North Korea have H-Bomb know-how?

CNN 6th January 2016

If reports are true, the announcement by North Korea that they have tested a hydrogen bomb will signal a significant advance in the country’s nuclear capabilities. Commenting on the reliability of the claims, Dr Martin S Navias, War Studies, said: ‘The North Koreans have a tendency of engaging in a full blown rhetoric, which can be bizarre and alarming. They tend to trumpet their achievements before those achievements have been actualised on the ground.’

Pathankot: ‘Modi’s AF-Pak diplomacy has rattled Pakistan’

Hindustan Times 6th January 2016

Experts suggest that an attack in Pathankot, India, could have been the result of diplomatic relations in December between India and Pakistan. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘Modi’s proactive Af-Pak diplomacy in December 2015 clearly ended up rattling those elements within the Pakistani military-intelligence complex which have a stake in perpetuating Indo-Pakistan hostility. So the attacks in Pathankot and in Afghanistan are merely symptomatic of this enduring Indo-Pak conundrum and were to be expected.’

Explainer: What is a hydrogen bomb? (And why it may not be what North Korea exploded)

The Conversation 6th January 2016

Dr Robert J Downes, War Studies, discusses the testing of a hydrogen bomb, claimed by officials in North Korea. ‘North Korean officials announced in advance that the test would involve a totally different type of nuclear bomb from those trialed in previous years. Following the test, North Korean state television lauded the first detonation of a hydrogen bomb as a national epoch-making event,’ he said.

Bahrain claims to have foiled Iran-linked terror plot

Financial Times 6th January 2016

Bahrain has detained a terrorist group linked to Hezbollah for attempting to plan bomb attacks in the country, increasing tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran. Dr Jean–Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘Bahrain has always been a proxy battle ground between Iran and Saudi.’

Sugar tax in Mexico cuts sales of sugary drinks by 12 per cent

Telegraph 6th January 2016

Mexico has introduced a sugar tax on fizzy drinks which has decreased the sales of sugar drinks by 12 per cent. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Mexico is a relatively poor country compared to the UK so the impact of tax is likely to be greater.’

The sun goes down on Vitamin D: why I changed my mind about this celebrated supplement

The Conversation 6th January 2016

Dr Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, has written an article discussing the possible health benefits of taking supplements such as Vitamin D. ‘Doctors, patients and the media have been enamoured with vitamin D supplements for decades,’ he said.

How rubbing your arms can banish bad memories: 'Havening' technique helps you get rid of distressing thoughts

Daily Mail 5th January 2016

'Havening' is thought to work by boosting levels of the mood-stabilising brain chemical serotonin, which can disrupt the link between the memory of an event and the distress it causes. The research team, led by Professor Greenberg of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) recruited a group of 27 men and women who had reported having problems with work due to anxiety or depression. The group was followed-up a week later, and again after two months, using several standardised measures of psychological wellbeing. 'Overall, we found that within this small sample there was a clear improvement on all mental health measures after the Havening intervention,' said Professor Greenberg. Also reported in Sun.

How rubbing your arms can banish bad memories: 'Havening' technique helps you get rid of distressing thoughts

Daily Mail 5th January 2016

According to a research led by Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IOPPN), 'Havening' can boost the levels of the mood-stabilising brain chemical serotonin, which can disrupt the link between the memory of an event and the distress it causes. 'Overall, we found that within this small sample there was a clear improvement on all mental health measures after the Havening intervention,' he said.

Etiquette

BBC Radio 4 Etiquette Guide 5th January 2016

Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice-Principal (Arts & Sciences), comments on the popularity of Guides to etiquette. ‘These’ how to’ manuals are incredibly popular. They are selling all over Europe and they show you what kind of clothing to wear, how to move your feet and how to hold your hat,’ she said (Interview starts at 02:40 minutes).

slamic State executioner might not be Siddhartha Dhar, prominent UK experts say

Huffington Post UK 5th January 2016

Speculation has arisen over the identity of the British Islamic State executioner featured in the latest video released by the terror group. The article included a link to a tweet by Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, which said: ‘I’m really not convinced that the new Jihadi John’ is Abu Rumaysah. New guy doesn’t sound like him and is much too bulky.’ He was also interviewed by BBC News, Sky News and BBC Radio 4 Today.

Shia-Sunni relations

BBC World Service 4th January 2016

Following the breakdown of diplomatic relations between Saudi Arabia and Iran, Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, discussed the background of tensions between Sunni and Shiite Muslim communities. ‘It goes back to the very beginnings of Islam when the prophet passed away…I think the break became really irreparable in 680AD…when one of the Shia imams was martyred in a battle with the forces of the Sunni leaders army,’ he said. Dr Kersten also commented on the topic for Iran Wire.

Markets in China

Sky News 4th January 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director of the Lau China Institute, discusses the current state of the Chinese stock market investors. ‘There is no real strategy behind some of the investments and the other problem is that Chinese companies are not of the quality that some may expect,’ he said.

Slower growth, but Beijing's influence in Asia set to grow

New Straits Times 3rd January 2016

Analysts say that despite slow growth, China’s economic influence in Asia looks to increase in 2016. Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, noted that the lowing GDP growth could be the trickiest economic issue for Beijing this year. ‘While the slowdown was expected by the government, its speed and extent were not,’ he said.

Dinter, bitz and gwop: A guide to youth slang in 2016

The Conversation 3rd January 2016

Tony Thorne, Director of Slang and New Language Archive, has written an article about the slang teenagers currently use and will be using this year. ‘A defining characteristic of youth slang is thought to be its faddishness – the fact that terms have a rapid turnover, quickly coming in and out of fashion and then disappearing before parents and teachers have time to decode them,’ he said. This was also reported by BBC Radio 5 Live and the Independent.

Has your child got a high IQ?

Sun 2nd January 2016

The article mentions a study carried out by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that artistic youngsters who can create a realistic image of a human at age four are more likely to be intelligent in their teens.

Has your child got a high I–Q?

The Sun 2nd January 2016

Researchers at King’s studied 15,000 pictures drawn by four–year-olds and found that children who are good at drawing are more likely to perform better in later IQ tests.

Terror threat

BBC Radio 4 2nd January 2016

Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, comments on the current state of terrorism and security in Europe. ‘I think that it is important to realise that the threat of transnational Islamic extremism has been with us for some time and that’s reflected in the UK government allocating additional expenditure on counter terrorism consistently,’ he said.

Alcohol guidelines

BBC News 24 1st January 2016

Interview at 13.26 with Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who comments on new advice on how much people in the UK should limit their drinking, which is to be issued following the first review of official alcohol guidance in 20 years. Dr Marlow discusses why people drink, how people respond differently to alcohol intake, the effect it has on the brain, and the physical and psychological benefits of cutting down. Also reported 09:25 01/01/16 BBC Radio 5 Live, 17:34 08/01/15 BBC News 24, 16:27 09/01/15, BBC Radio 4, and BBC News Online.

Alcohol guideline

BBC News 1st January 2016

In advance of the announcement of new alcohol guidance, the first review in 20 years, Dr Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses why people drink, how people respond differently to alcohol intake, the effect it has on the brain, and the physical and psychological benefits of cutting down. This was also reported by BBC Radio 5 Live.

2016 New Year Honours for health and social care services

Bloomberg 31st December 2015

The article outlines this year's honours list, which includes Professor Til Hilary Margaret Wykes, Vice-Dean of Psychology and Systems Sciences and Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) King's College London. For services to clinical psychology.

King's press release related to '2016 New Year Honours for health and social care services'

2016 New Year honours for health and social care services

Bloomberg Business 31st December 2015

The article outlines this year's honours list, which includes Professor Til Hilary Margaret Wykes, Vice-Dean of Psychology and Systems Sciences and Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation, IoPPN, for services to clinical psychology.

Our prettiest pollutant: Just how bad are fireworks for the environment?

The Conversation 31st December 2015

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, has written an article about the dangers of fireworks for the environment. ‘Firework smoke is rich in tiny metal particles. These metals make firework colours, in much the same way as Victorian scientists identified chemicals by burning them in a Bunsen flame; blue from copper, red from strontium or lithium, and bright green or white from barium compounds,’ he said.

Festive heartburn cures: Why over-the-counter drugs may be hurting your gut

The Conversation 31st December 2015

Professor Tim Spector, and Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, discuss the symptoms of heartburn and the medication used by people to cure the side effects. ‘Proton pump inhibitors…are able to cause rapid and dramatic reductions in gastric acid, are generally considered to be safe, and have few side effects,’ they said.

Man Booker Prize

BBC Radio 5 Up All Night 30th December 2015

Dr John Day, English, discusses his role and involvement in judging the Man Booker Prize which will take place in October 2016. ‘I was very flattered to be asked to take part; it’s a great and a big job. I’m in a blissful pre-reading period. Last year they did 156 books and so I imagine this year it will be something similar,’ he said.

Women’s Vanity

BBC Radio 4 Thinking Allowed 30th December 2015

Dr Joanne Entwistsle, Culture, Media and Creative Industries, comments on female vanity and the impact it has had on the fashion industry. ‘There is a historical association between women and vanity and perhaps that association still lingers today. I think it’s worth thinking about that it is a gender association; men have also been involved in fashion only we tend not to think of it in that way,’ she says. (Interview starts at 15:00 minutes).

Air quality report

BBC Radio London 29th December 2015

King’s Environmental Research Group produced a report for the Greater London Authority (GLA), which showed that up to 25 people per day were dying due to poor air quality in London. The report also highlighted that Oxford Street and Marylebone Road are the two most polluted streets in London. (Interview starts at 02:35).

Top health mantras to follow in 2016

NDTV 28th December 2015

Article recommends ‘wellness mantras’ for 2016. Research conducted at King’s into the effects of prolonged sitting and physical activity is mentioned in the article.

Art and Religion

BBC Radio 4 Sunday 27th December 2015

Dr Aaron Rosen, Theology and Religious Studies, comments on the relationship between art and religion, in an art gallery in London. ‘The first painting is Piero della Francesca’s ‘Baptism of Christ’ in 1450s. It has always captured the imagination not just of the people and this period, but also of modern artists,’ he said.

Could Modi's visit to Pakistan signal a policy shift?

Al Jazeera Inside Story 26th December 2015

In a surprise visit, and the first in over 10 years for an Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi travelled to Pakistan to meet Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. Commenting on the visit, Dr Sandipto Dasgupta, India Institute, said: ‘I think there is good political reasons for both Modi and Sharif to present this as some kind of impulsive visit…you don’t make it into a high level political summit, but more of an informal meeting. This allows you on one hand to showcase the good chemistry…but also leaves enough room to manoeuvre back if things don’t go as planned.’

Education is antidote to radicalisation

O Globo (Brazil) 25th December 2015

Youths from Middle Eastern countries of conflict, such as Syria, are being recruited by Islamic State. Commenting on those who join the terror group, Dr Shiraz Maher, International Center for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), identified a common feeling among recruits: ‘anger, defiance, feeling of harassment, and refusal to conform,’ he said.

The image of Jesus

BBC World News 24th December 2015

Many Western depictions of Jesus are widely considered to be inaccurate. Commenting on recent research that attempts to reconstruct a more accurate portrait, Professor Joan Taylor, Theology & Religious Studies, said: ‘It shows you the kind of man that lived during this time…The image of the long-hair long-beard comes from Byzantine art…overall we got this image from the idea of a glorified God.’

Floods in Cumbria

Sky News 24th December 2015

Professor David Demeritt, Geography, comments on the floods in Cumbria and the flood defence systems currently in place to protect residents. ‘Flood defences are designed to protect against a certain volume of water. Depending on how they are built they can be high or thick; that’s the kind of defenses you build for.’

Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

Telegraph 22nd December 2015

The article mentions a study carried out by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that up to 65 per cent of the difference in pupil’s GCSE grades was down to genetics, after analysing genetic data from 12,500 twins. They found that all exam results were highly heritable, demonstrating that genes explain a larger proportion of the differences between children, between 54 and 65 per cent. Also reported in O Globo.

The lethal effects of London fog

BBC News 22nd December 2015

The article focuses on the current air pollution crisis that London is facing. A recent study by the Environmental Research Group at King’s shows that over 9,000 people die each year as a result of air pollution in London. premature deaths a year.

How will Hezbollah respond to the assassination of one of its commanders in Syria?

Telegraph 22nd December 2015

PhD student Raphael D. Marcus, War Studies, has written an article about the assassination of Hezbollah commander Samir Kantar. ‘Kantar was originally imprisoned in Israel for a notorious attack which killed four Israelis,’ he said.

Spanish elections

BBC World News 21st December 2015

In the recent Spanish elections, ruling party Partido Popular (PP) fell short of gaining a majority vote, raising questions of how a coalition government may form. Dr Nagore Calvo, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, said: ‘There is an indication that there might be collaboration between Podemos and others, which would create some kind of stability in the parliament.’

Human rights reform still a long way off

BBC News 21st December 2015

The Conservative Party have promised reforms on human rights in 2016, aiming to replace the Human Rights Act with a UK bill of rights. Before they can make this change they will have to work together with the European Court of Justice. Professor Guglielmo Verdirame, War Studies, argues that the EU will not oppose the government and Parliament on the reform.

The art of the possible: Rediscovering the meaning of realpolitik

New Statesman 21st December 2015

Realpolitik, a book authored by Dr John Bew, War Studies, is reviewed by journalist Douglas Alexander. ‘Realpolitik: a History’ exemplifies the benefits that can be gained by careful and methodical study of history as a means to a better understanding of contemporary challenges,’ he said.

Touch technology: A medical and musical instrument of change – podcast

Guardian 21st December 2015

Dr Barry Quinn, Dental Institute, comments on how haptic and touch-based technology can help dental students to improve their skills. ‘Undergraduate dental students, in their first few years of dentistry have to learn clinical skills by practicing, using fake dummies. The dummies have teeth which have been extracted from real patients and they also have plastic teeth which students can use to practice,’ he said.

Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

Telegraph 21st December 2015

Scientists have discovered genes which can make people intelligent and boost their brain power. Earlier this year research by King’s showed that pupil’s GCSE grades were largely influenced by genetics after anyalysing 12,500 twins. Also reported by O Globo

How to brighten up on the glummest days

Guardian 20th December 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote a piece on how mirror neurons can make us unconsciously copy other people’s behaviour. ‘Some neuroscientists have argued that mirror neurons are the basis for empathy, and in fact simply holding a pencil in your mouth will activate your smile muscles and make you feel a little happier,’ he said.

Could a war in space really happen?

BBC News 19th December 2015

There are now 60 countries active in space raising interesting questions on diplomatic ‘space relations’. Professor Bhupendra Jasani, War Studies, comments historic role that the UK and USSR played in preventing a ‘war’ in space. ‘There was a tactical understanding between the US and Soviet Union that an attack on specific satellites that could disrupt and disable nuclear command and control or the ability to warn about an attack would be seen as a de facto nuclear attack. That served to deter both sides from attacking satellites,’ he said.

'He has to have a life, we have to take that risk': Children living with extreme allergies

Guardian 19th December 2015

The article explores some of the extreme allergies children have and why they develop. Professor Gideon Lack, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, explains how allergies develop: ‘It’s the foods in the environment that the baby is exposed to in the skin that set up the allergy. That’s why it’s critical that the foods the family eat are introduced into the baby’s diet.’

Military discussion

Al Jazeera 18th December 2015

Dr Humeira Iqtidar, Political Economy, was on a panel of speakers who contributed to a debate with former Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar. Discussing the control that the Pakistani government had over its military, Dr Iqtidar said: ‘I think it’s been a mixed record…the problem was that there was absolutely no clarity of policy.’

Diesel is fast losing favour in the UK

Hindustan Times 17th December 2015

The British Supreme Court recently ordered the UK Government to take steps to tackle air pollution, including phasing out diesel. Professor Martin Williams, ERG, explained that diesel was encouraged by the previous Labour government. ‘Diesel was seen as a good thing because it produces less CO2, so we gave people incentives to buy diesel cars,’ he said.

A space medicine special: skin suits

BBC World Service Health Check 17th December 2015

A skin suit has been developed by scientists at King’s that aims to protect astronauts from the harmful effects of microgravity, such as back problems. One of the developers of the suit, Dr David A. Green, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, said: ‘When astronauts go into space, they enter a weightless environment…That loss of gravity means that the tendency of the spine is to elongate. The suit is made of a special spandex material and the idea is that it recreates the loading our body’s experience here on earth.’ This was also reported on NPR and BBC Breakfast.

HE Green Paper: Reforms will benefit the established elite

Times Higher Education 17th December 2015

Professor Paul Blackmore, Policy Institute, wrote a piece about the government’s higher education Green Paper Fulfilling our Potential. ‘Change is proposed by introducing the teaching excellence framework (TEF), so that institutions who teach better will be paid more for doing so. Changing attitudes towards teaching will be particularly challenging, but the scale of the task is perhaps even greater and more complex than at first appears,’ he said.

Second Saharan dust cloud to hit England and Wales this weekend

Guardian 17th December 2015

Air pollution from the Saharan dust is expected to hit the UK and Wales this weekend. Parts of eastern, central and southern England have already being affected. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘Across Europe, Saharan dust is mainly an air pollution problem for Mediterranean countries, especially those in the east Mediterranean where episodes have caused air pollution to reach 10 times the EU limits.’

I think, therefore I buy: how buying nothing at Christmas time is harder than it appears

The Conversation 17th December 2015

Many people from all over the world recently took part in ‘Buy Nothing Day’, a day part of the anti-consumption movement. Recent research into ethical consumption, done in collaboration with King’s, is mentioned, which looked at groups decision making when faced with different available resource.

China and the Internet

BBC Radio 4 Today 17th December 2015

At the recent World Internet conference in China, the country’s government stated it wanted more control over what is on the internet. Professor Kerry Brown, Director of the Lau China Institute, commented on the demand: ‘China has been very resilient on controlling the internet and internet sovereignty within China. So internet sovereignty means that you don’t allow Facebook Google and other social networking sites into China and use Chinese companies to make profits,’ he said.

Joining a choir could help to stave off dementia

Telegraph 17th December 2015

According to health watchdogs, old people can avoid loneliness and dementia by joining a choir and reading to young children. Honorary Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Public Health, said: ‘Independence and mental well-being are hugely important in maintaining a sense of self.’

X-ray vision for allergy and Nicole Kidman

Telegraph India 16th December 2015

Professor Brian Sutton, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, discussed his recent role as scientific adviser to the West End play ‘Photograph 51’ and his research at King’s. ‘I have been at King’s for 27 years. When I joined Maurice Wilkins was an emeritus professor. He was the first to take the X-ray photograph of DNA and had refined the technique. He was actually a physicist,’ he said.

Elderly Care

BBC Radio 4 You and Yours 16th December 2015

Dr Mayumi Hayashi, Institute of Gerontology, comments on Japan’s ageing population and changing attitude towards dementia. ‘Years ago dementia was stigmatised and not recognised in many cases as an illness and as a natural part of ageing, but things are now different since the government changed the name of the condition,’ she said.

Turkey to set up Qatar military base to face ‘common enemies’

Daily Mail 16th December 2015

Turkey will have a military base in Qatar as part of a defence agreement between both countries. Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘If you are a small state like Qatar you have an interest in hosting several allies on your territory because it provides you with an indirect security guarantee from your ally. Moreover, it increases the costs for the aggressor of any potential attack.’

The Fed raises US interest rate

BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight 16th December 2015

The US Federal Reserve decided to raise interest rates in the country for the first time in nearly 10 years. Commenting on how this might impact on the Brazilian economy, Professor Anthony Pereira, Director of Brazil Institute, said: ‘I think this rate rise certainly doesn’t help and many people think that this may not have an immediate impact. What it suggests is that the dollar will creep up against the Brazilian currency, which will increase the cost of servicing the debt of Brazilian companies.’

Antidepressants can increase risk of bipolar and mania by up to 35%

International Business Times 15th December 2015

Research led by Dr Rashmi Patel of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), found that serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, and venlafaxine have the strongest ties to the subsequent development of the two mental illnesses. The team analysed data from medical records of 21,000 patients diagnosed with depression between 2006 and 2013. Of these people, 1.1% had been diagnosed with mania and/or bipolar. Those who were on SSRIs and venlafaxine were at a 34-35% heightened risk of developing the two other mental illnesses even when mitigating factors are taken into consideration. Also reported in US News.

Study abroad 2015 – 16

Times of India 15th December 2015

Major Indian newspaper Times of India has published its annual ‘Study Abroad’ guide for 2015-2016. Law student Shruti Subramaniam is quoted discussing her LLB course. ‘Studying at King’s in London will make me an international and well-rounded graduate who is sought after by employers,’ she said.

Women haven’t really won in Saudi Arabia - yet

TIME 15th December 2015

Recent elections in Saudi Arabia saw women able to vote, and be voted into political positions, for the first time. Joana Cooke, War Studies, said: ‘This is a symbolic victory for women as these roles don’t come with much power…But absolutely it’s a stepping stone.’

Saudi forms 34-nation anti-'terrorist' military coalition

Daily Mail 15th December 2015

Saudi Arabia has formed a military coalition of 34 countries to fight against terrorism. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘The IS threat is the most fundamental challenge to Saudi's raison d'etat and the security of its citizens. At the same time, the huge human and financial costs of the kingdom's military operation in Yemen have become increasingly difficult for it to bear.’ Also reported in the Economic Times of India.

Antidepressants can increase risk of bipolar and mania by up to 35%

International Business Times 15th December 2015

Research led by Dr Rashmi Patel, IoPPN, found that some antidepressants have the strongest ties to the subsequent development of the two mental illnesses. The team analysed data from medical records of 21,000 patients diagnosed with depression between 2006 and 2013. ‘Our findings also highlight an ongoing need to develop better ways to predict future risk of mania in people with no prior history of bipolar disorder who present with an episode of depression,’ said the researchers.
This was also reported by US News.

Chinese prosecution of lawyers

BBC World News 14th December 2015

China has been criticised for the persecution of many of its leading lawyers, including the recent trial of lawyer Pu Zhiqiang. Dr Eva Pils, Dickson Poon School of Law, said: ‘Targeting him now is symbolic of the wider crackdown on civil society in China, especially on free speech.’

Taking antidepressants while pregnant may double autism risk

Times of India 14th December 2015

Recent research published in Canada suggested that women who take certain common anti-depressants when pregnant may face almost twice the risk of having a child with autism. Professor Emily Simonoff, IoPPN, said that more research is needed. ‘All pregnant women, as well as those planning a pregnancy, who are taking SSRIs should discuss the therapeutic options with their doctor, bearing in mind that the present findings do not necessarily indicate a causal role of the medication,’ she said.

Smartphones, tablets should have 'bedtime' mode

Times of India 14th December 2015

Research conducted by the Evelina London Children’s Hospital, King’s, and the University of Surrey, found that smartphone tablets and e-readers produce short-wavelength blue light, causing disruption to sleep patterns. Researchers suggested modifications to devices for night-time use to reduce the impact on sleep.

The future of medicine is testing your body fluids at home

BBC Futures 14th December 2015

Scientists have found that bodily fluids can give us information about our health and body, and new technology has been developed that allow doctors to test patients for flu, fertility and signs of inflammation. Dr Guy Carpenter, Mucosal & Salivary Biology, said: ‘As you might expect, many of these kits will involve the testing of blood. In blood you can detect just about everything that you’ve eaten, or that’s going on in your body.’ Professor Tim Spector also commented in the article. ‘We think that at least a third of the metabolites in our blood are being produced by our microbes.’

Devolution talks

Sky News 14th December 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History, discusses Nicola Sturgeon’s request for devolution of more power on tax and welfare to Scotland by February 2016. ‘All this stems from the promise made before the Independence referendum last September, when party leaders agreed that Scotland was to have much more devolution of welfare powers and devolution of tax powers,’ he said.

Sugar rush discussion

BBC Radio 4 Philosopher’s Arms 14th December 2015

Dr Maria Alvarez, Philosophy, discusses the philosophy of having a ‘sweet tooth’ and people’s addiction to chocolate. ‘There is a phenomenon of experiencing this weakness of will. When you make a decision about what you want to do, whether it is to do with eating or something else and don’t do what you’ve deliberated to do, it can be quite problematic for philosophers. This is because the point of deliberation is coming to a judgement about what you think it’s best to do,’ she said.

Obesity isn’t the half of it: fat or thin, our eating is disordered

Guardian 14th December 2015

The article focuses on obesity and the health risk it poses for women. Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that obesity could be as a result of changes caused by early and frequent antibiotic use which alter the flora in our gut.

How what we wear affects our mood

Guardian 13th December 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote a piece on how wearing different clothes can change the way we feel. ‘Social and sartorial pitfalls abound, but what you may not realise is that your choice of outfit can change the way the brain understands the body,’ he said.

Saudi women cast historic first votes with help of Uber cabs

Sunday Times 13th December 2015

Women in Saudi Arabia have been allowed to vote and stand as candidates in polls for municipal councils for the first time in the country. Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, said: ‘The decision to allow women to take part in the poll is a milestone. Their policies seem primarily geared towards consolidating their grip on power and strengthening Saudi Arabia’s regional position.’

Online female fan club lionises jihadists with ‘Happy 9/11’ cake

Sunday Times 13th December 2015

An extremist group banned by the Home Office has caused more than 100 people from Britain and Europe to join ISIS. According to Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, the extremist group Al- Muhajiroun was founded by a preacher in London and has recruited many people across Europe to fight in Syria.

Unfriended

The Economist 12th December 2015

The article focuses on the number of ways IS use smartphones and videos to increase foreign recruits. However, Aaron Zelin, ICSR, notes that IS propaganda, both its quantity and reach are diminishing and that there has been a marked decline since a peak in midsummer.’

Corrupted bounty

The Economist 12th December 2015

Professor Leif Wenar, Law, discusses consumerism and trade in oil, minerals and metals in the West. Professor Wenar argues: ‘Western consumers are blinded to the fact that international trade still operates according to the law of the jungle.’

Air Pollution

BBC World News 12th December 2015

Despite tougher regulations, the amount of poisonous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the UK air remains high, and recent research found that during the rush hour in London, NO2 often peaks at dangerous levels. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘Our measurements from the London air quality network clearly showed that NO2 was not changing.’ Dr Ben Barratt, also of the ERG, demonstrated an experiment that measured the diesel pollution in London and its effects on our bodies. Discussing the research, he said: ‘It really changed something that was primarily seen as an environmental issue, to a health issue.’

Alex Polizzi: Hire Our Heroes

BBC 2 11th December 2015

Professor Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), is interviewed by Alex Polizzi about the challenges military veterans face when returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. He said soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder should be encouraged to return to work as soon as possible in order to help their recovery. Interview begins at 45.25.

CMO calls for measures to improve women's health

King's Press Release 11th December 2015

A new report by the Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies makes a series of recommendations to improve women’s health in the UK. Professor Debra Bick, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery, said: ‘Postnatal contacts should offer opportunities to identify and implement effective care to reduce maternal morbidity and promote longer-term physical and mental health, including outcomes of subsequent pregnancies and family health.’

King's press release related to 'CMO calls for measures to improve women's health '

Stars on key this Christmas

Metro 11th December 2015

The King’s Choir will perform for a programme called ‘Voices of Enchantment’ at the Christmas Festival at St John’s Smith Square to celebrate their 30th anniversary.

Is Donald Trump right that more British Muslims fight for Isis than the UK army?

Guardian 11th December 2015

US Presidential hopeful Donald Trump has claimed that more British Muslims have joined the Islamic State than the British armed forces. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), estimates that roughly 750 Muslims have joined IS in Syria in the last three to four years. ‘Isis is a fairly late actor. Most of those who went out in the earlier phases of the civil war were not joining Isis, they were going to Jabhat al-Nusra, and many other groups,’ he said.

Post-traumatic stress disorder and military veterans

BBC Two Hire our Heroes 11th December 2015

Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, is interviewed by Alex Polizzi about the challenges military veterans face when returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. He said soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder should be encouraged to return to work as soon as possible in order to help their recovery. ‘The evidence points to get them in work as soon as you can,’ he said. Interview begins at 45.25.

King's joins UK bid to strengthen India industry ties

King's Press Release 10th December 2015

King’s joined a UK government delegation looking to build stronger education, science, research and innovation ties with India this week. The university was invited to join ministers on the visit in what has been a series of events strengthening relations with partners and industry in India.

King's press release related to 'King's joins UK bid to strengthen India industry ties'

White students gain less from higher education, UK Engagement Survey suggests

Times Higher Education 10th December 2015

According to a survey, white students report lower levels of skill development compared to students from a black minority ethnic background. Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King's Learning Institute, said: ‘Students from disadvantaged backgrounds sometimes report higher gains and greater correlation between engagement and gaining skills.’

Women in terrorism

BBC Radio 5 Live 10th December 2015

Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, comments on the government’s latest figures, which show that the number of women joining the Islamic State (IS) has increased. ‘I’m not surprised at all mainly because the ways in which we are now detaining people are much earlier on than in the past. Women’s involvement in terrorism has been at the support end.’ (interview starts 02.12.19)

What should President Buhari do about calls for a free Biafra?

Newsweek 10th December 2015

There has been a recent upsurge in support for independence in the southern region of Nigeria, once known as Biafra. Dr Vincent Hiribarren, History, commented on the history of the region. ‘There’s a long history of mistrust with the federal government...Every time the Igbos and the pro-Biafrans complain about what’s going on now with Nigeria, they will stress the fact that the top appointments are not given to those from the southeast.’

Abe to Cash In on Modi Friendship as China Dominates Trade

Bloomberg 10th December 2015

As a result of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s and Indian President Narendra Modi’s close friendship, both countries are signing deals on defence equipment and India’s first rail link. Professor Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The relationship between India and Japan is perhaps the best it has ever been, largely because they have prime ministers who look at the region and the world in very similar terms.’

Depression May Be Tied to Lower Breast Cancer Survival

U.S. News & World Report 10th December 2015

A study by King’s shows that breast cancer patients with depression are at a higher risk of death. Dr Elizabeth Davies, Cancer Epidemiology & Population Health, said: ‘Low mood and depression are understandable reactions to a breast cancer diagnosis. Clinicians generally know to look out for this, but these findings emphasize the need to ask patients with cancer about their mood and for women to know it's OK to ask for help.’

‘Clean the plaque of the heart’ - Radhanath Swami Speaks at King's College Dental Institute, London.

Huffington Post 10th December 2015

King’s Dental Institute hosted an event with Radhanath Swami alongside Ash Parmar, a world-famous cosmetic dentist. Professor Mark Woolford, Dental Institute, gave his reasoning for the talks: ‘One of the things that I feel very dearly about is that we have to instill into students that it isn't just about dentistry, it isn't just about learning to work with this (your head), it's about learning to work with this (your head) and this (your heart).’

Dr. Robert T. Christ, DMD, DDS Reports on Therapy for Patients with a Phobia

Bloomberg 10th December 2015

According to a report by King’s, many people suffer from dental phobia and as result are unable to go to a dentist. However cognitive behavioral therapy can help individuals who suffer from fear and anxiety to visit the dentist. This was also reported by NPR and BBC World Service.

How the Conservative Party systematically alienated itself from a generation of young people and students

Independent 10th December 2015

The article focuses on the Conservative government and why some students are no longer backing the party. Philosophy student, Josh Boyle, who is a member of King’s Conservative Society said: ‘While it’s true the National Union of Students takes a consistent anti-Tory line on pretty much anything from tuition fees to the Syria crisis and all points in between, they are categorically not representative of all students.’

Counselling as effective as antidepressants

Daily Telegraph 9th December 2015

Professor Sir Simon Wesseley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on BMJ research that has found antidepressants are no more effective than counselling at combatting depression. "We should remember that its not either/or here - the evidence repeatedly shows that the best outcomes come from both together," he said. Also reported in Daily Mail.

Virtual 3D heart

King's Press Rlease 9th December 2015

Researchers at King’s have begun a new study to help improve surgery for newborn babies with a life-threatening heart disease called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Dr Pablo Lamata, Biomedical Engineering, comments: ‘Babies with HLHS normally have three complex operations – the first when they’re less than two weeks old. Planning these operations is difficult, because there’s little evidence as to exactly which surgical technique would work best for each child at each stage.’

King's press release related to 'Virtual 3D heart '

King's wins award for openness on animal research

King's Press Release 9th December 2015

King’s has won an award for engaging with the media on animal research in the Understanding Animal Research (UAR) Openness Awards 2015. The Concordat on Openness on Animal Research in the UK launched in May 2014 and has to date brought together 97 organisations, including King’s, in a pledge to be more open and transparent about the use of animals in research. King’s received the award for media engagement, presented by Sir Colin Blakemore, for hosting a media visit to its animal facilities.

King's press release related to 'King's wins award for openness on animal research '

The Lion's Den Challenge Start-Up Competition

King's Press Rlease 9th December 2015

Budding entrepreneurs can now apply to the Lion’s Den Challenge Start-Up Competition - the university's flagship start-up competition designed to make the business ideas of those at King's a reality. In its eighth year, this competition is now run by the King’s Student Entrepreneurship Institute (Entrepreneurship@King’s) and this year there are six awards available totalling £11,000 in prize money on offer which includes a special award which has been sponsored by the King's Cultural Institute.

King's press release related to 'The Lion's Den Challenge Start-Up Competition '

King's partner with Chinese nursing college

King's Press Release 9th December 2015

A ground-breaking collaboration between Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and the Nanjing Health School, China, has been formally agreed. Dr Joanna Newman, Vice-Principal (International), said: ‘We are thrilled to be embarking on the Nanjing Nightingale Nursing College project. This is the first project of its kind for King’s and is one of the major Sino British collaborations, announced during the visit of President Xi in October 2015.’

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Dow Chemical, DuPont in merger talks - sources

Daily Mail 9th December 2015

Dow Chemical Co and DuPont are in talks to merge, which will be at a value of more than $120 billion. Dr Angela Zhang, Law, said: ‘A deal like this will definitely be subject to close antitrust scrutiny by Chinese regulators - not just MOFCOM but many other government actors will be involved in the process. That doesn't mean the deal will necessarily be prohibited.’ This was also reported by the Hindustan Times.

Counselling as effective as antidepressants

Telegraph 9th December 2015

Professor Sir Simon Wesseley , IoPPN, comments on BMJ research that has found antidepressants are no more effective than counselling at combatting depression. ‘We should remember that its not either/or here - the evidence repeatedly shows that the best outcomes come from both together,’ he said. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Slave trade

BBC Radio 4 9th December 2015

Dr Hannah Dawson, English, talks about the slave trade in the 18th century. ‘There was a common perception in the 18th century that you only had rights if you had property. You can only be free they said if you had the means to live as you wanted, and if you had property you couldn’t be bribed,’ she said.

Brain Banks

BBC Radio 4 9th December 2015

Bill Edwards, Curator, Gordon Museum of Pathology, comments on the Brains Bank Network closing due to a lack of funding. ‘There will be some brains disposed of because they will not be used, so nowadays brains are collected with full clinical history which makes interpretation much easier,’ he said. (interview starts 03.10)

Business as usual for Trump partners in Dubai

Al Jazeera 9th December 2015

Businesses in the Middle East have been faced with questions over whether they will continue operating with the Trump Organization, following Donald Trump’s comments on allowing Muslims into the US. Dr Thomas Roulet, Management, said: ‘Answering this stigmatising discourse would be an acknowledgment of that label and would only serve and reinforce his rhetoric…Escalation is exactly what he wants, it should definitely not be given to him.’ This was also reported in Bloomberg.

Dilma Rousseff and Brazil

Bloomberg 9th December 2015

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, commented on the recent impeachment process against President Dilma Rousseff in Brazil and the broader issues in the country. ‘The social situation is going to get worse…inflation is rising and you may see mobilisation…against the political classes,’ he said.

UK College in partnership with Chinese nurse education

Nursing Times 9th December 2015

A new partnership has been announced between the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery and a nursing college at the Nanjing Health School, China. Professor Ian Norman, Executive Dean of the Florence Nightingale Faculty said: ‘This project represents a major development for nursing internationally.’

Lord Janner ruled unfit to face child sex abuse trial due to dementia

Daily Mail 8th December 2015

The article refers to the court expert for the Janner case, Professor Michael Kopelman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who diagnosed Janner with, "a degenerative dementia, currently of moderate severity, but rapidly becoming severe" - a combination of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. He advised that "Lord Janner would be unable to understand the charges against him, to comprehend that a juror could be challenged, to instruct his lawyers, to comprehend the details of evidence, or to follow and recall the court proceedings". Also reported in Daily Telegraph.

Energy storage is no longer just hot air

Financial Times 8th December 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, wrote an article about cheaper technology challenging the existing energy system within five years. ‘There could well be developments that would change the entire energy system but a eureka moment is not necessary. Incremental change is under way,’ he said.

Lord Janner ruled unfit to face child sex abuse trial due to dementia

Daily Mail 8th December 2015

Professor Michael Kopelman, IoPPN, comments on the court expert for the Janner case. ‘Lord Janner would be unable to understand the charges against him, to comprehend that a juror could be challenged, to instruct his lawyers, to comprehend the details of evidence, or to follow and recall the court proceedings,’ he said. This was also reported by Telegraph.

Teacher’s recruitment

BBC Radio 4 The Educators 8th December 2015

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, discusses her research on academies and the effect they have in the UK. ‘What we have found is that there is a real mixture of outcome, some academy chains are performing outstandingly and Ark schools are one of those,’ she said. (interview starts 23.00).

Gummy gripes

Daily Mail 8th December 2015

According to Professor Mark Ide, Dental institute, the state of your gums can reveal a lot about your health. Having loose gums suggests that there is a vitamin C deficiency. Professor Ide said: ‘Vitamin C is involved in the maintenance of collagen, a protein that holds the gums together and bonds them to the teeth.

Q. and A: Kerry Brown on Xi Jinping and the business of China

International New York Times 8th December 2015

Professor Kerry Brown, Director of the Lau China institute, was interviewed by the New York Times on China’s president Xi Jinping. ‘The (Communist) party is in power because it has been behind policies that have led to huge profits in China in the last few years. So this is a key part of its legitimacy,’ he said.

India and the First World War

BBC World Service 8th December 2015

In a programme discussing Indian troops in the First World War, work by Dr Santanu Das, English, is mentioned, which looked at rare first-hand accounts of Indians fighting during the war. This was also reported by NPR Radio.

Antibiotics

BBC World News 8th December 2015

Dr Miraz Rahman, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, discussed the future of antibiotics, and what the landscape for new drugs might look like in the next few years. ‘Over the last 30 years, we have not been able to develop any new antibiotics, but we don’t have to wait for another 30 years. We think we will be able to develop new classes, probably in the next 10 years,’ he said.

Are wi-fi allergies real?

Huffington Post 7th December 2015

"People who say they have called electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) are clearly ill," said Dr. James Rubin, a senior lecturer in psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). "But the science suggests that it isn't [electromagnetic signaling] that is causing the illness,". Dr Rubin has investigated symptoms and triggers in more than 1,000 people who reported having electromagnetic hypersensitivity. He concluded that "repeated experiments have been unable to replicate this phenomenon under controlled conditions".

Antibiotic prescribing and patient satisfaction

King's Press Release 7th December 2015

Reduced antibiotic prescribing is associated with lower patient satisfaction on the national General Practice Patient Survey, according to a new study by King’s. Dr Mark Ashworth, King’s Division of Health and Social Care Research, said: ‘Many patients come in asking for antibiotics when they have viral infections such as colds, coughs, sore throats, or the ‘flu, but antibiotics cannot treat viruses.’ This was also reported by Times, BBC News, Guardian, Express, Sun, BBC World News, Deccan Chronicle, NDTV India and Independent.

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By me William Shakespeare: A life in writing

King's Press Release 7th December 2015

By me William Shakespeare is a unique exhibition of carefully selected documents relating to Shakespeare’s life and a once-in-a-generation opportunity to see the playwright’s last will and testament. Hosted by King’s at the Inigo Rooms, Somerset House East Wing, 3 February – 29 May 2016, the exhibition is a first-time collaboration between the university and The National Archives. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director, London Shakespeare Centre, said: ‘The documents in this extraordinary exhibition offer unique insight into Shakespeare’s life and that of his fellow actors and playwrights.’ This was also reported by Telegraph and Daily Mail.

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King's Lawyer contributes to UK's 'New Settlement' for Religion and Belief

King's Press Rlease 7th December 2015

Civic institutions, laws and practices need to reflect the UK's less religious, more diverse society, according to Living with Difference, a report released today by the Commission on Religion and Belief in Public Life (CORAB). Professor Maleiha Malik, Law, says: ‘Religion and belief in the UK has been transformed in the last two generations at the same time that religion has gained more salience in politics, law and public policy.’

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Venezuela elections: Will election results mark a turning point?

Telegraph 7th December 2015

Dr Gabriel Leon, Political Economy, wrote an article about the elections in Venezuela. Dr Leon said: ‘The results of Sunday’s parliamentary elections in Venezuela will go down in Latin American history as the first significant electoral defeat of Chavismo, the left-wing movement that at one time threatened to engulf the whole region.’

Liberalism

BBC Radio 4 7th December 2015

Dr Hannah Dawson, English, talks about British men and women who have struggled against constraints on their liberalism and King Charles II. ‘Charles II dissolved Parliament and this is an extraordinary and shocking thing for him to have done, it is an instance of the King ruling by his will.’

Human Rights

LBC Radio 7th December 2015

A Somali refugee who raped two women in Britain has been allowed to stay in the country on humanitarian grounds. Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, said: ‘This decision is not final as the Home Secretary can appeal it.’

Glycaemic index

BBC Radio 5 7th December 2015

A study shows that blood sugar levels can vary from person to person, therefore the same diets cannot work for everyone and instead we should think about personalised diets based on blood tests. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘I think it’s a fantastic study and it really blows apart the idea that there’s a one size fits all diet, that is going to fit everyone.’ (interview starts 30.00)

As Dilma Rousseff stumbles, how will Brazil’s military react?

The Conversation 7th December 2015

PhD Student Christoph Harig, Brazil Institute, discusses the issues that Brazil’s president Dilma Rousseff is facing. ‘While some desperately attempt to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, a minority of right-wing protesters are openly asking for a military intervention,’ he said.

Are Wi-Fi allergies real?

Huffington Post 7th December 2015

Recent studies have shown that electromagnetic signals may not cause electromagnetic sensitivity (EHS). Lead author of the review, Dr James Rubin, IoPPN, said: ‘People who say they have EHS are clearly ill. But the science suggests that it isn't (electromagnetic signalling) that is causing the illness.’

E-cigarettes for millions on the NHS

Sunday Express 6th December 2015

The article discusses a report carried out for Public Health England in collaboration with researchers at the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry & Neuroscience (IoPPN). The report found that e-cigarettes carried 5 per cent of the risk of tobacco, and that if every smoker switched to vaping 75,000 lives could be saved each year. As a result e-cigs have been licensed for medical use and will be prescribed alongside nicotine replacement therapies.

Achievement unlocked! Use science to keep your new year's resolutions

Guardian 6th December 2015

“I think the main reason why new year’s resolutions fail is people being unrealistic,” says Benjamin Gardner, an expert in behaviour change at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Psychologists recently proposed that, for behaviour change to occur, people must have the capability, opportunity and motivation to make it happen. Often people aren’t making resolutions for the right reasons, says Gardner. The article outlines advice on increasing the likelihood of achieving new year's goals. Also reported in Deccan Chronicle.

10 reasons Christmas is bad for you

Daily Mail 6th December 2015

According to scientists at King’s, the pollution found on Oxford Street is high enough to cause damage to the arteries. The toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, is emitted from diesel vehicles which can cause health problems.

Why babies are so good with wookiees

Guardian 6th December 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote a piece on an experiment which shows that babies are able to recognise different faces, even at a young age. ‘A baby would probably be able to, , as newborns have much more diverse facial recognition skills than adults,’ he said.

Heal thyself

Times 6th December 2015

The article discusses what kind of food people should eat and avoid when they are suffering from a hangover. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘The by-products of ethanol can cause inflammation of the gut and this can stimulate the immune system as if it were under attack and contributing to the general sick feeling so typical of hangovers.’

Yes you can! How to keep new year’s resolutions

Guardian 6th December 2015

The article outlines advice on increasing the likelihood of achieving new year's goals. Dr Benjamin Gardner, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘I think the main reason why New Year’s resolutions fail is people being unrealistic.’

House windows you can't open shut out toxic air

Times 6th December 2015

A new policy will allow developers to build houses, flats and schools on some sites only if they fit them with windows that cannot be opened and mechanical ventilation systems that filter toxins from incoming air. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘Sitting schools and homes in highly polluted locations is not good policy, if it exceeds pollution limits then development should be stopped.

E-cigarettes for millions on the NHS

Sunday Express 6th December 2015

The article discusses a report carried out for Public Health England in collaboration with researchers at the IoPPN. The report found that e-cigarettes carried five per cent of the risk of tobacco, and that if every smoker switched to vaping 75,000 lives could be saved each year. As a result, e-cigs have been licensed for medical use and will be prescribed alongside nicotine replacement therapies.’

Making your house too clean could be dangerous for your children

Mirror 6th December 2015

Children who are exposed to bacteria are less likely to develop a weak immune system. Exposing children to a variety of household germs decreases their chances of developing allergies. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘We’re over-cleaning enough. The more microbial diversity you have, the better. I think we have to start striking a different balance because our sterility is causing problems.’

Are you prepared for the worst?

Times 6th December 2015

Daniel Salisbury, War Studies, discusses the threat of nuclear war and why people prepare for an attack. ‘People think by preparing for the worst you are ready for any eventuality. I suppose it is because of uncertainty. The sheer power of these weapons and the destruction they can wreak is so much bigger than anything else humans have ever devised, or even natural disasters,’ he said.

New medicines 'should prevent not just treat disease'

BBC News 5th December 2015

Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health), discussed the move towards personalised medicine in his capacity as the new President of the Academy of Medical Sciences. ‘I think it's unarguable that prevention is better than cure, and if you wait until the patient presents with signs or symptoms of kidney disease, liver disease, heart disease, very often most of the damage is done and can't actually be recovered. This was also reported by BBC Radio 4 Today, BBC Breakfast and Radio 5 Live.

War discussion

BBC Radio 4 5th December 2015

Professor Michael Rainsborough, War Studies, talks about the current state of the Islamic State in Syria and proxy wars. ‘There are numerous proxy wars to think of, I think the most prominent will be the proxy wars during the Cold War. This is where you had the superpowers backing one particular side but not actually coming directly to blows with each other ,’ he said. (interview starts 37.58)

Syria air strike vote

Various media outlets 4th December 2015

King’s academics have offered commentary across a wide range of media outlets in reaction to the Parliamentary vote on UK air strikes against Islamic State in Syria: Joanna Cook, War Studies, appeared on Sky News; Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, commented on Radio 5 Live; Professor John Gearson, War Studies, spoke on BBC News; Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, commented in the Independent, Guardian, Associated Press, Daily Mail, LA Times, Washington Post and Huffington Post; Professor Michael Kerr, War Studies, wrote a column which was in City A.M; Dr Victoria Fontan, War Studies appeared on BBC One Victoria Derbyshire; King’s graduate, Omar Metab, spoke on BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat ; Dr David Betz, War Studies, commented in the Guardian; Dr Jill Russell, War Studies appeared on BBC One Victoria Derbyshire and commented in the Associated Press, Daily Mail, LA Times, Washington Post and Huffington Post.

Experts say doctors over-keen on labels after woman died from refusing treatment

Guardian 4th December 2015

The article refers to a 'right to die' case, which involved a patient with histrionic or narcissistic personality disorder, a classification from the US-based DSM diagnostic system. This is commonly used along with the now under-review WHO method. Both have their drawbacks, explains Thomas Fahy, professor of forensic mental health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN): “Personality is a continuum. Deciding where the precise boundary lies between what is the normal range of personality and a disorder is always difficult.”

A Day Is a Long Time

Huffington Post UK 4th December 2015

Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, discusses the government’s decision to launch airstrikes in Syria. According to the Ministry of Defence there have been no reports of civilian casualties in Syria resulting from UK operations. However, Professor Freedman argues that ‘they are not a sure guide to likely consequences in Syria.’

One of the biggest cities in the world has banned half its cars because they are turning the streets into 'a gas chamber'

Independent 4th December 2015

Delhi’s government wants to decrease the number of cars driving in the city by only allowing vehicles to drive on alternate days depending on their number plate in order to reduce air pollution. A separate report by the Policy Exchange and King’s showed that one in four children were breathing in toxic air in London.

Islamic State

BBC News Victoria Derbyshire Show 4th December 2015

Dr Andreas Krieg, War Studies, talks about how the Islamic State (IS) is funded: ‘The mistake that a lot of people make is looking at IS as a terrorist organisation, primarily they are an insurgency group, that means that they are governing people living in their territory.’ (interview starts 05.30)

ISIL in Syria

Al Jazeera 4th December 2015

In a debate on how to defeat terror group ISIL, analysts have said that sending in US troops will ‘play into IS’s hands.’ Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), is quoted: ‘ISIL is aching for a conflict with the West, the execution videos were bait…ISIL’s spokesman was taunting Obama’s airstrikes.’

Ripper 'faked mental illness' to enjoy soft Broadmoor sentence

Daily Telegraph 3rd December 2015

Tom Fahy, Professor of Forensic Mental Health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), notes: "it is possible to fake mental illness, but it's very difficult to do that over a long period of time, especially when you are being examined by those with the experience of those at Broadmoor'. He notes that a patient with long-term paranoid schizophrenia would not be regarded as 'cured', but if their mental health had stabilised and could be managed within the prison system, they could be regarded as safe to transfer.

There is a way back from paranoid schizophrenia

Times 3rd December 2015

Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the developments in the Sutcliffe case. He notes that most people who have schizophrenia begin to recover from the symptoms as often levels of dopamine in the brain decline into a normal range as people get older. In Sutcliffe’s case, psychiatrists will be absolutely sure symptoms are gone before he is transferred. It may be the Sutcliffe would have to gain insight that what he did was wrong before he was considered sufficiently well for transfer. For some, regaining that insight can be very destructive and they can become very distraught.

Lower patient satisfaction in hospitals that employ more nurses trained abroad

King's Press Release 3rd December 2015

Patient satisfaction is linked with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care in English hospitals, a new study has shown. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery, said: ‘This study demonstrates that the yo-yo approach to nurse recruitment needs to stop and focus on producing enough well educated nurses to meet future demand and sustain quality in the system.’ This was also reported in the Telegraph, BBC Radio London, Daily Express and Yahoo News.

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Ripper 'faked mental illness' to enjoy soft Broadmoor sentence

Daily Telegraph 3rd December 2015

Professor Tom Fahy, IoPPN, commented on the recent case of the ‘Yorkshire Ripper’ Peter Sutcliffe, how was found to be ‘no longer mentally ill.’ ‘It is possible to fake mental illness, but it's very difficult to do that over a long period of time, especially when you are being examined by those with the experience of those at Broadmoor,’ he said.

There is a way back from paranoid schizophrenia

Times 3rd December 2015

Professor Sir Robin Murray, IoPPN, discusses the development of schizophrenia and discussed it’s causes. ‘Schizophrenia is linked to levels of dopamine in the brain which declines into a normal range as people get older. In many cases the symptoms vanish entirely,’ he said.

Explainer: What are womb transplants and who could they help?

The Conversation 3rd December 2015

Professor Henrik Hagberg, Imaging sciences & biomedical engineering, wrote an article about womb transplant after a Swedish woman became the first person to give birth through a womb transplant. ‘Previously, the only motherhood possibilities for women facing ‘absolute uterine factor infertility’ (AUFI) were adoption or the use of a surrogate carrier,’ he said.

Sukhbir Badal honours 22 entrepreneurs

Hindustan Times 3rd December 2015

In an event dedicated to entrepreneurship in the Indian state of Punjab, Deputy Chief Minister of the state, Sukhbir Singh Badal, highlighted projects currently underway. Minister Badal mentioned the recent announcement by King’s, of a medical institute to be opened in Chandigarh.

Universities in the city do their bit

The Hindu 3rd December 2015

Indian universities have introduced initiatives to aid students with disabilities. A trip by students at Delhi university to King’s was mentioned, where students learnt more about how universities can help further match the needs of disabled students.

KCL's Roar wins newspaper of the year at Guardian Student Media awards

Guardian 2nd December 2015

King’s student newspaper Roar has won Student Publication of the Year at the Guardian Student Media Awards. The judges said: ‘Roar was full of life, a clear winner. It had a clear editorial mission, with proper reporting, investigations and wit.’

Where is the world's most polluted city?

Guardian 2nd December 2015

Research shows that air pollution kills 3.3 million per year more than HIV, malaria and influenza combined. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘When we compare air pollution in cities, we only look at those with measurements. This focuses our attention on big cities and the developed world. Initial attempts to measure air pollution from satellites have revealed more areas of the world with dense populations and high air pollution.’

RD Laing: Was the counterculture's favourite psychiatrist a dangerous renegade or a true visionary?

Independent 1st December 2015

Professor Anthony David of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the legacy of RD Laing in this article. Professor David notes: “He argued powerfully for barriers between patients and the professionals, doctors and nurses, to be torn down – and this is now taken for granted. What naturally flowed from this was a critical stance towards the psychiatric profession, which, for Laing, was at its core dehumanising and oppressive." He goes on to say: “Where his influence is viewed most negatively is his work with people with schizophrenia, which appeared to blame parents for their children's illness and which discounted other physical, genetic, social and psychological factors.".

Lower survival in women with breast cancer and depression

King's Press Release 1st December 2015

Women with breast cancer who subsequently had a recorded diagnosis of depression had a 45 per cent higher risk of death from all causes, according to a study led by King’s. Dr Elizabeth Davies, Division of Health and Social Care Research, said: ‘Low mood and depression are understandable reactions to a breast cancer diagnosis. Clinicians generally know to look out for this, but these findings emphasise the need to ask patients with cancer about their mood and for women to know it’s okay to ask for help.’ This was reported in Daily Mail, Mirror and The Sun.

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Abdul Mumin Choudhury joins King's as Muslim Chaplain

King's Press Release 1st December 2015

mam Abdul Mumin Choudhury joins King’s College London as the university’s first Muslim Chaplain. The Dean of King’s, Reverend Canon Professor Richard A. Burridge said: 'I am very grateful to Abdul for agreeing to come and work with us at King's. Our spiritual and pastoral care for Muslim staff and students has been a vital part of my work over the last two decades and I greatly value the contribution Abdul will bring to our team.’

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Virtual 3D heart

King's Press Release 1st December 2015

Researchers at King’s have begun a new study to help improve surgery for new-born babies with a life-threatening heart disease called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Dr Pablo Lamata, Biomedical Engineering comments: ‘Babies with HLHS normally have three complex operations – the first when they’re less than two weeks old. Planning these operations is difficult, because there’s little evidence as to exactly which surgical technique would work best for each child at each stage.’ This was reported by Xinhua and the Evening Standard.

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Secret, immersive cinema is likely to change the future of film

The Conversation 1st December 2015

Dr Sarah Atkinson, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discusses the future of secret immersive cinema in the film industry. ‘A lot has changed in how films are produced and promoted in the intervening decade. Last summer, for example, there was a huge Secret Cinema Star Wars event. Their immersive The Empire Strikes Back experience sold a staggering 100,000 tickets, generating over £6 million at the box office,’ she said.

What I learned from 30 years of tackling HIV around the world

Independent 1st December 2015

For World AIDS Day, Dr Sridhar Venkatapuram, Social Science, Health & Medicine, wrote a piece about how to tackle HIV around the world. ‘HIV/AIDS work showed me that protecting and improving health is about so much more than medicine: it is about the way we and the people around us think and act,’ he said.

Toxic air threat to London pupils

London Evening Standard 1st December 2015

A report shows that one in four school children in London are exposed to polluted air. According to the report 328,000 pupils were breathing in above the permitted level of nitrogen oxide. The research by Policy Exchange and King’s was published to the world leaders at the Climate Change conference in Paris. This was also reported by BBC Radio London and The Economist.

Feeling lazy? Lacking motivation? Long-term apathy may be a sign of heart disease - or much worse

Daily Mail 1st December 2015

Scientists argue that apathy can not only be a sign of depression but can also be a key sign to conditions such as stroke and heart disease. Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN, comments: ‘Apathy is tricky to explain because, like a cough, it can be an outward symptom that could result from a variety of different underlying causes.’

Call to ban DNA editing over 'designer baby' fears

Telegraph 1st December 2015

Researchers at King’s, Newcastle University and the University of London are calling for a worldwide ban on the practice of genetic editing of embryos called ‘designer babies.’ Many geneticists are meeting in Washington to discuss the future of genetic editing.

RD Laing: Was the counterculture's favourite psychiatrist a dangerous renegade or a true visionary?

Independent 1st December 2015

Professor Anthony David, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the legacy of Scottish psychiatrist, RD Laing in this article. Professor David notes: ‘He argued powerfully for barriers between patients and the professionals, doctors and nurses, to be torn down – and this is now taken for granted.’

Maths competition winners announced

King's Press Release 30th November 2015

The winners of a competition run by the King’s Mathematics School and the Exeter Mathematics School have been announced ahead of a prize giving ceremony at the Bank of England. Dan Abramson, Head Teacher of the King’s Mathematics School, said: ‘We’ve had such a good time reviewing videos from all over London. This competition has shown how enthusiastic students are about mathematics, and at the same time how the subject is both a living and creative entity.’

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The Media Column: Why the left-wing New Statesman is stubbornly resisting the lure of Corbynmania

Independent 30th November 2015

In a press release by Jason Cowely, editor of the New Statesman, he praises the analysis of King’s academics included in the publication. ‘The Statesman has built a reputation in detailed analysis of the growing threat of Isis, deploying the likes of Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) and Dr John Bew, War Studies.’

Why EVs can reduce (but not eliminate) urban air pollution

Scientific American 30th November 2015

Increasing attention is being paid to the potential for electricity to power urban public transportation. Research from the Environmental Research Group is mentioned, which found that particulate matter in London is responsible for an estimated 3,537 premature deaths each year.

Britons divided over bombing IS

Voice of America 30th November 2015

Recent surveys have shown Europeans generally support military action against IS, however in Britain a large opposition number exists. Commenting on the decision to take military action, Dr John Bew, War Studies, said: ‘The real leadership cannot come from following opinion polls; it comes from those who are elected to be responsible for British national security.’

Childhood obesity

LBC Radio 29th November 2015

Jamie Oliver argues that pupils should be weighed at school from the age of three and that companies who produce junk food should lower the fat and sugar used in food. Dr Alan Davis, English, said: ‘Over the last 10 years children have been weighed and their heights measured at reception year, before they first start primary school.’

Patterns are repeated: Radicalisation in Europe

O Globo (Brazil) 29th November 2015

Experts have considered whether there are any commonalities between terrorists responsible for recent attacks in Europe. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, said: ‘The most comment element of a terrorist organisation, is the cell structure with an established trust relationship between only a few chosen few.’ Research from the ICSR is also mentioned in the piece.

Sports drugs test

BBC News 28th November 2015

BBC investigates sports drug testing in Rugby which is controlled by the UK Anti- Doping Agency. In this programme, the samples are analysed at King’s.

Bridging the distance

Telegraph of India 28th November 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant discusses the recent trip to the UK by Indian prime minister Narendra Modi. ‘While the media were keen to highlight the controversies surrounding Narendra Modi, he managed to redefine Indo-UK relationship for the new century,’ he said.

Terrorism prevention

NPR 28th November 2015

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, commented on the effectiveness of the government’s PREVENT strategy to prevent radicalisation. ‘In principle, reaching out to communities is a very good idea… When PREVENT is about turning people into spies, it usually tends to get rejected by communities. When it is about empowering people, mobilising communities…it is actually quite popular,’ he said.

Smoking high-strength cannabis may damage nerve fibres in brain

Guardian 27th November 2015

Smoking high potency ‘skunk-like’ cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Dr Paola Dazzan of the IoPPN said: ‘We found that frequent use of high potency cannabis significantly affects the structure of white matter fibres in the brain, whether you have psychosis or not. This reflects a sliding scale where the more cannabis you smoke and the higher the potency, the worse the damage will be.’ Also reported by Press Association, Daily Mail, The Sun, Independent, Daily Express, Scientific American, Metro and The Times.

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Times Higher Award for Sierra Leone Partnership

King's Press Release 27th November 2015

King’s Sierra Leone Partnership (KSLP) has won a prestigious Times Higher Education Award in recognition of its work to support the development of sustainable health services in West Africa. Dr Joanna Newman, Vice-Principal (International), said: ‘This fantastic achievement goes to show how our expertise in global health and commitment to partnership working is having a profound impact on people around the world and on changing health policy which has the potential to save millions more lives.’

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CBT can help overcome fear of the dentist

King's Press Release 27th November 2015

Cognitive behavioural therapy could help many people with a dental phobia overcome their fear of visiting the dentist and enable them to receive dental treatment without the need to be sedated, according to a new study by King’s College London. Professor Tim Newton, Dental Institute, said: ‘People with dental phobia are most commonly given sedation to allow them to become relaxed enough for a short period of time to have their dental treatment performed.’ This was also reported by BBC News and Times of India.

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Study shows white matter damage caused by 'skunk-like' cannabis

King's Press Release 27th November 2015

Smoking high potency ‘skunk-like’ cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Dr Paola Dazzan of the IoPPN said: ‘We found that frequent use of high potency cannabis significantly affects the structure of white matter fibres in the brain, whether you have psychosis or not. This reflects a sliding scale where the more cannabis you smoke and the higher the potency, the worse the damage will be.’ This was also reported by Press Association, Daily Mail, The Sun, Guardian, Independent, Daily Express, Metro, British Medical Journal and Times.

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Dentist Study

BBC Newsroom 27th November 2015

A study by King’s shows that therapy can help people overcome their dental phobia. Professor Tim Newton, Dental Institute, said: ‘Extreme fear which would constitute phobias is about 11 per cent of the adult population. It’s the third most common phobia in the world and comes after snakes and heights.’ This was also reported by BBC London, BBC World Service, Washington Post, NDTV and NPR.

Brussels Schools Reopen With Maximum Threat Alert Still in Place

Associated Press 26th November 2015

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), commented on the terror alerts in Belgium, warning that without further explanation of the situation officials risked undermining the public's trust. He said: 'It seems paradoxical to say that (Brussels) is still at the highest threat level but it’s OK to open schools and subways. It’s not very helpful to reassure people that everything is safe without sharing more information about what has actually been done.' Professor Greenberg's comments were reported by Time, Hindustan Times and Fox News.

Risk-based quality assessment ‘cannot work’, study concludes

Times Higher Education 26th November 2015

A study by King’s shows that monitoring standards in English in higher education using metrics cannot be achieved. King’s PhD student, Alex Griffiths, Management, said: ‘Any risk-based approach needs to use its metrics in a contextual setting and not rely on them because they won’t give you the correlation that you are after.’

University of Warwick bangs the drum for liberal arts

Times Higher Education 26th November 2015

Students at the University of Warwick can now enroll on a new liberal arts degree programme as part of a European consortium encouraging universities to develop more liberal arts degrees. Other universities such as King’s, University College London and the University of Birmingham have launched such courses in recent years.

Salem witch trials

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time 26th November 2015

Professor Susan Castillo, English, discusses the Salem witch trials and the impact it had on the community.‘The Puritans believed that the world was full of invincible spirits, devils and witches,’ she said.

Whatever happened to ‘bans’ on GM produce in British supermarkets?

The Conversation 26th November 2015

Professor Vivian Moses, Health & Life Sciences, has written about banning genetically modified foods. ‘The late 1990s and early 2000s in Britain was a period of intense back-and forth argument about GM. In 1999 Marks & Spencer announced that it was removing all GM foods from its shelves,’ she said.

King's and Pearson begin recruiting for online degrees

King's Press Release 26th November 2015

King’s is launching a new partnership to offer online masters degrees with Pearson, the world’s leading education company. Professor Edward Byrne, President & Principal, said: ‘We are delighted to be partnering with Pearson which has a global reputation for online education provision. This new initiative builds on our existing distance learning programmes in War Studies, Law, Nursing and Addiction Studies.’

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King's announces Circle of Cultural Fellows

King's Press Release 26th November 2015

King’s have announced a Circle of Cultural Fellows. Building on the university's success in developing a rich portfolio of connections with the cultural sector, the Circle - made up of 15 world leaders from across arts and culture - will enrich research and education, drive new thinking and increase the university’s engagement in London and beyond. Speaking about the Circle, Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), said: ‘I'm delighted to welcome these exceptional individuals to King's as inaugural members of our Circle of Cultural Fellows.

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Britons face up to Empire

Wall Street Journal 26th November 2015

A new show which focuses on the British Empire has been launched at the Tate Modern. Professor Paul Gilroy, English, who wrote the forward for the show’s catalogue said: ‘The burden is the healing possibilities of reacquainting people with the depth and extent of the empire.’

Brussels Schools

Associated Press 26th November 2015

Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, commented on the terror alerts in Belgium, warning that without further explanation of the situation officials risked undermining the public's trust. He said: 'It seems paradoxical to say that (Brussels) is still at the highest threat level but it’s OK to open schools and subways. It’s not very helpful to reassure people that everything is safe without sharing more information about what has actually been done.' Professor Greenberg's comments were reported by Time, Hindustan Times, ABC News and Fox News.

From Indonesia, a Muslim challenge to the ideology of the Islamic State

International New York Times 26th November 2015

The world’s largest Muslim group in Indonesia have condemned the actions of Islamic State in a 90-minute film, which experts say could be an effective campaign against the terror group. Nico Prucha, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘I see the counter-narrative as the only way that Western governments can deal with the ISIS propaganda, but there’s no strategy right now.’ Also reported by NDTV and The Hindu

An alliance for action on climate change

Nursing Standard 25th November 2015

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing & Midwifery, wrote an article about why health professionals are focusing on tackling climate change. Professor Rafferty, said: ‘The UK Health Professional Alliance to Combat Climate Change has been formed to advocate for stronger measures to tackle climate change.’

Do terrorists really think they're going to win?

BBC News 25th November 2015

In the aftermath of the Paris attacks, Benedict Wilkinson, Defence Studies, writes about the history of terrorism and what motivates this generation of radicals. The article focuses on Johan Most an American-German communist who believed that violence should be used to make a political change. ‘Throughout his writings, Johan Most, like other anarchists in the late 19th Century, recognised and grappled with a fundamental problem faced by those who sought to use violence in pursuit of political change,’ he said.

Tunisia Is a Shining Example of Tolerance, Unless You're a Woman or Gay

Vice 25th November 2015

A report by Amnesty International shows that the rights of Tunisian women and LGBT are under attack. Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, comments: ‘When the laws are in place, the problem is putting them into practice. Even if marital rape were to be criminalised in Tunisia, for example, encouraging women to come forward and report it would still be difficult - they wouldn't have confidence the police would deal with it sensitively, and there's a lot of stigma.’

Antipsychotic drug guidelines for patients with dementia need to be reviewed

Pharmaceutical Journal 25th November 2015

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) found that a review protocol, based on National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, reduced the use of antipsychotic drugs by dementia patients but led to deterioration of neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, when the protocol was used alongside a programme of social interaction and activities, neuropsychiatric symptoms and mortality rates improved. ‘Reducing the use of these drugs without any other interventions could result in worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms, which are highly distressing to the person, their carers and loved ones,’ says Anne Corbett, one of the researchers. The results demonstrate the ’critical importance’ of ensuring that any reduction in medication is accompanied by non-drug approaches to symptom control, particularly social interaction.

A sweet remedy that’s worth coughing up for?

Daily Express 24th November 2015

A recent survey showed that seven out of 10 people who buy cough medicines will choose remedies for a specific type of cough. Scientists at King’s have confirmed that Unicough, the first new cough medicine to be licensed in 30 years, has been clinically proven to reduce coughing.

Cheated of justice

Independent 24th November 2015

According to a study by King’s, 60 per cent of legal cases took universities more than two months to resolve, 40 percent of cases took six months to resolve. The article highlights that ‘for students who appeal against a university’s decision – whether it’s a degree result, expulsion, or a finding of misconduct – the stakes can be life changing.’

Bridge of Spies: Spielberg’s Cold War is predictably one-sided

The Conversation 24th November 2015

Polly Corrigan, PhD student, wrote a review of Steven Spielberg’s latest film Bridge of Spies. Corrigan said: ‘Despite the fact that the Cold War ended a generation ago, governments are still reluctant to declassify the files that would allow us finally to answer the many unsolved and unknown questions of that era.’

1,700-year-old Roman gold ring engraved with nude portrait of Cupid is found in British back garden

Daily Mail 24th November 2015

A metal detectorist in the UK has found a gold carved ring depicting a nude portrait of Cupid, god of erotic love. The ring is 1,700 years old and is now on display at Hampshire Museum. Dr John Pearce, Classics, has written a article about the ring in the journal Britannia.

North Africa: small glimmers of light in bid to stop violence against women

The Conversation 24th November 2015

Rebecca L. Farnum, Geography, discusses women’s rights in North Africa and the actions being taken to help women who have suffered from sexual harassment. In 2012 Moroccan teen Amina Filali’s suicide made international headlines. She killed herself after being forced to marry her rapist. A full 99.3% of Egyptian women have encountered sexual harassment,’ she said.

Centre for Urban Science and Progress in London

King's Press Release 24th November 2015

King’s, the University of Warwick and New York University (NYU), have signed an agreement to establish a London Centre for Urban Science and Progress at Bush House, part of King’s Strand Campus, from 2017. Professor Edward Byrne, President & Principal, commented: ‘We are delighted to have signed an agreement with NYU and Warwick to take forward this exciting initiative and to host the second Centre for Urban Science and Progress at our campus in central London.’

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Russian warplane shot down by Turkish forces

BBC World Service Newshour 24th November 2015

A tweet from Dr Sam Greene, Russian Institute, on the story of a Russian warplane that was shot down by Turkey, was mentioned on BBC World Service. ‘Putin's problems: 1) Turn lights on in Crimea; 2) End trucker protest; 3) Don't lose face over downed plane. 3rd is easiest, least important,’ he tweeted.

Turkey shoots down Russian jet it says violated its airspace

New York Times 24th November 2015

Turkey shot down a Russian warplane on Tuesday that it said ignored repeated warnings and crossed into its airspace from Syria. Commenting on the situation, Dr Natasha Kuhrt, War Studies, said: ‘Relations have been very strained between Russia and Turkey of late, so Moscow will be trying its utmost to contain the damage this might cause.’ Also reported by Associated Press, Daily Mail, Telegraph, Daily Express and Deccan Chronicle.

Letters to the editor

Times 23rd November 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discusses the House of Lords decision to allow 16 and 17 year-olds to vote in the EU referendum. He says: ‘The purpose of the referendum is to secure legitimacy either for Britain’s continued membership of the EU or for Brexit.’

GI diets don’t work – gut bacteria and dark chocolate are a better bet for losing weight

The Conversation 23rd November 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, has written an article about how eating dark chocolate can help people lose weight. ‘The mainstays of most of the diet regimens of the last 30 years have been the GI (glycaemic index) rating score as well as its cousin the glycaemic load. Famous best-selling diet books such as the G-Plan Diet and the South Beach Diet all used the index in some way and changed the way we thought about carbohydrates,’ he said. Also reported by The Independent and Sina.

The VW Emissions Scandal

BBC Panorama 23rd November 2015

The BBC investigates the Volkswagen scandal and the impact it has had on air pollution in the UK. Professor Frank Kelly and Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group commented on air pollution in London: Professor Kelly said: ‘Our measurements from the London Air Quality Network clearly show that nitrogen oxide was not changing, so we went and looked at the data near the roads and found that it was diesel vehicles which were emitting a lot more pollutants.’ (starts 13.05 mins)

The endless miracle of stem cell therapy

Daily Mirror 23rd November 2015

Stem cells are being increasingly used in the brain, heart and will soon be used to restore sight. Commenting on stem cells being used to cure a variety of diseases and illnesses, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘Any attempt to help the patients suffering from this terrible, debilitating disease is more than welcome.’ This was also reported by Xinhua Net and Sina.

Climate Change

Sky News 23rd November 2015

Prince Charles argues that there is a direct link between climate change and the current refugee crisis in Europe and Syria. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments: ‘In the UK we have an underlying constitutional principal that the monarch does not become involved in matters of party and political controversy. However, Charles is not yet the monarch, so he is not a monarch who can become involved in political controversy.’

Terror threats

BBC London 23rd November 2015

In the recent defence review, the government has planned to increase its budget by £12 billion in the wake of recent terror threats. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, said: ‘I think it’s going to be a difficult balancing act for the government to find this kind of money, given the austerity measures that we are all supposed to be in for.’ This was also reported by BBC News.

Fresh Air Square at London Bridge

King's Press Release 23rd November 2015

A new Fresh Air Square parklet has been created on Tooley Street near London Bridge. The project was led by Team London Bridge business improvement district in collaboration with TfL, CJS Plants and King’s. Andrew Grieve, Environmental Research Group (ERG) said: 'It has been a pleasure to work with Team London Bridge on this project. Bringing the issue of air quality into the public realm in this way is first and the response from the public has been fantastic.’

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Police call him an ISIS recruiter. He says he’s just an outspoken preacher

Washington Post 23rd November 2015

Mazanur Rahman is considered one of social media’s most infamous promoters of Islamic State, and his case illustrates the challenges of prosecuting Islamic State promoters in nations that promote free speech. Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, describes Rahman as a ‘lighthouse’ on social media. ‘He walks you to the cliff, and you’re supposed to decide yourself whether to take the last step — and that’s been incredibly difficult to deal with by the authorities,’ he said. This was also reported by NDTV.

What is healthy eating?

Guardian 22nd November 2015

The article examines eating disorders and mentions a book written by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, entitled The Diet Myth. The book explores the study of delusions about food. In the book he notes: ‘Avoiding processed foods may be the only real benefit of GF diets.’

Trade unions, the professions and rising inequality

Guardian 22nd November 2015

In light of the Paris attacks Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote a piece on why people expressed empathy and sadness to the victims in the attack. Dr Glaser comments: ‘Rationally, these tragedies are equally abhorrent, but while it’s possible to empathise with people in unfamiliar places through thought and reason, our neurobiological reaction to terrible events is driven by our previous experience of where they take place.’

Trade unions, the professions and rising inequality

Guardian 22nd November 2015

Professor Clive Coen, Women’s Health, comments on an article written by Simon Jenkins which supports the government’s pay cuts of junior doctors. Professor Coen said: ‘Simon Jenkins condescendingly asserts that British universities are ‘wasting half the student year while teachers ‘do research’ or take holidays’. Does he believe that the publishable research required from academics happens in a time-free dimension?

The digital front of Islamic State

O Globo (Brazil) 22nd November 2015

Terror group Islamic State widely use social media networks to recruit members, share images and news of their attacks, and distribute propaganda. Research from the ICSR is mentioned, which found that it is not only those directly fighting for Islamic State who share the group’s work on social media; other internet users contribute to what is called a visual war.

Britain’s EU exit campaigners stuck in a squabble

NDTV 22nd November 2015

Two rival groups have emerged within the ‘leave’ campaign over Britain’s EU membership. Commenting on the two groups, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘In some ways, it works quite well having two movements because they are appealing to two different constituencies.’

Can India deliver in South-East Asia?

Live Mint 22nd November 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discusses the recent visit by Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, to Malaysia and Singapore. The visit ‘has once again focused the attention of Indian diplomacy on a region that is not only a hub of economic growth and prosperity in Asia, but is also critical for global stability against the backdrop of China’s rise,’ he said.

There are strange forces at work behind our food desires

New Scientist 21st November 2015

Caitlin O'Hara of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)discusses the mechanisms behind our eating habits. It could be that those who overeat may have a dampened Dopamine response, and those with anorexia have a heightened, more sensitive one. She notes: 'that may make all reward stimuli, especially those associated with food, overwhelming to them, and so their response is to pull away and not eat'.

'There is a massive paranoia': UK Muslims on life after Paris

Guradian 21st November 2015

King’s alumni, Areeb Ullah, discusses the stigma attached to being a Muslim in light of the Paris attacks. ‘There is a massive paranoia now, there is an element of self-censorship, being afraid to politically speak up, being afraid to say one thing or another on the basis of being ostracised as a result of it,’ he said.

There are strange forces at work behind our food desires

New Scientist 21st November 2015

Caitlin O'Hara, PhD student at the IoPPN, discusses the mechanisms behind our eating habits. It could be that those who over eat may have a dampened Dopamine response, and those with anorexia have a heightened, more sensitive one. She notes: 'That may make all reward stimuli, especially those associated with food, overwhelming to them, and so their response is to pull away and not eat'.

Paris and Mali attacks expose Qaida-ISIS rivalry

Times of India 21st November 2015

Responses to attacks in Mali carried out by Al-Qaida reveal an increasing rivalry between the terror group and Islamic State. Commenting on both groups, Professor Peter Neumann, The International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: ‘The goal is to inspire overreaction, inspiration and retaliation…that radicalises more people and deepens the pool of recruits.’

Woman killed in French police raid had unlikely path to extremism

NDTV 21st November 2015

Hasna Aitboulahcen has been identified as having been killed in a raid by police in a Paris suburb. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, said that her death may be exploited by Islamic State. ‘She is a martyr in their eyes.’

Paris attacks

CNN 21st November 2015

In the aftermath of the Paris attacks, the Schengen agreement and surveillance in Europe has come under question. Commenting on the changes imposed by Police and the use of technology to stop terrorism, Professor Didier Bigo, War Studies, said: ‘If we have more and more technology to control, we have to think: will this be the solution to stop terrorism? Is Human intelligence more important?’

Terror attacks

Sky News 20th November 2015

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, comments in reaction to the terror attacks in Mali and whether it can be linked to the Paris attacks. Professor Gearson said: ‘At this stage there is a danger of conflating anything that happens anywhere in the world with Paris, and somehow look for links.’

Chief Medical Officer discusses the future of antibiotics

King's Press Rlease 20th November 2015

The UK’s Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies, spoke about the future of antibiotics at the Policy Institute. Describing the scale of the issue, Dame Sally said: ‘It is difficult to overstate the magnitude of the threat we face - allowing AMR to continue unchecked could ultimately signal the end of modern medicine.’

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Seven subtle signs you're burned out

Fox News 19th November 2015

Professor Peter Goadsby, a neurologist who specializes in headache disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses headaches as a sign of burn-out. He notes: "We're not exactly sure why, but migraines are sometimes triggered by the let-down after a period of stress rather than the stress itself,". The effect might be the result of a sharp drop in cortisol.

Cameron defeated as Lords vote to extend age limit in EU poll

Financial Times 19th November 2015

The House of Lords voted in favour of extending the lower age limit in the EU referendum to young people aged between 16 and 17, although the Prime Minster argues that the minimum age should be 18. According to the ‘UK in a Changing Europe’, an initiative based at King’s and led by Professor Anand Menon, European & International Relations, in 2014 there were over a million voters aged 16 and 17 in the UK representing 2.9 per cent of the overall electorate.

New Asia Pacific study hub launched at King's

King's Press Rlease 19th November 2015

A new social science centre providing expertise on the Asia Pacific region has been launched at King’s. Dr Joanna Newman, Vice-Principal (International) said: ‘The Asia Pacific region is a vital, vibrant and fast-expanding region which cannot be understood by one or two countries being studied in isolation.’

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Seven subtle signs you're burned out

Fox news 19th November 2015

Professor Peter Goadsby, IoPPN, discusses headaches as a sign of burn-out. ‘We're not exactly sure why, but migraines are sometimes triggered by the let-down after a period of stress rather than the stress itself. The effect might be the result of a sharp drop in cortisol,’ he said.

Can you think yourself into a different person?

Huffington Post 18th November 2015

The article mentions a study carried out by Professor Clive Ballard at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found some evidence that online brain-training games might help reasoning, attention and memory in the over-50s.

Top research teams ‘have more overseas academics and use carrots not sticks’

Times Higher Education 18th November 2015

A report by the Policy Institute and RAND Europe shows that that the research teams who did well in last year’s research excellence framework (REF) had more non-UK academics and people with experience from overseas.

Can you think yourself into a different person?

Huffington Post 18th November 2015

Article discussing neuroplasticity: the brain’s ability to change itself in response to things that happen in our environment. Research conducted by the IoPPN into the effectiveness of online brain-training games is mentioned.

Syria’s Alawites: Regime Hostage or Regime Partner?

Huffington Post 18th November 2015

Review of a book edited by Professor Michael Kerr and Dr Craig Larkin, Institute of Middle Eastern Studies: The Alawis of Syria: War, Faith and Politics in the Levant. The book is compiled of 14 authors and arose from a workshop held at King’s in January 2014.

Could a runny nose make you depressed?

Daily Mail 17th November 2015

Dr Valeria Mondelli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses a study that investigates inflammation in depressed patients, indicating that chronic inflammation can lead to damage in brain cells, causing depression.

Could a runny nose make you depressed? Hay fever sufferers may be four times more likely to develop the mental illness

Daily Mail 17th November 2015

Dr Valeria Mondelli (IoPPN) discusses a study that investigates inflammation in depressed patients, indicating that chronic inflammation can lead to damage in brain cells, causing depression.

China accused of trying to 'co-opt and emasculate' Christianity

Guardian 17th November 2015

A secretive conference to examine the future of Christianity in China is due to take place in Beijing. Commenting on the position religion has in the state, Dr Eva Pils, Law, discussed the fear in Beijing that the rapidly growing church could become a political threat. ‘This isn’t really about religion; it’s about loyalty and power. For years there was a sense that Christianity was less likely to be targeted in this way, partly because it was very well understood that there was a higher political cost to persecuting them,’ she said.

David Cameron’s tricky balancing act over EU membership

US News 17th November 2015

UK prime minister David Cameron recently proposed changes as part of his plans to reform EU membership. Commenting on the overall result, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘I think he'll get a deal, and he'll call it a great triumph. But that will be a difficult message to sell.’

Benefits culture 'creating work resistant children'

Independent 16th November 2015

Dr Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) warns that the welfare system is having the unintended consequence of boosting the number of children born into work-less households where they are at risk of developing 'aggressive, antisocial, and rule-breaking tendancies'.

Cultural organisations to celebrate Shakespeare's 400-year influence

King's Press Release 16th November 2015

The Shakespeare400 consortium, coordinated by King’s, will showcase Shakespeare’s creative achievements, his profound influence on culture across the centuries and the impact of his works on a wide range of artistic forms. Speaking on behalf of the consortium, Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), said: ‘We are very pleased to have brought together the diverse and dynamic range of partners that make up the Shakespeare400 consortium.’

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Narendra Modi ushers in a much-needed ‘reset’ in relations with the UK

Diplomat 16th November 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, says the recent visit by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to the UK has successfully reshaped relationships between the two countries. ‘It was the perceptual change in this bilateral relationship that will have a lasting impact on its future trajectory, which was seemingly headed nowhere before this visit,’ he said.

Confronting ISIL

Al Jazeera 16th November 2015

Following the attacks in Paris, French authorities have two targets: ISIL in Syria and domestic terrorist threats. Discussing whether this will have a positive impact, Dr Eugenio Lilli, War Studies, said: ‘This is a strong and largely expected signal that the government is not going to stand idle in the face of attacks on French territory.’

Mass surveillance can't catch terrorists. That's the uncomfortable truth

Telegraph 16th November 2015

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, discusses the encrypted messages used by the Paris terrorists to plan the attacks. ‘The terrorists’ use of encryption is no surprise. Indeed it would have been surprising had they not encrypted their electronic communications, given the ready availability of high-grade, end-to-end encryption technologies, ’he said.

Fireworks are fun – but the effects are not

Guardian 15th November 2015

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, wrote a piece on the effect fireworks have on air pollution. ‘The sparkles from fireworks last a few seconds but the air pollution can linger in our cities for hours. Firework smoke is rich in tiny metal particles making it very different to normal urban air pollution,’ he said.

Benefits culture has made generations less motivated to seek employment, says university academic

Independent 15th November 2015

Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN, warns that the welfare system is boosting the number of children born into work-less households, where he said they are at risk of developing 'aggressive, antisocial, and rule-breaking tendancies.’

Why we need sleep

Guardian 15th November 2015

Junior doctors are striking in light of the government’s new proposed changes to their contracts, changes that will impact on their working hours. Dr Daniel Glaser, Director Science Gallery, commented on the impact these changes may have. ‘While tiredness causes slip-ups at work, the right kind of rest is also crucial: learning is consolidated during dreaming sleep, when the body is taken ‘offline’ and the brain can run through what it has done that day,’ he said.

G20 summit in Turkey

People's Daily 15th November 2015

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, discussed the Chinese economy and its relationship with the UK. ‘I believe that right now China and the UK are very complimentary…China produces goods that the UK needs…and the UK offer services that Chinese consumers want,’ he said. Dr Pardo also provided comment for Channel NewsAsia on the summit.

New York University Professor wins prestigious humanities award

Reuters 15th November 2015

Visiting Professor Jonardon Ganeri, Philosophy, has been announced as the winner of the Infosys Prize 2015 in Humanities. Professor Ganeri was awarded for his work on Indian and Greek philosophy. Also reported by Deccan Herald and Times of India.

Why teaching children 'grit' won't get them into Oxbridge

Daily Telegraph 14th November 2015

Professor Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the 'growth mind-set' and suggests that teaching resilience is not beneficial to children. He argues that genetics shape children's inclinations regardless of parental and teacher intervention, and notes: 'growth mind-set is greatly overplayed. If you try to tell kids who have trouble learning, "you can do it, you can change", you can actually do some harm.'. He goes on to say: 'change these kid's mind-sets, and they're all going to go to Oxbridge. That's nuts'.

Why teaching children ‘grit’ won’t get them into Oxbridge

Daily Telegraph 14th November 2015

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) argues that genetics shape children's inclinations regardless of parental and teacher intervention. ‘If you try to tell kids who have trouble learning, ‘you can do it, you can change’, you can actually do some harm,’ he said.

Britain says Irish won't be affected by benefits curbs on EU migrants

Guardian 14th November 2015

Irish nationals living in the UK will not be affected by the new conditions that may be introduced by the government to restrict EU migrants access to the welfare system. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘Excluding Irish nationals from any in-work restrictions would be no more or less legal than excluding other EU nationals. The legal issues are the same.’

Dean of King's College London gives Lord Dearing Lecture on role of religion in HE

Independent Catholic News 13th November 2015

The Revd Canon Professor Richard Burridge FKC, Dean of King's College London, discusses the role of faith in higher education during the seventh Lord Dearing Annual Lecture at the Church House Conference Centre. Professor Peter Lutzeier, Vice Chancellor of Newman University and Chair of the Cathedrals Group of faith-based universities, said: ‘We were delighted that Professor Burridge agreed to give this year's Lord Dearing Lecture.’

What happens after Sinjar key to fight against IS

BBC World Online 13th November 2015

Dr Victoria Fontan, War Studies, wrote a piece following reporting of fighting between Kurdish forces and so-called Islamic State (IS) in Sinjar. ‘Retaking Sinjar would be extremely important strategically and for the morale of the Kurdish people in their fight against so-called Islamic State (IS) - but what happens in the days and weeks afterwards will be crucial,’ she said.

Security talks as Lebanon mourns bomb victims

Radio France International 13th November 2015

Following a double suicide attack in Beirut, the Lebanese prime minister held security talks with cabinet and military chiefs. The attacks are said to be the worst on civilians since the end of the country’s civil war. Professor Michael Kerr, Institute of Middle Easter Studies, said: ‘This suicide attack is certainly an attempt to destabilise Lebanon and reignite strife that has existed in the past.’

Uneven growth of twins may begin shortly after conception

King's Press Release 12th November 2015

According to a new study led by King’s, unequal growth between genetically identical monozygotic (MZ) twins in the womb may be triggered in the earliest stages of human embryo development. Laila Noli, Women’s Health, first author and PhD student said: 'Having two distinct ICMs within a single embryo of which one was bigger and more developmentally advanced than the other was an unexpected finding.’

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A sense of fun has seriously positive consequences

Financial Times 12th November 2015

Peninsula Business Services, a human resource consultancy firm has earned its FT/Glassdoor ranking by combining training programmes, access to career advancement opportunities. Professor David Guest, Management, said: ‘This is the generation who wants it all. They want good pay, good quality of working life and they also want opportunity to progress ambitiously and quickly.’

Saudi Arabia

BBC Radio 4 12th November 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, comments on Saudi Arabia selling bonds in the international bond marketing. ‘I think that this tells us that Saudi Arabia are dabbling down on their existing policy to keep producing oil and that they don’t mind if the price stays low for a while’, he says.

Women, education and intelligence

BBC Radio 4, Woman’s Hour 12th November 2015

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, discusses why there are more women in higher education than ever. Professor Wolf comments: ‘I think that this is a cause for concern that many people are not aware of these figures. It is also worrying that there are a lot of men not doing well, we have higher unemployment for men than for women and another unknown is statistics on how high the suicide rate is for men.’

Four prestigious NEDs join precision medicine catapult board

Reuters 12th November 2015

Four non-executive directors have been appointed to the board of Precision Medicine Catapult, an innovation centre for precision medicine. One of those appointed is Dr Menelas Pangalos, Visiting Professor at IoPPN.

Nord Anglia Education and King’s College London announce unique programme

Reuters 12th November 2015

Nord Anglia Education, a global leading premium schools organisation and King’s have announced the launch of a new Executive Masters in International Education, a part-time programme designed for teachers working in international schools worldwide. Professor Sharon Gewirtz, Education & Professional Studies, said: Nord Anglia Education is an organisation that takes the professional development of its staff extremely seriously and we are delighted to be working with them on this new initiative.’

Indian MPs complete leadership programme at King's

King's Press Release 11th November 2015

Nine Indian MPs have completed the King’s College London-Chevening-CPR Parliamentary Leadership Programme, hosted in its second year by the India Institute at King’s. Commenting on the programme, Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, said: ‘This is exactly the sort of knowledge transfer project that we at King’s want to engage in. It allows academics from both King’s and from across the UK, and key UK policy actors to connect and substantially engage with a promising and highly involved group of Indian lawmakers.’

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Socially Responsible Investment

King's Press Release 11th November 2015

An update from Professor Edward Byrne AC, President & Principal, on King’s position on socially responsible investment. Professor Byrne said: ‘I am pleased to announce the conception of the ‘Socially Responsible Investment Review Committee’ to further explore how King’s, through ethical investment and in other areas, can further support the transition to a low carbon and just world.’

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King's awarded outstanding by Ofsted

King's Release 11th November 2015

Trainee teachers at King’s receive an outstanding training according to the latest Ofsted Initial Teacher Education Inspection Report. Professor Sharon Gewirtz, Head of the Department of Education and Professional Studies, said: ‘We’re delighted with the Ofsted Inspectors’ recognition of the quality of teacher training we offer our students here at King’s. They saw that our trainees and newly qualified teachers receive training founded on a well organised and well balanced training programme.’

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Number of white working class boys taking AS or A-levels 'shockingly low'

Guardian 11th November 2015

A study commissioned by the Sutton Trust shows that white boys from poor families in deprived areas are more likely to leave education earlier than their peers who live in affluent areas. Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, said: ‘Working class underachievement is a scandal. Recent attention has been focused on the achievement of working class boys; this report highlights this is an issue for girls too.’

Al-Shabab’s most wanted: Abu Ubaidah, the leader with a $6 million bounty on his head

Newsweek 11th November 2015

The U.S State Department on Tuesday issued a $6 million reward of information on the whereabouts of Abu Ubaidah, the alleged leader of the Somali militant group Al-Shabab. Dr Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, ICSR, said Abu Ubaidah followed his predecessor in pledging allegiance to Al-Qaeda, and that the group have ‘really stepped up their efforts to carry out terrorist attacks abroad’, under Ubaidah’s leadership.

Fit legs equals fit brain, study suggests

BBC News 10th November 2015

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)have found that The King's College London team says leg power is a useful marker of whether someone is getting enough exercise to help keep their mind in good shape. Exercise releases chemicals in the body that may boost elderly brains, say the scientists, in the journal Gerontology. But they say more research is needed to prove their hunch. Lead researcher Dr Claire Steves said: "When it came to cognitive ageing, leg strength was the strongest factor that had an impact in our study. Other factors such as heart health were also important, but the link with leg strength remained even after we accounted for these. We think leg strength is a marker of the kind of physical activity that is good for your brain." Also reported in Daily Mail, Huffington Post and US News.

Brain patterns in ADHD and bipolar disorder

King's Press Release 10th November 2015

A new King’s study has identified both unique and shared brain patterns in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD), which could, in the future, help clinicians more accurately diagnose and treat the conditions. Giorgia Michelini, PhD Student in the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘Assigning the correct diagnosis for ADHD and bipolar disorder is absolutely crucial as the treatment options for these conditions are different - whether that be stimulant medication for ADHD or mood stabilisers for BD.’

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King's scientists study El Niño fires in Indonesia

King's Press Release 10th November 2015

Scientists at King's have received funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to use drones to measure how Indonesian wildfires made worse by El Niño affect the atmosphere. ‘We know these extreme fires have a major impact on the Earth's atmosphere, and that this is one of the most important ways in which El Niño affects the climate,’ says Professor Martin Wooster of the Geography department at King's and Divisional Director of NERC’s National Centre for Observation. This was reported by Reuters

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King's Leaders join BSA board

King's Press Release 10th November 2015

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement) and Professor Louise Archer, Education & Professional Studies, have joined the British Science Association Board of Trustees, in recognition of their work to the science community. Deborah said: ‘I am delighted to be joining the British Science Association and look forward to working with colleagues at the Association to integrate science ever more effectively within culture and society.’

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Principal responds to HE Green Paper

King's Press Release 10th November 2015

Professor Edward Byrne AC, President & Principal, used his speech at the fifth annual Universities UK Action on Access summit to share his views on the implications of Fulfilling our Potential, the Government’s recently published HE Green Paper. Commenting on Action on Access Summit, Professor Byrne said: ‘I was pleased to have an opportunity to talk about the fantastic, in some cases sector-leading, work Anne-Marie Canning, her department, and the wider academic and student community have been undertaking at King’s to help widen access and improve student success.’

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How love hormone spray can fight the flab: Oxytocin may have effect on brain areas controlling appetite

Daily Mail 10th November 2015

A spray of oxytocin could be a new way to tackle obesity, after an earlier smaller study found just three squirts of the hormone before a meal can reduce the amount people eat. Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN, comments: 'It is impressive to see that intranasal oxytocin reduced calorie intake, but the real question is: Why? The most likely explanation, I suspect, is that a dose of oxytocin has a comforting effect on the recipient, hence they no longer have the urge to eat fatty foods.'

Why the IB is the perfect passport to university

Daily Telegraph 10th November 2015

The International Baccalaureate (IB) has gone from being a qualification only suitable for a few groups of students, to being well-regarded and considered as important as A-Levels. Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, said: ‘Because King's offers so many inter-disciplinary subjects, where the students are expected to be numerate and analytical and have good written prose, the skills they have developed (on the IB) tend to mean that they progress very well.’

The obstacles to Cameron’s EU demands are political, not legal

Guardian 10th November 2015

David Cameron is facing many problems renegotiating Britain’s relationship with the European Union. One of the many things the Prime Minister has highlighted is his plans to stop EU migrants claiming benefits until they have paid into the system for four years. Professor Guglielmo Verirame, War Studies, advised David Cameron on the legal issues of negotiation with the EU.

Fit legs equals fit brain, study suggests

King's Press Release 10th November 2015

Research by King’s shows that older women who have strong legs are likely to fare better when it comes to ageing of the brain. Lead researcher Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘When it came to cognitive ageing, leg strength was the strongest factor that had an impact in our study. Other factors such as heart health were also important, but the link with leg strength remained even after we accounted for these.’ This was reported by BBC Online, Independent, Daily Express, Guardian, The Sun, Daily Mail, The Times, Huffington Post UK, LBC and Mirror Online.

A radical shift in thinking on mental health issues

Guardian 9th November 2015

In a letter to the Guardian, experts in mental health call for the support of governments and the public to enhance understanding, raise awareness and bring greater funding to bipolar disorder. Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have signed the letter, including Professor Allan Young, Chair of mood disorders, and Dr Argyris Stringaris, Head of the Mood and Development Lab at King's College London.

We need a radical shift in our understanding, to put bipolar and other chronic mental health conditions on a par with conditions like cancer and heart disease – where science has been put to work to transform care, improve treatments and save lives.

Should psychiatric hospitals ban smoking?

British Medical Journal 9th November 2015

Ahead of the 53rd Maudsley debate - should psychiatric hospitals ban smoking - the BMJ publishes the for and against submissions. A “smoking culture” leads to disproportionate harm among people with serious mental health problems, argue Deborah Arnott and Simon Wessely. But Michael Fitzpatrick thinks it unethical to deprive patients of autonomy and impose treatment.

Letters to the Editor

Daily Telegraph 9th November 2015

Universities may be allowed to increase their fees if they are able to prove that their teaching is of a good standard. Professor Charles Turner, Informatics, said: ‘There are some simple steps that could be taken to improve the quality of teaching without the introduction of yet another bureaucratic structure.’

Faces of Evil book ranks Bomber Harris with Hitler

Daily Mail 9th November 2015

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, reviews a book about crimes and criminals of the 20th century. Included in the book are Lord Kitchener and Sir Arthur ‘Bomber Harris’. In response to these inclusions, Professor Blick said: ‘To put them in the same category is misleading. Whatever the likes of ‘Bomber’ Harris may have done – and I do not endorse it – it does not place him on the same plane as Hitler.’

Russian doping allegations

BBC News 9th November 2015

It has been alleged that Russian athletes were involved in doping systematically during the London 2012 Olympics. Professor David Cowan, Forensic Science & Drug Monitoring, discusses the Russian doping controversy and what this means for Russian athletes. Professor Cowan said: ‘This is very disappointing as we had a wonderful game in London; we did a good job trying to make sure that we didn’t have cheats taking part in the games.’

Should psychiatric hospitals ban smoking?

British Medical Journal 9th November 2015

Ahead of the 53rd Maudsley debate – ‘should psychiatric hospitals ban smoking?’ - the BMJ publishes the 'for' and 'against' submissions. Deborah Arnott and Professor Simon Wessely, IoPPN, argue that a ‘smoking culture’ leads to disproportionate harm among people with serious mental health problems.

A radical shift in thinking on mental health issues

Guardian 9th November 2015

In a letter to the Guardian, experts in mental health call for the support of governments and the public to enhance understanding, raise awareness and bring greater funding to bipolar disorder. Researchers at the IoPPN have signed the letter, including Professor Allan Young, Chair of Mood Disorders, and Dr Argyris Stringaris, Head of the Mood and Development Lab.

Awarding medals

LBC 9th November 2015

PhD student Tom Thorpe, Defence Studies, discusses how medals are assigned in the military and why and how they are awarded. Tom said: ‘You have to think about the different types of medals that are awarded; you get medals for service such as those who helped during the Ebola outbreak and those in war.’

Digital body

BBC Radio 4 9th November 2015

The body in the modern age is explored in 'DigiHuman' history at the Wellcome Collection in London. Dr Anna Maerker, History, gave insight on some of the medical equipment once used. ‘The 'obstetric phantom' machine was a tool used to simulate the process of giving birth, in particularly obstetrician and midwives,' she said.

A setback for India’s prime minister?

Al Jazeera 9th November 2015

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his party, the BJP, suffered an election defeat in the Indian state of Bihar. Commenting on the significance of this defeat, Dr Sandipto Dasgupta, India Institute, said: ‘It’s unexpected, but it’s not surprising…This election result shows Indian democracy is in good health.’

Global Consensus recognizes importance of religious leaders in the fight against violent extremism

Bloomberg Business 9th November 2015

The publication of a ‘Global Consensus on preventing and countering violent extremism’ includes a section on the importance of religious leaders in preventing terrorism. The report is the main outcome of a conference in Madrid organised by the Club de Madrid and the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR).

Siblings and success

Guardian 8th November 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, discuses China’s decision to end its one-child policy. Dr Glaser said: ‘Only children in China are sometimes called ‘little emperors’, and indeed with no brothers and sisters around there’s less evolutionary incentive to co-operate, as they have less genetically in common with their closest peers.’ Professor Nikolas Rose, Social Science, Health & Medicine also comments in the Daily Telegraph: ‘An increasing number of elderly people, often with dementia or other illnesses are left stranded in the countryside as their only child moves to one of the mega-cities such as Shanghai.’

And in the red corner

Guardian 8th November 2015

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on the subject of Heathrow’s third runway. Professor Kelly said: ‘Gatwick is a better option than Heathrow, and it’s not the only pressing issue when it comes to cleaning London’s air.’

Delhi University's Gyanodaya Express to be given a red signal?

Economic Times of India 8th November 2015

A project at Delhi University – Gyanodaya Express – may be discontinued this year. The article mentions that students from King’s joined students from the university on the programme to travel to Punjab. Also reported by NDTV

Letters to the Editor

Daily Telegraph 7th November 2015

Professor Paul McCrone, Health Services & Population Research, wrote a piece on the NHS and proposed that the government should invest more money into the health service. ‘As an economy develops, it is to be expected that some sectors will experience productivity gains,' he said.

Oil giants ‘face cascade of claims’

The Times 7th November 2015

An investigation by New York’s attorney general into ExxonMobil’s record on climate science may lead into an investigation on other oil companies such as BP and Dutch Shell. Dr Eloise Scotford, Law, said: ‘If they manage to draw a link between the science and financial risks posed by climate change, then I think that would lead to a cascade of following claims.’

London's invisible health threat

BBC Radio 5 Live, In Short 7th November 2015

Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, measured the levels of black carbon around different places in London. ‘High levels of pollution can cause a number of health problems and depending on the duration and amount of exposure, can cause serious health effects on the heart, lung and even the brain, he said’

Former principal dancer

BBC Radio 5 7th November 2015

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), comments on whether ballet companies are keeping couples from performing together. ‘I can’t really find any evidence of systematic attempt by ballet companies to keep couples apart,’ she said.

Reaching out to Africa

Telegraph of India 7th November 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed the third India-Africa summit, which was recently hosted in India. ‘True to the style of the prime minister, Narendra Modi, everything about the event was grand. More than 1,000 delegates from all 54 African countries attended the summit, with more than 40 countries represented at the level of president, vice-president, prime minister and king,’ he said.

Times Higher Top twenty for King's Social Sciences

King's Press Release 6th November 2015

King’s has risen to 20th place in the 2015/16 THE World University Rankings for Social Sciences, a climb of seven places and the highest position the university has ever achieved for the subject ranking. Professor Frans Berkhout, Dean for the Faculty of Social Sciences and Public Policy, said: ‘It is fantastic news that we have achieved our highest ever ranking for social sciences. Today’s announcement is further recognition of the world leading education and research we have at King’s from across all areas of the social sciences.'

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Exercise and therapy 'useful for chronic fatigue syndrome'

Nursing Times 6th November 2015

A study by King’s, University of Oxford, University College London and Queen Mary University shows that talking therapy and graded exercise therapy can help patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome.

Christie’s Jussi Pylkkanen and superauctions

Financial Times 6th November 2015

The article focuses on auctioneer Jussi Pylkkanen and his success in the art world’s biggest sales. Professor Christian Heath, School of Management & Business, describes auctions in the 21st century as ‘a somewhat anachronistic method of selling goods, more common perhaps to traditional agrarian societies than post-industrial capitalism.’

In the patient’s best interests? Who says?

British Medical Journal 6th November 2015

Dr. Koula Asimakopoulou and Dr. Sasha Scambler, Population & Patient Health, wrote a piece on understanding what patient-centered care is, and how it can be practiced, realistically, within the healthcare system. ‘To this end, we have proposed a model of patient care that aims to support clinicians to deliver care that is truly in the best interests of the patient and driven by the patient themselves,’ they said.

Only connect – poetry's hidden power to break down barriers

Guardian 6th November 2015

The article highlight the importance of poetry in society and the influence new media has had in increasing its popularity. King’s College London will be hosting a series of events called ‘Poetry and …’ on 25 November at the Strand Campus.

‘The Silent Deep: The Royal Navy Submarine Service since 1945’, by Peter Hennessy and James Jinks

Financial Times 6th November 2015

Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, reviews a book written on the Royal Navy Submarine. ‘The particular physical and psychological demands faced by submariners as they operate in the silent deep inform this full and vivid account of the history of the submarine service since 1945,’ he said.

Tory MP slams Jeremy Hunt for junior doctors pay deal

Express 6th November 2015

Jeremy Hunt’s 11 per cent increase to junior doctor’s has been scrutinised by health professionals and medical students. Dr Sarah Wollaston, Chairman of the Commons Health Select Committee, who studied at King’s College London said: ‘It is a colossal waste of the resources spent to train them and is leaving our hospitals struggling to cope.’

Flights banned

BBC News 6th November 2015

The Russian government has suspended flights between Sharm-el-Sheikh and the country following a plane crash. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, said: ‘Egypt and Russia have developed a relationship in a way that they are both trying to put an end to the war in Syria. If it is proven that ISIS was behind the attack, I think Putin will have to consider how he will proceed.’

Super-quick Dina Asher-Smith is fast becoming a star

London Evening Standard 6th November 2015

King’s undergraduate student, Dina Asher-Smith discusses her training programme and her journey to her first Olympic in Rio next year. ‘I just want to make the Olympic team, that’s the first step you have to take before anything else. You might have medal ambitions and want to be a champion but, if you don’t make the team, then you can’t do anything, ‘she said.

IDG, Kalaari, 500 startups invest Rs 13 crore in POPxo

Economic Times of India 6th November 2015

IDG Ventures India and Kalaari Capital have invested two million dollars in Series A funding of POPxo, an online engagement platform for young women. The website was co-founded in Delhi by King’s alumni Priyanka Gill.

Former head of GCHQ advising Shell and private intelligence firm

Guardian 5th November 2015

Visiting Professor Sir Ian Lobban, Policy Institute, has become an adviser to Shell and Hakluyt & Co, a boutique corporate intelligence firm. A spokeswoman for Shell said: ‘Sir Ian is a leading figure in this field, and Shell is just one of a number of companies he advises on such matters.’

Do YOU struggle to remember faces? You could have face blindness

Mail Online 4th November 2015

Scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have created a short questionnaire for people who suspect they have prosopagnosia, a condition that causes an inability to recognise faces. The researchers hope the questionnaire will help improve diagnosis of the condition. Also reported by Bloomberg, BBC News Online and BBC Radio 4 Today (48.10).

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Walter Mitty Hunters Club: Facebook group exposes military imposters

Independent 4th November 2015

Professor Neil Greenberg, specialist in defence mental health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the motivations of individuals who pretend to be war veterans. He notes: 'it can be a way to boost one's esteem when the person has nothing to be rightly proud about'.

Museum website says 'homo-erotic' is top 10 search BBC

BBC News 4th November 2015

A new research project at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A Museum) shows the type of searches made on the London museum’s website. Among the work being promoted at the V&A Museum is ‘Being Human/Being Animal’, in which historians from King's and the Royal College of Surgeons will look at how studies of human and animal health have overlapped.

Would UK military action in Syria simply be irrelevant?

City AM 4th November 2015

Professor Michael Kerr, Institute of Middle Eastern Studies, debates whether the UK should intervene in the war in Syria. ‘UK air strikes in support of a flagging US campaign will be viewed as an irrelevant gesture in the fight against the Islamic State,’ he said.

Middle East conflicts

BBC Radio 5 4th November 2015

Dr David Betz, War Studies, comments on the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. ‘Syria bears a lot of similarity in the Middle Eastern region more broadly to developments in warfare in Central Europe 300 to 400 years ago,’ he said.

Researchers develop test to diagnose 'face blindness'

King's Press Release 4th November 2015

Scientists from the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King’s College London have created a short questionnaire for people who suspect they have prosopagnosia, a condition that causes an inability to recognise faces. Punit Shah, lead researcher, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, IoPPN, said: 'In its most extreme form, people with face blindness cannot even recognise their family or friends. This can have a disabling impact on their life, including on their career prospects.’ This was also reported by BBC News Online, BBC Radio 4 Today and Bloomberg.

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Britain announces plan to update surveillance laws

International New York Times 4th November 2015

UK home secretary Theresa May has announced new proposals for tougher scrutiny over ‘snooping’ by spy agencies. Dr Cian Murphy, Law, said that there were positive developments in the proposals. ‘The move towards a judicial role in the authorisation of surveillance is welcome, but the mechanism requires study,’ he said.

Online brain training 'improves daily lives of over-60s'

Daily Telegraph 3rd November 2015

Playing online games that challenge reasoning and memory skills – brain training - could have significant benefits for older people in their day to day lives, according to new research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King’s College London. Dr Anne Corbett of King’s said: ‘The impact of a brain training package such as this one could be extremely significant for older adults who are looking for a way to proactively maintain their cognitive health as they age. The online package could be accessible to large numbers of people, which could also have considerable benefits for public health across the UK.’ The story was also reported by BBC Radio 4 Today (starts at 53.30), BBC Radio London (starts at 22.50), BBC London TV (14.08), Sky News, BBC News Online, The Times, The Independent, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, Huffington Post and British Medical Journal.

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Now don’t wash your hands: Why more dirt will make us more healthy

Times 3rd November 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments on hygiene and whether people should wash their hands. ‘If you think of the number of food poisoning incidences in the home, they are incredibly rare. We are over-cleaning enough. The more microbial diversity you have, the better. I think we have to start striking a different balance because our sterility is causing problems,’ he said.

Thatcher’s dresses

Sky News 3rd November 2015

Margaret Thatcher’s family has chosen to auction many of her dresses with a total of 350 items to be put up for sale, including her wedding dress. Dr Eliza Filby, Modern British History, said: ‘What is important to remember in this context is how vital Thatcher’s clothing was to her authority, particularly her authority as a female leader.’

Maths education: Western policy makers look to Asia

Financial Times 3rd November 2015

Policymakers in the West are looking to China to tackle the lack of numeracy skills in classrooms and the workplace. Kings College London Mathematics School, inspired by Russian specialist schools, challenges 16 to 19-year-olds selected for enthusiasm as well as attainment. In its first round of public exams this year, 97 per cent of pupils achieved an A grade.

Should you only use the back rings of your cooker? The clever tricks experts say can save you from toxic air pollution

Daily Mail 3rd November 2015

Air pollution has been linked to increased risk of stroke; cognitive decline; high blood pressure; type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘If exposed to high levels of pollution over a number of decades, even healthy airways and blood vessels can become damaged, triggering asthma and heart disease.’ Further studies by King’s shows that people in cars and taxis are often exposed to the highest level of pollution, many times more than pedestrians or even cyclists. Dr Ben Barratt, ERG, commented: ‘When stuck in traffic, the exhaust from the car in front is very likely to be pumping straight into your car's inlet system.’

UTOPIA 2016: A year of ‘Imagination and Possibility’

King's Press Release 3rd November 2015

King’s will work in partnership with Somerset House and the Courtauld Gallery & Institute to present Utopia 2016 - a year-long celebration of the 500th anniversary of the publication of Thomas More’s inspirational text – the largest ever celebration of this radical work anywhere in the world.

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Brain training improves memory and performance of everyday tasks in older people

King's Press Release 3rd November 2015

Playing online games that challenge reasoning and memory skills – brain training - could have significant benefits for older people in their day-to-day lives, according to new research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Dr Anne Corbett, Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases, said: ‘The impact of a brain training package such as this one could be extremely significant for older adults who are looking for a way to proactively maintain their cognitive health as they age. The online package could be accessible to large numbers of people, which could also have considerable benefits for public health across the UK. This was reported by BBC Radio 4 Today, BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio London, Sky News, BBC News Online, Daily Telegraph, The Times, Independent, Daily Mail, NPR, O Globo and Huffington Post.

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Britain will present legislation to increase oversight of surveillance

International New York Times 3rd November 2015

The UK government will present a draft bill intended to clarify the state’s surveillance powers and increase transparency for intelligence agencies and the police. Dr Cian Murphy, commented that while he did not expect that the draft bill would seek to expand powers, it might still prove controversial.

The real reason why we Brits drink so much

Huffington Post 3rd November 2015

Article looking at the changes in the amount of alcohol consumed in Britain over the last 30 years, and the shifts in gender differences in drinking culture. Dr Clare Herrick, Geography, discussed the idea that ‘women should drink…a half-pint, not a pint’, which she argues came from the fear of women becoming more masculine than men, competing with men, and drinking the same drinks as men. Also reported by BBC News

Ethics of genetic screening in ‘Tomcat’: What trade-offs are we ready to make to live in a world free from illness?

Huffington Post 3rd November 2015

Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, commented on the play ‘Tomcat’, currently being shown at the Southwark Playhouse, in which the main protagonist is the last remaining human carrying the genetic traits for psychopathy. Commenting on questions the play raises, Dr Camporesi said: ‘It leaves you thinking about the future, and the present, of humanity, as it prompts many reflections on our current society: what, and to what extent, are we ready to trade off for a healthy and safe society?’

How to bridge the rhetoric gap

Financial Times 2nd November 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, wrote a piece on the commitment made by world leaders to reduce carbon emissions over the next two decades. ‘The latest projections from the International Energy Agency suggest that in 2040, even on positive assumptions, the world will still depend on hydrocarbons for 74 per cent of its total energy needs,’ he said.

Elderly deserve a tipple

Daily Mial 2nd November 2015

Dr Niall McCrae, Mental Health Nursing, expresses his concerns about guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellences, specifically the scientific facts upon which advice that people should avoid alcohol to reduce their risks of dementia is based.

The end of China’s one-child policy

Independent 2nd November 2015

Professor Nikolas Rose, Social Science, Health & Medicine comments on China’s decision to revise its one-child policy rule. ‘It is a stunning, but not unexpected reversal of a long-standing policy, and reflects a growing understanding of the implications of controlling the birth rate for the demographics of China as a whole,’ he said.

Quarter of cancer patients dead in six months due to late diagnosis

Daily Telegraph 2nd November 2015

New figures show that one in four British cancer patients are unlikely to live longer than six months after diagnosis because they - and GPs - are missing signs of the disease. Reference is made to a report by researchers at King’s, which also found that thousands of cancer sufferers might still be alive had GPs referred them for fast track appointments.

Elephant poaching: King’s College London and Metropolitan Police validate fingerprint test for ivory to identify poachers

King's Press Release 2nd November 2015

Scientists from King’s College London and University College London have collaborated with imaging and fingerprint experts from the Metropolitan Police to validate the use of new techniques for retrieving fingerprints from ivory for the first time. Dr Leon Barron, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘This is the first time that fingerprinting on ivory has been thoroughly investigated and a practical solution offered.’ This was reported by The Times, Independent, Metro, National Public Radio and BBC World Service Newsday.

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Chancellors’ visit to Germany

Sky News 1st November 2015

Ahead of the Chancellors trip to Germany, various experts including Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, discuss the importance of the visit and what this will mean for the UK. ‘What strikes me is the talk about protecting ourselves from further integration in the Eurozone,’ he said.

Jewish Museum exhibit

BBC Radio 4 1st November 2015

Professor Aaron Rows discuses a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum called ‘Sacrifice’. ‘This exhibition is very interesting. We have had a troop of school children pass and you always wonder what they are going to think about this type of work,’ he said.

Is this the end of marriage?

Observer 1st November 2015

Heterosexual couples are fighting for the right to a civil partnership, eschewing the age-old traditions of matrimony. Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, said: ‘An alternative to marriage for both different-sex and same-sex couples exists in the Netherlands, Gibraltar, Malta, Quebec, South Africa, New Zealand and the US states of Hawaii and Illinois. There is no evidence that it has threatened marriage in any of these places.’

Why we are attracted to fireworks

Observer 1st November 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, explores the neurological reasons that explain our reactions to fireworks. ‘In general, the colours we see are created by light bouncing off the reflective surfaces of objects around us. As we encounter this reflected light all the time, we’ve become very good at unscrambling the colours in our brain and, as a result, anything different can seem otherworldly,’ he said.

Living on Paper: Letters from Iris Murdoch 1934-1995

Independent 1st November 2015

Dr Rivka Isaacson, Chemistry, reviews ‘New treasure trove of Murdoch letters’, compiled by Anne Rowe and Avril Horner. ‘Living on Paper is presented in chronological sections, each helpfully introduced by Rowe and Horner, who set the scene for Murdoch’s life at that time; her writing, her passions, her whereabouts,’ she said.

What to do about diesel pollution?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06khzvy/sunday-politics-london-01112015 1st November 2015

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, demonstrated how air quality is measured, taking a portable device to measure pollution levels in the Rotherhithe tunnel. He warned that most modern cars are emitting high levels of nitrogen dioxide. ‘We know that all of the modern day diesels emit between 60 - 70 times more nitrogen dioxide pollution in the real world than they do in the test,’ he said.
This was also reported by BBC News.

Everything you ever wanted to know about teeth (but were afraid to ask the dentist)

Guardian 1st November 2015

In an article answering commonly asked questions about dental care, Dr Rebecca Moazzez and Professor Marie Therese Hosey, Dental Institute, offer advice on how to care for your teeth. Dr Moazzez said: ‘The main thing to be careful of is fruit juice or fresh fruit, because they contain acid that can make the surface of the tooth quite soft.’ Dr Hosey continued: ‘Brushing protects against gum disease, but it’s the fluoride in toothpaste that prevents tooth decay.’

‘Not in God's Name: Confronting Religious Violence’

NPR 1st November 2015

Rabbi Lord Professor Jonathan Sacks, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on religion in the 21st century. ‘People must cultivate their own truth while finding God, in the face of the stranger and the religious other,’ he said.

Swipe - Green tech pioneers solving climate change and virtual dentistry

Sky News 30th October 2015

A new virtual reality dentist kit has been developed, which allows students to train without having patients. Dr Alistair Barrow, Dental Institute, said: ‘The 3D glasses give the student a3D view of their patients and also gives them a lot more information than the traditional methods.’

Chinese overseas students welcome more UK-China academic support

China Daily 30th October 2015

Chinese students at British universities saw the recent visit of President Xi Jinping as a sign of cooperation between the UK and China, but would like more support from their home country. PhD student Eco Li said: ‘I feel so proud of the visit but I wish China can give more support to students who study overseas.’

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers 'can overcome symptoms of ME with positive thinking and exercise'

Telegraph 29th October 2015

A study carried out by Oxford University in collaboration with researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has found that graded exercise therapy (GET), in which sufferers gradually increase activity levels, as well as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which encourages positive thinking and behaviour, had a dramatic impact on the fatigue levels of ME sufferers. Also reported in Daily Mail and Nursing Times.

King's press release related to 'Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers 'can overcome symptoms of ME with positive thinking and exercise' '

Returned vet's sick risk woes

Sun 28th October 2015

The mental health of soldiers returning from war zones gets worse in the months after returning to Britain, finds a recent study, rather than anxiety or depression levels improving from being away from the front line. Professor Neil Greenberg of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) says: 'further studies are required to see if problems persist over time'.

King's press release related to 'Returned vet's sick risk woes'

Cutting sugar can improve health in nine days, says study

O Globo (Brazil) 27th October 2015

A report found that by reducing sugar intake among a number of over-weight children saw indicators of health benefits in only nine days. Professor Tom Sanders, Nutrition and Dietetics, said the study needed to be viewed “with some scepticism” because it was uncontrolled. It did not compare the children with a similar group who continued to eat a high-sugar diet.

Europe’s Plan to test car emissions are criticised

New York Times 27th October 2015

EU policy makers are pushing ahead with plans to subject cars to on the road exhaust testing in the wake of the Volkswagen scandal. The article cites the Environmental Research Group’s work which stated that exposure to nitrogen dioxide in London had contributed to 6,000 deaths a year.

Red meat tied to cancer

Wall Street Journal 27th October 2015

The World Health Organisation has warned that processed meat such as bacon and sausages should be classified as carcinogenic and that red meat also poses a cancer risk. The report confirms the previous recommendations of expert committees. Tom Sanders, Nutrition and Dietetics, commented that red meat is a good source of vitamins and iron but warned it was not necessary to eat large amounts of meat.

Embryo splitting deemed not viable for producing twins through IVF

Deccan Chronicle 26th October 2015

A new study led by King’s College London suggests that human twin embryos created in the laboratory by splitting single embryos into two using a common method may be unsuitable both for IVF and for research purposes. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, corresponding author of the paper, said: ‘Our study suggests that a 'developmental clock' drives human early development, although we don't yet know the precise ways in which it works.’ Also reported in the Economic Times of India

KAICIID to discuss peacebuilding through interreligious dialogue at Madrid +10 Policy Dialogue

Reuters 26th October 2015

The ICSR, along with Club de Madrid, have organised a two-day meeting in Madrid urging global policymakers and high-level experts to use interreligious dialogue in preventing and countering violent extremism. The Policy Dialogue will convene more than 250 high level experts, including King Felipe VI of Spain, UN Secretary General Bank Ki-Moon and the current Prime Minister of Tunisia, Habid Essid.

Enemy of Enemies: The rise of ISIL

Al Jazeera 26th October 2015

A special two-part documentary for Al Jazeera English charts the rise of the so-called, Islamic State group and examines its origins and reasons for success. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, contributed to the programme. He tells how as the Syrian civil war deteriorated into further factions, IS emerged as the most significant ‘victor’. ’Islamic State attracted the largest number of recruits, it had the largest amount of resources…it allowed them to develop the most powerful, the most vital asset that any army has – that is fighters with combat experience,’ he said.

Is Russia’s call for elections in Syria realistic?

Al Jazeera Inside Story 25th October 2015

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, has said that he would consider a Russian diplomatic initiative calling for elections in the country, if there is support for it from the Syrian population. Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘Russia is keeping diplomatic momentum going and is trying to seize opportunities. But the whole question of preparing elections in Syria is questionable; practically it is not feasible in the current fragmentation of the country.’

The very non-halal ways potential Jihadists are funding their work

Foreign Affairs 25th October 2015

Young Europeans have been traveling to Syria to join the terror group Islamic State. Research from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) is mentioned in the article, which found the top European country of origin, Belgium, saw 440 Belgian residents leave for Sunni militant organisations in Iraq and Syria in 2015. Research from ICSR about disillusioned Islamic State fighters was also mentioned in the Deccan Chronicle.

Are Hydrogen cars the future?

BBC World News 24th October 2015

In a report on the work conducted by the Environmental Research Group (ERG) at King’s, Andrew Grieve, ERG, discussed their research and demonstrated equipment used to monitor air pollution. ‘The particles in the air that we’re really worried about are the ones you can’t see,’ he said. Dr Gary Fuller, ERG, also discussed air pollution in London for Agence France-Presse and Economic Times of India, about a report which found problems associated with air pollution cost the London economy up to £3.7 billion each year.

Long overdue: India gets serious about Africa

The Diplomant 24th October 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the third India-Africa summit, which will be hosted in India with representatives from more than 40 African countries. ‘Today all major powers including the United States, China, Japan, and the European states are wooing Africa with investments and trade linkages at a time when Africa is beginning to engage the world on its own terms. India will have to ensure that it remains relevant to Africa’s rapidly changing needs,’ he said.

A friend in deed

Telegraph India 24th October 2015

Narendra Modi is likely to become the first prime minister of India to visit Israel later this year. Commenting on the relationship between the two countries, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘When it comes to India's Israel policy, hypocrisy has been the norm.’

Some experts hopeful about Syria’s chance

Voice of America 23rd October 2015

US Secretary of State John Kerry met with leaders from several Middle Eastern countries and Russia to discuss how to revive the political process in Syria. Commenting on the meeting, Professor Michael Kerr, Institute of Middle Eastern Studies, said: ‘The challenge for the US, European Union, and other parties is to come up with a policy that provides consistent and robust support politically for whatever moderate opposition groups that come to the fore in any new political initiative…I'm not sure that's going to happen.’

Auris Medical and King’s College London collaborate in drug discovery for second generation tinnitus treatment

Bloomberg Business 23rd October 2015

Professor David Thurston, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, will collaborate with Auris Medical Holding, to develop a treatment for certain types of tinnitus. Commenting on the collaboration, Professor Peter Hylands, Head of the Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, said: ‘This latest of a series of commercial collaborations demonstrates the breadth and depth of our research capability and the great demand for our expertise in discovery and development.’

Expert calls for mental health shake up

Daily Mail 22nd October 2015

Professor Mike Slade of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the current mental health support system. He is calling for a shift to a 'nothing about us without us' attitude, where those affected by mental health problems are involved in the debate about their future.

The invisible women with autism

The Atlantic 22nd October 2015

On average, girls who have mild symptoms of autism are diagnosed two years later than boys; diagnostic tests are based on observations of boys with autism, contributing to errors and delays. Professor Francesca Happé, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, commented on the diagnosis of women who could be autistic. ‘They have good imitation, good intonation in their language, body language—surface behaviour isn’t very useful for a diagnosis, at least for a certain set of women on the spectrum,’ she said.

Witness

BBC World Service 21st October 2015

In 1990, Emeritus Professor Denys Brunsden, Geography, was one of the first Western scientists to visit the Aral Sea in Soviet Central Asia, where they confirmed that the formerly fourth largest inland sea in the world had virtually disappeared. Commenting on the experience, Professor Brunsden said: ‘I think it was an adventure for any British academic to go into the Soviet Union...I’d read all my life about these deserts…I knew a lot about the ecological history of the sea.’

U.K and China cement growing friendship with big nuclear deal

Foreign Policy 21st October 2015

During his state visit to the UK, Chinese President Xi Jinping signed a number of deals, one of which will provide funding for a controversial nuclear power plant in the UK. Commenting on what some opposition British politicians have called a ‘British sell-out’ to Beijing, Dr John Bew, War Studies, said: ‘There’s been no attempt to fully come to terms with what this might mean in the long term.’

Every Indian Child Deserves Complete Vaccination: Is The Govt Doing Enough?

Huffington Post 21st October 2015

Dr Sridhar Venkatapuram, Social Science Health and Medicine, examines the impact of last month’s agreement by world leaders of 17 global goals to achieve by 2030. One specific target of Goal 3 is to end preventable deaths of new-borns and children under 5 years of age. All countries should aim to reduce neonatal mortality to at least 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least 25 per 1,000 live births. The astounding thing is that many of these child deaths are entirely preventable through vaccinations,’ he said.

Gene could hold the key to treating Parkinson's

BBC Radio 4 Today Programme 20th October 2015

Dr Joe Bateman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is interviewed on the Today programme at 49.30 about his research into a new gene linked to nerve function, which could provide a treatment target for ‘switching off’ the gene in people with neurodegenerative diseases. Also reported in BBC World Service (19.10), BBC Radio London (37.00), BBC Radio Scotland (02.16.20), and Xinhua (China).

King's press release related to 'Gene could hold the key to treating Parkinson's'

Chinese feature documentary “Hopes and Dreams” launches British premiere in London

Xinhua 20th October 2015

Article mentions the launch of feature documentary “Hopes and Dreams”, which was premiered at the Greenwood Theatre. The documentary gives a snapshot of contemporary life in China.

As migrants reach Europe, fears may be misplaced

International New York Times 20th October 2015

Experts and academics have disputed fears that members of militant group Islamic State could travel to Europe disguised as refugees. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: ‘If they want to come to Europe, there are easier ways; they have access to money, and they have networks.’

Cancer therapy firm Gritstone gets $102 million to start

Boston Globe 20th October 2015

Gritstone Oncology Inc, a company that focuses on developing personalised treatments for cancer, has received $102 million in funding. The company was founded by a group of doctors from a number of global institutions, including King’s. Also reported by Reuters.

People with Parkinsons walk again after promising new drugs trial

Independent 19th October 2015

The article outlines a study investigating the effects of a new drug on Parkinson's disease. The new drug demonstrated dramatic improvements in symptoms, with some patients being able to speak or walk again when previously unable to. However, Professor Ray Chaudhuri of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments: 'if it can really reverse the effects of Parkinson's, we'd have reached a major milestone, but I'm sceptical. I would say, "watch this space".' Also reported in New Scientist.

What causes us to feel fear?

BBC Radio 4 Today 19th October 2015

Dr Adam Perkins, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), was interviewed about how the brain has evolved to process fear. Item begins at 02:25:40.

Global careers

Times of India 19th October 2015

For students interested in working at a major international law firm, attending international higher education institutions can be highly beneficial. Professor Satvinder Juss, Dickson Poon School of Law, advised: ‘Indian students who wish to study law overseas should look to apply to world-class institutions. The study of national law should be combined with global themes and perspectives because this drives the development on law.’

European perceptions of China

Xinhua 19th October 2015

As China’s President, Xi Jinping, embarked on his state visit to the UK, Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, commented on perceptions of China in Europe. ‘European people have a better perception of China than they used to have…One reason is that there are more Chinese people living in European countries…Secondly, China has become a more developed country. This a new China that is very vibrant, with a traditional but also modern culture,’ he said. Also reported in China Daily, Sina and People’s Daily. Dr Pardo also did interviews with CNN, Sky news and Vietnam Television/VT.

Taxpayers could pay millions to fix London's Big Ben

Reuters 19th October 2015

Funds required to fix Big Ben reportedly could cost tax payers over £29 million. Commenting on the iconic British building, Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘Big Ben and the Elizabeth Tower on which it sits, is…arguably the most famous iconic image of the UK…it is part of the image of the country.’

New ‘skinsuit’ trialled in space

Economic Times of India 19th October 2015

A innovative ‘SkinSuit’ designed to reduce the debilitating physical effects of space flight has been trialled for the first time on the International Space Station by a European Space Agency astronaut. The suit was developed by researchers at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, in collaboration with King’s College London, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the European Space Agency. Also reported by NDTV.

Counter-terrorism announcement of British government

RTL 19th October 2015

The UK government has announced a five-year counter-terrorism strategy. The proposal includes plans to create a network linking individuals and groups in the UK to ‘stand up to extremists in communities.’ Commenting on the strategy, Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, said: ‘That’s the recognition the government can’t deliver this on its own. It wants to create a whole national response to this issue.’

Blocking brain chemical could stop migraines

New Scientist 17th October 2015

Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) in collaboration with New York Univeristy, has potentially found a new treatment to help patients suffering from migraines. Their research discovered large amounts of a peptide in the blood of people with migraines, and after injecting the chemical into volunteers, found that it triggered headaches. The peptide (PCAP) stimulated neuron activity in the brain, and by blocking the receptors, the neuron activity responsible for the headache stopped.

Scientists find way to stop Schizophrenia

Daily Telegraph 17th October 2015

Dr Oliver Howes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has carried out research showing that schizophrenia may be prevented by calming down the immune system and inflammation in the brain. His team found that cells sometimes respond to damage in the brain by severing the wrong connections between cells, so that they are not wired properly. Dr Howes comments: 'For the first time, we have evidence that there is over-activity even before full onset of the illness. If we could reduce activity we might be able to prevent the illness'. Also reported in Daily Mail, Bloomberg and Nursing Times.

King's press release related to 'Scientists find way to stop Schizophrenia'

Schizophrenia Study Could Improve Treatment

Sky News 16th October 2015

A study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry is the first to find that immune cells are more active in the brains of people at risk of schizophrenia as well as those already diagnosed with the disease. Dr Oliver Howes of the IoPPN and head of the psychiatric imaging group at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, said: 'Schizophrenia is a potentially devastating disorder and we desperately need new treatments to help sufferers, and ultimately to prevent it.’

New gene test tells how you are ageing

Daily Mirror 16th October 2015

Early intervention is crucial in treating Alzheimer’s. This piece reports again on the finding by scientists at King’s who have come up with a test that will help doctors decide which people could be offered preventive therapies even before the first symptoms of dementia begin to appear.

Why London defies attempts to write the definitive novel

Financial Times 16th October 2015

Dr Jon Day, English, writes about the London novel, saying: ‘The time of the great synoptic London novel is over, for there is no London any more. Instead there are many Londons: multiple cities separated from one another by money or its lack; by language or religion or life experience.’

King’s College London institute brings academia closer to policy

Times Higher Education 15th October 2015

The article profiles King’s Policy Institute’s work in academic and policymaking and its high-profile visiting Professors and lecturers such as Labour ministers Charles Clarke and Margaret Hodge and former Conservative University and Science minister David Willetts. Professor Jonathan Grant, Director, Policy Institute, said: ‘The aim is to make King’s more porous as an institution and to establish these units, at the interface of King’s as a world-class university and broader society.’

Why do people ignore doctors' advice?

BBC News 15th October 2015

Professor John Weinman, Pharmaceutical Sciences, discusses why patients often ignore medical advice. Professor Weinman said: ‘Some doctors assume because they have made a good diagnosis and that they have offered the right treatment that everything will be followed.’

Two Days in Two Months to Support Dignity and Social Inclusion for People With Mental Health Problems Worldwide: an Uphill Journey

Huffington Post 14th October 2015

Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the significance of World Mental Health Day and World Mind Matters Day in focusing our attention to the most urgent priorities. He notes the link between poverty and mental health. On average, people who are poor are twice more likely to experience depression or anxiety than more affluent people; and up to five times more likely if they are poor children or adolescents. Poor people are up to four times more likely to develop serious disorders, such as schizophrenia, than affluent people. Women from disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to experience severe stress, depression and other mental disorders during pregnancy and after giving birth. In turn, these upheavals may influence the mental and psychosocial development of the child, thus potentially perpetuating a trans-generational cycle of poverty and poor mental health.

Expert Insight

Guardian 14th October 2015

Dr Mary Baginsky, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, discusses social care in the UK and why it has the poorest rate of retention and staff turnover. Baginsky said: ‘Social work has more female than male professionals yet I go into offices where jobsharing for frontline child protection work is discouraged.’

Astronaut trials gravity-mimicking SkinSuit on ISS

Daily Mail 14th October 2015

A new type of space clothing called SkinSuit which has been designed reduce the debilitating physical effects of spaceflight was worn by Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen on the International Space Station (ISS). SkinSuit has been developed in collaboration with scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kings College London and the European Space Agency.

World University Rankings 2015-2016 by subject: clinical, pre-clinical and health results announced

Times Higher Education 14th October 2015

King’s is ranked eighth position in this year’s Times Higher Education rankings for pre-clinical and health subjects. Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health), said: ‘This success reflects a steady improvement in our performance in biomedicine, which has thrived partly due to a culture of collaboration among top London institutions.’

King's launches key report on partnerships within the arts and cultural sector

King's Press Release 14th October 2015

According to a new report ‘The art of partnering’, partnerships enable cultural organisations to reach broader audiences and increase the quality of their work. Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal, (Culture & Engagement), and Lord Hall, Director-General of the BBC, launched the report at a reception in Bush House. Deborah Bull said: ‘This Enquiry was inspired by what appears to be a growing focus on partnership in and across the cultural sector, as policy makers emphasise the importance of partnership in maximising the value of ever-scarcer resources.’

Thousands of cancer patients dying because GPs fail to refer for tests

King's Press Release 14th October 2015

A new study by King’s shows higher death rates in cancer patients whose GPs do not regularly send patients through the two-week urgent referral route for suspected cancer. Professor Henrik Moller, Cancer Studies, said: ‘Achieving an earlier diagnosis of cancer at a less advanced stage is a public concern and has become a widely adopted priority for healthcare systems.’ This was also reported by Mirror Online, Daily Mail, Guardian, Metro, Sun, Huffington Post Telegraph, Nursing Times and Independent.

King's press release related to 'Thousands of cancer patients dying because GPs fail to refer for tests '

Putin’s moment in the Middle East

DNA India 14th October 2015

Two days after US President Barak Obama warned against Russian action in defence of the Bashar al-Assad regime, the Russian air force began its bombing campaign in Syria. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed the actions in an opinion piece. ‘With this move, Putin is trying to live up to his ‘uber’ macho image that he has assiduously tried to cultivate,’ he said.

‘The glaring gap in the English education system is social class’

Guardian 13th October 2015

A profile of Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, focuses on her education research and work in politics. The writer said: ‘Francis’s priorities are crystal clear. Besides holding policymakers to account, she is determined to protect poorer children from cuts, and prevent any watering-down of policies designed to help them.’

'It was immense for us': 2015 winners reflect on their success

Guardian 13th October 2015

The winners of last year’s Guardian University Awards discuss what they have done since they won the award. King’s Sierra Leone Partnership won the International projects category. Max Manning Lowe, Operations Manager, said: ‘We’ve grown and professionalised a lot over the course of the outbreak – you have to if your organisation grows tenfold in under a year.’

How do you get rid of garlic breath? Why do our stomachs rumble? And IS sparkling water bad for you?

Guardian 13th October 2015

Dr Adam Perkins, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), comments on why people feel sick when they see something unpleasant. According to Perkins when the brain receives a visual clue that something could be toxic - such as rotting meat - it messages the vomiting centre at the bottom of the brain. Perkins said: ‘Those who experienced revulsion at rotting meat were more likely to survive, so the reflex spread.’

Strains over Syria jeopardise Turkey-Russia economic ties

Financial Times 12th October 2015

The economic relationship between Russia and Turkey is strained due to the on-going war in Syria. Turkey is the second-largest consumer of Russian natural gas and a new pipeline across the Black Sea was supposed to cement the partnership, but now it is unclear whether this will still go ahead. Dr Adnan Vatansever, Global Institute, said: ‘It would mean major delays, and there’s too much political capital invested in the project.’

First 'in womb' stem cell trial to begin

BBC News 12th October 2015

The first clinical trial injecting foetal stem cells into babies still in the womb has been announced. It is hoped the cells, which are able to transform into a range of tissues, will reduce symptoms of incurable brittle bone disease. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, commented: ‘Any attempt to help the patients suffering this terrible, debilitating disease is more than welcome. People with the same type of osteogenesis imperfecta may present a different clinical picture, even within the same family.’

Why we are terrified of sink holes

Guardian 11th October 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote about a sinkhole that recently opened in St Albans. Dr Glaser said: ‘We are programmed to react when something we are used to being there - such as the pavement - suddenly disappears. Filtering out unchanging stimuli and focussing on difference helps us spot potential predators or prey.’

3,000 schools face threat of toxic diesel

Sunday Times 11th October 2015

Up to 3,000 British schools are situated in areas with potentially dangerous levels of air pollution. Scientists at King’s found that many schools in London lie in areas where nitrogen dioxide breaches the 40mcg EU limit. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘It is clear that children attending very many schools are breathing polluted air for all those years they are a pupil.’ This was also reported by London Evening Standard and BBC Newsnight.

Mediterranean diet: The secret to a long life... drink a shot of olive oil every day

Independent 11th October 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, wrote a piece on the advantages and disadvantages of eating Mediterranean food. Professor Spector said: ‘Health surveys of European populations kept finding that southern Europeans lived longer and had less heart disease despite higher fat intakes.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Pear-shaped women less likely to develop diabetes, new research claims

Daily Mirror 11th October 2015

According to recent study women with a ‘pear-shaped’ body are less likely to develop diabetes. Dr Kerrin Small, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘At the whole-body level, these differences between alleles are not associated with changes to overall weight or body mass index, but they do affect women’s hip circumference. Previous studies have shown that on average, women who carry fat in their hips - those with a ‘pear-shaped’ body type - are significantly less likely to develop diabetes than those with smaller hips.’ This was also reported by Daily Mirror, Independent, Daily Mail and Times.

Should women abstain from alcohol throughout pregnancy

British Medical Journal 10th October 2015

Dr Kate Wiles, Women’s Health, comments on whether women should abstain from alcohol during pregnancy. The Department of Health undermines the advice that women should avoid drinking alcohol by giving a ‘safe’ level for alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Dr Wiles said: ‘Worldwide estimates are that at least 1% of live births are affected by prenatal alcohol.’

Now for the brain course! Scientists prove you CAN eat your way to a sharper mind

Daily Mail 10th October 2015

A study shows that the things we eat have a direct influence on the brain. Certain food can have an impact on our moods and can make us think faster. Professor Tom Sanders, Nutrition & Dietetics, said: ‘Fish is the food richest in Vitamin D and low levels are linked to an increased risk of dementia.’

How the quality of mercy is strained

The Economist 10th October 2015

Last year the Middle East area consumed almost 60 per cent of the global budget for humanitarian relief, which reached almost $25 billion. It is hard to measure how effective all that aid is, however Aid agencies perform spot-checks on projects, but say their resources are too stretched to conduct full-scale assessments. Professor Dr Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, said: ‘People become refugees for many reasons, but a big one is to reach that aid. If the food won’t get to the people, they’ll come to it.’

Migraines may begin deep in the brain

Huffington Post 9th October 2015

Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience explains how migraines develop in the brain. He notes: "To understand migraines, you need to understand what chemicals the brain is using to transmit the signal" that causes the headaches. In his research using rats he has shown that vasodilators — which are medicines that cause blood vessels to widen, increasing blood flow — effect certain receptors in brain cells. One vasodilator, nicknamed PACAP, causes a cluster of neurons in the center of the head called the trigeminovascular system to fire more than normal, mimicking the symptoms of a migraine. A compound injected into the brain successfully blocked these receptors, preventing them from over-firing and causing pain. This challenges another theory that migraines are caused by blood vessels throbbing in the brain.

Is there a gay gene?

BBC Two 9th October 2015

Dr Qazi Rahman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the genetics of homosexuality and the role of nature vs nurture on the Victoria Derbyshire programme at 1.39.00. Also reported in the Guardian and USN HealthDay.

Dying at home leads to ‘more peace and less grief’

Nursing Net 9th October 2015

According to research, cancer patients who die at home experience more peace but not more pain that those who die in hospital. Dr Barbara Gomes, Cicely Saunders Institute, said: ‘We know that many patients fear being at home believing they place an awful burden on their family. However, we found that grief was actually less intense for relatives of people who died at home.

Nobel Peace Prize winners

Sky News 9th October 2015

This year’s Nobel Peace Prize winners were the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet. Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, commented: ‘They have done extremely well as Tunisia has no history of democracy, so it was in difficult circumstances they were operating in. They managed to help guide the country through to a functioning democracy.’

Coalition warplanes bomb Yemen rebels

Daily Mail 9th October 2015

Warplanes from the Saudi-led coalition raided positions of the Iran-backed Shiite insurgents east of the rebel-held capital. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, commented: ‘Targeting remains difficult in the current environment... lack of intelligence and deliberate acts of perfidy by Huthis and loyalists. I think that these attacks were committed by Huthi rebels or loyalists trying to intimidate local communities. Locals tend to think that they were targeted by air strikes.’

Kremlin turns opinion over Syria with U.S.-style 'shock and awe' media blitz

Daily Mail 9th October 2015

Dr Samuel Greene, Director, Russia Institute, comments on Russia’s military intervention in Syria. Dr Greene said: ‘From the very beginning, this has been couched in language that is almost identical to the language that the United States used in justifying domestically its intervention in Iraq.’ This was also reported by Sky News and Reuters

Who is the world's most influential politician? Angela Merkel or Vladimir Putin?

Telegraph 9th October 2015

Various academics at King’s commented on which leaders they think hold power over world events. Alexander Clarke, War Studies, argues that President Putin is the most influential leader and said: ‘A testament to a person’s influence on events is if they manage to dominate the conversation even in rooms they are not invited into; this is the definition of President Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin.’

Migraines may begin deep in the brain

Huffington Post 9th October 2015

Professor Peter Goadsby, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, explains how migraines develop in the brain. He notes: ‘To understand migraines, you need to understand what chemicals the brain is using to transmit the signal that causes the headaches.’ In his research using rats he has shown that vasodilators — which are medicines that cause blood vessels to widen, increasing blood flow — effect certain receptors in brain cells.

Cambridge Cognition licence agreements

Telegraph 9th October 2015

Cambridge Cognition Holdings has announced two new licence agreements which extend the company's testing capabilities into new areas of research, enabling assessment of 'Hot' cognition - mental processes that are influenced by emotion and social interaction - to be performed reliably and routinely for the first time. The first licence provides exclusive access to four new innovative tests developed in collaboration between scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Manchester, University College London, and King's College London, in a programme funded by the Medical Research Council.

What could Isil actually do if they got their hands on nuclear material?

Telegraph 8th October 2015

Richard Brown, International Centre for Security Analysis, wrote a piece on reports stating that black market gangs have been offering nuclear materials for sale for Islamic State buyers. Brown said: ‘The term ‘nuclear material’ can, in fact, cover a range of different substances, including those required for nuclear explosions – namely, uranium and plutonium. Neither is at all easy to produce.’

Standard tests for students: a big leap forwards or moving in the wrong direction?

Times Higher Education 8th October 2015

Academics debate whether non-subject-specific exams could be used to measure ‘learning gain’ in English Higher Education. Professor Alison Wolf, Public Sector Management, said: ‘Universities vary hugely in their degree ‘mix’, so a university whose degree mix is heavily weighted towards the content of a test will appear to be doing a much better job than those whose mix is not so closely linked, even though that isn’t necessarily the case at all.’

Guilt - even innocent guilt - is an evil thing: how soldiers struggle to cope when they come home

Guardian 7th October 2015

The article discusses returning servicemen who, having survived combat, become casualties of peace. It highlights research from the King's Centre for Military Health Research, which suggested that service personnel may be twice as likely to suffer from depression and anxiety as the general working population. Unlike in the United States, where an epidemic of military suicides has gained widespread coverage, the relationship between suicide and service has received limited attention in Britain.

Brain scans could predict patients at risk of major depression

Reuters 7th October 2015

Dr Roland Zahn of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has carried out research on 64 patients that demonstrates brain scans could be used to predict with 75 per cent accuracy who is most likely to relapse into depression, an approach that could help doctors make better decisions about who should stay on antidepressants and who should stop. He notes: "Before this approach can be rolled out...we need to test it out in an independent group of patients and improve it so that its accuracy reaches 80 percent” but that the approach may prove important in the future, "as there are currently no accurate ways to predict those who will have a recurrence following recovery". Also reported in Daily Mail, Huffington Post, Bloomberg, and Xinhua.

King's College London Says 'It Stops Here' to Sexual Harassment

Huffington Post 6th October 2015

It Stops Here is a campaign launched at King's with the aim of building an inclusive and safe environment, where sexual harassment is never acceptable. The collaborative campaign between KCL and KCL Student Union has also garnered the support of many student groups. Rachel Williams, Vice President of Welfare & Community at KCLSU said: ‘Each person getting involved and signing the pledge is a step towards an environment where sexual violence is challenged and survivors of violence are listened to and respected.’ This was also reported by BBC Trending.

Assisted dying: What does the law in different countries say?

BBC News 6th October 2015

According to the British Council, many top UK institutions have hosted both international and British students who have won Nobel prizes. Nearly two-fifths of Nobel laureates who studied at universities outside their home country went to an institution in the UK – more than any other country – the research found. King’s College London has had two international and British students win the Nobel prize.

Branded painkillers do same job

Sky News 5th October 2015

Reports show that consumers in Britain are paying up to four times more for big-name painkillers compared with unbranded tablets. Professor Jayne Lawrence, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, said: ‘Some people believe that by taking a more expensive preparation, perhaps a branded formulation, they'll get better pain relief. If it's the same dose of drug, in the same formulation, the customer will experience no difference.’

What exercise regime is worth the pain?

Deccan Herald 5th October 2015

Article considers a number of different exercise techniques, evaluating their effectiveness. A study into the benefits of pilates, conducted by Dr Duncan Critchley, Physiotherapy, found that it does activate and strengthen core abdominal muscles.

How to get away with a lie

Guardian 4th October 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote about how to detect when someone is lying, in the aftermath of the Volkswagen scandal. Dr Glaser said: ‘Some people are naturally better liars than others: if you want to play dirty, the best thing to do is identify the good liars – if you can – and hire them. Which is maybe what VW wishes it had done.’

The Price of Digital Privacy

BBC World Service 2nd October 2015

In a panel discussion, Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, discussed government surveillance, digital privacy, and the impact of revelations made by former CIA employee Edward Snowden. ‘Edward Snowden revealed a lot of data in terms of large number of documents…this doesn’t mean we now understand what he had revealed… Many of those journalists who have reported on the stories have never even spoken to a member of the intelligence community,’ he said.

UK creative industries get strong showing at World Expo 2015

Bloomberg 1st October 2015

Creative industries in the UK have contributed £76.9 billion to the country’s economy. Creative and cultural events for 2016 include a programme of performances, exhibitions and events being coordinated to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, hosted by King’s.

Chevening Leadership Programme

Hindustan Times 30th September 2015

King’s College London has announced the start of the 2015 Chevening Gurukul Programme for Leadership and Excellence. The 12-week course, hosted by King’s India Institute, is the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s flagship fellowship scheme for India.

World University Rankings blog: the challenges facing world-class universities

King's Press Release 30th September 2015

Many academics and university leaders attended the Times Higher Education World Academic Summit in Melbourne to discuss the challenges that world-class universities are facing and how they may be tackled in the future. Professor Edward Byrne, President & Principal, said: ‘For me, a major challenge is taking a university almost totally dedicated to research and getting my colleagues to understand that the education they deliver is every bit as important, and to society at large probably the most important thing we do.’ This was also reported by the Times Higher Education and Independent.

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Our knack for remembering faces is a highly evolved skill

New Scientist 29th September 2015

Wondering if genetics could shed any light, Nick Shakeshaft of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and his team tested more than 900 sets of UK twins – including both identical and non-identical pairs – on their face recognition skills. The ability turned out to be highly heritable, with identical twins having more similar abilities than fraternal ones. The same went for intelligence, which had earlier been tested as part of a long-running study. However, there was little relationship between face recognition abilities and intelligence: in other words you could be clever but bad with faces, or vice versa. Comparing individuals against their twin suggested that only 10 per cent of the heritability of face recognition was down to genes that also influenced intelligence. “That’s consistent with the idea that there are genes that drive the development of a specific brain region,” says Shakeshaft.

Thousands enter Syria to join ISIS despite global efforts

International New York Times 29th September 2015

Nearly 30,000 foreign recruits have travelled to Syria, many to join terrorist group Islamic State. However a report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King’s revealed disillusionment within the extremist group. Commenting on the report, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘ISIS no longer has the momentum in its core territory of Syria and Iraq…It’s no longer the ever-expanding jihadist utopia that it seemed to be.’ Also reported in NDTV

Brains in a dish guide autism

Bloomberg 28th September 2015

The article quotes Declan Murphy, professor of psychiatry and brain maturation at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who researches the excitation-inhibition chemical balance in the brain that may contribute to autism.“It’s kind of like the accelerator and brake of your brain,” he comments, and adds that there is early evidence that scientists can influence that balance and thereby impact brain functions.

Why does the UK need China to build its nuclear plants?

BBC News 25th September 2015

It will be the first new nuclear plant in the UK for 20 years. Hinkley Point C in Somerset is expected to provide up to 7% of the UK's electricity needs and create thousands of jobs. Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, said: ‘I believe that if the UK government has confidence in the project it could and should invest directly - it would be cheaper to do that than paying to borrow money from the Chinese.’

Six reasons Americans may want to get their college degree abroad

Huffington Post 25th September 2015

The article discusses the advantages of travelling abroad for Americans wishing to pursue higher education. The author mentions the average cost of studying at King’s for international students, specifically that this is cheaper than American colleges. It also mentions that financial aid is available for prospective students.

From isolation to tech impact factory: A combo psych and tech lab helps Sofia University educate more impactful engineers, taking psychology and engineering from adversaries to allies

Reuters 25th September 2015

Sofia University and the Transformative Technology Lab have partnered to develop technology that aims to increase ‘human well-being’. Researchers from King’s, amongst other institutions, will be advising on the collaboration. Also reported in Bloomberg

Does breastfeeding lead to higher IQ?

BBC London Radio 24th September 2015

Professor Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the theory that there is a link between length of time breastfeeding and greater IQ in children. Also reported in Daily Mail and Nursing Times.

Mental health research 'needs cash boost'

BBC 24th September 2015

Professor Til Wykes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was lead researcher on a study published in the Lancet, which argues that argue UK research funding for mental health - which is currently £115m - should be trebled. The article outlines six steps to improve mental health, including investing in new treatments, or pooling mental health databases. Professor Wykes comments: 'The impact of mental disorders is rising - now we have the science to bridge these gaps, funding mental health research will benefit everyone in the long run - in health and wellbeing as well as financially.'.

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Here's why you should take more breaks during office hours

Hindustan Times 23rd September 2015

Research carried out by Dr Benjamin Gardner of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown that increasing levels of physical activity as an intervention is less effective at reducing prolonged sitting than directly attempting to decrease sitting time. "These findings will be of interest to researchers and practitioners designing new ways to reduce prolonged sitting". Some of the promising strategies included the provision of sit-stand desks at work, encouraging people to keep records of their own sitting time, setting individual goals for limiting sitting time, and using prompts and cues to remind people to stop them sitting were also found to help reduce sitting time. Also reported in Wall Street JOurnal

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VW scandal caused nearly 1m tonnes of extra pollution, analysis shows

Guardian 23rd September 2015

Volkswagen’s rigging of emissions tests means they may be responsible for nearly one million tonnes of air pollution each year. Dr Gary Fuller, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘Since 2003 scientists have been saying things are not right. It’s not just the VW story; this is part of something much bigger. It has a serious public health impact.’ Many members of Environmental Research Group have been interviewed about this topic including Dr Heather Walton, Professor Frank Kelly and Professor Martin Williams. This was also reported by Telegraph, Financial Times, Guardian, Telegraph, Channel 4, Daily Mail, ITV and Newsnight.

Trans fatty acids may be safe in small amounts, new research suggests

Daily Mail 23rd September 2015

Research has shown that processed food products may be safe to consume as long as it is in small amounts. Trans fatty acids (TFAs), also known as trans or hydrogenated fats, have previously been linked to high cholesterol, heart conditions, strokes, diabetes and some cancers. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, highlighted the limitations of the study including the possible confounding effect of poorer participants having a higher industrial trans fat intake and richer people consuming more dairy products.

What's in YOUR 'microbial cloud'? Bacterial 'aura' surrounding our bodies is as unique as a fingerprint...and is full of skin and gas

Daily Mail 23rd September 2015

Research has shown that each of us is surrounded by a cloud of invincible bacteria. Professor Tim Spector, comments in New Scientists: ‘I don’t think it’s crazy to think that in the future we could be recognising people by their bacterial mist.’ This was also reported by the New Scientist.

The Sutton Trust's summer school kickstarted a push for fairer access to UK's elite universities

Independent 23rd September 2015

King's College London already runs its own specialised scheme alongside the Sutton Trust summer school and now also runs its own summer school for teachers – to help them navigate their pupils' way through the applications process. The scheme has helped many disadvantaged pupils apply to prestigious universities such as King’s College London and Cambridge.

Mental health research 'needs cash boost'

BBC News 23rd September 2015

Professor Til Wykes, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), was lead researcher on a study published in the Lancet, which argues that UK research funding for mental health - which is currently £115m - should be trebled. The article outlines six steps to improve mental health, including investing in new treatments, or pooling mental health databases. Professor Wykes comments: 'The impact of mental disorders is rising - now we have the science to bridge these gaps, funding mental health research will benefit everyone in the long run - in health and wellbeing as well as financially.’

UK government called to rethink its policy on overseas students

BBC News 23rd September 2015

Thousands of international students have encountered problems due to the tough laws on visas. Professor Edward Byrne, Principal & President AC highlights the issue this may have on the international student population and economy. Professor Byrne said: ‘I would urge the government to look at the Australian experience, where the Labour government made the same decision. This had an impact on the number of international students who came to study in the country.’

How depression pills turned me into a zombie

Daily Mail 22nd September 2015

Professor Allan Young, chair of mood disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN),comments on the use of a type of anti-depressant: 'SSRIs have been under intense scrutiny for a number of years because of the claims by Dr Healy and others, but there's nothing in the literature to back up the claim SSRIs make suicidal thoughts or psychosis are increased in patients taking these drugs. Psychosis does not usually follow treatment with SSRIs,' he says. 'But people who are depressed can become psychotic for a variety of reasons. We are worried about the use of antidepressants in bipolar depression, for instance, when not only do they not work, they can cause a switch into mania".

China should not be the answer to Britain's nuclear problems

Financial Times 22nd September 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, wrote a piece about George Osborne’s visit to Beijing. Professor Butler said: ‘Mr Osborne, on a visit to Beijing, has offered the Chinese two billion of government guarantees in return for their investment in the much delayed nuclear power project.’

Jihadists defecting from Isil after failed promises of heroism and luxury cars

Telegraph 21st September 2015

According to the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR) at least 58 people have left Isil since January because some feared that they were being used as suicide bombers or ‘cannon fodder’. The report by the ICSR said: ‘Some of those who left were disappointed by the ‘quality of life’ and were ‘typically among the ones who had joined the group for material and ‘selfish’ reasons, and quickly realized that none of the luxury goods and cars that they had been promised would materialize’. This report was published by Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, and was reported by Guardian, BBC World Service, Times, Metro, Huffington Post UK, Deccan Chronicle, NDTV, Washington Post, CNN, New York Times, Foreign Policy, Mirror, Reuters, Sky News and many others.

Hefce to pilot standardised student tests

The Times Higher Education 21st September 2015

Nationally administered standardised tests for students are to be piloted in English universities. The tests will evaluate whether they could be used to measure undergraduates learning gain. Professor Alison Wolf , Management, said: ‘The tests might be very helpful to individuals as a way of demonstrating their achievement.’

Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘outsider status’ and the flocking phenomenon

Guardian 20th September 2015

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director of Science Gallery, wrote a piece about the increasing support Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is receiving. Dr Glaser said: ‘The extraordinary swell in support for Jeremy Corbyn, the new leader of the Labour Party, can’t be explained by speaking to individual voters.’ This was also reported by NDTV.

17th century child mortality

Channel 4 20th September 2015

Dr Ian Mudway, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, comments on an old register which suggestS that people believed that the teething process was the cause of death of several children. Dr Mudway said: ‘One of the interesting things about the register is the number of deaths due to rickets. We know that it has an effect on bone development, but now we have an understanding that it plays a role in helping us fight infections.’

Why More U.S. Students Are Going Abroad for College

Wall Street Journal 20th September 2015

Increasing university costs in the US have caused many students to study abroad. The two most popular destinations are Canada and the UK because the tuition fees are lower. Chris Payne, head of USA Office, said: ‘The U.K. is more affordable than comparable U.S. colleges. Ivy League and top research universities in the U.S. can cost $50,000 or $60,000. King’s College London costs £15,200 (about $23,740) for the 2014-15 academic year.’

19th century bin-sitar hums with ageless music in London

The Hindu 19th September 2015

The instrument bin-sitar is a rare hybrid that shares structural and musical elements with both the rudraveena and the sitar. It was part of the collection of Major Charles Russell Day (1860-1900), the author of The Music and Musical Instruments of Southern India and Deccan (1891), who acquired it in the late 19th century. Dr Katherine B. Schofield, Music, comments: ‘This is an exciting and unprecedented moment. It is the first time that something like this has been tried, to have a contemporary musician play an ancient instrument in the collection.’

Gene-editing embryos should be banned to prevent 'genetically-enhanced children', scientists warn

Indpendent 18th September 2015

Scientists argue that there needs to be an international ban on the use of gene-editing technology to create genetically-modified babies. Professor Peter Braude, Women’s Health, said: ‘Clearly there needs to be a discussion about how this gene-editing technology is used. You should understand it before applying it. There has to be an understanding of the science, which is very new, but it would be wrong to have a moratorium that simply says ‘don’t do anything more’.’

Is Donald Trump a narcissist -- or a bully? Here's what psychologists say

Huffington Post 17th September 2015

In this article, Dr Adam Perkins, who is a neurobiologist of personality at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), comments on the traits of Donald Trump: "He is also highly intelligent, and so has a lot of problem-solving horsepower to direct at whatever goals his personality profile sets".

Indian scientific discovery in the twentieth century

BBC Radio 3 17th September 2015

Dr Jahnavi Phalkey, India Institute, says that India was at the forefront of scientific discovery in the 1930s and 1940s, when C.V. Raman won the Nobel Prize for Physics. Dr Phalkey said: ‘Beneath the well-known stories of the soldiers, the industrial labour in India had expanded to support the British war and the empire. The war changes things radically and quickly, especially in cities and towns because there is a flood of new work.’

Women's hour takeover

BBC Radio 4 14th September 2015

Professor Myra Hunter of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) joins other guests to discuss ageing, not having children, and being single in your fifties.

Women and minorities struggle with elitist nature of the orchestral culture

BBC Radio 4 14th September 2015

Due to the elitist nature of the orchestral culture, women and ethnic minorities have experienced discrimination. Dr Christina Schariff, CMCI, said: ‘There seems to be a presumption that ethnic minorities are not the musicians. For example when they go to a stage room they are often mistaken for the cleaner.’

Fish diet could ward off depression

BBC Radio Five Live 11th September 2015

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) commented on new research which found that a fish diet could reduce the risk of depression. He explained that consumption of nutrients found in fish could be helpful, alongside pharmacological treatments, for people with clinical depression. Interview begins at 55.10.

Molecular Switch Rewires Neurons Linked To Learning: Study

International Business Times (US) 11th September 2015

Researchers from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN) at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London, have discovered a new molecular ‘switch’ that controls the properties of neurons in response to changes in the activity of their neural network. Also reported by Medical News Today, Biotech News and The Scientist.

King's press release related to 'Molecular Switch Rewires Neurons Linked To Learning: Study'

Fish diet and depression

BBC Radio Five Live 11th September 2015

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) commented on new research which found that a fish diet could reduce the risk of depression. He explained that consumption of nutrients found in fish could be helpful, alongside pharmacological treatments, for people with clinical depression. Interview begins at 55.10.

Dr Andrew Blick appointed expert adviser to devolution inquiry

King's News Centre 11th September 2015

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, has been appointed expert adviser to a new panel on devolution and the constitutional future of the UK. The new panel, under the chairmanship of Lord Kerslake, former Head of the Home Civil Service, was set up by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Reform, Decentralisation and Devolution in the UK.

Make it clear when drones can be used

London Evening Standard 10th September 2015

Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, has written an article about how the UK needs new legislation to authorise military action against terrorist suspects. Dr Rosemont said: ‘Parliament should consider introducing legislation that would authorise the use of force against IS wherever it is based in the region.’

Alzheimer's could be passed on by humans

Times 10th September 2015

Professor Roger Morris,Chemistry, Natural & Mathematical Sciences, comments on a study that suggests the trigger for Alzheimer's could be passed on through contaminated surgical instruments. He notes that the procedure referred to has not been carried out in the UK for 30 years and asks: 'Does this nature paper presage an era in which Alzheimer's disease changes from being an isolated disease of each individual as they age to becoming infectious and able to attack everyone, young and old?’ This is reported by ITV News, Financial Times and STV Central East.

Brain cells get tweaked 'on the go'

King's News Centre 10th September 2015

Researchers from the MRC Centre for Development Neurobiology (MRC CDB) at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have discovered a new molecular ‘switch’ that controls the properties of neurons in response to changes in the activity of their neural network. Professor Oscar Marín, IoPPN, who led the study, said: ‘Our study demonstrates the tremendous plasticity of the brain, and how this relates to fundamental processes such as learning.’

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E-cigarettes tempt young into smoking

Telegraph 9th September 2015

Although a study appears to show that e-cigarettes may encourage young people to smoke, Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments: "Ann McNeill, professor of tobacco addiction at the National Addiction Centre, King’s College London, said: “Sadly this study cannot throw any light at all on what influenced a proportion of these 16 people to soften their attitudes towards cigarette smoking."

European Union faces different crises

BBC Radio Scotland 9th September 2015

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, outlined the different crises that Europe is facing at moment, including the Eurozone crisis and the massive instability in the South and Eastern Europe. Professor Menon said: ‘There is lots of crisis internally and externally. Internally European integration has always been quite fragile and externally you’ve got the migrant crisis.’

E-cigarettes 'tempt young into smoking’

Telegraph 9th September 2015

A new study appears to show that e-cigarettes may encourage young people to smoke. However Professor Ann McNeill, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) cast doubt on the findings: ‘Sadly this study cannot throw any light at all on what influenced a proportion of these 16 people to soften their attitudes towards cigarette smoking.’

Unemotional traits in babies can hint at future personality

Daily Mail 8th September 2015

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have shown it’s possible to predict at just five weeks old whether babies will develop callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Dr Rachael Bedford said: 'We found that increased preference for a person’s face -rather than a ball - at just five-weeks of age was associated with lower callous unemotional traits. We also found that if a mother responds more sensitively to their baby during playtime, then the child is less likely to display callous unemotional behaviour as a toddler.We are the first to find this and others will need to confirm it before it can inform how we support families.’ Also reported in Telegraph, Huffington Post and Times of India.

Britain targeting its own citizens in Isil drone strike sets dangerous precedent

Telegraph 8th September 2015

Three UK citizens, Junnaid Hussain, Reyaad Khan and Ruhul Amin were killed on 21 August in a RAF drone strike. Joanna Cook, War Studies, said: ‘This is the first time that the UK has engaged in targeted killing of its own citizens in the current conflict, and there are three key implications that emerge from this case for the UK. In Yemen, drone strikes have acted as a key recruitment tool for Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and have contributed significantly to increased membership of the organisation.’

Britons Killed In Anti-IS Cyber-Army Operation

Sky News 8th September 2015

Dr Jack McDonald, War Studies, and Shiraz Maher, ICSR, commented on the death of the Britons killed by a drone strike. Dr McDonald said: ‘The international community has always supported domestic terror campaigns both in the UK and abroad, however the idea that people can conduct campaigns is relatively new.’

Syria and the crisis of world order

New Statesman 8th September 2015

Dr John Bew, War Studies, has written an article about the Syrian war and refugee crisis in Europe. Dr Bew said: ‘The crisis in Syria is developing fast. Iranian and Russian involvement is increasing by the week, in addition to the role played by Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states in funnelling money into the conflict.’

Helen McCartney on the symbolism of street shrines

BBC Radio 3 7th September 2015

Dr Helen McCartney, Defence Studies, comments on the historical importance and symbolism of street shrines in Great Britain. ‘It’s quite interesting they didn’t really start till August 1916 and the first one appeared in Hackney and then it started to grow. The Mayor had also promoted this in the media highlighting the importance of this issue,’ she said.

Save money on medicine: Big-name drugs can cost 500% more than identical supermarket versions

Mirror Online 7th September 2015

According to a new study by money-saving website Voucherbox, people spend around 500% more on branded medicine which are often identical to generic drugs. Commenting on the study, Professor Jayne Lawrence, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, said: ‘Brand names are more expensive because drug companies have to recoup their development costs. However, all products, branded or generic, have to be manufactured by law to the same minimum standard.’

Could a test reveal whether your newborn will grow up to be a PSYCHOPATH? Scientists claim that unemotional traits in babies can hint at future personality

Daily Mail 7th September 2015

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have shown it’s possible to predict at just five weeks old whether babies will develop callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Dr Rachael Bedford, said: 'We found that increased preference for a person’s face -rather than a ball - at just five-weeks of age was associated with lower callous unemotional traits. We also found that if a mother responds more sensitively to their baby during playtime, then the child is less likely to display callous unemotional behaviour as a toddler. We are the first to find this and others will need to confirm it before it can inform how we support families.’

Test shows how old your body really is

BBC News 7th September 2015

Research led by King’s College London has developed a way of testing how well, or badly, a person is ageing. Lead author of the study, Professor James Timmons, Medical & Molecular Genetics, said: ‘There's a healthy ageing signature that's common to all our tissues, and it appears to be prognostic for a number of things including longevity and cognitive decline. It looks like from the age of 40 onwards you can use this to give guidance on how well an individual is ageing.’ This is reported by ITV Online, Guardian, Daily Mirror, Independent, The Times, Daily Mail, Huffington Post UK, ITV News, BBC News, Daily Telegraph, Fox news, O Globo, Hindustan Times, Folha, Xinhua, Bloomberg Business, and Economic Times of India.

'She was phenomenal': Nicole Kidman gains standing ovation after West End return with first performance of Photograph 51

Daily Mail 6th September 2015

Nicole Kidman received a standing ovation on the first night of her new play, Photograph 51. In the play Nicole plays researcher Rosalind Franklin, who discovered the structure of DNA at King’s. Nicole and the cast of Photograph 51 recently visited King’s Archives as part of their research about the life of Franklin. This is reported by Guardian.

Energy poverty, the plight that a billion people need not endure

Financial Times 6th September 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written an article about the current worldwide energy crisis. According to the most recent forecast from the International Energy Agency, almost a billion people will still lack electricity, even in 2030. Professor Butler said: ‘Developing countries including Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania are tackling energy poverty in rural areas, where more than half the villagers have no connection to the electricity grid.’

Why do refugees and migrants come to Europe and what must be done to ease the crisis?

Telegraph 4th September 2015

Academics at King’s explain why refugees and migrants risk their lives to travel to Europe and consider what can be done to solve the crisis. Since the beginning of the year, more than 160,000 migrants have made their way to Greece, nearly four times the 43,500 who arrived in the country in 2014.

Hormone-related depression and treatment

BBC Radio 4 2nd September 2015

At 11.15 the programme discusses the use of hormones to treat women experiencing depression at times of hormonal flux. Some women are vulnerable to changes in hormones and may develop hormonal-related mental health issues, and therefore could benefit from Hormone Replacement Therapy than anti-depressants.

Moody neurotics are more likely to be creative geniuses, study says

Independent 28th August 2015

A new study by Dr Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) suggests that neuroticism and panic tendency is closely linked to an over-active, threat-generating imagination, which although can cause negative emotions such as fear, can also lead to original thinking, problem solving and creative brilliance. He comments: 'We're still a long way off from fully explaining neuroticism, and we're not offering all of the answers, but we hope that our new theory will help people make sense of their own experiences, and show that although being highly neurotic is by definition unpleasant, it also has creative benefits.' Also reported in Daily Mail, Independent, Metro, Telegraph, Scottish Daily Mail, Mirror, Huffington Post, Fox news and Economic Times.

Google digs in for protracted antitrust fight tracking the fight in Europe

Wall Street Journal 28th August 2015

In a formal response to antitrust charges, Google rejected a European Union demand that it changes how its search engine functions. Professor Renato Nazzini, Law, commenting on the length of the ruling said: ‘These really drawn-out cases are not good for anyone.’

Is Britain good at inventing or developing?

BBC Radio Four 27th August 2015

Professor David Edgerton, History of Science and Technology, comments on what the British past track record on inventing and developing can tell us about Britain’s changes for future success. He said: ‘This is a very complicated subject and there is a lot of mythology about this topic. The greatest myth is that Britain is bad at inventing and only good at developing.’ This was reported on BBC World Service.

Dina Asher-Smith runs impressive PB in world championship 200m heat

Guardian 27th August 2015

King’s history student, Dina Asher-Smith has set another record at the World Championships in Beijing. Dina ran 22.22 seconds in her opening heat in the 200m race. This is the fastest first round 200m in World Championship history. She said: ‘I didn’t expect to run a personal best in the heat, I ran a good bend and when I saw where I was I tried to ease my way to the line to get a good lane for the semi-final. I’m absolutely over the moon.’ This is reported by Daily Mail, Guardian and Independent.

Mental health in the Asian community

BBC News 27th August 2015

Dr Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discussed the negative mental health stigma in the Asian community. He said: ‘It’s not only a South Asian problem, but there is a stigma of mental illness across the whole spectrum. However in the South Asian community the problem is slightly magnified because the families are worried that their daughters who are mentally ill may not get married.’

6-year-old boy able to stand again after Chinese surgeons use 3D printing

Telegraph 27th August 2015

Doctors in China have carried out the first orthopaedic surgery using 3D technology on a six year old boy, who had multiple painful fractures in his leg. Most doctors are now using 3D technology during surgery. Dr Tarique Hussain, Child Health Clinical Academic Group, used a 3D-printer to create a life-size plastic copy of a heart.

Dementia is set to become a trillion dollar disease

Daily Mail 26th August 2015

Treating dementia around the world has risen by 25 per cent over the last five years alone and will hit a trillion US dollars or £634million by 2018, researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have predicted. The findings, published in the 2015 World Alzheimer Report, estimated that dementia currently costs the UK economy £26.3 billion. Lead author Professor Martin Prince, said: ‘We estimate that 46.8 million people worldwide are living with dementia in 2015. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 74.7 million in 2030 and 131.5 million in 2050.’ This leaves dementia care one of the biggest public health challenges facing public health today and in the future. Also reported in Deccan Chronicle, Hindustan Times, O Globo and CNBC.

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Stop counting calories and start a high-fat Mediterranean-style diet, health experts urge

Independent 26th August 2015

According to experts, people should stop counting calories and focus on the food they eat in order to improve their health and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. However, Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Even a healthy dietary pattern can result in weight gain if too many calories are consumed. In my opinion, it is idiotic to suggest that calories don’t count and then advocate a high fat diet.’ This is also reported by Huffington Post.

London’s low-emission zone fails to improve air quality

New Scientist 26th August 2015

London’s campaign to reduce the city’s air pollution has not been as successful as hoped. The scheme was launched in 2008 and its aim was to improve the air quality. Earlier this year, London’s mayor confirmed plans to launch an ultra-low emission zone to enforce stricter pollution standards on vehicles. Professor Frank Kelly, Analytical & Environmental Health, said: ‘If you really want to achieve an improvement in air quality, these vehicles should be banned.’

When India sought covert United States help to tackle the ‘triple squeeze’ of 1965

Indian Express 25th August 2015

During the 1965 war with Pakistan, India asked the United States to covertly provide experts to work with Indian military officials to tackle the ‘Chinese threat’. Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, explained how the requests, made verbally, were revealed by Indian MP Sudhir Ghosh. ‘Ghosh chanced upon these revelations sometime after Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru died,’ he said.

A seismic shift in India’s Pakistan Policy

Diplomat 25th August 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commented on what he described as a ‘seismic shift’ in India’s Pakistan policy. ‘The much-hyped National Security Adviser (NSA)-level talks between India and Pakistan scheduled for this week may have collapsed even before they could formally start. But the Modi government managed to convey the message that it has been successful in reshaping the terms of New Delhi’s engagement with Islamabad, perhaps forever,’ he said.

Intertek publishes study on improving inhalation medicines with King’s College London

Reuters 25th August 2015

Intertek, a ‘quality solutions provider’, announced the publication of a study with King’s College London. The study, looking at improving inhalation medicines, demonstrated that inhaler formulations must be co-optimised with the inhaler device during product development. Also reported in Bloomberg

Chinese government is comfortable with slower growth, says expert

O Globo (Brazil) 25th August 2015

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, explained the recent ‘significant transformation’ in the Chinese Economy. ‘We are seeing a bubble in the stock market break without much government intervention. As the expectation was that the state would intervene, which did not happen, many investors panicked,’ he said.

Life-saving test for bowel cancer we ignore because it's 'too much of a faff'

Daily Mail 25th August 2015

Faecal Immunochemical Testing (FIT) is a new screening method to help test for bowel cancer. Professor Roger Jones, Primary Care and Public Health, said: ‘FIT tests for blood in the stools just like the FOB test, but it is much more sensitive which means only one stool sample is required - it can measure very low concentrations of stool blood whether from a tumour or a polyp.'

Michael Grandage: I've got the best of Nicole Kidman creatively – and personally

Evening Standard 25th August 2015

Director Michael Grandage and the cast of Anna Ziegler’s new play Photograph 51 visited King’s College Archives as part of their research into the life and work of Rosalind Franklin. Actress, Nicole Kidman, spent the afternoon viewing historical artefacts and papers relating to the DNA research that took place at King’s in the 1950s.

Dental device promises pain-free tooth repair

Reuters 25th August 2015

New technology developed by British scientists could dramatically reduce the need for painful dental drilling. Dr Rebecca Moazzez, Mucosal & Salivary Biology, said: ‘Traditionally, the way we have dealt with dental caries is to basically drill the decay out and fill it with a filling material. But the problem with that is, once you start in that cycle - fillings don't last forever - so the fillings will need to be repaired and replaced. And you're really in that cycle of repair and replacement for the rest of the tooth's life.’

Vaccine to protect against all strains of flu is ‘within reach’

The Times 25th August 2015

Scientists at King’s College London are developing a universal flu vaccine after two jabs were shown to protect animals against several different strains of the virus. Flu kills about 8,000 people in Britain each year, and it has been extremely difficult to vaccinate against because the strains vary from year to year.

Why sunlight could protect against multiple sclerosis

The Telegraph 25th August 2015

A study by McGill University in Canada and King’s College London havs discovered that sunlight can reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The research revealed that people with low vitamin D levels are at increased risk from the disorder. The researchers say more work needs to be done to find out if Vitamin D supplements or greater exposure to sunlight could delay or prevent MS but said that the study provided ‘strong evidence in support of a causal role of vitamin D in MS susceptibility.’

Dementia is set to become a trillion dollar disease

Daily Mail 25th August 2015

Treating dementia around the world has risen by 25 per cent over the last five years alone and will hit a trillion US dollars or £634million by 2018, researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have predicted. The findings, published in the 2015 World Alzheimer Report, estimated that dementia currently costs the UK economy £26.3 billion. Lead author Professor Martin Prince, said: ‘We estimate that 46.8 million people worldwide are living with dementia in 2015. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 74.7 million in 2030 and 131.5 million in 2050. This leaves dementia care one of the biggest public health challenges facing public health today and in the future.’ This is also reported by Time, Deccan Chronicle, Hindustan Times, CNBC, NDTV and Globo

Elderly people warned over alcohol consumption

BBC News 24th August 2015

One in five people over 65 who drink is consuming an "unsafe" level of alcohol, say researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Experts warned that GP's were "less attuned" to drinking problems among elderly people. Analysis of health records in London found that heavier drinkers tended to be male and relatively affluent. For older people, the report said, drinking more than the recommended amount carried an additional risk of confusion and falls. National guidelines advise no more than 14 units of alcohol a week for women and 21 units a week for men. Dr Tony Rao, the lead author, said: “As the baby boomer generation become seniors, they represent an ever-increasing population of older people drinking at levels that pose a risk to their health. This study shows the need for greater awareness of the potential for alcohol-related harm in older people, particularly those of higher socioeconomic status, who may suffer the consequences of ill health from alcohol at an earlier age than those in previous generations.” Also reported in Times, Independent, Telegraph, Guardian, Mail, Mirror, Sun, Daily Express, Metro, Mirror, Scottish Daily Mail, Press Association, i-paper.

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Taconic Biosciences to fund custom model development and breeding to support Vici syndrome research

Bloomberg Business 24th August 2015

Taconic Biosciences, a provider of genetically modified models and services, announced it will fund the development and breeding of a custom mouse model to study Vici Syndrome. Commenting on the model, Professor Mathias Gautel, Life Sciences & Medicines Research, said: ‘We hope this model will help us unravel the basic biology of Vici syndrome and eventually identify therapies and screen compounds.’

Elderly people warned over alcohol consumption

King's College London 24th August 2015

Researchers at King’s College London have found that one in five people over 65 who drink, consume an unsafe level of alcohol. The research also found that men tended to drink more than women and that unsafe drinking was far more common among the white British and Irish population, than those from the Caribbean, African or Asian ethnic groups. Study Co-author Dr Mark Ashworth, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences, said: ‘The elderly who were most at risk were those from the white British population rather than from an ethnic minority, and those who were wealthier and better educated.’ Study author Dr Tony Rao, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) adds: ‘As the Baby Boomer generation become seniors, they represent an ever-increasing population of older people drinking at levels that pose a risk to their health.’ This was also reported by BBC, Mail Online, Times, Daily Telegraph, Daily Express, Independent, Mirror, Sky News Online, Telegraph, BBC London 94.9, Washington Post and the Economic Times of India.

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Cultural Challenge winner, Isabel Feeney

King's College London 24th August 2015

King’s graduate, Isabel Feeney, talks to King’s about what she has been doing a year after winning the Cultural Challenge. She said: ‘I was offered an internship as part of the King’s Cultural Challenge in 2014. I particularly wanted to work with the RSC as I love theatre and the company, which was quite local to me growing up. I started my internship last August and my role was to evaluate the Stratford-on-Sea programme, as well as assist with the running of the events.’

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Single hospital rooms - a good idea?

BBC News 24th August 2015

The ‘Nightingale Ward’, wards characterised by several beds separated only by curtains are reported to be ‘out of favour’. A study by King’s College London examined the experiences of patients and staff that were in single rooms. The results were mixed as patients felt more dignity, privacy and confidentiality in single rooms. However, one of the key problems was visibility as many patients, especially the elderly, were at risk of falling.

What is our Universe made of?

BBC Earth 24th August 2015

Researchers have recently monitored galaxies smashing into each other. During these powerful collisions, new particles such as WIMPS could be discovered. Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, said: ‘If WIMPs do make up the dark matter and we discover them at the Large Hadron Collider then we are in with a good chance of working out what the dark matter in the Universe is composed of.’

Big picture: 1965, fifty years later

Indian Express 23rd August 2015

On the 50th anniversary of the Indo-Pakistan war, Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, discussed the role of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, the foreign minister for Pakistan during the conflict. ‘This was Bhutto’s war – an opportunity seized by a relatively young and ambitious actor working behind the scenes,’ he said.

Weiwei paints China in new light

Sunday Times 23rd August 2015

The Chinese artist and political dissident Ai Weiwei is under attack for making sympathetic comments about the Communist party’s authoritarian regime, given during a landmark trip to Germany. Dr Eva Pils, Law, said: ‘I see Ai Weiwei as a victim of oppression and it’s really important to keep that in mind.’

A British house overflowing with Lords draws scorn

International New York Times 22nd August 2015

Prime Minister David Cameron is expected to nominate new members to the House of Lords, which as an unelected body concedes on legislation if so demanded by the House of Commons. Commenting on the House, Dr Elizabeth Gibson-Morgan, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘One of its virtues is that it is different from the Commons…Turning it into an elected house would turn it into a clone.’

Big relief for India

Deccan Herald 22nd August 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commented on the shifting relations between India, China and Sri Lanka. ‘China’s role is now firmly embedded in Sri Lanka – economically as well as geopolitically. India will have to up its game if it wants to retain its leverage in Colombo. Rajapaksa or Sirisena, China’s role is only going to grow in the island nation,’ he said.

Why Islamic State' is increasingly attracting women

O Globo (Brazil) 22nd August 2015

The proportion of women wanting to join the extremist group Islamic State has risen dramatically. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, explained why the group would want women. ‘They want to create a new state…and very much want women to come, as part of their utopian politics,’ she said. Also reported in Folha De S.Paulo and the BBC

Tinned tomatoes, cold potatoes, frozen peas: the healthiest ways to eat veg

The Times 22nd August 2015

The article highlights the “do’s and don’ts” on how to make your vegetables more nutritious. Dr Megan Rossi, Nutrition, said: ‘Relying on supermarkets for your ‘fresh’ produce may no longer be the case. The time from farm to plate can take months and the older the fruit and vegetables, the greater the nutrient loss, particularly the water-soluble vitamins like vitamin C.’

How DNA detectives are helping solve the rise of superbug

Guardian 22nd August 2015

Research has shown that DNA sequencing could be key to quickly identify pathogen strains and track routes of transmission and monitoring mutations. Dr Lara Marks, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘Many of our hopes for using knowledge about the human genome to better fight the likes of heart disease and cancer, still lie years and decades in the future, but DNA sequencing in healthcare is not all about tomorrow. It is already revolutionising clinical microbiology.’

Number of dementia cases stabalising in UK says experts

Guardian 21st August 2015

The dementia epidemic may not have been as widespread as previously thought due to using outdated data from the 1980s, finds a recent study. Martin Prince, professor of epidemiological psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said he would have come to more guarded conclusions from the evidence in the studies because the numbers of elderly are growing so steadily. “A wise approach for policymakers, until we have much clearer evidence to the contrary, is to assume that age-specific prevalence remains constant, and that, therefore, numbers will continue to increase in line
with population ageing,” he said. Also reported in Independent and Deccan Chronicle.

British health workers unsure how to spot and help trafficked patients

Daily Mail 21st August 2015

A study published today by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has found that NHS staff have treated many victims of human trafficking, but lack the confidence and skills to respond effectively. Senior author Dr Sian Oram comments: "You're essentially looking for people who might be showing signs of abuse or neglect, so that might be physical injury or sexual abuse," or another sign may be if the patient is reluctant to speak freely. In 2014, 2,340 suspected trafficking victims in Britain were passed to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), a government scheme for identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking, up 34 percent from the previous year. "Certainly we're seeing year on year more trafficked people being identified, but we don't know if people are getting better at identifying, or there are more victims of trafficking," Oram said. Also reported in Metro and Reuters.

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Are India-Pakistan talks jinxed?

BBC News 21st August 2015

An article written by Professor Harsh V. Pant, Defence Studies focuses on the relationship between security advisers in India and Pakistan, which has stalled over the disputed Kashmir region. ‘India's premise has largely been that a peace process will persuade Pakistan to cease supporting and sending extremists into India and start building good neighbourly ties. Pakistan, in contrast, has viewed the process as a means to nudge India into making progress on Kashmir, which is essentially a euphemism for concessions,’ he said.

King's College backs work visas for Indians

Times of India 21st August 2015

Professor Ed Byrne AC, President and Principal of King’s, has stated his support for Indian students studying in the UK. Professor Byrne, who will travel to India for the first time in September in his role at King’s, said: ‘Bright, motivated Indian students are an indispensable part of the British community and their presence in King's significantly benefits British society, culture and economy.’

What makes people gay?

Boston Globe 20th August 2015

The article discusses the many disparate factors that may affect sexual orientation, and refers to work carried out by Dr Qazi Rahman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). “Some gay people owe their sexual orientation to the fraternal birth order effect, others to genetics, some to prenatal hormonal factors or other neurodevelopmental factors,” Rahman says, “and many to interactions between these."

The crucial role of women within Islamic State

BBC News 20th August 2015

The number of women joining the Islamic State (IS) has increased dramatically in the last two years. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, believes that IS wants women to join them. She said: ‘What is really interesting is that people talk of IS as being a death cult, but that is the opposite of what they are trying to create. They want to create a new state and very much want women to join that as part of this utopian politics.’ Also reported by Daily Mail.

Sixth form transition

BBC Radio 4 20th August 2015

Dan Abramson, Head teacher of King’s College London Mathematics Schools talks about GCSE results and post-16 education. ‘We look at students who have a great academic aptitude and we want to nurture and cultivate their talents. Our specialist school is about Mathematics and what they can expect is to meet other students with the same interest,’ he said.

Ice bucket challenge boosts research into disease

BBC Brazil 20th August 2015

Experts have said that the ice bucket challenge campaign has increased funding towards research into motor neuron diseases. Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi, Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, discussed one project that has benefited - the Britain in Mine Project, which analyses genomes of 15,000 people with motor neuron diseases. Professor Al-Chalabi said of the project: ‘This is a huge project that will produce enough data to fill 10,000 hard drives.’ Also reported in Folha and Globo

What makes people gay?

Boston Globe 20th August 2015

The article discussed the many disparate factors that may affect sexual orientation, referring to work carried out by Dr Qazi Rahman, IoPPN. ‘Some gay people owe their sexual orientation to the fraternal birth order effect, others to genetics, some to prenatal hormonal factors or other neurodevelopmental factors, and many to interactions between these,’ he said.

Dismaland Exhibition

Sky News 20th August 2015

An exhibition called Dismaland by the artist Banksy features work from well-known artists such as Damien Hirst. Dr Ruth Adams, CMCI, said: ‘His show at Bristol Museum was a complete sell-out. Banksy is very accessible and his work can be seen on the street for free. He really opens up art to a wide audience that might otherwise feel excluded from some of the museums and galleries.’

E-cigarettes could be prescribed by the NHS to help smokers quit, report says

BBC News 19th August 2015

A leading report highlights that e-cigarettes are 95% less harmful than smoking, and recommends that they should be prescribed on the NHS to help smoking cessation. The report was commissioned by Public Health England, and carried out by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) in collaboration with Queen Mary Univeristy. Professor Ann McNeill of the National Addiction Cente said: '‘There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are undermining England's falling smoking rates. Instead the evidence consistently finds that e-cigarettes are another tool for stopping smoking and in my view smokers should try vaping and vapers should stop smoking cigarettes entirely. E-cigarettes could be a game changer in public health in particular by reducing the enormous health inequalities caused by smoking. Also reported in Times, Daily Telegraph, Sun, Daily Mail, Financial Times, Daily Mirror, Daily Express, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Sina, Xinhua Net, and NDTV Profit.

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What is it like to have never felt an emotion?

BBC 19th August 2015

This article discusses 'emotional blindness', or alexithymia, in autism, and refers to expert Dr Geoffrey Bird from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). He notes that around half of autistic people are perfectly capable of perceiving and responding to others. At the moment, misunderstandings can often stand in the way of some autistic people getting the help they need. “One autistic adult I worked with wanted to be a carer, but she was told ‘you don’t have empathy so can’t have the job’,” he says. “Our research shows that lots of people with autism are fully okay with emotions.”

The logic behind Argentina’s heterodoxy

Financial Times 19th August 2015

Dr Ingrid Bleynat and Dr Paul Segal, King’s International Development Institute, discuss Argentina’s current macro-economic policy which has been accused of being incoherent and inconsistent. Dr Bleynat and Dr Segal said: ‘For most of the last decade Argentina’s agricultural exporters have benefitted from record commodity prices. By raising the real exchange rate, these prices make domestic industry uncompetitive – a standard case of Dutch Disease that can reasonably be feared to slow down long-run growth.’

Early life adversity and later depression for teens

Reuters 18th August 2015

Tough experiences before age six, like family instability or abuse, are tied to changes in brain structure and to a higher risk of anxiety or depression, according to a study which followed 500 mother-son pairs in England during pregnancy, from 1991 or 1992. “Early adversity increases later symptoms of depression or anxiety, which, in turn, can associate with variation in cortical structure,” said senior author Edward D. Barker of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London. He adds: “Most children will experience a degree of adversity, but this is not necessarily harmful,” Barker told Reuters Health by email. “Our research suggests that children who experience many forms of adversity are at risk.” Also reported in Fox News.

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Stab in the dark

Daily Mail 18th August 2015

The stabbing pain in the mouth is often caused by blocked salivary glands. Professor Tara Renton, Tissue Engineering & Biophonetics, commented on a procedure known as basket retrieval, where, she said: ‘A tiny tube with a camera at the tip is passed into the blocked duct to locate the stone, which is then pushed into a tiny basket and pulled out.’

Brazil protests

Russia Today 18th August 2015

Protests have taken place across Brazil, calling for the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff, as the country slides into economic crisis. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, explained that: ‘There were big demonstrations in several cities, the biggest in Sao Paolo. At the same time, there were some important statements by business leaders...They said it’s better for Brazilian political and business leaders to work together towards a resolution of the economic crisis, and not try to destabilise the government through talks of impeachment by way of removing President Rousseff.’

Early life adversity and later depression for teens

Reuters 18th August 2015

Tough experiences before the age of six, such as family instability or abuse, are tied to changes in brain structure and to a higher risk of anxiety or depression, according to a study which followed 500 mother-son pairs in England during pregnancy, from 1991 or 1992. ‘Early adversity increases later symptoms of depression or anxiety, which, in turn, can associate with variation in cortical structure,’ said senior author Dr Edward D. Barker, IoPPN.

Iran and the international community

BBC World 18th August 2015

In an interview with the BBC, Iranian Vice-President Masumeh Ebtekar said that Iran wants to work with other powers in the Middle East to promote peace following the recent nuclear deal. Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, said: ‘I think she’s really trying to make the case for reintegrating Iran back into the community of nations.’

Why millions of children are at risk from FGM

London Evening Standard 17th August 2015

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is on the rise, and many young girls are at risk of the dangerous and illegal practice. Professor Janice Rymer, Gynaecology, commented on the rise of the practice. ‘FGM is an abuse of women. It’s violence against women, doing something to women against their consent, an abuse of human rights. One has to take the stance that it’s not acceptable in any context,’ she said.

GPs put 1 in 20 under-aged girls on the Pill: Thousands of children as young as 12 are now on the contraceptive

Mail Online 16th August 2015

It has been revealed that one in 20 schoolgirls - many as young as 12 - are now being prescribed the contraceptive Pill by GPs without their parents’ consent. In the study, researchers at King’s College London looked at the official prescribing data and found that 12 to 15 year-old girls being prescribed the Pill rose from 3.3 per cent in 2002 to 5.2 per cent in 2011. Dr Asia Rashed, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, said: ‘I was surprised by the figure. Five per cent is high.’ This was also reported by The Sunday Times, The Telegraph.

Saudi Arabia’s hard choices on oil and regional influence

Financial Times 16th August 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, writes about Saudi Arabia’s challenges in the oil market and comments that the oil price must be increased and stabilised. He said: ‘Concerns about Iranian influence led Saudi Arabia to intervene in Yemen, but the ill-conceived air campaign has achieved little beyond demonstrating the limitations of the Saudi military.’

Collection from ‘The School of Life’

Folha (Brazil) 16th August 2015

In 2008 ‘The School of Life’, a social enterprise organisation launched a programme of classes and workshops exploring the fundamental questions of life. The contents of the programme have been published in a series of books. Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology & Religious Studies, authored one of these books: Dealing with Adversity, where he explored ways to recognise adversity as a source of learning.

Is live surgery a narcissistic exercise or useful educational tool?

Economic Times India 16th August 2015

Live surgery events (LSE) - where surgery is broadcast to show procedures and shared with other medical professionals – has become increasingly popular in India. Professor Prokar Dasgupta, Innate Immunity, commented on the practice. ‘Live surgeries do put extra pressure on the surgeons performing them and so carry an additional risk, however they are an important part of the process of learning for the surgeons who have not been exposed to new techniques…To enhance patient safety a number of published guidelines are in place,’ he said.

Black flags on Europe's doorstep: Inside ISIS's new capital Sirte on Libya's coast

Daily Express 15th August 2015

ISIS has founded a new capital in North Africa, its first outside Iraq and Syria. The Mediterranean port city of Sirte which is a few hundred miles from Europe’s Coastline is the new location for the Islamist group. Commenting on fears that the group could use this new area to travel to Europe, Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, said: ‘Entering Europe by boat is possible but not the most efficient way of wreaking terror on the continent.’

The secrets of extraordinary survivors

BBC News 14th August 2015

The article discusses the psychology behind surviving trauma, and quotes Professor Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). In it he comments on the effects of friendly fire which is, "a violation of professionalism. It disrupts your worldview. It has a much more dramatic impact on PTSD.” He also analyses factors in the aftermath of the 2005 London bombings.

Dina Asher-Smith raises standards on and off the track on eve of world championships

Telegraph 14th August 2015

King’s history undergraduate Dina Asher-Smith discussed her trip to Japan and China for the World Championships. She is also preparing for the new academic year and has started to work through her extensive reading list. Dina said: ‘It is kind of stressful at times but I enjoy juggling the two things and it makes me a better athlete.’ Also reported by the London Evening Standard.

The U.S. embassy in Cuba is officially opened

BBC News 24 14th August 2015

Dr Stephen Wilkinson, Law, comments on the opening of the U.S. embassy in Cuba. It has been more than 50 years since the U.S. broke off their diplomatic relations with the country. He said: ‘This is a historic moment not only for the U.S. but also for Cuba. This will hopefully improve relations, although there is still a long way to go.’

8 UK universities recognised for tackling racial inequality on-campus as they are awarded Race Equality Charter Mark

Independent 14th August 2015

King’s College London has been recognised for its efforts in tackling racial inequality at the university. Out of a total of 30 universities, eight have received the Bronze Award, which recognises the quality of the work undertaken and the robustness of the action plans. Chris Mottershead, Vice Principal (Research & Development) said: ‘A critical assessment of our performance in this area was long overdue and this is a key step in us becoming the diverse and inclusive organisation we want to be.’

'A good relationship and good communication are not sufficient for patient-centred care'

BDJ, Nature Online 14th August 2015

Dr Koula Asimakopoulou, Population & Patient Health, discussed her research interests, which focus on behaviour change in oral health settings and the understanding of communication of risk information to increase patient adherence. She said: ‘I became interested in understanding how fear campaigns and the risk of further disease might sometimes be used inappropriately by the health system.’

A day in the life: At the centre of innovation

BDJ, Nature Online 14th August 2015

Professor Nigel Pitts, Centre for Dental Innovation & Translation talks about his day’s work and role at the Dental Innovation and Translation Centre. He said: ‘I can say with great certainty that no two days are ever the same. I am in a very privileged position of interacting with many scientists and technologists as well as clinicians.’

The geopolitics of yuan

O Globo (Brazil) 14th August 2015

In an article discussing the shifting relationship between the IMF and the Chinese Central Bank, Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, explained that it is unclear what role the system led by China could play in the broader financial landscape. ‘These development banks have at least a complementary role in relation to the IMF and the World Bank,’ he said.

Promote e-cigarettes over harmful tobacco smoking, say experts

Guardian 13th August 2015

The article refers to a study on e-cigarette use carried out by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) in collaboration with Queen Mary University. Experts suggest that for those not ready to quit, evidence shows using e-cigarettes, in the short term, poses a lower risk to health than smoking.

A Critical Theory of Creativity: Utopia, Aesthetics, Atheism and Design, by Richard Howells

Times Higher Education 13th August 2015

Times Higher Education reviews a book written by Dr Richard Howells, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, which focuses on his expression of Utopia. He describes it as a ‘human drive to create a better world’. According to Howell, Utopia is entirely cultural and it ought not to be understood as having anything to do with religion.

Narendra Modi's UAE trip highlights India's shifting Middle East approach

Diplomat 13th August 2015

Narendra Modi has visited the United Arab Emirates; the first by an Indian prime minister in 34 years. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said of the visit: ‘Modi’s visit to the UAE is going to be significant and it will once again underline India’s continuing stakes in a region that is growing through a period of momentous change. Much like the regional states, India would also like a stable balance of power to emerge in a region riven with multiple fault-lines.’

Ayman al-Zawahiri pledges allegiance

BBC World Service 13th August 2015

The leader of Al-Qaeda, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has pledged allegiance to the new head of the Afghan Taliban, Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansoor. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, commented on the announcement. ‘The pledge of allegiance isn’t that surprising since the Taliban announced they had new leadership…Ayman al-Zawahiri has been silent for a while and I think that’s because of the broader dynamics being played out between Al-Queda and Islamic State,’ he said.

Asia's new geopolitics

Deccan Herald 11th August 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed the fast paced changes seen in Asian geopolitics in the past few months. ‘Uncertainty of Chinese power and intentions in the region as well as of future American commitment to maintaining the balance of power in Asia rank high in the strategic thinking of regional powers,’ he said.

Is Greece to blame for the crisis?

Foreign Affairs 10th August 2015

Foreign Affairs asked a group of experts to discuss where the blame lay for the debt crisis in Greece. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘The blame lies in many quarters: with the Greeks…and with other member states…No one comes out of this well.’

The mental health of military personnel

BBC Radio 4 9th August 2015

Professor Sir Simon Wesseley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the mental health of soldiers, particularly when returning to civilian life in the community, and the role of institutions.

Airlines' double standards

BBC Radio 5 Live 7th August 2015

At 03.20 Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses proposals to introduce jail sentences for drunk and disorderly behaviour on airlines. The civil aviation authority says the number of incidents involving disruptive passengers as more than doubled since 2010. Dr Marlow, a researcher in alcohol intake and addiction, suggests that airlines can't have it both ways. They either need to find a way to deal with drunk passengers or they've got to stop selling alcohol. Also covered by BBC 2 Wales.

The bombing of Hiroshima: 70 years on

Al Jazeera 7th August 2015

70 years on from the nuclear bomb attack on Hiroshima, Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, discussed whether this attack ended the Second World War, or whether the Japanese were about to surrender in any case. ‘This strikes at the very heart of a long lasting controversy, about whether or not it was necessary to drop the bomb,’ he said.

IQ 'boosted as children leave behind ADHD'

Independent 6th August 2015

Children who grow out of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have higher IQs than those who do not, finds research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). The research examined 110 young people with ADHD and 169 controls over a six year period. They tested IQ, attention, levels of drowsiness and reaction time in children and did follow-up testing over an average of 6.6 years. It was found that the cases with ADHD which had gone into remission had a higher IQ than those whose ADHD persisted. Dr Jonna Kuntsi, who conducted the study said: “Our study reveals important differences in brain activity and cognitive performance between individuals who grow out of their ADHD. These findings will guide the development of interventions for ADHD persisters.”

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Cyberattacks as Significant as Traditional Threats, Says Battleship Manufacturer

Newsweek 6th August 2015

The prospective manufacturer of the Royal Navy’s next generation of warships argues that cyberattacks pose an equally important threat to the more traditional threats, such as missiles and torpedoes. Professor, Tim Stevens, War Studies said: ‘Hypothetically, you could alter the navigation system of a guided missile so that it comes back and blows the boat up. There's no such thing as an entirely secure system so the designers of these new systems will have to take into account many, many such scenarios.’

With Iran’s Help, India Eludes China in Race for Gas Riches

Bloomberg Business 6th August 2015

Closer Iran-India ties would allow New Delhi’s leaders to secure cheaper energy imports to bolster economic growth and reduce the influence of both China and Pakistan in the region. Professor Harsh V. Pant, Defence Studies said: ‘Pakistan has essentially had a stranglehold over India’s policy in the region and India wanted to break that. Now, that constraint has been removed.’

Cyberattacks as significant as traditional threats, says battleship manufacturer

Newsweek 6th August 2015

BAE systems, the company negotiating with the Ministry of Defence to manufacture new warships, have said that cyberattacks pose a threat to the vessels. Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, explained that: ‘Hypothetically, you could alter the navigation system of a guided missile so that it comes back and blows the boat up…There's no such thing as an entirely secure system.’

Inside Shells’ extreme plan to drill for oil in the Arctic

Bloomberg Business 5th August 2015

Shell, the Global oil company, announced plans to drill for oil in the Arctic, something that Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute at King’s, considers to be a ‘dangerous wager.’ He explained: ‘Given the environmental and regulatory risks in the Arctic and the cost of producing in that difficult setting, assuming they ever get to producing, Shell must anticipate an enormous find—and future oil prices much higher than they are today.’

Britain charges Anjem Choudary, radical preacher, with aiding ISIS

International New York Times 5th August 2015

British authorities have charged Anjem Choudary with inciting support for the terrorist group Islamic State. Commenting on the radical preacher, Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) said: ‘a network exists around him from which a number of people have joined the Islamic State.’ Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, also commented on the arrest for Washington Post and PBS. ‘He’s always been very careful to say that he wasn’t the one actually encouraging them or directly bringing them into these plots. But it is widely felt that he played an important role in radicalising them,’ he said.

Supercomputer race heats up as China bans exports of high-performance machines

Newsweek 4th August 2015

China announced that it was reducing exports of supercomputers and high performance drones, citing unspecified national security concerns as the reason for restrictions. Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, explained the rise of supercomputing: ‘Traditionally, a lot of supercomputing has grown out of the nuclear industry. Once there was a moratorium on nuclear testing, you had to find some other way of doing it,’ he said.

Several recent university studies suggest that electronic cigarettes may be an effective aid to quitting smoking

Bloomberg Business 4th August 2015

Research conducted at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) found that the most common reasons for using e-cigarettes are to stop smoking completely and to reduce smoking. Professor Ann McNeill, IoPPN, said: ‘Most smokers want to stop but are struggling. If you are using an e-cigarette, use it more frequently and stop smoking cigarettes as fast as you can. If cigarettes don't work, try something else.’

Where’s the scientific research into how sexual orientation develops in women?

Slate 3rd August 2015

The article discusses the lack of scientific insight into sexual orientation of women, and refers to research carried out by Qazi Rahman and Andrea Burri of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), exploring the genetics of women's sexual orientation. By comparing patterns of orientation and sexual behavior in identical and fraternal twins, they determined that differences in genes must explain some (but not most) of how orientation develops in women. The exact genes—and the other, more important factors—are still a mystery.

Beach bugs: Illnesses often follow offshore swims

Wall Street Journal 3rd August 2015

Research conducted at King’s and published in the International Journal of Cancer found that a high mole count may reduce the chances of dying from malignant melanoma. The study found that of those melanoma patients with a high mole count, 91.2% survived for five years compare with 86.4% with a low count.

Soft robots

Al Jazeera 3rd August 2015

Dr Matthew Howard, Informatics, discussed research conducted in the informatics department at King’s, specifically looking at the development of ‘soft robots.’ ‘A soft robot is inherently safe…what we’d like is to make systems that humans can collaborate with,’ he said. They further discussed technology developed at King’s, which has been designed to make robotic surgery safer. More on this can be found at the link here.

Ice bucket challenge: What's happened since?

BBC 2nd August 2015

Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that analyses the genomes of 15,000 people with MND, which has been accelerated by funding from the ice bucket challenge. He adds that there is a danger the public might think these diseases don't need any more money - and yet the opposite is true: "We need a continuous ice bucket."

Equal terms of engagement

Telegraph India 1st August 2015

Pakistan-based terrorists were suspected to be behind a recent attack in Punjab, India. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said the attacks have stalled negotiations between the two countries. ‘This takes India-Pakistan ties right to where they have been for a long time - in a state of suspended animation,’ he said. Also reported in Deccan Herald.

India, Pakistan and the 1971 War POWs

Diplomat 1st August 2015

The Indian government has come under pressure to lobby Pakistan for the release of 54 missing prisoners of war, held since 1971. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed how this could be an opportunity for reconciliation between the two states. ‘The PoWs case probably won’t change realities on the ground too much, but it could change public perceptions of the talks and help build confidence,’ he said.

Can IS grow in India? What Mullah Omars death means

NDTV 30th July 2015

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, discussed the reported death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar, which he argues could open possibilities for Islamic State. ‘If Omar is no more, hundreds and thousands of Taliban foot soldiers will no longer feel compelled to adhere to the diktats of political agents thought to have been close him. These soldiers will look for new master,’ he said.

Invisibility cloaks and four more scientific wonders that could soon turn to reality

Economic Times India 29th July 2015

Technological developments are swiftly making fantasy items a reality. Dr Mark Miodownik, Natural & Mathematical Sciences, commented on the discovery of graphene, the thinnest material known to mankind. It was discovered he said, by ‘mucking about in a lab.’

Very premature or underweight babies at risk of being neurotic adults – study

Guardian 28th July 2015

Dr Chiara Nosarti from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on a new study which found that children born very prematurely are at greater risk of growing up to become introverted, neurotic and risk-averse adults. Dr Nosarti said: ‘This is an important study which provides convincing evidence that events that occur early in development contribute to specific aspects of personality.’

Russian officer arrested in Ukraine

Al Jazeera 27th July 2015

Ukraine state border guards claimed to have arrested a Russian officer found to be driving a truck filled with weapons. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, commented on the incident. ‘In a way it’s a minor incident because this truck was going to the southern part of Ukraine, and it deviated, without knowing, into the Ukrainian side. It was a mistake rather than an attempt to provoke in any way. It does however confirm what we already knew; a covert Russian military presence,’ she said.

Fighting extremism

NPR 27th July 2015

British Prime Minister David Cameron announced a programme to counter extremism, including greater integration of schools and public housing. Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: ‘He was putting a lot of emphasis on ideology, countering the narrative of violent extremists. He was also emphasising that this would also include non-violent extremists…who he believes are providing the mood music that allows these people to thrive.’

How to deal with adversity

NPR 27th July 2015

In an interview discussing his latest book ‘How to Deal with Adversity’, Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology & Religious Studies, looked at why adversity exists, commenting that: ‘Adversity is inevitable.’

It’s time to reboot our relationship with Russia and Iran’s Neighbours

Newsweek 27th July 2015

Despite the economic benefits of relaxed sanctions in Iran, neighbouring countries in the South Caucasus are still affected by deep-rooted economic, political and social problems. Visiting Senior Research Fellow, Ambassador Denis Corboy, War Studies, said: ‘The prospect of intense contacts ahead with Iran, and challenges from a more assertive Russia, should cause the West to reshape and re-energize its South Caucasus strategy.’

A terrorism case in Britain ends in acquittal, but no one can say why I

International New York Times 25th July 2015

A reporter for the Guardian has been restricted from reporting potentially sensitive information on the recent acquittal of a British student, arrested on terrorism charges. Dr Cian Murphy, Law, questioned this decision. ‘How is the public to evaluate the state’s actions if the media cannot report on it?’ he said.

Genes influence academic ability across all subjects, latest study shows

Guardian 24th July 2015

Many of the same genes may affect exam results across various school subjects, according to a new study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Kaili Rimfeld from the IoPPN said: ‘Our findings suggest that many of the same genes influence achievement across a broad range of disciplines, moving beyond core subjects such as English and maths to include humanities, business, art and languages. For the first time, we found that these general genetic effects on academic achievement remained even when the effects of general intelligence were removed.’ Also reported by Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mirror and The Conversation.

King's press release related to 'Genes influence academic ability across all subjects, latest study shows'

Harmful drinking among middle-class over-50s

BBC Radio 4 24th July 2015

Dr Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), was interviewed about a report which suggests that people over 50 who are healthy, active, sociable and highly educated are more at risk of harmful drinking than their less well-off peers. She said this reflects findings which indicate that the more disposable income people have, the more they spend on alcohol and the more they consume (interview starts at 02.42.55). Dr Marlow was also interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Radio London and Sky News.

Alzheimer's Disease Could Have A Drug-Free And Effective Treatment Via Table Tennis

Huffington Post 24th July 2015

Research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is exploring the effects table tennis may have on a person with dementia.

Basis for eating disorders found in children as young as eight

Guardian 23rd July 2015

Children as young as eight can experience dissatisfaction with the size and shape of their body that puts them at risk of eating disorders in their teens, according to a major study which for the first time reveals how early anxieties about body image set in. The research was conducted by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Harvard. Also reported by Mail Online and Independent.

Why do people drink at the airport?

BBC London 94.9 23rd July 2015

Dr Sally Marlow from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), comments on why holidaymakers drink at the airport.

India’s trouble with Pakistan

Wall Street Journal 23rd July 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has commented on the temperamental relationship between India and Pakistan following a recent meeting between the two states. Professor Pant said: ‘Unlike its predecessors, the Modi government seemed to have recognised from the very beginning that a quest for durable peace with Pakistan is a nonstarter. All that matters is the management of a neighbour that is viewed more as a nuisance.’

Russia uses MH17 crash for propaganda

Wall Street Journal 23rd July 2015

Following the Cold War, it was thought that free access to information would align the West and Russia, and ‘propel the world toward common beliefs’. However as conspiracy theories continue to emerge from Russian media on who was to blame for the MH17 crash in 2014, Dr Samuel Greene, Russia Institute, argues that such common beliefs are ‘not quite true…there’s a whole reassessment going on now about what to do about it,’ he said.

Medically unexplained symptoms

BBC Radio 4 21st July 2015

Professor Rona Moss-Morris from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), was interviewed about medically unexplained symptoms, sometimes known as MUS. She said the NHS fails patients and much needs to change, including the name, MUS.

Stephen Hawking teams up with Russian Billionaire for $100 million alien search

Newsweek 21st July 2015

Stephen Hawking has teamed up with Russian billionaire, Yuri Milner, to head a $100 million project to search for extra-terrestrial life. Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, commented on the importance of the project: ‘If the human race did discover intelligent life out there, it would change everything about how life on Earth would go ahead. It would change our own perspective on ourselves and on each other and it would change the way that we view ourselves in the universe,’ he said.

She was a quiet commercial lawyer. Then China turned on her

Washington Post 19th July 2015

More than 100 lawyers in China have been detained as part of a raid across the country, which according to officials aimed to ‘smash a major criminal gang that was disturbing social order.’ Dr Eva Pils, Law, described one of those arrested, Wang Yu. ‘When she came out [of prison] she quickly became a part of this movement and really threw herself into it.’ Also reported in Guardian, South China Morning Post and Yahoo

The Greek dilemma

Telegraph India 18th July 2015

A Greek exit from the Eurozone was prevented following a decision by leaders to offer the country a third financial bailout. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said recent developments have left ‘many Greeks humiliated, with many…using the word, “surrender” to describe Greek government's response.’

Low chance of recovering normal body weight

BBC News 17th July 2015

The chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is 1 in 210 for men and 1 in 124 for women, increasing to 1 in 1,290 for men and 1 in 677 for women with severe obesity, according to a study of UK health records led by King’s. The findings suggest that current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity at population level. Dr Alison Fildes, Division of Health and Social Care Research, said: ‘Losing 5 to 10 per cent of your body weight has been shown to have meaningful health benefits and is often recommended as a weight loss target. These findings highlight how difficult it is for people with obesity to achieve and maintain even small amounts of weight loss.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Times and Sun.

King's press release related to 'Low chance of recovering normal body weight'

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A Caro, book review

Independent 17th July 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes a review of the Pulitzer prize-winning biography of Robert Moses, The Power Broker, originally published in 1974, and now published in Britain for the first time. Professor Bogdanor said: 'If you give someone the power to do good, you also give them the power to do evil. That is the dilemma of democratic government. Great results can be achieved only by those with power; but those with power are all too likely to misuse it.'

Should we genetically screen four-year-olds?

Guardian 17th July 2015

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), is interviewed about the role genetics play in children's academic success.

Why it's okay to eat mouldy cheese

Daily Express 16th July 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, writes for the Express and discusses the issue of wasted food. He states that we should ignore supermarket use by dates. He said: 'There are obviously things to steer clear of, particularly when it comes to raw meat such as mass-produced chicken where salmonella or campylobacter can take over and potentially cause stomach infections but When foods from supermarkets age they may lose taste and structure and their microbe composition may change but they are not harmful.'

Defence chiefs warn of Russian cyber attacks on the City - Telegraph

Telegraph 16th July 2015

Top defence chiefs fear banks and finance firms across the UK and US could become targets of Russian hackers if relations between Moscow and the West worsen. Former GCHQ director Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, told an audience at the London Stock Exchange that state-led attacks on banks are an increasing threat. He said the background to any attacks may already be in place, waiting for an event to cause the hackers to pull the trigger: 'That is exactly the kind of action governments really don't want to have to deal with as they try to navigate some future crisis involving issues of peace and war.'

Can higher education’s golden age of plenty continue?

Times Higher Education 16th July 2015

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, argues that funding is at risk now that universities may recruit as many students as they want: 'Universities will expand their intakes rapidly. The academic record of new entrants will be lower. As participation rates rise higher, the average salaries of graduates will fall and so will loan repayments.'

Stem cell breakthrough may prevent the need for three parent babies

Daily Telegraph 16th July 2015

There may no longer be a need for three parent babies after scientists discovered a potential cure of mitochondrial diseases. Dr Dusko Illic, Women's Health, added that the study in questions was 'beautifully executed' and could allow mothers at risk of passing on such conditions to repair their eggs. This was also reported by the Independent.

Scholarship on the front line: life in Iraq and interviewing IS

Times Higher Education 16th July 2015

Dr Victoria Fontan, War Studies, has borne witness to Iraq’s unfolding tragedy. Here she discusses encounters with Islamic State and US troops and her fears for the country’s future and what drives a researcher to eschew the comforts of Western society for a life on the front line:'I feel that if I can show the humanity of the people, if I can show them to others the way I see them, maybe I am contributing to a normalisation of relations.'

Brexit: the perks and pitfalls for higher education

Times Higher Education 16th July 2015

After Tory victory in the general election, an EU exit could become reality. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, says that there are 'all sorts of good reasons for staying in the EU – but preserving university teaching and university research money cannot be one of the most important ones.' The UK 'pays a great deal out for research, we get maybe slightly more back in return but not much, there are lots of administrative overheads', she argues of EU funding. And she adds: 'If we’re no longer paying into the EU research fund, it beggars belief that it won’t get paid into a British research fund.'

Baby Boomers and Generational Conflict, by Jennie Bristow

Times Higher Education 16th July 2015

A book review by Rt Hon David Willetts MP, Policy Institute, of Baby Boomers and Generational Conflict, by Jennie Bristow says that: 'What makes Mannheim’s work in this area so great is precisely the way he links the most natural facts – human mortality and reproduction – with an account of cultural attitudes. That is sociology at its best. The arguments presented in Baby Boomers and Generational Conflict, in contrast, are wrong-headed in their attempt to detach cultural shifts from demographic and social change.'

One year later, MH17 downing still impacts Ukraine crisis

Voice of America 16th July 2015

A year has passed since the Malaysian passenger jet, MH17, was shot down over Ukraine, allegedly by Russian-backed separatists. Considering the impact the crash had on the Ukraine conflict, Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, said: ‘I believe that it was an important turning point, because it rallied all Europeans behind an escalation of the sanctions.’

Is Japan’s military heading for a fight?

Voice of America 16th July 2015

Protestors in Japan fear that their 70-year-old pacifist constitution is under threat, following proposed plans to expand the role of the Japanese military. Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, said: ‘From a security perspective, these reforms are long over-due. If you look at the content of the bills, the changes are relatively minor.’

Qatar crowned best government in world (and not just by Sepp Blatter)

Independent 15th July 2015

It is an autocracy where women are discriminated against, migrant workers are exploited and free speech is curtailed. But according to the World Economic Forum (WEF), Qatar is a model of efficient government. Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, said the country’s strong showing in the table was 'hard to fathom' even if its questionable human rights record was set aside: 'I don’t know what they were trying to measure, but in no meaningful sense have they derived a sensible conclusion that Qatar is the most efficient government in the world. I don’t care how solid their methodology is, most people who work in Qatar would not recognise this study’s findings.'

Gulf countries skeptical About Iran nuclear deal

Voice of America 15th July 2015

Arab countries, mainly those in the Persian Gulf, have raised concerns over the recent Iran deal, which saw allowances made for it to possess nuclear capabilities. Dr Matthew Moran, War Studies, said: ‘This deal implicitly recognizes and legitimizes illicit behaviour on the part of Iran for the past 12 years…I think others will be watching this carefully.’

Mitochondrial disease research makes progress

Huffington Post 15th July 2015

Scientists have made further developments in treatments for mitochondrial disease. However, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, believes these could be prohibitively expensive. ‘The Nature study is beautiful work, but it may not be needed,’ he said. Also reported in Daily Telegraph

Peter Saunders sorts out confusion over ‘Epigenetics’

Huffington Post 15th July 2015

Emeritus Professor Peter Saunders, Mathematics, has suggested that confusion over the term ‘epigenetics’ is responsible for the concerns by ‘Neo-Darwinists’, over what they see as challenges to the theory of evolution. Professor Saunders, who authored a paper on epigenetics, said: ‘That wasn't what we meant by epigenetics, and it still isn't what we mean when we're talking about rethinking evolution.’

Found: gene that drives us to drink

The Times 14th July 2015

An international team of scientists, including researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), has identified a key gene associated with alcohol consumption in fruit flies and humans. It is hoped that the new findings could help with the development of targeted treatments aimed at tackling alcohol abuse and addiction.

Women dependent on cocaine or meth have less grey matter

New Scientist 14th July 2015

Dr Mitul Mehta, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), comments on the finding that women dependent on cocaine or methamphetamine appear to have less grey matter, even after they stop using them. Dr Mehta said longitudinal studies are necessary to untangle the causes and effects before any treatment decisions could be based on this research.

Pushy parents are the best parents and we need more of them

Telegraph 14th July 2015

Sir Michael Wilshaw, the head of Ofsted, has said that by sending their toddlers to state-run preschool nurseries, middle-class parents are 'colonising' nurseries, crowding out the children of poorer homes who would benefit more from a place. Professor Becky Francis, Department of Education and Professional Studies, argues that working class parents want their children to get on in life at least as much as their posher peers but just don’t have the same range of tools to help make that happen.

Vitamin Cease

Sun 14th July 2015

A piece by Kris Hallenga mentions that she and her twin sister are on the Twin Registry and King's. She also mentions that Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, has used twins to study the effects of microbes in our guts.

Treating bipolar disorder with virtual reality

Al Jazeera 14th July 2015

Researchers at the King’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), have been using gaming technology to help improve treatments for those with mental health issues. Dr Lucia Valmaggia of the IoPPN, said: ‘We are trying to combine some of the new technologies available in the gaming industry… and one of the interesting new developments, is the use of virtual reality.’ Also reported by BBC World Service and Newsweek.

Strategic concerns impact Greek crisis

Voice of America 14th July 2015

Negotiations between Greek and other European leaders ensured that Greece remained in the EU and retained the common euro currency. Dr Aris Trantidis, Political Economy, considered what would have happened had Greek exited the EU. ‘That would have meant that the European Union is not an optimal currency union, something that economists have already stressed, but it’s also a very profoundly dysfunctional political project,’ he said.

CMA appoints standing counsel panel

Bloomberg Business 14th July 2015

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has announced a standing counsel panel, which includes David Bailey, Visiting Professor, Law.

The historic nuclear deal with Iran

BBC World Service 14th July 2015

International sanctions on Iran have been eased in exchange for limitations on the country’s nuclear program. Whether this will have an immediate effect on trade is doubtful, said Dina Esfandiary, War Studies. ‘Even if investments are driven by large multinationals, building the necessary infrastructure will take years,’ she said.

The US-UK divide on sex cases

BBC News 13th July 2015

Bill Cosby faces a string of allegations of sexual assault but cannot be prosecuted in the US because of the statute of limitations. In the UK there is no time limit in sexual abuse and other serious cases. What explains this difference?The notion dates as far back as ancient Greece, explains Professor Penney Lewis, Law. There are two main reasons behind it, she says. One is that there should be some finality, so that a person can move on with their life without the constant threat of prosecution hanging over their heads, Lewis says.

How diesel fumes give city dwellers old people's skin: Particles from engines make skin come out in blotches

Daily Mail 13th July 2015

Diesel fumes from cars in cities can seriously damage your skin, new research has found. Commenting on the study, Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘The possible impacts of pollutants (other than UV radiation and ozone) on skin have not been examined by enough investigators. I’m not aware of any appropriate studies that have been undertaken in a UK city.'

Exclusive: 'Grave concerns' for hard-won health visitor gains

Nursing Times 13th July 2015

Dame Sarah Cowley, Nursing and Midwifery, warns that it would be 'absolute madness' to allow public health spending cuts to hamper hard-won increases in the number of health visitors. Dame Sarah said: 'Two hundred million doesn’t sound much to the NHS, but when you look at the very much smaller budget for public health in local government then it’s a huge amount – something like a million pounds for each local authority.'

How support for a Chinese rights lawyer could have led to crackdown

Reuters 13th July 2015

A crackdown on human rights lawyers by Chinese authorities has resulted in the arrests of 101 lawyers and activists in the country. Dr Eva Pils, Law, commented on why this recent move is unprecedented. ‘Previously, it was much more covered, it was much less open, and the reason why people are saying this is a bit 'Cultural Revolution-style' is because it's so public,’ she said.

Devolution can only advance when basic rights are clear

Financial Times 12th July 2015

The welfare state was founded so benefits are distributed on need, not geography, writes Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History. Government and local authorities need to distinguish between powers that can be devolved from those that are the basis of our citizenship.

‘Ride the nerd wave’ to widen access to selective universities

Times Higher Education 11th July 2015

Children should have more positive ‘nerd’ role models, Dan Abramson, headteacher of King’s College London Mathematics School, told the audience at an educational conference hosted by King’s.

£2billion a year: Bosses' bill for apprentice levy

Daily Mail 11th July 2015

Chancellor George Osborne has outlined plans for a new tax on the UK’s largest firms to fund three million apprenticeships. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, said: ‘If the Government is serious about having three million proper apprenticeships over the next five years it needs to be looking at having £3.5billion, not £1.5billion.’

Chinese authorities detain and denounce lawyers

New York Times 11th July 2015

At least five Chinese lawyers who specialise in human rights cases have been detained by police in Beijing, on accusations of running a criminal syndicate. Commenting on this attack on the movement of human rights defense lawyers, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said: ‘They see a need to delegitimize it, to officially declare the human rights lawyers enemies of the state.’

Will it help?

Deccan Herald 11th July 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, questions if the Indian Government will sustain interest in Central Asia, enabling them to establish a strategic profile in the region. ‘In a significant move, Prime Minister Narendra Modi is visiting the five Central Asian countries this week…Modi’s decision underlines his government’s resolve to take these ties to a new level after years of neglect,’ he said.

Greece is flirting with Russia to make Europe jealous

Economic Times India 11th July 2015

Analysts have suggested that increased diplomatic relations between Greece and Russia may be part of tactical moves by both sides for short-term gains and long-term geo-strategic motivations. Dr Anna Matveeva, War Studies, said: ‘The recent Moscow-Athens dialogue has given a boost to Russia's soft power and made headlines across the world.’

Smoking 'may play schizophrenia role'

BBC News Online 10th July 2015

A new study by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) suggests that smoking tobacco is associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis. People who suffer from psychosis are three times more likely to smoke cigarettes than healthy controls, according to the meta-analysis published today in Lancet Psychiatry. Dr James MacCabe from the IoPPN said: ‘While it is always hard to determine the direction of causality, our findings indicate that smoking should be taken seriously as a possible risk factor for developing psychosis, and not dismissed simply as a consequence of the illness.’ This story was reported by BBC News Online, BBC Radio 4 Today (starts at 53.00), BBC Radio Five Live (starts at 03.20), BBC Radio 2, BBC London 94.9, BBC News Channel, LBC Radio, ITV News, Press Association, Associated Press, Independent, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Sky News, Sun, Metro, Daily Mirror, BMJ, Guardian, Huffington Post, Reuters, Wired, Yahoo News, National Public Radio (US), Fox News (US), International Business Times, ABC News, Irish Times, O Globo (Brazil), Deccan Chronicle (India), Ani News (India), Zee News (India), Jakarta Post, RT (Russia), Australian, New Zealand Herald and Japan Times.

King's press release related to 'Smoking 'may play schizophrenia role''

Angry EU leaders lash out at Greece, eyeing endgame

AFP 10th July 2015

Criticism of Greece by EU leaders may be part of a strategy to manage public opinion prior to the end of the crisis. Dr Pablo Calderón Martínez, European & International Studies, said European leaders may be trying to pre-empt the fallout from the final resolution of the crisis. ‘Everybody seems to be trying to cover themselves from any kind of exposure...We're already playing the blame game, basically,’ he said. Reported in Economic Times of India

Antidepressants sweeping the nation

Mail Online 10th July 2015

Public attitudes towards mental illness and levels of healthcare spending may explain the huge variation in antidepressant use across Europe, according to a new study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London.

King's press release related to 'Antidepressants sweeping the nation'

Forming a habit that's hard to break makes exercise automatic, experts say

Daily Mail 10th July 2015

A study has found that the trick to regular exercising is to develop cues that make going to the gym or going for a run automatic actions. As part of the study, Dr Phillips and her colleague Dr Benjamin Gardner, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, asked 118 healthy adults to rate the strength of their instigation and execution habit. Approximately 25 per cent of participants were overweight or obese. Around 5 per cent reported not exercising, while nearly 50 per cent said they had regularly exercised longer than 12 months. The study found execution habit had no effect on exercise frequency, after controlling for instigation habit.

How big data has transformed research

Guardian 10th July 2015

The Guardian speaks to the academics behind four inspiring projects to see how big data is being used to develop and enhance research. Tobias Blanke, Digital Humanities, describes his project: 'he growing use of mobile and digital devices has led to a massive increase in the amount of data each of us generates, but until now, access to mobile data has been restricted to just a handful of companies and government agencies. And for this reason, we have little knowledge about the kinds of data that our mobile phones collect and transmit. The project – Our Data, Ourselves (ODO) – aims to reverse this. It makes the data and how it’s transmitted visible in order to develop new modes of citizen engagement, as well as new avenues for research and creativity.'

Granny gets down with the kids by copying teen slang

Evening Standard 10th July 2015

Tony Thorne, Language Consultant at the English Language Centre, says that teens are constantly inventing new slang terms and their parents and grandparents are catching on so quickly to their new language. He said that people in their 70s make their grandchildren 'cringe' by coining terms such as 'totes' and 'adorbs'.

New guidelines for FGM

BBC Two 10th July 2015

According to an estimate, 130,000 women living in Britain have been subjected to FGM, another 60,000 are at risk. New guidelines say that any healthcare professional who suspects FGM in a girl under 18 will have to report it to police. Professor Janice Rymer, Medical Education, comments on her experience: 'What we've been seeing for the last 20 years is that women who've had FGM done come to the country and want this reversed so that they can have intercourse and successful vaginal births.'

Researchers test virus to reverse forms of genetic deafness

BBC Brazil 9th July 2015

Research claims to have reversed some types of deafness in guinea pigs using a virus that can correct the genetic problem and restore some hearing. Professor Karen Steel, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, commented on the research. ‘I think this research is a very exciting advance in our understanding of what can be achieved using gene transfer…to reduce the impact of harmful mutations,’ she said. Also reported in Folha

An IS Secret to Success: Shock Troops Who Fight to the Death

New York Times 8th July 2015

An elite group of Islamic State troops, known as ‘Inghemasiyoun’, are credited with many of the group’s battlefield successes due to their ‘fight to the death’ tactics. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘IS local commanders receive overall orders on strategy but are given freedom to operate as they see fit to achieve them.’ Also reported in Huffington Post, Time, Fox news, Daily Mail, The Indian Express, and the Economic Times of India

Ageing rates vary widely, says study

BBC News 7th July 2015

A study which focuses on people born within a year of each other has discovered a significant difference in the speed at which their bodies age. Dr Andrea Danese, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, said: ‘This is the first step to detect factors that influence the rate of ageing, and very early prevention (of diseases) may be one of the things we will be able to measure better.’ Also reported by Daily Telegraph

'Rambo' protein limits development of heart failure

Times of India 7th July 2015

New research by King’s College London has found that a protein which had been previously thought to cause death may, in fact, protect against heart failure. Professor Kinya Otsu, Cardiovascular Division, said: ‘The discovery of the Rambo protein's importance in protecting cells represents a step forward in understanding of disease processes at the cellular level.’

Doping in sports

BBC Radio 4 7th July 2015

Professor David Cowan, Drug Control Centre, has been advising officials in Japan, South Korea and Brazil on how to catch dopers at their upcoming olympics. Professor Cowan says that scientific methods available to his team allows them to detect most banned substances.

The new robot receptionist at the Strand campus

Independent 6th July 2015

Following a recent competition to design the face of the new robot receptionist for the Strand campus, a feature piece in the Independentexplores the new trend for creating robots that look more human. The piece is based around the work of the Centre for Robotics Research, which is developing a robot receptionist for the Strand Campus, among other robotics projects. Kinba (the new receptionist), however, is not as human as some. Dr Matthew Howard, Informatics, describes the ‘Uncanny Valley’ in which more lifelike robots make humans feel uncomfortable, however he says: ‘If you can make a humanoid robotic system that is very lifelike, then you start to increase your affinity again.’

London bombings after 10 years

O Globo (Brazil) 6th July 2015

On the 10th anniversary, the UK played tribute to those killed in the London terror attacks on 7 July 2005. Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, said that the attacks ‘changed the whole outlook for the UK’s counter-terrorism strategy.’ Also reported by AFP, Le Figaro and Gulf News

Facing the Fats

The Sunday Times 5th July 2015

It has been suggested that coconut oil can aid weight loss and reduce the risk of heart disease. However experts dispute this common assumption. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Coconut oil raises blood cholesterol more than most oils. I would never recommend it as health supplement or everyday cooking oil.’

British Muslims Integration

Sky News 5th July 2015

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, was interviewed by Sky News on the topic of the integration of British Muslims in society. He said: 'There are a number of Muslims who don’t feel integrated here despite being British citizens – we’ve seen that with the huge number of people who’ve left the UK to join Islamic State. If you look at the Prevent strategy and the idea of trying to bring British Muslims in to the state and make them feel more secure, confident and integrated in their role and position in society, we’ve got it wrong'

Dina Asher-Smith: 'It’s weird I’m in the world top 20 for 100m and 200m'

Guardian 4th July 2015

Dina Asher-Smith, undergraduate student, History, broke the British 100m record in May to become the world junior 100m champion. Commenting on balancing her studies with competing she said: ‘I found it quite stressful at first because not only did I have to make the transition from A-levels, but my training load also went up too.’ Also reported by Daily Mail, London Evening Standard Online

Don’t swallow myths about juicing, experts warn

The Times 4th July 2015

According to experts, juicing poses an unseen threat to the public health. A glass of fruit juice can contain well above the daily recommended intake of sugar, with the potential to cause type 2 diabetes. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Obesity is the reason for the increase in type 2 diabetes and it is affecting mainly people in their late fifties and sixties. The juice consuming population tends to be a younger age group.’

Antibody wipeout relives chronic fatigue

New Scienstist 4th July 2015

Results of a recent study about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed that a drug usually used to treat the blood cancer lymphoma or rheumatoid arthritis can treat the condition. Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, said: ‘The belief that CFS is all in the mind has been around since the beginning. It’s tragic that it might take a study like this to take sufferers seriously.’

Islamic State's aim

BBC News Channel 4th July 2015

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comments on the family of 12 from Luton who left Britain for Syria, following their statement: 'They've invited all Muslims to come and join them. They say 'we are a caliphate, we are here for all Muslims around the world'. For them, that is the real aim of their project.'

Caring for the old is everyone’s problem

Independent 3rd July 2015

The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, highlights that the loneliness endured by about 900,000 old people does not only affect the body but also the mind. He encourages more Westerners to follow China’s ‘elderly rights law’, which punishes relatives who neglect their senior relatives. Professor Anthea Tinker, Gerontology, warned that this may not be a solution. ‘Even in the past we don’t know how much of it was what people chose, and how much was enforced,’ she said.

Murder, drug cartels and misery counter Argentina’s claims of falling poverty

Guardian 3rd July 2015

Although crime, poverty and unemployment rates have increased in Argentina, some analysts claim that there has been progress in tackling poverty and crime. Dr Paul Segal, King’s International Development Institute, said: ‘Many people have seen their living standards rise, unemployment is low and average wages have risen faster than prices during tenure.’

Official figures confirm health visitor target missed

Nursing Times 2nd July 2015

Latest figures confirm that the government missed its target to recruit an extra 4,200 health visitors by the end of March, though community nurse leaders have hailed the rise in staff numbers. Dame Sarah Cowley, Nursing and Midwifery, said: ‘The government missed their target of 4,200 health visitors, but only just – still an increase of 49.2% overall. It is a great achievement, but disappointing that the big cities – London, Birmingham, Manchester – are where there are still big gaps.’

Avoid another sticky night of insomnia by licking your wrists and freezing your sheets

Daily Express 1st July 2015

As the hot weather continues, Dr Lindsay Edwards, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, explains the science behind why freezing your bed sheets may help you get a better night sleep in the heat. He said: ‘As it dries, the water evaporates, taking with it any moisture on your skin. But once the sheets are dry, it will make no difference.’

Ben Uri Gallery and Museum, Britian's oldest Jewish cultural organisation, celebrates centenary

Evening Standard 1st July 2015

Britain’s oldest Jewish cultural organisation is celebrating its centenary with a blockbuster show of art that reflects the social and art history of the 20th century. Out of Chaos - Ben Uri: 100 Years in London, presented in association with the Cultural Institute at King’s College, London, is at the Inigo Rooms, Somerset House, from 02 July.

HRH The Princess Royal opens one of the world's leading neuroscience institutes

Daily Telegraph 30th June 2015

HRH The Princess Royal opened the Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute at King’s College London, one of the leading centres for neuroscience research in the world. HRH The Princess Royal met scientists who are undertaking ground breaking research into Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, motor neurone disease, depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy and stroke. This was reported by the Daily Telegraph.

King's press release related to 'HRH The Princess Royal opens one of the world's leading neuroscience institutes'

Medical Miscellany

Daily Mail 30th June 2015

A new study has found that people may inherit back problems. The piece mentions a 2012 study which found that a gene called PARK2 is likely to cause back pain due to degenerative spinal discs.

Here's to you Mr Robinson

Daily Express 30th June 2015

An article exploring the life of Matthias Archibald Robinson, in light of Robinson’s link with Wimbledon, mentions that Mr Robinson was also one of the founding subscribers at King’s. Robinson set up his own grocer’s business with his father. Throughout his success he served on a school’s charity board and was also supported by the King.

Napolean the Great

BBC Radio 4 Feedback 30th June 2015

Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, was interviewed about his new book ‘Napoleon the Great.’ Professor Roberts said: ‘He was not Adolf Hitler, he was a much more enlightened figure. He wasn’t the warmonger he was made out to be, I’m just begging people to look again'.

UK researchers exploring possibility of longer-range wireless charging for robots

Xinhua 30th June 2015

A team of researchers from UK universities are exploring the possibility of longer-range wireless charging for robots and other digital devices. King’s is mentioned due to its involvement in the project.

Pilot scheme Freed to treat eating disorders

BBC Radio 4 29th June 2015

At 10.09.36, Ulrike Schmidt, professor of Eating Disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the first episode and rapid early intervention for eating disorders (Freed) trial, and reasons why early treatment from health services doesn't always happen.

Cameron reins in ministers as he aims to capitalise on poll win

Financial Times 29th June 2015

Downing Street has put ministers and civil servants on a tight rein since the general election as David Cameron seeks to capitalise on his election victory. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘The problem for the Conservatives since Thatcher has been how to combine competitive capitalism with social responsibility. Cameron would very much like to resolve this problem.’

Taylor Swift in Hyde Park

BBC News 29th June 2015

Taylor Swift recently performed on stage at London’s Hyde Park and mentioned her first UK show which was sold out and took place at King’s.

Schools shut under a cloud of diesel

Sunday Times 28th June 2015

Two schools in South Yorkshire became the first in Britain to be shut because of air pollution.In London alone, more than 1,100 schools lie within 150 yards of major roads. A few of these have air quality monitors, installed by the Environmental Research Group at King’s College London as part of its air quality network and these confirm there is cause for concern.

Microdosing is seen as golden ticket for dopers wanting to trick the testers

Daily Mail 28th June 2015

In a piece looking at micro-dosing, a new method of doping which is thought not to be picked up on by traditional testing, Professor David Cowan, Director of the Drug Control Centre, says he remains confident that they will eventually catch microdosers: ‘It’s really tricky to do it reliably. What we’re doing is holding samples back and then doing a batch test that is more cost-effective and making use of intelligence where there is suspicion. That’s not to be complacent; we’re working on loads of new tools.’

Women scientists selected for career advancement scheme

Times Higher Education 28th June 2015

Dr Alexandra Santos, Department of Paediatric Allergy, has been selected to take part in a programme to help more women achieve senior research positions. Those chosen to take part in the inaugural SUSTAIN programme, run by the Academy of Medical Sciences, will take part in a year-long programme of training, mentoring and peer networking around research.

World Cup woes add to Qatar Business Jitters

Financial Times 28th June 2015

The Al-Wakran Stadium in Qatar is under construction for the World Cup, which will be taking place in 2022. The corruption scandal in Qatar has the World Cup under threat and may affect the stadium as causing a fall in oil prices. Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, said: ‘The depth of the cuts suggests that [Sheikh] Tamim and his prime minister are highly concerned about a chasm opening up in their future budgets if they don’t act now.’

Brain under siege

New Scientist 27th June 2015

This article outlines research carried out by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) exploring the link between depression and inflammation, an immune response designed to keep us safe when we are sick. Studies have found that a third of people with depression have higher than normal levels of inflammatory cytokines in the blood. Professor Carmine Pariante comments: ‘Before, you’d only get stressed if you had a lion chasing you or if you were starving and had to hunt. Now we get stressed because of traffic or because our boss shouts at us. None of these wounds us physically, so we don’t need inflammation. But it’s still there, working away on our brain.’

The tech start up revolution

Metro 26th June 2015

The rise in start-ups is increasingly being seen in other UK and European cities. Dr Paolo Gerbaudo, Digital Humanities, commented on the trend. ‘There are major challenges for the digital economy in London due to the rent situation. That makes it very hard to develop viable enterprises,’ he said.

The right way to deal with Iran's nuclear past

Guardian 26th June 2015

A guest blog co-written by Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, states that: ‘In order for a comprehensive nuclear deal to be reached and effectively implemented, Iran’s security concerns must be understood and considered. By ignoring them, negotiators would shoot themselves in the foot. A final, lasting agreement can only be reached and implemented if Iran walks away feeling like its national security and dignity will remain intact.’

Alcohol effects on health

BBC Radio 5 Live 26th June 2015

Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the negative effects of alcohol, which become worse over time, often due to increased tolerance levels, and what it is to be dependent on alcohol.

Terror attacks

CNN 26th June 2015

Dr Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, commented on suspected terror attacks in France, which left one man dead and others injured. Dr Hitchens said: ‘This is not the first time you see tourists being targeted in the Middle East… One of the main things you achieve when you hit tourist industries in countries like this that really depend upon tourism is that you are hitting the economy.’ Also reported on BBC News Online

Dozens killed in attacks in Tunisia, Kuwait and France

LA Times 26th June 2015

At least 39 tourists were killed at a Tunisian resort after two gunmen opened fire on a beach, one of three attacks on the same day following a call for violence by Islamic State extremists. Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, said of the attacks: ‘The terrorists are attacking Tunisia's reputation. Not just as a safe and welcoming destination for Western holidaymakers but as the one real success story to emerge out of the Arab Spring.’ His comments were reported in the LA Times, The Indian Express and Dr Hill was interviewed by Sky News. Dr Alexander Meleagrou - Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation,was quoted in the New York Timesand Fox news. ‘We have people relaxing on the beach on their holidays being murdered – that is not going to help the attempts by the Tunisian tourist industry to get people to come to the country,’ he said. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, was also interviewed by BBC London.

Women's role in the care sector

BBC Radio 4 Woman's Hour 26th June 2015

Dr Shareen Hussein, The Policy Institute, comments as part of a feature on the predominant role of women in the care sector. She discusses the fact that people are paid less than the minimum wage as travel time and preparation are not accounted for when calculating hours worked. She said: ‘It’s a very straining job and people take that home and we’re not recognising that.’ (Interview at 21.25 mins)

Syriza fault lines exposed on 'barbaric' EU demands

Guardian 25th June 2015

In a piece exploring the European Union demands to Greece, Dr Stathis Kouvelakis, French, said: ‘The only way to keep Syriza united is to avoid capitulation’ and that creditors clearly wanted to ‘break the party politically.’

David Cameron’s legacy depends on making Big Society work

Independent 25th June 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, asked how the government intends to restore values of community and trust in Britain, when Conservative free enterprise ethics seems to brush them aside. In the opinion piece, Professor Bogdanor states: ‘Cameron has always been underestimated. When he stood for the leadership in 2005, he was seen as an outsider with little chance. Ten years later, he is potentially master of all he surveys.’

The art of forgery: The minds, motives and methods of master forgers, by Noah Charney

Times Higher Education 25th June 2015

Dr Richard Howells, Culture, Media and Creative Industries, reviews a new book by Noah Charney. ‘Soundbites apart, Charney’s book is at its best when it considers the greyer, more nuanced aspects of the crime – including the role played by certain parts of the art world itself. Not every dimension of forgery is such delightful fun,’ he said.

Queens’ European speech in Berlin

Sky News 25th June 2015

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed by Sky News on the topic of the Queen’s European speech in Berlin. He said: ‘The Queen doesn’t get involved in matters of party political controversy. This issue is a matter of extreme controversy.’

Road traffic noise can reduce life expectancy

Times of India 25th June 2015

Research led by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in partnership with Imperial College London and King's College London found that long-term exposure to road traffic noise may lead to an increased number of heart strokes and deaths.

Cameron steps up EU renegotiation as U.K. business says stay

Bloomberg 25th June 2015

David Cameron arrived in Brussels for a summit, where he will attempt further renegotiation around British membership in the European Union. Professor Anand Menon, European & International studies, commented on the meeting: ‘Whatever Cameron gets, he’s going to come back and say he’s achieved what he wanted.’ Also reported in Washington Post

Myanmar operation a step to bring back credibility

New Indian Express 25th June 2015

Following attacks by tribal guerrillas in Manipur, the Indian Army responded five days later with strikes on rebel camps inside Myanmar. Commenting on the attack, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The speed with which this attack was carried out after the initial terror attacks was not only unprecedented but also demonstrates a new level of confidence in the political authorities in wielding the military instrument of coercion.’

Fighting Islamic State

BBC World News 25th June 2015

ISIS militants disguised as Kurdish security forces infiltrated a Syrian town and launched an attack on civilians. Commenting on the attack, Dr Jill Sargent Russell, War Studies, said: ‘It is likely a vague propaganda effort in support of the video they have just put out. If they have a spectacular military attack somewhere then that drives people to check them out online.’

Further Education may ‘vanish into history’ according to new report

Financial Times 24th June 2015

The education funding system is destroying economically vital post-19 education, according to a new report published today by respected academic Baroness Alison Wolf, Sir Roy Griffiths Professor of Public Sector Management at King's College London. Heading for the precipice: can further and higher education funding policies be sustained?, published by the Policy Institute at King’s College, London, illustrates how the structure of education funding is squeezing further education - classified as adult education at all levels, but taught in a non-university environment - at such a rate it may ‘vanish into history’. This was reported by Financial Times, Times Higher Education, Evening Standard, Telegraph, Guardian, BBC Radio 2 and BBC Radio 4 Today.

Traffic free days on Regent Street cut pollution by 75%

Evening Standard 24th June 2015

A series of road closures next month will slash the levels of harmful gas breathed in by shoppers and workers by up to three quarters, reports suggest. A study by Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, found that the day long absence of vehicles cuts pollution levels to those that can be found in the capital’s parks.

Moving pictures may have been invented in Leeds

BBC Radio 4 Today 24th June 2015

Dr Richard Howells, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, comments on claims that the first film was shot in Leeds in 1888 by Louis Le Prince. Dr Howells said: ‘As an academic I would say Louis Le Prince invented moving pictures but, of course, it depends what you mean by invented. If you invent something and nobody hears about it, have you invented it?’ (01.46.00)

DNA’s third man

BBC Radio 4 Science Stories 24th June 2015

Professor Brian Sutton, Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics, discussed the historical work at King’s on the structure of DNA.

The secret world of Isis brides

Guardian 24th June 2015

Western women who travel to Syria to join Islamic State are encouraged to do so by talking to extremists online, who promise a ‘utopian’ way of life. Dr Katherine Brown, Defence studies, explains that in joining the state, the women believe it’s possible to have a ‘perfect world’, and will become ‘perfect people.’ Also reported in NDTV

If Greece melts down, who really cares?

CNN 24th June 2015

Professor Anand Menon, European & International studies, considered the ramifications of a Greek exit from the European Union. ‘What is clear is that the political implications of a default and possible Euro exit would be huge and largely negative…such a scenario raises the possibility of a number of potentially harmful political outcomes both within Greece and further afield.’

Why we still care about the notorious pirate Captain Kidd

TIME 24th June 2015

Rebecca Simon, History, commented on why public fascination with piracy and buried treasure continues in media and popular culture. Ms Simon spoke of notorious pirate Captain William Kidd, whose long-lost treasure was recently reported to have been found. ‘The discovery of this loot proves that real pirates who were condemned and executed over 300 years ago are as interesting today as they have ever been,’ she said.

10 scientific reasons drinking beer is actually good for you

Metro 23rd June 2015

A new book, The Diet Myth by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research, claims that everything we know about losing weight is wrong – and that drinking Belgian beer is actually good for your gut bacteria, which can aid efficient digestion.

The case for capital controls in the UK?

Financial Times 23rd June 2015

Many Londoners wonder whether the influx of rich buyers has provided any benefit to less affluent residents. Research by Professor Chris Hamnett, Geography, is mentioned. Professor Hamnett studied the effect of foreign money on the city’s property market, likening it to a three-bowl fountain of the type often found in London parks. A jet of water fills the topmost and smallest bowl; overflow spills into the middle bowl and, eventually, into the bottom, largest bowl.

Britain struggles to stem flow of radicalised youth to Islamic State

Voice of America 23rd June 2015

Recent reports of Westerners travelling to fight for Islamic state were discussed by David Cameron at a security conference, where he said the Muslim community in Britain must do more to counter radical views. Joana Cook, War Studies, disagreed with this approach. ‘By a sweeping broad analysis like this, you risk alienating the law-abiding, peaceful citizens that are going to be your biggest allies,’ she said.

Shells

BBC World Service 23rd June 2015

Shells have been used as currency in West Africa since the 11th century, playing a significant role in the continent’s economic development. Dr Toby Green, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, said: ‘This was a monetised trade from a very early time…as the currency supply, and shell supply expanded, trade expanded. This was a process which was a big part of the economic relationship between West Africa and the World.’ Also reported on BBC Radio 4

Viagra does something very important: But it is unlikely to cause melanoma, researchers conclude

Bloomberg 23rd June 2015

An analysis of 20,000 medical records has shown that erectile dysfunction drugs, such as Viagra, are not a cause of melanoma, despite the higher risk for the disease among users of these drugs. Hans Garmo, Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, was credited for his involvement in the study.

This pita bread can hack your computer

Vice 23rd June 2015

A new portable devise for data hacking has been developed using a gadget designed to fit inside pitta bread. The gadget is called ‘Portable Instrument for Trace Acquisition.’ Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, commented on the technology. ‘It’s an interesting use of existing technology in a cheap and rough-and-ready way…I had no idea it was actually even possible,’ he said.

Here’s how to recognise and deal with adversity failures

Folha (Brazil) 23rd June 2015

The School of Life organisation, a social enterprise, has brought together a range of content in a collection of short books, including one by Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology & Religious Studies, entitled ‘Dealing with Adversity’. In the book, Dr Hamilton looks at methods of recognising adversity as a ‘source of learning able to define our existence.’

Who is pioneering feminist foreign policy in Sweden, and who have they upset?

BBC World Service 23rd June 2015

The new Swedish Minister of Foreign Affairs, Margot Wallström, has placed gender equality at the center of her foreign policy strategy. Dr Magnus Ryner, European & International Studies, commented on the confrontations Wallström has subsequently faced with other countries, such as Saudi Arabia. ‘Sweden will face the classic dilemma. International relations versus national interest,’ he said. Also reported in O Globo

More women are reaching 100 but centenarian men are healthier

Mail Online 22nd June 2015

New research from King's has found that, whilst women are more likely to reach age 100, male centenarians suffer from less illness than their female counterparts. Researchers at King's College London studied 11,048 centenarians - 8,982 women and 2,102 men - reaching 100 between 1995 and 2013. This was also reported by Times, Telegraph, Xinhua and Business Standard.

Is the Queen the world's hardest-working monarch?

MailOnline 22nd June 2015

She may be 89 but the Queen has a social calender that would exhaust someone half her age. The past week, which saw the monarch carry out eight public appearances in just seven days, was proof enough. In this piece looking at the Monarch's public engagements, the launch of the George III Project in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle is mentioned. This is a collaboration with King's, of which Her Majesty is patron, to digitise the papers of King George III to make them available online.

Help us identify air pollution hotspots, Londoners urged

Evening Standard 22nd June 2015

Londoners are being invited to help create the most comprehensive picture of air pollution in the capital under a new project that aims to drive a shift to cleaner modes of transport. Entrepreneur Lord Drayson is working on the project with Professor Frank Kelly, head of the Environmental Research Group at King’s.

Crisis in Yemen

Al Jazeera 22nd June 2015

Following air strikes in Yemen, Saudi Arabian forces declared that they had achieved their military aims in the country. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, commented on the campaign. ‘Why did the Saudi’s go into war to begin with? They wanted to restore peace in Yemen, which is a very generic strategic goal. They also wanted to destroy ballistic missile capability,’ he said. Dr Krieg argued their aims had only been partially achieved.

Turkish heritage organisation deepens advisory board with global expertise

Reuters 22nd June 2015

The Turkish Heritage Organisation (THO) announced the expansion of its Advisory Board to include a number of experts, including Bill Park, Defence Studies. His expertise in Turkish regional strategy and Turkey-US relations was noted in the article.

NHS trial 'transforms lives' of young anorexia and bulimia sufferers

Guardian 21st June 2015

Ulrike Schmidt, professor of eating disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), heads the first episode and rapid early intervention for eating disorders (Freed) trial. This service helps young adults suffering from anorexia and bulimia to start specialist treatment within an average of 33 days rather than between four and eight months in the NHS. Early indications suggest that Freed patients achieved full weight recovery at six months after starting treatment, where patients in the clinical trial had not caught up at 12 months. Additionally drop-out was down from 30% in SLAM services to 13% in the Freed trial. Professor Schmidt comments: “If you have a child with cancer, you wouldn’t wait until they had reached stage four cancer before starting treatment. It’s no different with an eating disorder, because if you delay treatment, then the illness becomes more ingrained and more difficult to treat.”

Teen ‘liked’ radical preacher before family left for Syria

Sunday Times 21st June 2015

THE 14-year-old son of one of three Bradford sisters feared to have joined Isis in Syria with their children supported a notorious radical preacher before leaving Britain. The pieces mentions a report last year by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation which found that Ahmed Musa Jibril was the most 'liked' on Facebook of 190 fighters they were tracking.

Gut reaction - Why is my hangover so bad?

Guardian 21st June 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research, writes about the effects of alcohol on the gut. He says: 'Hangovers occur due to the side-effects of the chemical produced when alcohol is broken down. Alcohol itself is fairly harmless – but enzymes convert it to acetaldehyde, which does the damage.'

The city from the saddle

Financial Times 20th June 2015

A review of the memoir of Dr Jon Day, English, who, prior to becoming a lecturer at King's, was a London bicycle courier. He cycled up to 300 miles a week.

All choked up - did Britain's dirty air make me dangerously ill?

Guardian 20th June 2015

This year, environment correspondent at the Guardian, John Vidal, had heart bypass surgery – a wake-up call that prompted him to investigate the state of the air we breathe. The piece mentions quotes Professor Frank Kelly of the Environmental Research Group and his research which shocked the British government in 2010, when they stated that air pollution caused the premature deaths of 29,000 people a year in Britain. Professor Kelly says: 'that today’s air pollutants are largely invisible and odourless, and are obvious only when dust is occasionally swept up from the Sahara or when traffic and industrial fumes get trapped on sunny days and a dull orange-grey smog develops.'

Illicit pills for the hyper competitive

Financial Times 19th June 2015

New findings show that prescription pills are being sought out by those who simply want an edge at work, despite known health risks. Researchers at King’s and the London School of Economics found that nine per cent of surveyed students had used Modafinil, Adderall or Ritalin at least once. Moda­finil is approved for helping shift workers stay alert in the US.

Muslim communties' role in the fight against extremism

Sky News 19th June 2015

Dr John Gearson, War Studies, comments on David Cameron's recent speech. He said: 'He's pointing out that more should be done and some have a level of acceptance to some of the ideology.'

Do we need disloyalty cards for theatre?

Guardian 19th June 2015

Feature on encouraging audiences to try new cultural venues. References Lauren Holden, King’s student, and the King’s Cultural Challenge, from Culture at King’. Lauren’s idea, the Disloyalty app, is currently in development with King’s Technology Society.

Women Scientists on Sexism in Science

BBC Radio 4 18th June 2015

Dr Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), was interviewed on the subject of sexism in science, following the comments from Tim Hunt about women in laboratories (begins at 08.45).

Why do we love Jane Eyre?

BBC Radio 4 18th June 2015

Professor Karen O'Brien, Vice-Principal (Education) and Professor of English Literature, discusses the story of Jane Eyre for In Our Time on BBC Radio 4. The discussion was used again in a separate broadcast for Radio 4 in 4.

Bioethics as a Profession: Expertise and Accountability for the Gene Editing Debate

Huffington Post 18th June 2015

Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health Medicine, considers what it means to be a bioethicist and the role she thinks these professionals should play in the ongoing debate about gene editing. ‘Just as bioethicists should be held accountable as professionals, so too do they have expertise in Bioethics that cannot be improvised. Hence, returning to the ethics of gene editing, I believe that it needs to be the bioethics professionals who drive the debate,’ she said.

Hope of test to spot Alzheimer’s early

Daily Telegraph 17th June 2015

A blood test could identify the first signs of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia 10 years before symptoms develop, scientists believe. The study followed 100 sets of twins over 10 years, and found that there were lower levels of a particular protein present in the blood in people who go on to develop mild cognitive impairment, a disorder that often leads to dementia. Dr Steve Kiddle of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments: 'This could lead to the development of a reliable blood test which would help clinicians identify suitable people for prevention trials.' Also reported by Daily Mail, BBC News Online, O Globo, Bloomberg and Fox News.

King's press release related to 'Hope of test to spot Alzheimer’s early'

Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo

CNN 17th June 2015

18 June 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, the final battle of the Napoleonic wars that followed the French Revolution. It saw the French army, under Napoleon, defeated in modern-day Belgium by the armies of the Seventh Coalition, led in part by Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington and founding father of King’s. Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, was interviewed on the history of the Battle by CNN, France 24 and LBC.

Fellowship for the Professor who puts patients first

Nursing Standard 17th June 2015

Professor Stephen Tee, Nursing & Midwifery, is among 55 people to be given a fellowship out of 180 nominees. Professor Tee has been a mental health nurse for more than 30 years and said: ‘I am absolutely delighted with this award. I am also very appreciative of all the encouragement and support I have received over the years from colleagues and students.’

Chief medical officer calls for statins review

Guardian 17th June 2015

Chief medical officer, Sally Davies, has called for a review to shore up public confidence about the safety and effectiveness of medicines in response to the controversy around statins and the Tamiflu vaccine. Professor Sir Michael Rutter, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience has been appointed to head the working group.

Not By Grooming Alone: Why We Can't Just Focus On the PR Tactics of Islamic State

Huffington Post 17th June 2015

Following the death of Talha Asmal, Britain’s youngest suicide bomber, who took his own life fighting for Islamic State, Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, considers why individuals travel to Iraq or Syria to fight for the militant group. ‘Recognising the combination of local and global push and pull factors is essential to any response and counter-radicalisation strategy…. It requires more than a focus on Islamic State's PR outputs. Ultimately it requires an open and ongoing discussion about future possibilities for a 'good life' in Iraq, Syria and here in the UK,’ she said.

Public 'see Armed Forces as victims' survey says

Daily Telegraph 16th June 2015

Misconceptions that Britain’s Armed Forces are more likely to suffer from PTSD, commit suicide or to end up in prison could harm recruitment, a new study claims. More than half of the public wrongly thinks service personnel are more likely to kill themselves, according to the report from King’s College London, which included researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and polling firm Ipsos Mori. A Royal British Legion analysis last year concluded they are alctually less likely to end up in prison, and across the whole Armed forces levels of PTSD are similar to civilians, though they are higher in combat troops and reservists.

Viewpoint: Does strategy of killing militant leaders work?

BBC News (Online) 16th June 2015

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, writes for the BBC about the relative ‘success’ of killing of militant leaders. He says: ‘The dispute between al-Qaeda and Islamic State has now given way to fratricidal conflict between the two groups and demonstrates both the limits and unintended consequences of killing terrorist leaders.’

Dirty bomb: Just how worried should we be as ISIS seeks ultimate threat?

CNN 16th June 2015

Following news that ISIS had reportedly obtained radioactive materials with a view to develop a ‘dirty bomb’, Dr Matthew Moran, War Studies, and Dr Christopher Hobbs, War Studies, ask what the group could do with the newly acquired materials. ‘Ultimately, while the thought of ISIS using dirty bombs to further its terrorist agenda is unsettling, the threat should not be exaggerated, particularly when it comes to its impact on public health. These are not the nuclear weapons that ISIS supposedly desires, and will do nothing to further the group's ambitions in this regard,’ they said.

Lives at risk in NHS eating disorder crisis

The Guardian 15th June 2015

Professor Ulrike Schmidt of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on NHS eating disorder services. "Certain services only see people when they reach a certain level of severity with their eating disorder,” she says, “people might be told that their weight isn’t low enough to be seen, that they need to get sicker to get seen. It’s paradoxical. It’s horrible for patients to be told that you have to get worse before you get any specialist help." Also reported in Daily Telegraph.

Chilcot report is ‘delayed by a year’

Times 15th June 2015

Tony Blair’s biographer claims that the Chilcot inquiry on the Iraq war will not be published for at least another year. In the Independent on Sunday, Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, writes that this further delay in the 2009-commisioned report means it will have taken longer to produce than the time spent by British troops in Iraq.

Bacteria found in thin people could help to fight obesity

Times 15th June 2015

A new treatment for obesity using bacteria found in the guts of healthy people could soon be tested on humans. Professor Tim Spector, Twins Research, said that the bacterial species Akkermansia showed promise for treating problems linked to obesity.

Repentant 'godfather' of British jihad recalls extremism's lure

Reuters 15th June 2015

The story of Abu Muntasir, a former radical Islamic preacher once described as the ‘godfather of jihad’, has been told in ‘Jihad’ a documentary about why Western Muslims are travelling to fight for Islamic State militants. Research conducted by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation has been mentioned in the piece. Also reported by the New York Times and the Daily Mail

What did Magna Carta do for Women?

Huffington Post 15th June 2015

On the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, this article considers the lack of reference to women in the document. Professor David Carpenter, History, said that this reflects ‘the inequalities between men and women, and in particular the way women played a very limited part in public
affairs.’

Boffin or artist? It's in the genes

Sunday Times 14th June 2015

New research carried out by Professor Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown that genetics impacts the subjects children are good at in school. In a study following 10,000 twins, the chances of identical twins both choosing either science or arts at A-level was 80% compared with 50% for typical siblings. Plomin’s research also found genes accounted for up to 70% of the variation between teenagers’ scores at A-level. Other factors, such as school performance or pushy parents, swayed results by up to a third. He comments: “When you look at textbooks for teachers, there is nothing about genetics,” and says that a “one size fits all” education system is wrong. Also reported in Daily Telegraph, Hindustan Times and Economic Times.

Magna Carta scribe uncovered on eve of its 800th anniversary

BBC News 14th June 2015

A project led by the University of East Anglia and King’s has identified scribes who wrote two of the four original 1215 copies of the Magna Carta. Professor David Carpenter, History, said: ‘We now know that three of the four surviving originals of the charter went to cathedrals. This overturns the old view that the charters were sent to the sheriffs in charge of the counties. That would have been fatal since the sheriffs were the very people under attack in the charter.’ The findings were reported by the Sunday Times, Observer, BBC Radio 2, Mirror, Daily Mail, BBC and Guardian. Dr Andrew Blick, History, discussed the importance of the Magna Carta on Sky News. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, wrote about the ‘competing forces that cry out for a constitutional convention’ in the Independent. Also reported by BBC London 94.9 and Independent.

Toxic truth of ‘clean’ petrol cars

Sunday Times 14th June 2015

An article on pollution from vehicles mentions research by King’s which measured emissions from buses, taxis and cars. It found that vehicles were emitting between four and five times more nitrogen dioxide on the road than in the standard tests by which they were approved.

Egypt: 'New' Suez Canal to Open Aug. 6

Voice of America 14th June 2015

A ‘new’ Suez Canal will be opened on August 6th by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, an expansion that according to authorities will more than double the canal’s income over the next 10 years by making the trip faster and cheaper for shippers. Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, is sceptical about the level of income that will be generated and whether this could be enough to benefit the Egyptian population. ‘Egypt is a large, complex country with a very big population. It is highly unlikely it is going to be able to live off the kind of income it will get, even from two canals’, he said

Only connect

Financial Times 13th June 2015

A new book by Dr Laurence Scott, English Language and Literature, is reviewed by Sophie Elmhirst who says that Dr Scott has ‘set himself a tricky task’ in writing an account of the digital age in the more traditional medium of the book.

The inside story

Financial Times 13th June 2015

An essay about the importance of microbiomes includes reference to a new book by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research – The Diet Myth: The Real Science Behind What We Eat.

A broader Asian strategy

The Telegraph India 13th June 2015

We should not ignore the significance of visits by the Indian Prime Minister to Mongolia and South Korea, says Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, in this comment piece. ‘Delhi and Seoul need to advance their political ties so that a mutually beneficial and long-term partnership can evolve between the two sides. The resulting relationship could be as important for regional stability as it is for Indian and South Korean national interests’, he said.

New strategy takes shape

Deccan Herald 13th June 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on recent news that the US plan to send 450 military trainers to Iraq to help train and advise local forces. ‘The US … is being billed not as recognition of failure, but a continuation of success. The US Department of Defence is calling it a change in plans, not a change in strategy despite being a remarkable turnaround in Obama administration’s initial objections to such a policy posture.’

British Safety Council’s annual conference: An opportunity to get up to speed on what’s next

Bloomberg Business 12th June 2015

The British Safety council will be holding its annual conference ‘Health and Safety – What’s Next?’ on Wednesday 23 September. Mr Geoffrey Podger, Geography, will be delivering the concluding keynote speech.

Superior visual ability found early in children with autism

Health Day 11th June 2015

Exceptional visual perception might be an early hallmark of autism, which could help predict whether a child will be diagnosed with the developmental disability, a new British study suggests. Infants who more quickly perceived a mismatched symbol on a screen when they were 9 months old were more likely to receive an autism diagnosis by age 2, the researchers found. Most autism research to date has focused on difficulties children have with social interactions, behavior and communication, such as poor eye contact, the authors noted in their study. Focusing on above-average perceptual skills is a new direction to research.

Anderson report: Let UK agencies collect bulk surveillance data

New York Times 11th June 2015

David Anderson has conducted a comprehensive assessment of intelligence gathering in the UK in a new report which makes a series of recommendations to Government, reports the Telegraph. Dr Cian Murphy, Law, welcomed the conclusions of the report, writes the New York Times. ‘The report…gives Britain the best possible chance for effective and proportionate powers, in compliance with the law and protective of civil liberties’, he said.

Study suggests common genetic roots between creativity and psychiatric illnesses

Xinhua 10th June 2015

Genes linked to creativity could also increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). It suggests that creative people may have a genetic predisposition towards thinking differently which, when combined with other harmful biological or environmental factors, could lead to mental illness, said Robert Power, first author of the research paper. Also reported in Times of India, Hindustan Times, o Globo, and Deccan Chronicle.

King's press release related to 'Study suggests common genetic roots between creativity and psychiatric illnesses'

Tougher MoT to cut deaths from toxins

Sunday Times 7th June 2015

MoT testing will be strengthened to include pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide which will be measured at various engine speeds and loads. Scientists at King’s used a light beam to analyse the exhaust plumes of 25,000 vehicles. David Carslaw, Environmental & Analytical Sciences, said: “We found emissions for post-2005 diesels are four to five times higher on the road than in the Euro tests under which they were approved.”

Depression while pregnant 'gives your child blues'

Daily Mail 5th June 2015

Recent research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown that individuals are three times more likely to suffer from depression if their mother had the condition when pregnant. The study found that of 35 adult offspring exposed to maternal depression during pregnancy, 57 per cent met diagnostic criteria for depression, compared to 28 per cent of those not exposed to maternal depression during pregnancy. Lead author Dr Dominic Plant comments:‘Our study is the first to demonstrate the impact of mothers’ depression during pregnancy on depression in their children as young adults, and importantly, we found childhood maltreatment to be a strong mediating factor'. Also reported in Sun.

King's press release related to 'Depression while pregnant 'gives your child blues''

Dina Asher-Smith, Britain's fastest woman: student and sprinter

BBC Sport 5th June 2015

Article looking at the career of King's history student Dina Asher-Smith who recently became the fastest British woman in history, bettering her personal best by 0.12 seconds and breaking the previous national record of 11.05 secs. Discussing her decision to study alongside pursuing a career in athletics, she said: 'It's a saving grace because when I go back to athletics the next day, I'm refreshed because I haven't been watching videos, going over and over my performance. The degree gives me a balance, which makes life easier and prevents me going stir crazy. It's given me a more rounded perspective.'

These are all the things Theresa May's legal highs bill could accidentally ban

Independent 5th June 2015

In this article Dr Adam Winstock of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) reflects on the potential effects of the proposed Psychoactive Substances Bill aimed at banning legal highs. He notes that the definition of psychoactive in the bill would also cover common solvents, plants such as nutmeg, common medications and pheremones. "The Global Drugs Surveys...saw a year-on-year decline in the use levels of research chemicals in the UK, spotting a decline in the use mephedrone two years before the national government did. It hit it’s peak with mephedrone and it’s been declining ever since. The government has also, as far as I know, not put in any measure as to how they’re going to determine whether or not their regulation is effective. Ecstasy, cocaine and cannabis are all banned and all illegal – lots of people still use them. What the government won’t do is engage in adult conversations with people who use drugs and treat them as sensible adults. That’s daft."

History isn't a backward-looking exercise. It nudges us forward: Sunil Khilnani

Times of India 5th June 2015

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, discussed his ongoing radio 4 series ‘Incarnations – India in 50 lives’ and how it has explored Indian history in a new way. Professor Khilnani said: ‘We need to find different, more engaging ways to tell our own history…The lives of individuals offer a useful thread to enter into the labyrinth of Indian history, to discover its wonders but also its horrors, its creativity and its conflicts.’ The series, which can be listened to here, has received wide press coverage and positive reviews, including BBC News, New Statesman, Times of India, Telegraph, Financial Times, Spectator, Radio Times and BBC History Magazine, amongst others.

Clothing castoffs may be wearing economies thin

Washington Times 5th June 2015

Charitable donations of old clothes may be doing more harm that intended, by undercutting the clothing market for entrepreneurs in some of the world’s poorest countries. Dr Andrew Brooks, Geography, said: ‘The sale of second-hand goods from charities in the US and other developed countries actually undercuts domestic sellers and stunts the local economy.’

City pollution blackspots revealed: air is too toxic for joggers

Evening Standard 5th June 2015

The City of London Corporation has produced a free mobile phone app to help people find the least polluted routes through the city. The City Air app, designed by experts from King’s College London, offers a choice of three routes to avoid pollution.

City pollution blackspots revealed: air is too toxic for joggers

Evening Standard 5th June 2015

The City of London Corporation has produced a free mobile phone app to help people find the least polluted routes through the city. The City Air app, designed by experts from King’s College London, offers a choice of three routes to avoid pollution.

Genetic changes affecting signals between brain cells could be cause of schizophrenia

The Independent 4th June 2015

Scientists have linked schizophrenia to variations in the gene sequences that are known to control chemical messages between synapses in the brain. The findings are part of a wider body of evidence that indicates there may genetic causes for the condition as well as environmental. Treatment for schizophrenia is currently focussed on dopamine neurotransmitters but the latest research suggests another approach. Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments: “The implication of this paper is that it would be more sensible instead to develop drugs which regulate the balance between the glutamate and GABA systems controlling synthesis of dopamine”.

Elastic App: meet the inventors of the indoor GPS app that shows you the way

Evening Standard 4th June 2015

Joseph Mambwe and Reeve Yew attended a hackathon organised by the rail industry at the end of March and the indoor GPS app they developed, Elastic Navigation, was such a hit with the organisers that the two students will have set up their start-up business by September. The piece mentions that Yew is a business management undergraduate at King’s.

Lives remembered: Charles Kennedy

Times 4th June 2015

Professor Lord Raymond Plant, the Dickson Poon School of Law, discusses the life of the late Charles Kennedy, reflecting on when he taught him as a student at Glasgow University. He wrote: 'He was an exceptionally clever and committed student and he had a particular interest in issues to do with social justice.'

Boston terror suspect's shooting: What we know and don't know

CNN 4th June 2015

Usaamah Rahim, a suspected radicalised religious extremist, was shot and killed by law enforcement officers in Boston after threatening them with a military knife. Nick Kaderbhai, researcher at International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, commented on the suggested terror connection to Rahim shown through social media activity. ‘There’s a certain tone to it, and it points to a certain direction. We can look back and say the warning signs were there,’ he said.

Education bill to close loopholes blocking academies expansion

Guardian 3rd June 2015

The education secretary, Nicky Morgan, has vowed to “sweep away bureaucratic and legal loopholes” obstructing the takeover of as many as 1,000 struggling local authority schools in England and their rapid conversion into academies. Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, said: 'The evidence on whether or not academies have had more success in raising attainment than other equivalent schools is mixed, and hard to pin down.'

60 seconds with Pearl Sakoane

Nursing Times 3rd June 2015

The Nursing Times speak to a nursing student at King's why she became a nurse, her training and her thoughts on changes in nursing over the next decade and what makes a good nurse. She said: 'I think a good nurse is someone who shows genuine concern for those around them - both patients and colleagues. It's someone who has integrity as well as emotional intelligence.'

Why Modi visit to Israel is important for India

NDTV 3rd June 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commented on Narendra Modi’s visit to Israel later this year, a first for any Indian prime minister. Professor Pant said: ‘The Modi government is doing well by repudiating the discredited Israel policy of its predecessors. An open relationship with Israel serves India well and it's about time Tel Aviv gets the recognition it deserves from New Delhi.’

John-Thor Dahlburg and Misha Dzhindzhikhashvili

Deccan Chronicle 3rd June 2015

Research from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) is mentioned in an article discussing the estimated number of Western individuals who have travelled to fight for Islamic state.

Global warming does what live aid never could

Times 2nd June 2015

Climate change has achieved what Bob Geldof and Live Aid failed to do by ending the drought in the Sahel region of Africa that killed more than 100,000 people in the 1980s, a study has found. Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, said the study was relevant to the debate about whether rich countries should compensate poor ones for the damage done by emissions: 'One should continue to remain sceptical of overconfident claims that ‘climate change’, by which is meant fossil fuel emissions, always causes negative effects in these African drylands.'

Being bullied as a child linked to depression in young adults

Daily Telegraph 2nd June 2015

The article covers a study carried out by Oxford University, which used research by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). This followed 7,771 children whose parents provided information on their child's bullying when they were aged seven and 11.

King's press release related to 'Being bullied as a child linked to depression in young adults'

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy increases risk of baby developing a rare circulation problem

Daily Mail 2nd June 2015

Professor Louise Howard of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on an American study which suggests a link between taking antidepressants during pregnancy and circulatory problems in the baby: 'The small increase in risk reported for the less severe forms of PPHN could be due to the effects of antidepressants, but may be due to other factors such as body mass index, smoking or the effect of depression itself,’ she said. 'Women considering whether or not to take antidepressants in pregnancy need to discuss with their doctor the risks of not taking medication...as well as the current evidence base on possible risks of medication.’

New survey finds Britons have more favourable view of Europe

Washington Post 2nd June 2015

A new survey has found that British attitudes towards the European Union (EU) are improving ahead of a referendum, which will decide whether the UK will remain in the EU. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said of the survey results: ‘I think the Brits have come to appreciate EU membership more now.’ Also reported in Economic Times

Has the strategy against ISIL failed?

Al Jazeera 2nd June 2015

At a summit in Paris, foreign ministers from several countries discussed why the strategy against ISIL is proving ineffective. This follows territorial gains madein Iraq and Syria by the radical group. Professor Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘There has been a mix of different strategies that have been applied. The West, for different reasons, don’t want to put boots on the ground and therefore rely heavily on air power and on armed forces on the ground…provided by Iraqi armed forces, supported by militias. The problem with that strategy is a problem of coordination. It’s a problem to make sure you have a common objective and so far we are witnessing strong contention between different members of the coalition.’

Sectarian tensions in Iraq

Al Jazeera 2nd June 2015

Fears that Iraq will return to the sectarian violence seen in 2006, 2007 and 2008, have been sparked by viral videos of militia groups’ activities in the country. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, commented as part of a debate discussing the sectarian tensions currently in Iraq.

The last man to do National Service

BBC News Magazine 1st June 2015

Chris Stokel-Walker meets the last man officially discharged from National Service, 52 years ago. Professor Richard Vinen, History, is author of a book on National Service in the post war years and explains: 'It served different purposes at different times. Initially it was to train soldiers as a reserve force, and then it was to have them ready for immediate deployment, and then it was for colonial warfare.'

Do you need to go on a noise diet

Daily Mail 1st June 2015

There is increasing evidence that noise does not simply damage our hearing but can also have an effect on our health. This piece mentions 2013 research which found that people who lived near Heathrow were at greater risk of being admitted to hospital or dying prematurely.

Not brushing your teeth can trigger dementia and heart disease

Daily Mail 1st June 2015

Serpil Djemal, Dental Institute, advises ‘tickling’ (light brushing) every surface of every tooth is the best way to a clean mouth in this article which reports the experiences of Dr Christopher Van Tulleken, who avoided brushing his teeth for 2 weeks to find out more about the effects on his oral and general health. New research shows that chronic inflammation can affect your health.

London nurse urges women to run for cancer charity

Nursing Times 1st June 2015

Former King's nursing student, Sophie McCallum has just qualified as a chemotherapy nurse at Barts Health NHS Trust and is calling on women to join the fight against the disease by signing up for Cancer Research UK’s annual “race for life” following her own battle against cancer as a teenager.

Four new attitudes against obesity

O Globo (Brazil) 1st June 2015

Research by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, is quoted as one of four new attitudes in the fight against obesity. Professor Spector’s research found that eating junk and process food killed stomach bacteria which protect against obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, inflammatory bowel conditions and autism.

IS revamps recruitment, with savvy professional broadcasts

International New York Times 1st June 2015

Since 2012, Islamic State has invested heavily in increasing the quality of its propaganda, used to attract support and more fighters. However few who have left life under IS are willing to talk about it. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, said: ‘Right now it’s really only Islamic State who is telling a story. To have a counter-story being told by a former fighter would be potentially very powerful.’ Also reported by Economic Times, Fox News, Associated Press, Deccan Herald and Hindustan Times

House of Secrets

New Yorker 1st June 2015

A recent investigation by the Financial Times found that more than a hundred billion pounds’ worth of real estate in England and Wales is owned by offshore companies, of which two-thirds are in London. Research by Professor Chris Hamnett, Geography, into the effect of foreign money on London’s property market is mentioned, which states the impact is that of displacement of residents.

Air Pollution in the UK: the public health problem that won't go away

BMJ 30th May 2015

The government has been accused of a failure to act while drivers of diesel cars, who were encouraged to believe they were doing the environment a favour are now categorised as polluters in chief. Ian Mudway, Environmental Research group, says that the science is becoming more robust: 'It has become more pressing to deal with these issues. Meeting the current limits for particulates, nitrogen dioxide and ozone, should be seen as the minimum expectation for public health.'

Cancer drugs rankings suggest many are of little benefit to patients

Guardian 30th May 2015

Leading experts are calling on the pharmaceutical industry to focus on coming up with meaningful drugs and boosting levels of effectiveness. Professor Richard Sullivan, Director of the Institute of Cancer Policy and KHP Integrated Cancer Centre global health work, said they wanted pharmaceutical companies and those who fund drug discovery to focus on inventing meaningful drugs that help patients, rather than just making profits: 'Over the past decade, more and more medicines have been going on to the market with lower and lower levels of benefit.' Also reported in Reuters and Bloomberg.

Nicole and DNA co-star? They've got chemistry!

Daily Mail 29th May 2015

A new play based which tells the story of the work of Rosalind Franklin will star Nicole Kidman and Stephen Campbell Moore. Stephen Campbell Moore, who was in the original casts of award-winning plays The History Boys and Chimerica, will join Nicole in Anna Ziegler’s play Photograph 51, about the pioneering DNA research undertaken by biochemist Rosalind Franklin at King’s College, London. Nicole will play Franklin and Campbell Moore will portray Maurice Wilkins, who collaborated with her on some of the early DNA research.

Putin builds new bases to fight covert Ukraine war

Times 29th May 2015

Newly built military training camps close to the Ukrainian border have become launchpads for Russia to wage covert war against its neighbour, according to an authoritative report that uses satellite imagery and hundreds of photographs posted by soldiers on the internet. Eliot Higgins, a research student in the Department of War Studies, said: 'It's obviously clear that Russia is sending soldiers, military equipment, building up camp - they're heavily involved in the military activity in Ukraine.

Jessie J virtual duet with Leeds teen seen by millions

BBC News (Online) 29th May 2015

A teenager from Leeds has become an overnight internet sensation after singing a virtual duet with Jessie J.
Tom Bleasby's sing-a-long with the pop star has racked up more than seven million views on Facebook. Tom is a student of politics at King's.

You don't have to have a one-track mind to study law

Guardian 29th May 2015

A piece exploring the benefits of studying a joint honours law degree quotes Professor John Tasioulas, Director at the Yeoh Tiong Lay Centre for Politics, Philosophy and Law: 'By placing the law in the context of its underlying values and the social reality in which it operates. Such courses enable students to become more creative and penetrating thinkers.'

Rebel with a cause: artist Maggi Hambling on ignoring critics, Soho dandies and her latest exhibition

Evening Standard 29th May 2015

Hambling’s new show, a self-selected retrospective of work about war, death and memory, hosted by the Cultural Institute, is largely abstract, with pieces drawn from across three decades. As well as re-showing her Walls of Water canvases, there’s a homage to Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem, an Eighties canvas of women in hijabs taking aim with rocket launchers, and a room of recent work, gnarled driftwood, cast in bronze and then painted, a reanimation of the discarded and decaying, with new life.

Fighting the crisis of liberalism, one suicide-bomber joke at a time

Financial Times 29th May 2015

A blog from Tom Burgis looks at the crisis of liberalism and quotes Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation: 'The west is very shy of its values – it doesn’t speak up for classical liberalism. We are unsure of them. They make us feel uneasy.'

'There is still a shocking level of ignorance regarding dementia'

Guardian 29th May 2015

A live discussion with an expert panel on the Healthcare Network asked 'What is the role of education in supporting joined-up care?' Mayumi Hayashi, Institute of Gerontology, King’s College, said: 'Could the integration be achieved in part by offering shared training and professional development - even initial orientation and a preparatory education course - to all destined to work in dementia care? This might make integration a metaphor, rather than an aspiration with nurses learning alongside care mangers and healthcare workers. It would remove the stale hierarchies and divisive social walls between the occupations.'

Attention tea lovers: Here’s everything you need to know about your favourite beverage

Huffington Post 29th May 2015

Research conducted by Dr Carrie Ruxton while she was at King’s College London is mentioned in the article regarding the health benefits of tea. The study found that tea can be beneficial for rehydration. ‘Studies on caffeine have found very high doses dehydrate and everyone assumes that caffeine-containing beverages dehydrate. But even if you had a really, really strong cup of tea or coffee, which is quite hard to make, you would still have a net gain of fluid,’ she said.

The eternal prison of jihadist girls

Estadao 29th May 2015

Young Westerners who join Islamic State (IS) are unlikely to return home, with only two of the estimated 600 who have joined extremists in Syria having done so. Joana Cook, War Studies, said of those looking to escape IS: ‘Many middlemen people are working in Syria now, helping civilians to escape the violence. I wonder if there is also a growing market for these dealers to help those trying to escape IS.’

Islamic State: Women who join discover 'harsh realities'

BBC News 28th May 2015

A new report by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue and the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King's claims young women travelling to Syria to join Islamic State often end up 'domestically isolated in severe conditions'. Having monitored more than 100 of the 550 Western women believed to have join Islamic State on social media platforms, the researchers suggest that, whatever the women's reasons for joining IS, their 'first and foremost' responsibility will actually be 'to be a good wife to the jihadist husband to who they are betrothed and to become a mother to the next generation of jihadism.' Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: 'Female recruits now make up a substantial part of those who have emigrated to join the ISIS cause, but little has been done to properly investigate the reasons why they are joining and how to prevent them.' Also reported by Mail Online, Daily Mirror, Daily Express, Metro, BBC News, Reuters UK, ITV News, Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Newsweek, Folha, Huffington Post, International New York Times, Reuters, The Economic Times, Indian Express, Economic Times and Reuters

Human rights and the workings of democracy

Times 28th May 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written in to the Editor regarding the Human Rights Act. He wrote: 'Issues of human rights often concern vulnerable minorities, such as asylum-seekers or prisoners, unable to enter the electoral marketplace, or to win support from political parties. That is the case for judicial review.'

Campus news

Times Higher Education 28th May 2015

Professor Sunil Khilnani, director of the India Institute, is following a journey from ancient India to the 21st century in Incarnations – India in 50 Lives. The first 25 episodes of the 50-part series, which was recorded in India over the past year, are being broadcast on Radio 4 each weekday until mid-June.

Forcing doctors to report FGM ‘will scare off victims’

Evening Standard 28th May 2015

Professor Janice Rymer, Medical Education, has warned that new rules which compel doctors to report female genital mutilation to the police could stop women from seeking medical help. She told the Evening Standard: 'The concern is that pregnant women will hang back, thinking they’ll be investigated by the police. These are women who may need help for many reasons, including FGM-related complications around pregnancy.'

Mirchi ka Salan recipe: from Indian cook and author Mallika Basu

Evening Standard 28th May 2015

Dr Fiona Russell of the Cardiovascular Division and leading expert on the science of chillies is mentioned in this recipe column following a 'hilarious' talk she was involved with in which World of Zing brought bags of chillies and such spicy nuggets of information to London’s South Bank.

Historians weigh in on Britain’s relationship with Europe

Times Higher Education 28th May 2015

Historians for Britain is a campaign headed by some of Britain’s leading historians and academics who believe that there needs to be a substantial change in Britain’s relationship with the European Union. They list David Starkey, Visiting Professor in the Department of War Studies, among their supporters.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 28th May 2015

Professor Alberto Sanchez-Feuyo, Transplantation Immunology & Muscosal Biology, has been awarded a grant for prospective randomised marker-based trial to assess the clinical utility and safety of biomarker-guided immunosuppression withdrawal in liver transplantation.

Exploring the State of Science in India

BBC World Service 28th May 2015

India is fighting to become a superpower in key scientific industries, such as space exploration, computing, biotech and engineering. At the same time, nearly 400 million Indians are not connected to the national grid. Dr Jahnavi Phalkey, India Institute, said: ‘Clearly in some areas, the success of science and engineering research has been celebrated…At the same time, there are issues of comparing India with other nations such as China. We should step aside from measuring success in terms of numbers of publications, to ask questions of what is it that bothers people in India?’

No exit: For female jihadis, Syria is one-way journey

Washington Post 28th May 2015

For Western girls and young women who have joined extremists in Syria, there is little chance that they would be able to leave the war zone. Joana Cook, War Studies, commented on the link between women and jihad. ‘There is great disillusionment for many who have travelled to Syria to join ISIL and you’ll find many stories of those who went abroad noting ‘this isn’t what we signed up for,’ she said.

The Queen's Speech

BBC Radio 4 Today 27th May 2015

An EU referendum, tax cuts for low-earners and an extension of Right to Buy will be promised in the first all-Conservative Queen's Speech since 1996. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed how to define a bill that is of constitutional importance. He said: 'There's no clear definition of this but I think it's fair to say that if it relates to the fundamental workings of our political system or our rights and how we interact with government then it's fair to call it constitutional.' Dr Blick was also interviewed on Sky News on how Parliament updates laws, in relation to highway laws from the 19th century and driver-less cars.

Psychedelic drugs should be legally reclassified so that researchers can investigate their therapeutic potential

BBC Radio 4 27th May 2015

Interview on BBC Radio 4 Today at 53:20 with Dr James Rucker of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who argues that there are potential benefits to the use of psychadelic drugs when used in a supportive therapeutic environment, however, meaningful research is nearly impossible unless authorities downgrade their unnecessarily restrictive classification. He notes historical research that supported their use as psychotherapeutic catalysts, helping to provide insight into maladaptive behaviours and create mentally beneficial change. However, they are currently more legally restricted than cocaine and heroine, which stigmatizes research into their use and stalls grant funding. He comments: "psychedelics are not harmful in relation to other controlled substances and are not habit forming, and evidence suggests medical use".

Also reported in BMJ, Guardian, Daily Mail, Newsweek, Time, Estadao, Daily Beast and BBC Radio 5 Live.

Winners and losers from the startling rise in short-sightedness

Financial Times 27th May 2015

According to a King's study published in the Opthalmology journal, found that around a quarter of the European population is short-sighted but it is nearly twice as common in younger people, with almost half (47 per cent) of the group aged between 25 and 29 years affected. Katie Williams, Ophthalmology, discussed why people are becoming more short-sighted. She said: 'Myopia has been associated with education, near work, urbanisation, prenatal factors, socio-economic status, cognitive ability, season of birth, light and time spent outdoors.'

Mice in space develop thin skin

BBC News 27th May 2015

A study of three mice that spent 91 days on the International Space Station has found abnormalities in their skin. Dr David Green, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, said these experiments were particularly noteworthy because of their duration as never before has a non-human animal spent this long in zero-g. He commented: 'It suggests that the skin is sensitive to being in microgravity, and that over long periods of time that might create a dysregulation in the proliferation and the replacement of skin.'

Breaking the Saudi rules of succession

Washington Post 27th May 2015

Dr David B Roberts, Defence Studies, commented on the shifting power dynamics in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, following an announcement by current King Salman that Mohamed bin Nayef, a grandson of the state’s founder, would be second-in-line to the throne. Dr Roberts said: ‘The ultimate test will come when Salman, a 79-year old with significant health problems, shuffles off this mortal coil. Saudi history is not kind to sons of kings who pass away, and with Salman’s precedent-setting unpicking his predecessor’s decree and his bypassing of the Allegiance Council, Mohammed bin Salman in particular is eminently removable.’

Swap tea and smoothies for more water to beat fatigue, say experts

Telegraph 26th May 2015

Diet experts have warned that it is 'not enough' to rely on tea, coffee and soft drinks, experts say, as data show poor drinking habits are putting strain on the NHS. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: 'One of the issues is whether people are actually drinking water at mealtimes in the same way as they once did. When I grew up there was always a jug of water on the table. Schools have a habit of doing that, but a lot of people have got out of the habit. They expect to drink something else.' Also reported by Daily Mail.

Erasers are an ‘instrument of the devil' which should be banned, says academic

Telegraph 26th May 2015

Professor Guy Claxton, Education, has claimed that erasers are an ‘instrument of the devil' and should be banned from classrooms because they encourage children to feel ashamed about mistakes. Professor Claxton told the Telegraph: 'he eraser is an instrument of the devil because it perpetuates a culture of shame about error. It’s a way of lying to the world, which says ‘I didn’t make a mistake. I got it right first time.’ That’s what happens when you can rub it out and replace it.' Also reported by Mail Online, Independent, Guardian, BBC News, The Hindu, Huffington Post, London Evening Standard, BBC Portugal, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo

The Human Rights Act

Sky News 26th May 2015

Professor Robert Wintemute, the Dickson Poon School of Law, was interviewed on Sky News on scrapping the Human Rights Act. In Professor Wintemute's opinion, the European Court of Human Rights is Europe's response to the Holocaust. He compares the new government to a football player who doesn't like the ruling of the referee and, therefore, leaves the game. Professor Wintemute argues that the government would hugely damage the human rights system as it would set a dangerous precedent for countries which maybe have a less robust legal system.

Has Narendra Modi lived up to expectations?

BBC News 25th May 2015

A poll by the Times of India found 47 per cent of the respondents saying that Prime Minister Narendra Modi's performance in government had been 'somewhat good', and an ambivalent quarter saying that it had been 'neither good, nor bad'. Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commented on how taking the lead in evacuating stranded people in conflict-zones like Yemen and rushing relief to earthquake-ravaged Nepal has earned his government rightful praise. He said: 'Two foreign policy priorities have emerged: South Asia and the management of a larger periphery with a focus on China.'

Cycling series: It’s all about the bike bod this summer

Times 25th May 2015

According to the CTC, the national cycling charity, almost 800,000 people now use a bicycle as their main form of transport to get to work. The piece mentions that researchers at King's recently discovered regular cycling can ward off the effects of ageing. Their study of 85 men and 41 women aged 55-79, all of whom cycled regularly, showed that on almost all measures of physical functioning and fitness, the cyclists didn’t show their age.

University guide 2016: King's College London

Guardian 25th May 2015

In the Guardian's 'at-a-glance guide to King's', the university is described as offering 'world-class teaching and research at its nine schools and six Medical Research Council centres. Analysis of the results from the government's latest research audit suggests that the university is seventh in the UK for its research 'power ranking'.'

Labour and the legacy of Blair and Brown

Guardian 25th May 2015

In a letter to the Guardian, Emeritus Professor Michael Redclift, Geography, comments on Labour's loss in the General Election 2015. He wrote: 'We do not need to disinter Tony Blair to win, we simply need radical and green policies that bring Labour supporters to the voting booth and stop defections to other parties (including the SNP, Green and Ukip).'

How European are you?

CNBC 25th May 2015

Dr Pablo Calderón Martínez, European & International Studies, discussed a project which analysed how ‘European’ individuals are, and revealed insights into ‘general life’ and politics. He said: ‘We are trying to put together publicly available data that has not been collected before…In the next stages of this development, we’re going to invest more into looking at holidays for instance, and also about how people work and productivity.

The great diesel car deception speeding us to a toxic death

Sunday Times 24th May 2015

Asthma can be triggered by many factors but it is no coincidence that whenever air pollution levels rise, Britain’s hospitals and GPs see a surge of patients with asthma. More than 20 years ago, scientists warned that the growing popularity of diesel vehicles could turn them into one of Europe’s greatest health threats. Professor Martin Williams, Environmental Research Group, said: 'The reason we have a problem with air pollution now is that UK policy has been focused on climate change, and reducing CO2 emissions, to the exclusion of much else, for most of the last two decades. Diesel was seen as a good thing because it produces less CO2, so we gave people incentives to buy diesel cars.'

Germany’s decision on coal brings a clash of wills

Financial Times 24th May 2015

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute at King's, asks whether Germany can claim to be an environmental leader while still burning more coal than any other developed country apart from the US. Discussing Germany's environmental footprint, he wrote: 'The country is not as pure and green as the rhetoric suggests. Emissions have risen over the past three years. Renewables have also grown, but 44 per cent of electricity still comes from coal, in particular carbon-intensive lignite or brown coal; coal-fired power plants account for a third of all emissions.'

Dina Asher-Smith sets new British 100m record of 11.02sec

Guardian 24th May 2015

History student Dina Asher-Smith became Britain’s quickest female sprinter of all time on Sunday after breaking the national 100m record at a meeting in the Netherlands. Asher-Smith’s time was 0.12sec faster than her previous best and came in her first 100m race of the outdoor season.

IMF fuel subsidies are not what they seem

Telegraph 24th May 2015

The International Monetary Fund (IMF), which usually restricts itself to bailing out indebted eurozone countries, has released a paper claiming that more than five trillion dollars is spent annually in subsidies for the fossil fuel industry. Professor Mark Pennington, Department of Political Economy, discussed rebranding externalities as subsidies. He said: 'all of the estimates given depend on politically charged calculations of carbon costs versus benefits, where the theorist plugs in assumptions to generate the result they want. The truth is that no one has a clue.'

How Britain became European

International New York Times 24th May 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed what the 2015 UK General Election has revealed about British politics and the upcoming discussions around the European referendum. Professor Bogdanor said: ‘It is a paradox that, as the world is becoming increasingly interconnected economically; it is also becoming more fragmented politically…In the referendum due to be held before the end of 2017, it is unlikely that the Conservatives will be able to preserve a united front.’

Palmyra: Islamic State locks down ancient city's museum

BBC News 23rd May 2015

Syrian officials have reported that Islamic State militants have locked Palmyra's museum and placed guards outside its doors, days after seizing the ancient city. Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, was quoted saying: 'The words written and arguments elucidated over the importance of saving cultural heritage sites are also a part of wider discussions and pressure to cobble together anything approaching a meaningful plan to intervene or otherwise halt the worst excesses of the violence in Syria.'

Should monkeys be granted human rights?

Telegraph 23rd May 2015

PhD candidate Sophia Ostler has written a piece on how the fate of Sandra, a 29 year-old orang-utan held in captivity in Buenos Aires Zoo, is to be decided in court this week. Commenting on animal rights, she wrote: 'Treating animals humanely and with respect should certainly be enshrined in the law. But broadening the scope of human rights to acknowledge some animals and not others will only dilute their significance to humans.'

'Little island with a big voice': Pride over Ireland's same-sex marriage vote

CNN 23rd May 2015

Ireland became the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage through a vote, and consequently became a worldwide trending topic on social media. A tweet by Dr Cian C Murphy, Dickson Poon School of Law, was included in the article.

The politics of naming

Telegraph (India) 22nd May 2015

The article looks at how India's neighboring countries feel about the Narendra Modi government increasing India's international profile and enhancing its global standing. The article mentions in King's in relation to how Indian studies are becoming part of Western academic interest and states: 'It is time India becomes a little more demonstrative in asserting its strategic and civilizational centrality.'

Rewrite the rules

Prospect 22nd May 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece calling for a new constitution to resolve the conflict and save the union. He wrote: 'The three main issues on the political agenda are constitutional ones.'

Morale in the armed forces

BBC Radio 5 Live 22nd May 2015

Dr Jonathan Fennell, Defence Studies, was interviewed on morale in the armed forces following the release of Armed Forces Continuous Attitude Survey 2015. He commented: 'It is quite interesting what they are measuring - it's satisfaction rather than a willingness to do what they have been asked to do.'

E-cigs aiding 2.6m to give up smoking

Daily Mirror 22nd May 2015

The number of e-cig users has grown by half a million from the previous year according to anti-smoking campaigners. The article quotes Dr Leonie Brose of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who says: "The proven harm of tobacco is getting less coverage than the much smaller and far less certain harm from electronic cigarettes".

Will Isil destroy the Palmyra ruins?

Telegraph 22nd May 2015

Joana Cook, War Studies, discusses whether Isil will destroy the ancient Palmyra ruins and what the consequences will be if they do. She wrote: 'Isil would do well to learn that such unnecessary destruction will only further foster hate from those it aims to control, reduce its legitimacy as a government, and unify an increasing number of external actors who may challenge the group by widening the stakes and the interests under threat. These ruins are an important and historic symbol for all Syrians, and the wider world, and will remain a unifying motivation for action against Isil.'

Britain's relationship with the EU

BBC 1 Breakfast 22nd May 2015

David Cameron will start negotiating his plans to start reforming Britain's relationship with the EU. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, commented on the reception David Cameron will get in terms of credibility. He said: 'I think the overwhelming emotion will be curiosity. I think the other heads of state and government will be curious to know what Mr Cameron plans to do and when he plans to do it.'

Is the US-UK's special relationship in decline?

BBC News 22nd May 2015

Opinion piece on how the relationship between the US and UK may be becoming increasingly strained, despite the co-operation in intelligence matters and military efforts against Islamic State. Professor David Ucko, War Studies, commented: 'The US has acted as if it's always available - 'We surge, we do this, we do that. It's far more pro-active.'

Testosterone rules for women athletes are unfair, researchers argue

Fox news 22nd May 2015

Elite women athletes are banned from competing in top-tier competitions if their testosterone levels are found to be too high. However two new studies have put in doubt the definition of ‘normal levels’, upon which the regulations are based. Professor Peter Sonksen, Emeritus Professor of Endocrinology, who authored a previous study, GH-2000, said: ‘The policy that exists today is grossly unfair…It's not making the sport any fairer; it's just disqualifying these poor individuals who happen to have this condition.’

Ticklish Issue

Deccan Herald 22nd May 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the recent approval by the European Union (EU) of a naval mission to stem the influx of migrants trying to reach Europe. ‘The economic slump and nationalist backlash in Europe have made immigration a hot political topic, so low-skilled migrants are often unwelcome. The EU is struggling to come to terms with the growing disenchantment with the political establishment’s handling of immigration and it is likely to shape the organisation’s response to a crisis of growing magnitude,’ he said.

Plagued by mozzies? Can't feel pain? You must be in love

Daily Mail 21st May 2015

In an article looking at the effects that love has upon people, the piece mentions how brain-imaging scans by scientists at King's revealed that when people in love are shown a picture of their beloved, it triggers the same pleasure centres in the brain as cocaine, leading to similar elation.

The history of India in 50 personalities

Spectator 21st May 2015

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, is focusing his new series Incarnations on India for Radio 4 on 50 great personalities who, he believes, have been crucial to the Indian story. He said: 'Biography has been under-used in the telling of Indian history. I chose individuals who interested me but also who could tell us something about their moment in time and how they are ‘incarnated today’.'

Thought for the week

Times Higher Education 21st May 2015

At the end of the article, it is mentioned that next week’s visiting lecturer in Times Higher Education's Built Environment series is from the Department of Architecture at King’s.

Dunkirk Spirit

BBC Radio 4 World Tonight 21st May 2015

It's the 75th anniversary of the evacuation of Allied troops from the French beaches of Dunkirk. After that, Dunkirk Spirit has become British rallying cry. Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, explained how what is in effect a retreat became a reason for celebration. He said: 'It was indeed a miracle of deliverance.'

Obituary: Professor Raymond Gosling

Times 20th May 2015

Professor Raymond Gosling, scientist, was born on July 15, 1926. He is best known for taking the first X-ray photograph in 1951 that revealed that DNA could crystallise and had a regular structure. Just over a year later, he also helped to take the photograph — known as Photo 51 — which allowed Watson and Crick to work out the double-helical structure of DNA. The piece reads: 'Raymond Gosling was the unassuming graduate student at the heart of one of the great scientific surprises of all time.' Professor Raymond Gosling was also remembered in a tribute on BBC Radio 4, Last Word.

Hospices: The wealth gap

Independent 20th May 2015

In a report published today on the state of palliative care, the Cicely Saunders Institute has found that while the proportion of people dying in specialist hospices in England doubled between 1993 and 2012, this still represents only 6 per cent of the population. Inequalities between rich and poor are also growing, with people in more affluent areas more likely to die in a hospice than those in deprived areas– a gap that has grown by 25 per cent since 1993.

Bullied children face heart risks

Guardian 20th May 2015

New research by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has found that children who are bullied at school are more likely to grow up to be obese, and are at greater risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease in later life. Professor Louise Arseneault from the IoPPN said: ‘Our research has already shown a link between childhood bullying and risk of mental health disorders in children, adolescents and adults, but this study is the first to widen the spectrum of adverse outcomes to include risks for cardiovascular disease at mid-life. Evidently, being bullied in childhood does get under your skin.’ Also reported by Telegraph (front page), Times, Daily Mail, Reuters, Sun, Daily Mirror, New York Times, Huffington Post, ITV News, Channel 5 News, BBC Radio London, LBC Radio, BBC Radio Five Live and Xinhua News Agency.

King's press release related to 'Bullied children face heart risks'

India and China: Charting a fresh course

DNA (India) 20th May 2015

Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece that discusses how the plain speaking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during his visit to China will be all that the trip will be remembered by. He wrote: 'For years, Indian political leaders have gone to China and said what the Chinese wanted to hear. Modi changed all that when he openly 'stressed the need for China to reconsider its approach on some of the issues that hold us back from realising full potential of our partnership' and 'suggested that China should take a strategic and long-term view of our relations'.'

50 years of appreciating China's achievements

Morning Star 20th May 2015

In an article that discusses The Society for Anglo-Chinese Understanding which was set up in 1965 to spread knowledge of China in Britain, an event held at King's on 30 May is mentioned. 'Challenging Britain’s Perceptions of China: 50 Years of Sacu' will take place on the Strand Campus between 10.30-17.00.

Obama, will it be Iran or the GCC?

Al Jazeera 20th May 2015

Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, has written an article on how Camp David might be a first step towards changing Gulf Cooperation Council perceptions of the US commitment in the Middle East. Discussing Obama's harsh criticism of the Gulf monarchies, he wrote: 'Obama's words only reinforced prevalent perceptions in the Gulf that the US is gradually disengaging from the region - something that has been fuelled by the perceived pivot to Asia and the strategy of 'leading from behind'. At the same time, the US engagement with Iran has done little to build confidence.' Dr Rickli was also interviewed on Radio Television Suisse (RTS) and TV5 Monde.

ISIS is trying to lure British recruits with cappuccinos

VICE News 20th May 2015

A British man who left the UK to fight in Syria has written a 46-page guide to to the Islamic State entitled A Brief Guide to the Islamic State 2015. The document promises to enlighten those wanting 'to know more about this new fledgling state and what life is really like under the Caliphate.' Dr Carool Kersten, Department of Theology & Religious Studies, commented on the guide. He said: 'The guide is clearly directed at the consumerism that also characterises the lifestyles of young urban Muslims. The author recognises food and drink as an integral part of the urban ‘comfort zone’ to the extent that what I had expected to be much more central to narrative—halal food—comes only as an afterthought.'

Professor Luiz Edson Fachin

Correio Braziliense 20th May 2015

Article on Visiting Professor Luiz Edson Fachin, the Dickson Poon School of Law, who needs the votes of 41 senators to take charge of the Brazilian Supreme Federal Court. In the 'Who is he?' section, the piece mentions Professor Fachin speaks English, Spanish, Italian and French fluently.

How we made an octopus-inspired surgical robot using coffee

Scientific American 20th May 2015

Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Department of Informatics, discusses how a group of scientists and engineers has attempted to work out how an animal that has no bones transforms its tentacles from a soft state to one stiff enough to catch and even kill prey in order to replicate the abilities of an octopus tentacle in a robotic surgical tool. Commenting on octopus-inspired robots, he wrote: 'They could be used for industrial inspection especially where the robot needs to squeeze through a narrow opening and then extend into an otherwise inaccessible or dangerous area. This idea is of particular interest to the nuclear energy industry, which is already employing rigid, snake-like robots for such tasks.'

Legion of foreign fighters battles for Islamic State

Huffington Post UK 20th May 2015

Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, Islamic State's leader, has appealed to Muslims throughout the world to move to lands under its control — to fight, but also to work and to marry. The piece mentions the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation which reported that 3,300 Western Europeans and 100 or so Americans have travelled to Syria and Iraq.

Is nicotine all bad?

Reuters 19th May 2015

Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the differences between smoking and nicotine, suggesting that: "We need to de-demonize nicotine". Smoking is the most effective way to deliver nicotine to the brain, but it is associated with harmful consequences and is the biggest preventable killer in the world. However, understanding that in fact there may be limited negative and perhaps even positive effects from the nicotine itself, may encourage individuals to use nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and successfully quit smoking. Also reported by Mail Online.

The US must ratify the Law of the Sea Treaty

New York Times 19th May 2015

Professor David Caron, Dickson Poon School of Law, has written a piece looking at how the US has been facing territorial questions for all oceans after the Second World War and discusses the ground rules necessary for navigating the realities of a new Arctic. Commenting on the Law of the Sea Treaty, Professor Caron wrote: 'The treaty would officially give U.S. fisherman priority over stocks adjacent to the American coast, and the U.S. Navy would continue to navigate the globe unimpeded. But the U.S., almost alone, has never ratified the treaty it sought and needed, despite the efforts of every President since, because the rule is so customary that it goes mostly unchallenged.'

Tonight: The Air We Breathe

ITV News 19th May 2015

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, will be appearing on ITV Tonight in a programme that investigates why levels of pollution are so high and what’s being done to protect the nation’s health from the air we breathe. Professor Kelly helped to find out what the levels of pollution were for four volunteers around the UK. Three volunteers along with presenter Fiona Foster each carried a personal air quality measuring device with them for a 48 hour period.

New mothers suffering postnatal depression shouldn't rule out medication

Daily Mail 19th May 2015

Emma Molyneaux of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has carried out research showing that the benefits of new mothers consumed by postnatal depression taking antidepressants are considerable, and should be considered as a treatment option. The study found that of 72 women with postnatal depression randomised to be given treatment with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors - a form of antidepressant - 54 per cent reported 'much improved' symptoms or a more than 50 per cent reduction in their symptoms. Miss Molyneaux comments: 'We would urge that treatment decisions during the postnatal period consider the potential benefits as well as risks of medication, as well as the risks of untreated depression for both mother and baby.'

William Shakespeare: Experts 'deeply unconvinced' by claims that the earliest portrait of the Bard has been discovered

Independent 19th May 2015

A botanist writing in Country Life has claimed that the earliest drawing of Shakespeare has been discovered in a celebrated Elizabethan book on plants. Dr Lucy Monro, English, told the BBC the picture was 'unlikely' to be the Bard, adding: 'The idea you would have the writer depicted from life in quite this way, would be pretty much unprecedented.' Also reported by Economic Times (India).

Why Isil's victory in Ramadi is so important

Telegraph 19th May 2015

Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, has written a piece looking at how Ramadi's size, location and symbolism mean Isil's victory matters and discusses how the complex Iraqi counter-offensive to retake the city could truly reshape the country. Discussing the significance of the capturing of Ramadi over the weekend, she wrote: 'The city’s fall highlighted the failure and weakness of the Iraqi military. While it is no secret that the army struggles to recruit into its ranks, particularly amongst the Sunnis, its poor organisation and coordination became glaringly apparent.'

Binge drinking

BBC Radio 4 19th May 2015

Interview at 04:40 with Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discussing the effects of alcohol consumption. Dr Marlow outlines the effects of different chemicals that occur in the brain when drinking alcohol, as well as theories of addiction, and the differences between men and women.

Out of business

Outlook (India) 18th May 2015

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, discusses the history of US-UK-India relations from 1965, and how since then non-involvement has become the US and UK's mantra. He wrote: 'The 1965 war may not have been a watershed conflict. It was unlike the more dramatic encounter in 1971 that led to the birth of a new country. Yet, for the large part, it seriously limited Anglo-American interest in a dispute that, as the CIA pointedly put it, is one best solved between the nations involved.'

Gu Tao: Inside and outside the forest

China.org.cn (China) 18th May 2015

Gu Tao's documentary 'The Last Moose of Aoluguya' (2013) opened the Fifth Chinese Visual Festival held at King's this year. The article discusses the life of the director and the inspiration behind the film.

Screening for mental illness at work

BBC News Online 18th May 2015

The deaths of 150 people aboard Germanwings flight 9525 was tragic enough, but the possibility that the co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane brought a new level of disbelief. There has been a huge focus on the psychiatric history of the pilot and calls for greater screening for psychiatric disorders at work. Dr Max Henderson of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses what screening is and the issues of screening for psychiatric disorders. He comments: "Psychiatric disorders can't really be "screened" for. There is no recognised "latent" phase. Moreover, psychiatric diagnoses are based largely on symptoms, so the concept of "symptom-free" depression, for example, is difficult to sustain"

Antibiotic resistance is a growing menace – we must act before it’s too late

Guardian 18th May 2015

The AMR review launched by David Cameron last year will suggest ways to revitalise the research and development pipeline to produce about 15 new licensed antibiotics every 10 years, after research have shown that the profligate use of antibiotics has led to bacteria developing resistance to the drugs. The image that accompanies the piece is a picture of students' hands at King's who used glow gel to highlight remaining bacteria after washing their hands.

Cheese and wine: Eating to stay slim and healthy

Mail Online 17th May 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, has written a piece on how the key to losing weight and staying healthy is to look after your gut, as stated in his new book The Diet Myth. Commenting on how so many people have been caught up in fad diets and dogmas, Professor Spector wrote: 'It turns out we have been ignoring what some scientists call the ‘forgotten organ’ of our bodies, one that has the power to restore our balance. It is called our gut microbiome and is an area within our lower gut weighing 4lb and containing 100 trillion microbes. We all possess a unique set of these microbes, which vastly outnumber our cells and genes, and their function is to digest our food and keep us alive and healthy.' Also reported by Daily Express.

Incarnations: The 50 men and women behind India's story

BBC News 17th May 2015

An epic new series on the men and women who made India has been unveiled on BBC Radio 4. Presented by Professor Sunil Khilnani, director of the India Institute, Incarnations: India in 50 Lives takes listeners on a journey from ancient India to the 21st Century through the life stories of 50 of India's major figures. Professor Khilnani told Radio Times: 'Buddha's solution to suffering lay in the individual mind. But he was also sketching a new form of society. He was a moral meritocrat, and to an extent a social one too.' Also reported by Indian Express.

Is Harry right to fight for return of National Service?

Sun 17th May 2015

Prince Harry has called for the return of national service in Britain, crediting a military career for helping to keep himself and the soldiers he commanded on the right track. Professor Richard Vinen, History, discussed when National Service was first brought in. He said: 'Those most likely to fail their medical were from tough backgrounds. The Army in the 1950s didn't think its role was discipline.'

MH17: British investigator says Russians did fire missile that destroyed passenger jet in new documentary

Daily Mirror 17th May 2015

In a new documentary, research associate Eliot Higgins said he almost has certain proof Flight MH17 was shot down by a missile from a Russian air base, after months analysing photos and video taken in the days before the Malaysia Airlines jet was downed over Ukraine in July 2014. He said: 'It very unlikely it was driven into rebel territory, the keys handed over, and the rebels told ‘there you go just press that button the launch a missile.'

Embryo engineering

BBC London 94.9 17th May 2015

Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, was interviewed on the genetic engineering of embryos, following scientists in China announcing they had successfully edited the genome of a human embryo. Commenting on what genetic engineering means, he said: 'We now have technology available that means you can correct mutations in genes. If some mutations are causing diseases, we have the ability to repair these mutations.'

We Are Many: The new movie teaching us lessons to learn from the 2003 Iraq war protests

Independent 16th May 2015

A new film 'We Are Many' looks back at the biggest protest in British history when more than one million people marched in London against the war in Iraq. Dr Eliza Filby, History, is mentioned in piece discussing how history has shown that there are three main ways of making an impact with a protest. She said: 'You can have huge numbers, as they did in 2003. You can have prominent people – that works. You’ve got to have lots of violence against property and destruction of property, because that breeds chaos.'

Ambassador to Brazil Alex Ellis speaks at King's

UOL (Brazil) 16th May 2015

At an event held by the Brazil Institute at King's, Ambassador to Brazil Alex Ellis discussed his experience of living in Brazil's capital Brasília, addressing the political and economic crisis the country is facing. He started the talk by asking 'Brazil, what happened?' before saying that eventually Brazil will once again become a safe country for investments and economic growth.

Preemies have 'fewer links in brain': study

Mumbai Mirror (India) 16th May 2015

A new study has found that premature birth can alter the wiring in key parts of a baby's brain. The discovery could help explain why being born too early increases the risk of neurodevelopmental problems ¬ including autism and attention deficit disorders, say researchers. Lead scientist Dr Hilary Toulmin, the Centre for the Developing Brain, said: The next stage of our work will be to understand how these findings relate to the learning, concentration and social difficulties ¬ which many of these children experience as they grow older.'

Can avocados cut the health risk of smog? Fruit's high levels of vitamin E may help to protect lungs from tiny particles

Daily Mail 15th May 2015

A new study from King’s College London and Nottingham University has found that higher levels of vitamin E may help protect the lungs from particulates which are tiny particles of smog. Particulate matter is one of the main air pollutants thought to be damaging to human health. Co-author Professor Frank Kelly, Head of the Environmental Research Group, said: 'These new findings are consistent with previous reports which observed lower levels of vitamin E in people with lung conditions such as asthma.' Also reported by Deccan Herald, Sun and Mumbai Mirror.

Is sweetener hidden in 6,000 products a danger to your health?

Mail Online 15th May 2015

The ingredient aspartame which is used in more than 6,000 products worldwide has sparked controversy across the world, and last month Pepsi announced that it was dropping the sweetener from diet drinks in the U.S. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Pepsi is under a lot of pressure to increase the popularity of sugar-free beverages in place of full-sugar ones. Commercially it seems to make sense to switch to a less controversial sweetener, providing it performs as well. But aspartame remains safe, and it is not the science that is driving the decision but consumer opinion.'

What does the summit between Barack Obama and Gulf leaders mean?

Telegraph 15th May 2015

Dr David B Roberts, Defence Studies, has written a piece that analyses why the Arab states in the Persian Gulf are increasingly perturbed by what they see as escalating US indifference to them and their region. Discussing the US’s refusal to stand by the ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in the face of Arab Spring protests which angered the Gulf states, he wrote: 'If America can break one multi-decade relationship, the Gulf states fear, perhaps America would, if protests erupted, break their own long relationship.'

How defining British values can help in the fight against terror and extremism

Telegraph 15th May 2015

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, War Studies, and Nicholas Kaderbhai, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comment on how without a true consensus on what it means to be British, extremists will continue to take advantage. Discussing the importance of the new counter-terrorism bill, they wrote: 'The intellectual background to this comes from an ongoing discussion in response to extremist groups who promote violent ideologies in an effort to recruit and mobilise British citizens. Thus, the question of what it means to be British - and the role the answers to this deliberation have in the fight against terrorism and extremism - has been placed, once again, at the centre of the debate.'

Terror threat to the UK

ITV Good Morning Britain 15th May 2015

Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, was interviewed on how the figures have risen for people in the UK being arrested for terrorism, with more than half of the arrests being related to Syria. She said: 'We are improving our counter-terror efforts as well, so this can be a positive story as well as a negative one.'

Academics from London awarded top history prize

Evening Standard 15th May 2015

Professor Richard Vinen, History, is one of two historians to be awarded the Wolfson History Prize at a ceremony at Claridge’s hotel. Professor Vinen won the award for his book National Service, which tells the story of Britons conscripted into the Army after the Second World War.

New drugs test can detect cocaine use from a simple fingerprint

Daily Mail 15th May 2015

Scientists from universities including King's have revealed that a new test can determine if a person has taken cocaine by analysing a single fingerprint, distinguishing between those who have ingested the class A drug, and those who have just touched it. The new test is hoped to lead to the introduction of portable drug tests for law enforcement agencies to use within the next decade. Also reported by Fox News.

Time to foster bilateral ties beyond Chinese shores

New Indian Express (India) 15th May 2015

Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece looking at prime minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Mongolia and South Korea this week. Commenting on the importance of these trips, he wrote: 'These visits are important in their own right and should not be sidelined in the din about the China visit. That Modi is making a point to visit Mongolia and South Korea after China is in itself significant as it is a signal that much as China is increasing its presence in South Asia and the Indian Ocean, India too can expand its profile in China’s periphery.'

Indian 'virtual university' on European model soon

Yahoo! News 15th May 2015

Four Indian universities will launch pilot open online courses by the beginning of next year to spearhead a major 'virtual university' concept funded by the European Union. They are working in collaboration with King's and the University of Bologna, Italy.

Opinion divided on outcome for heir to throne

Times 14th May 2015

Analysis of whether the 'spider letters' will damage Prince Charles' reputation. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, commented that Prince has the right to share his views: 'The Queen has the constitutional right to be consulted, to encourage and to warn. The heir to the throne does not have the right to be consulted, but he does, in my judgment, enjoy the right to encourage and to warn. The letters show him exercising that right.'

My dad made me eat McDonald's for 10 days. This is what happened

Telegraph 14th May 2015

Article by genetics student Tom Spector, son of Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, explaining why his father asked him to eat junk food for every meal and what the effects were on his body. He wrote: 'Straight after the experiment, I drove to the supermarket and got two big bags of salad. I ate them all. I was over the moon. And the test results were fascinating. I’d lost 1,400 bacterial species in my gut in just 10 days, which was extraordinary.'

Former MI6 chief Sir John Sawers joins BP board

Financial Times 14th May 2015

Sir John Sawers, former head of Britain’s secret intelligence service and Visiting Professor at King's, has joined BP as a non-executive director. BP are set to benefit from his extensive experience of the Middle East’s hotspots while a career diplomat, and his influential roles in formulating foreign policy. Also reported by Mail Online.

While the psychiatrists argue about antidepressants, I’ll keep taking them

The Guardian 14th May 2015

Journalist John Crace reflects on his experience of seconding Professor Allan Young of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at the latest Maudsley debates: Does the long-term use of psychiatric medication do more harm than good? Of Young's argument he said: "Young made what sounded to me like the reasoned response. Drugs are imperfect in all areas of medicine, but the science is improving and the data clearly shows that more people have benefited than have been harmed". Crace concludes from his experiences as a patient that: "Most mental health patients may be ill, but they aren’t stupid. Allow them to make their own informed choices... Nobody chooses to go on anti-depressants or other psychotropic drugs as a lifestyle choice. We do so because we are desperate. I had been in therapy for 10 years before my first depressive episode. I remain in therapy still. And I find it beneficial. But sometimes it’s not enough."

Terrorism detentions

BBC News 14th May 2015

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, was interviewed on the number of people detained for terrorism related offences across England, Wales and Scotland which has reached record levels. He said: 'I think that it's interesting that the figures are going up, but what is particularly interesting is the breakdown of the figures - significant numbers of very young people are appearing in these charge figures.'

Tonight: How to Get into a Good School

ITV Tonight 14th May 2015

According to an exclusive Tonight survey, parents would o cheat in large numbers to get their youngsters into the best state schools, with more than 40 per cent saying they had or would be willing to pretend to live in the catchment area. Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, said: 'I was also interested that almost half of parents believe that other parents are cheating the system in order to get their kids into a good school. How awful that almost half of parents think that we have a system that can be cheated and are anxious about bad practices that are clearly going on. This can't be socially healthy.'

Could wearing a Fitbit help manage schizophrenia?

Daily Mail 14th May 2015

Deteriorating sleep quality is one of the major hallmarks of a potential relapse event in schizophrenia patients, and now a new device that can objectively objectively measure sleep behaviour may help to prevent the relapse. The article refers to a study carried out by the University of Bonn and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which discovered that twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation can lead to conditions in healthy people similar to the symptoms of schizophrenia. This went beyond low concentration to a loss of contact with reality.

Kerry to confront China over island-building in South China Sea

USA Today 14th May 2015

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, discusses the impact the aggressive stance of the US over Chian's territorial claims in the South China Sea may have on US-China relations. He was quoted saying: 'The Chinese will not stand by. They're likely to deploy their own forces, both military and law enforcement. It's fair to assume it will get hotter around the area.' Also reported by Detroit Free Press.

Psychiatric drugs do more harm than good?

The Guardian 13th May 2015

The article discusses the key theme of the latest Maudsley Debate occurring at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN): Does the long term use of psychiatric medications cause more harm than good? The views expressed by Professor Peter Gøtzsche of the Nordic Cochrane Centre are countered by Allan Young, a professor of mood disorders at the IoPPN, and John Crace, a psychiatric patient and Guardian writer.
Also reported in the Telegraph, the Mirror and Press Association.

Embryo engineering a moral duty, says top scientist

BBC News 13th May 2015

Last month, a group in China announced it was the first to successfully edit the genome of a human embryo which sparked controversy across the globe, but Dr Tony Perry has told the BBC that advances in genetics posed a 'wonderful opportunity' for eliminating diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Professor Peter Braude, Women's Health, comments that screening for genetic diseases as part of IVF would be a better method of preventing disorders being passed down. He said: 'One does not manipulate the genes in any way, simply decide which of the embryos can be implanted into the woman safely in the knowledge they will not carry on that genetic disorder.'

UK at greater risk of terror attack because EU states ‘don’t trust each other’

Daily Express 13th May 2015

According to researchers, information which would help fight the threat of terrorism across Europe is being withheld by member states. The study, conducted by researchers at Anglia Ruskin University and King's, found member states were only knowledgable and concerned about their own country, rather than other members.

Is ISIS about to send women to die on suicide missions?

Daily Mail 13th May 2015

A document has been uncovered of an ISIS wedding certificate which stipulates that jihadi brides can carry out suicide missions without the husband's permission, and that the final decision over a bride's life lies with Islamic State's leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi. The piece also mentions that academics at King's have identified three British females as members of the group IS.

Is there any possible nuclear deal with Iran that would satisfy leaders of the Gulf states?

Telegraph 13th May 2015

Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, has written a piece looking at Iran's regional role and actions in the Syrian war and Yemen, and how the nuclear deal they want Iran to sign is one Tehran will never agree to. Discussing the nuclear deal in the eyes of Iran's neighbours, she wrote: 'At present, there is no acceptable nuclear deal with Iran that would satisfy the Gulf Arab states. The leaders of the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are nervous about Iran’s regional role. They see the nuclear agreement as an opportunity to rein in a rival regional power.'

Gulf leaders expected to seek tougher US line on Syria and Iran at Camp David Summit

Newsweek International 13th May 2015

Officials from Gulf states including Saudi Arabia travelled to Camp David in the US to demand a tougher line on president Bashar al-Assad's Syrian administration. Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, was quoted saying: 'They'll be pushing for ways to guarantee a rollback on Iran's intervention in Syria, which will be difficult because Iran is dead-set on its programme in Syria.'

Where do we go now?

Morning Star 12th May 2015

Professor Keith Ewing, Dickson Poon School of Law, has written a piece regarding the future vision of trade unions following last week's General Election result. Discussing the outcome for Labour, he wrote: 'Trade unions will now pay a heavy price for Labour’s defeat. Tory plans are set out clearly enough in their election manifesto, including the much-trumpeted proposals for yet more restrictions on strike ballots, most notably a requirement that strikes in certain sectors will need the support of 40 per cent of those eligible to vote, as well as a majority of those voting.'

Good morning, Miss Nightingale

Independent 12th May 2015

On International Nurses' Day, Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery, has said that mature students are valued for the experience they bring. She commented: 'Many come with skills and life experience and that serve them well in health care. For some, the course means financial hardship and they work part-time while studying.'

How can health and care integration help people living with dementia?

Guardian 12th May 2015

The Guardian is hosting a live discussion on Thursday 14 May between midday and 14.00 to discuss how integrated services can improve dementia care. Dr Mayumi Hayashi, Institute of Gerontology, will be on the panel.

Number of women freezing their eggs soars by 400 per cent in one year as careers are prioritised over motherhood

Daily Mail 12th May 2015

New figures have revealed that prioritising a career over motherhood has resulted in a huge rise in the number of women having their eggs frozen, with demand for the procedure having soared by 400 per cent in one year. Professor Susan Bewley, Women's Health, said: 'This is a profit-driven industry, which is fuelled by marketing and positive stories. But like most assisted reproductive technology, the reality is way behind the hype. Fertility clinics can be very in your face but there are certain facts about biology that can’t change.’

Seasons affect 'how genes and immune system work'

BBC News 12th May 2015

According to an international group of researchers, the seasons appear to have a profound effect on how human genes work. The scientists found genes involved with immunity were more active in cold months which whilst helping to combat viruses such as the flu, may rigger or worsen conditions, such as arthritis. Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: 'Another dimension that could be as important are our gut microbes, which also change between seasons and could be driving these changes because of seasonal changes in diet.' Professor Tim Hubbard, Genetics and Molecular Medicine, also commented that there might be an evolutionary advantage behind the seasonal changes the researchers found.

‘I’m coming out of the mental health closet for my daughter’

The Daily Telegraph 11th May 2015

Professor Thalia Eley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) expert comment on anxiety: "We all experience anxiety to one degree or another, but when it inhibits us from living our normal daily lives, that's when it becomes a problem that warrants attention in terms of treatment. Coming out the the 'mental health closet' is important because it can empower you to do something about it and receive medical help".

Headaches? Tired all the time? You may need to drink more water

Daily Mail 11th May 2015

The article looks at how dehydration is a growing problem in Britain, with emergency hospital admissions for dehydration rising by 57 per cent over the past decade. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said busy lifestyles may be partly to blame for people not drinking enough. He was quoted saying: 'Traditionally, people would stop for a tea break mid-morning and have a proper lunch hour when they topped up their fluid levels, but this has been eroded.' Professor Sanders was also interviewed for a podcast by Nature.

Shortsightedness on the rise across Europe, say researchers

Guardian 11th May 2015

According to research carried out by King's, the number of people suffering from shortsightedness, also known as myopia, is increasing across Europe, with a study finding the problem to be nearly twice as common in those aged between 25 and 29 as from 55 to 59. The lead author, Katie Williams, Ophthalmology, said: 'We knew myopia was becoming more common in certain parts of the world – almost eight in 10 young people are affected in urban east Asia – but it is very interesting to find that the same pattern is being seen here in Europe.' Also reported by Press Association, Daily Mirror, Daily Mail and Independent.

How important is the battle for Iraq's Baiji oil refinery?

BBC News 11th May 2015

Jill S Russell, War Studies, has written a piece discussing the importance of Iraq's largest oil refinery, Baiji, for Iraqi government forces and Shia militia against Islamic State. She wrote: 'To the victor of Baiji go the spoils, according to the current narrative of the conflict in Iraq, but this conclusion is questionable given the effort required to take it combined with the equivocal gains.'

Jessica Ennis-Hill returns to action but despite feeling 'rusty' she's just happy to be back

Daily Telegraph 10th May 2015

The article mentions King's student Dina Asher-Smith started the outdoor season with a win over the double European sprint champion Dafne Schippers in the 150m. Dina led from the outset and won the race in 16.82sec. Also reported by Observer, Sunday Telegraph and Guardian.

Achingly hip

Mail on Sunday 10th May 2015

Senior honorary clinical lecturer Zameer Shah has written a piece answering a series of questions on hip pain and how to treat it. Discussing the causes of hip pain, he wrote: 'The vast majority of hip pain is caused by osteoarthritis, which is responsible for nine out of ten hip replacements. The condition causes cartilage – the spongy tissue that cushions joints – to deteriorate so the bones rub together, causing pain and reduced movement.'

Fast food kills bugs that keep you thin

Sunday Times 10th May 2015

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, has found that diets built around fast food make people fat not just through excess calories but by killing off the gut bacteria that help people burn off their excess energy. These findings are published in Professor Spector's book 'The Diet Myth' which is out this week, and which investigates the links between gut bacteria and health. Discussing the importance of microbes, he said: 'Microbes are not only essential to how we digest food; they control the calories we absorb and provide vital enzymes and vitamins.' Also reported by Times, Press Association, Metro, Daily Express, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Sun, BBC Radio 4 Today and BBC London 94.9 Breakfast.

Human ‘guinea pig’

Times 10th May 2015

Elizabeth Manners, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, has written to the Times about how animal research can help cure genetic diseases: 'Animal research has made possible a clearer understanding, accurate diagnosis, and ameliorative or curative treatment for millions of families who were previously left without any hope or help.'

Pollutionwatch: A deadline missed, with deadly consequences

Guardian 10th May 2015

Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, has written a piece on how the government has missed the deadline of 2010 to meet European Limits for nitrogen dioxide. Commenting on how the happened, he wrote: 'Over the last 15 years a huge growth in the proportion of diesel vehicles on our roads has compounded the problem. Today, the locations with greatest nitrogen dioxide are close to major roads in urban centres, especially in locations that are dominated by diesel traffic, including the buses, taxis and delivery vehicles that make our cities work.'

Fruit snacking is a rotten idea for your teeth, warn dentists

Times 9th May 2015

Dentists have warned that snacking on fruit between meals is fast emerging as one of the biggest sources of tooth problems as teeth are subjected to near-continual erosion. Professor David Bartlett, Dental Institute, said: 'It’s not what you eat, it's how you eat it. It’s all about habits and frequency. People snack on fruit all day because they’re told that fruit’s good for you, but what you’ve got to do is modify the intake and keep it to meal times.' Also reported by Sun and Mail Online.

Plea for enforced ceasefire in Yemen

Times 9th May 2015

Professor Tony Allan, Geography, has co-signed a letter to the Times which discusses how the extreme fuel shortage caused by the fighting in Yemen is hampering the delivery of food and medicine to the population. The letter states: 'Fuel is essential to pump drinking water to Yemen’s towns and villages, to allow industries to operate and pay their workforces, to drive the irrigation pumps on which most Yemeni agriculture critically depends, to take produce to market and to power the fishing boats operating all along its long coastline.'

Not breathing easy

Economist 8th May 2015

On April 29 the Supreme Court ordered the next government to come up with a plan by the end of the year to reduce the amount of nitrogen dioxide in the UK. Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, is mentioned in the piece for having said that yhe health effects of NO2 have not yet been calculated for Britain, but are thought to be as potentially damaging as fine man-made particulate matter.

University modern language courses easier to get on than five years ago

Guardian 8th May 2015

New figures suggest that a student’s chances of getting into a leading university to study languages have increased in the past five years, principally due to a plummet in applications and lack of interest in the subject. The article mentions that in 2010 there were 1,165 applications and 150 acceptances, and in 2014 there were 575 applications and 125 acceptances.

Summer school on cancer to begin on May 11

Times of India 8th May 2015

Specialists from King’s College London will travel to the Tata Memorial Hospital in India to teach in an oncology summer school for Indian medical students. For 10 days, fifty students will learn from specialists in the hospital. India currently has approximately 1,500 trained oncologists, but there is generally considered to be a shortage countrywide. Also reported in the Hindustan Times

Pop tribes

BBC Radio 4 Today 7th May 2015

Music allegiances used to simple and defined into categories, but this week Liam Gallagher called Blur's new release his song of the year. Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discussed whether things are changing in popular culture. She said: 'I think the internet and the ready availability of all popular culture from the past 60 years certainly has made a difference. We live in a perpetual present in that sense.'

Commercial courts can assist in arbitration system

Financial Times 7th May 2015

Professor Jan Dalhuisen, Dickson Poon School of Law, has written in to the Financial Times regarding the commercial courts. He wrote: 'In matters that affect the public interest, private dispute resolution feels counter-intuitive and there is a natural suspicion particularly acute in foreign investments. It is not helped by the fact that this arbitration practice is often run like a business that may attract large fees.'

Experts on election rules to prevent hung Parliament hiccups

Times Higher Education 7th May 2015

In a piece on today's election, academics working with the media and government discuss current misconceptions on hung Parliaments. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History, will be a guest during ITV’s election night coverage. He was quoted saying: 'I think the issue of electoral reform, proportional representation, will come on to the agenda after the election.'

OECD’s Ahelo project could transform university hierarchy

Times Higher Education 7th May 2015

The UK must decide by 31 May whether to take the next step with The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (Ahelo) to measure university teaching quality. The project would offer an opportunity for East Asian universities to improve their standing, but possibly at the expense of the Western elite. Professor Alison Wolf, Department of Management, said that Ahelo is 'unrealistic' and 'will not provide governments with any useful information.'

What can Britain learn from Israel's troubled coalition-building?

Telegraph 7th May 2015

Rob Pinfold, War Studies, discusses what British party leaders could learn from Israel, following news that Benjamin Netanyahu has formed a government with a 'wafer-thin' majority. Commenting on the UK, he wrote: 'The British government looks as though it could become as fragmented as its Israeli equivalent. Final polls in the UK suggest that no party will gain a decisive majority in today’s general election and there could be days of frenzied negotiations between the parties as they try to form a coalition government.'

Viewpoint: How far is Saudi-Iranian rivalry fuelling Yemen war?

BBC News 7th May 2015

Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, has written a piece for the BBC discussing how Saudi Arabia projected the fighting in Yemen as a proxy war with Iran, deliberately or otherwise. He commented: 'the sense that the Gulf Arab states, led by Saudi Arabia, are simply winging their policy in Yemen is inescapable. In lieu of anything approaching a cogent, strategic plan, the short-termist resort of bombing to win does not inspire hope for the near future.'

Inexcusable sexism calls for action

Times Higher Education 7th May 2015

Dr Christine Cheng, War Studies, has written in in response to the 'sexist nature of the peer review comments' on Fiona Ingleby and Megan Head’s Plos One journal submission on gender inequality in the life sciences. She writes: 'As a female academic, I personally found some of the sexist comments (such as only men have the personality necessary to make it to the top jobs in science) so outlandish that it was difficult to take them seriously. Surely no credible scientist could honestly believe that it is physical stamina that explains men’s publication advantage?'

What happens next in a hung UK parliament

Financial Times 6th May 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece looking at how the rules work if no party wins a majority. Discussing the election's outcome, he wrote: 'Perhaps the multi-party system — five parties in England, six in Scotland and Wales — is not an aberration but a permanent feature of the landscape, reflecting a fundamental change in our political culture.'

Three in every four British men will be obese by 2030, says World Health Organisation

Independent 6th May 2015

According to new predictions from the World Health Organisation, three in every four men and two in every three women in the UK will be overweight by 2030. These figures appear to counter more positive figures from Kings that appeared to show levels of obesity among young children in England beginning to 'level off'.

Dr Andrew Blick on The Paul O'Grady Show

ITV The Paul O'Grady Show 6th May 2015

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, appeared on The Paul O'Grady Show on 'Break Time', answering school children's questions on the election. Responding to a question on why the parties are the colours that they are, Dr Blick commented: 'Once they used to pick a colour because it was to do with something that they stood for but now I don't think anybody can remember why. It's a bit like branding with football teams - you've got to have different colours out there so you know who's who on the pitch and it's like that in politics.'

How a glass of red wine a day could keep diabetics' hearts healthy

Daily Mail 6th May 2015

US and Israeli researchers have tracked the health of 224 diabetics over two years and found wine drinkers experienced an increase in their ‘good’ cholesterol. However Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said the link between higher HDL cholesterol and improved heart health was not clear-cut: 'In my experience, any health claims made for red wine need to be regarded with a jaundiced eye.'

Low breastfeeding rates help fuel epidemic of child obesity

Telegraph 6th May 2015

Low breastfeeding rates are fuelling the epidemic of childhood obesity, health experts have warned, as new figures show Britain has one of the worst rates in Europe. Another study, which is also being presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Prague, found that children as young as six are suffering dissatisfaction with their bodies. However previous research by Kings has suggested that the trends of childhood obesity may be balancing out.

Jihadist who left Britain to join ISIS in Syria was responsible for the slick footage showing Jordanian airman being burned alive in a cage, says prominent Islamist

Daily Mail 6th May 2015

Portuguese ISIS jihadi Fabio Pocas has been identified as the depraved ISIS militant who filmed the murder of a Jordanian pilot. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, commented on the videos produced by ISIS: 'ISIS shows innovation in finding new means of psychological warfare or terrorism. The helplessness of the victim, the viciousness and thought with which the fire was arranged make the video unwatchable.'

What do economists think of the coalition’s economic record?

Buzzfeed 6th May 2015

Professor Amrita Dhillon and Professor Shaun Hargreaves Heap, Political Economy, have been quoted in an article on the government's economic performance. Professor Dhillon said: 'It would have been better if they had been honest about the mistakes that they made with the austerity policy, especially as it cut strategic investment in the public sector. But overall, you have to be happy with a government that changes policy when the circumstances change.' Professor Hargreaves Heap added: 'Unlike members of the eurozone, the UK controls its own money supply, and so it was never in the same danger as Greece.'

Too busy to be sick?

Nursing Standard 6th May 2015

Almost half of health workers have postponed visiting a doctor because they are unable to take time off, a survey has found. Nurses were among the 81 per cent of health workers who go to work feeling too unwell to do their job. Large multi-site trusts make it hard for staff to attend occupational health appointments, according to Jill Maben, the National Nursing Research Unit.

Cameron has championed India’s interests like few British PMs

NDTV 6th May 2015

In advance of the British 2015 General Election, Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the inclusion of policy related to India in the party manifestos. Dr Pant said: ‘David Cameron has championed Indian interests like few British Prime Ministers in recent years. A Conservative-led government will be good for India. But the rise of India as an economic power is transforming British attitudes…even a Labour Party government…won’t be in a position to ignore Delhi.’

Nuclear smugglers abusing Alibaba listings challenge Iran deal

Bloomberg 6th May 2015

As the United Nations (UN) sanctions to contain nuclear proliferation against Iran are eased, world powers may have to use online marketplaces to ensure long term effectiveness. Companies such as Ebay and Alibaba may be enlisted to ensure moderation of supply and demand of technology and products that could be used to develop weapons. Ian J. Stewart, War Studies, said: ‘If Iran continues to buy goods illicitly in defiance of UN resolutions, the whole agreement would be undermined.’

South Asian political tango

DNA India 6th May 2015

Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, provides an analysis on the China-Pakistan bilateral relationship that has developed in recent years. Dr Pant said: ‘For a relationship that has been described as “higher than the Himalayas, deeper than the Indian Ocean and sweeter than honey,” there has been little to show.’

Why menopause isn’t the sex killer you thought it was

Time 6th May 2015

Research by King’s College London has revealed that menopause has less of an impact on sexual issues, such as sex drive and problems with sexual function, than previously thought. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, who led the research, said: ‘We were surprised by the results a little bit. They suggest that menopause has been exaggerated as an excuse for everything.’ Also reported in the Deccan Herald

Electricity could help relieve a dry mouth

Daily Mail 5th May 2015

A jolt of electricity may be a new way to tackle dry mouth with electricity being delivered via a flat pad placed on the jaw which stimulates the saliva glands beneath the skin and boosts the amount of fluid produced. Commenting on the findings, Professor David Bartlett, Dental Institute, said: 'It is an interesting concept, but this is a small study and more work is needed. We also need to know how long the stimulation would need to be applied and how practical it is.'

Eric Abidal opens up on his battle with cancer

Daily Mail 5th May 2015

Eric Abidal, who represented Barcelona from 2007 to 2013, has spoken out about his battle with cancer. The piece mentions that he has just launched the Eric Abidal Foundation which has established a link with King's.

How big a threat are Isil-inspired terror attacks to the US and western Europe?

Telegraph 5th May 2015

Jill Russell, War Studies, has written an article discussing how lone wolf attacks such as those in Texas, Boston and Paris present relatively little threat in their own right, but have the potential to drive a damaging wedge between authorities and minority communities. Commenting on how to combat Isil's terror attacks, she wrote: 'In addition to every bit of fine, proactive counter-terror tactic and policy, the single best weapon against Isil and its immediate and long-term threats within Western societies is the strength of relations between the relevant communities and individuals and the authorities.'

Online info about braces can be improved

Reuters UK 5th May 2015

According to a new study from the Netherlands, internet information about orthodontic braces varies in quality and may not be entirely accurate. Researchers evaluated 62 websites for accessibility, usability, reliability, readability and completeness of information. Dr Martyn Cobourne, Dental Institute, warned that on the internet 'medical information is uncensored, not peer reviewed and can often be plain wrong.'

UK youth activism

BBC Radio 1 Stories 5th May 2015

In the run up to the election, Tina Daheley follows five of the UK's leading youth activists as they campaign for their causes in the run-up to polling day. One King's student, Melanie, is working on Amnesty International's My Body My Rights campaign, which focuses on the reproductive and sexual rights of women.

The 2015 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research is awarded to Sir Paul Nurse, a geneticist and cell biologist and President of The Royal Society of London

Bloomberg 5th May 2015

The President of the Royal Society and Director of the Francis Crick Institute, Sir Paul Nurse, has won a prize in Health Research. The article mentions that the Francis Crick Institute is a consortium of six of the UK’s ‘most successful scientific and academic organisations’, including King’s College London.

Hip hop the real musical revolution as Beatles and Stones pronounced derivative

Newsweek 5th May 2015

Research conducted at King’s College London and Queen Mary University tracked musical evolution of 17,000 songs between 1960 and 2010. They concluded that it was the emergence of hip-hop and rap in the nineties that caused the biggest revolutionary shift in the modern history of pop music, rather than the explosion of rock music in the sixties.

Cyber warfare

BBC World Service 5th May 2015

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, commented on the debate about cyber warfare and his book ‘Cyber war will not take place.’ Discussing the nuances of the attacks widely considered ‘cyber’ he says: ‘We should talk about the attacks that actually happen…These are non-violent attacks and yet they have a huge effect.’

Tam Dalyell: Unelected Sturgeon has no right to do post-election deals

Times 4th May 2015

Former Labour MP for West Lothian Tam Dalyell has challenged the right of Nicola Sturgeon to negotiate on behalf of her party after the election, arguing that her intention to take the lead in deals made in the event of a hung parliament is unprecedented in the past century. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History, agreed, saying: 'You can appoint who you like to negotiate. I doubt if the SNP would be bound by any rules.' Professor Bogdanor was also quoted in the Guardian and Financial Times, and interviewed on BBC News.

Brain scans of premature babies reveal changes that may raise risk of autism

Guardian 4th May 2015

Researchers at King’s have found from brain scans of children who were born prematurely that there are differences in the connectivity of key regions that may play a role in developmental disorders. The findings may help doctors understand why preterm children are so often affected, and help them to work out how best to care for them. Dr Hilary Toulmin, Imaging Sciences & Biomedical Engineering, commented: 'In the future, it will help us to test whether changes in care, or different medications during the preterm period improve the outcome of these children. It is important to remember that the effects of prematurity persist into adulthood.' Also reported by Daily Mirror, Huffington Post, Press Association and Daily Mail.

The hell of having a hoarder for a husband

Daily Mail 4th May 2015

In an article discussing the difficulties of having a husband with a hoarding habit, it is noted that a a 2009 study of 5,000 twins at King’s showed hoarding can be genetically influenced.

In British comedy, sometimes the joke's on you

Huffington Post 4th May 2015

A blog post describing the author’s experience of comedy shows in London, as an American on a year abroad in the capital. King’s College London undergraduate student, Vanessa Matthews, is quoted in the blog, describing how she ‘always had an obsession with UK culture…and when she joined a newly formed improvisation group at her university, she felt she had finally tapped into the culture.’

What if no one wins in Britain?

Politico 4th May 2015

The British General Election on 7 May is likely not to produce one party with a majority. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed the ‘rules’ that underpin British politics. He said: ‘There is a real question of the rules being fit for purpose in our modern era. We have conventions and understandings. These are rules that are politically binding, not legally binding.’

Economic Outlook: It’s like 2010 — but with a much starker choice

Sunday Times 3rd May 2015

Opinion piece on how this election differs from any the UK has seen previously. The article mentions a speech at King's Strand Group by Sir Dave Ramsden who said that the Government Economic Service (GES), which employs nearly 1,500 economists, came into being as a result of a policy failure.

Obama weighs up Saudi’s mystery new kid in town

Sunday Times 3rd May 2015

Article on how the international community will be looking at the future king of Saudi Arabia, Prince Mohammed bin Salman, at the Gulf leaders at Camp David next weekend hosted by President Barack Obama. Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, was quoted on the relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia. He said: 'Both sides are looking for a reset. Then comes MbS — an unknown quantity and a future king. So there will be tremendous curiosity.'

We've been taken for a ride by diesel

Telegraph 3rd May 2015

Last week, the Government was ordered by the Supreme Court to address the issue of diesel and the pollution it causes. Martin Withers, Professor of Air Quality Research, commented that the problem is that regulators in the UK solely concentrate on carbon emissions. He said: 'In California there is a 'smog index', so you get an overall measure of a vehicle's environmental impact. Here we only publicise CO2.'

'Hollywood' therapy eases agony of MS

Daily Mail 3rd May 2015

'Mindfulness has great potential for reducing stress in progressive MS' comments Professor Rona Moss Morris of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), after a recent study which followed 40 patients experiencing the most progressive forms of the neurological condition. Regular meditation sessions delivered by skype, and lasting up to half an hour, reduced distress scores significantly.

In Algeria, entrepreneurs hope falling oil prices will spur innovation

New York Times 3rd May 2015

Algeria is facing an economic crisis following a serious drop in oil prices. However, entrepreneurs such as Toufik Lerari and Marhoun Rougab believe that this will finally prompt economic reform in the country. Mr Rougab is mentioned as an alumni of King’s College London.

Tragedy highlights the political disaster experienced by Nepalese

Folha (Brazil) 3rd May 2015

The recent earthquake in Nepal, which has caused approximately 6,600 deaths, highlights serious political and economic problems within the country. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The state in Nepal, in its different forms, has failed to win people’s trust. Moreover the government’s capacity is limited. With a disaster of this magnitude, there is no ability for efficient state intervention.’

A who's who guide to the team that will be holding Kate's hand for baby number two... aside from William, of course!

Daily Mail 2nd May 2015

The piece looks at who will be by Kate's side during the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's second child. A member of her household staff, Natasha Archer, who is Kate's PA, is mentioned as having been a former student of Hispanic Studies at King’s. Also reported by Telegraph.

Munchausen syndrome: Why bloggers like cancer fraud Belle Gibson fake sickness online

The Independent 1st May 2015

"In a world of global sympathy where you can suddenly have 20 million hits on youtube, it’s your one chance to be a celebrity – far beyond what you’d ever expected", comments Professor Simon Wesseley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) in an interview on Munchausen syndrome. In this condition, an individual feigns a "sick role" or tragic situation in order to reap benefits such as financial rewards, compassion and excuse from responsibilities. The possible advantages are now far greater in the internet age where a wider audience can be reached and the ability to be seen as a victim is amplified. He adds that the individual is often not aware that they have the disorder which can build up slowly over time.

The thick of IT

Metro 1st May 2015

The article looks at how the 2015 election marks the biggest digital battle between election candidates and political parties in UK history, but how UK politicians actually have surprisingly lower followings on social media than their political counterparts in other countries. Dr Paolo Gerbaudo, Digital Humanities, commented that social media matters given the evolution since the last election, but added: 'Don't buy into what the marketing men and women are telling you. This election campaign has not been a demonstration of the power of social media.'

India must regain lost clout

Deccan Herald 1st May 2015

Afghan President, Ashraf Ghani, has met with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the significance of the visit: ‘Ghani’s visit to India has been an important opportunity for India to underline the role it will play in the unfolding strategic dynamic in the region. The Modi government has to make it clear that unlike its predecessor, it takes its responsibilities as a regional power seriously.’

Right between your ears

Psychologist 1st May 2015

Neuroscientist Dr Kris De Meyer of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and filmmaker Sheila Marshall are putting the finishing touches to Right Between Your Ears, a documentary about how we can become convinced that we are right, even when we are completely wrong.

Maternity care experiences of women abused in childhood

BBC Radio 4 Woman's Hour 30th April 2015

Dr Elsa Montgomery, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery, who has just completed her PhD on the maternity care experiences of women who were abused during childhood, discussed how she has talked to female survivors about their experiences of ante-natal care and childbirth. She said: 'My feeling now having conducted my research is that we should make it absolutely obvious that this is a subject that is ok to talk about but I don't think it's helpful to ask the question outright. It requires a great deal of trust for a woman to disclose abuse, so we need to let them be aware that, if they feel they can trust the staff around them, they can disclose. But equally we should ensure that we provide care that doesn't require disclosure.'

Why a hard day at the office may beat dementia

Daily Mail 30th April 2015

Those with a demanding occupation had half the rate of decline in memory and thinking capacity in later life than those in less challenging work, finds a study which followed 1,054 people aged over 75 in an eight-year period. The article refers to research conducted by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that a drug used to treat diabetes reversed memory loss in mice.

Saudi Arabia's King Salman announces major cabinet reshuffle and new heirs to throne

Independent 30th April 2015

Saudi Arabia’s new king has named his nephew as the country’s new crown prince, demoting his brother from the role, as part of the country’s biggest cabinet reshuffle in years. Dr Carool Kersten, Department of Theology & Religious Studies, was quoted saying this shift marks a 'radical move'.

Grant winners – 30 April 2015

Times Higher Education 30th April 2015

Jakub Radoszewski, Department of Informatics, has been awarded a Newton International Fellowship for his work on software and algorithms for manipulating 'next generation sequencing' data. These fellowships are given to non-UK early career postdoctoral researchers in the humanities, engineering and natural and social sciences to allow them to carry out research at UK institutions. The awards offer financial support in the region of £100,000 for a two-year placement.

Cutting out one fizzy drink a day slashes diabetes risk by 25 per cent

Daily Mail 30th April 2015

Research has shown that cutting fizzy drinks and hot chocolate and opting for drinking water and unsweetened tea could reduce your risk of developing diabetes by a quarter. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said drinks tended to reveal a lot about lifestyle. He commented: ‘Soft drinks are associated with fast food outlets compared to water, tea and fruit juice – which are associated with a healthy lifestyle.’ Also reported by Sun.

Sons of Hillary and Norgay took refuge in same village by chance during Nepal earthquake

Telegraph 30th April 2015

The sons of the first climbers to reach the summit of Mount Everest, Jamling Tenzing Norgay and Peter Hillary, took refuge by chance in the same tiny Himalayan village when the Nepal earthquake struck. The article mentions that Peter Hillary had been leading a group of 11 fellow former King's College London classmates.

Saying no to a friend

Indian Express 30th April 2015

Professor Christophe Jaffrelot, India Institute, considers the implications of the Pakistani refusal to help Saudi Arabia in Yemen. He said of the recent rebuff: ‘This decision is the result of a series of circumstances. First, the Pakistani army is conducting a military operation in North Waziristan. To open another front would have been a dangerous distraction. Second, taking Saudi Arabia’s side could have alienated Iran at a time when Islamabad wants to engage Tehran in talks about a post-Nato Afghanistan.’

Small is beautiful. The democratic advantages of smaller states

Huffington Post 30th April 2015

Wolf von Laer, Political Economy, discusses the benefits of being a smaller democratic state. He said: ‘The complexities of the world we live in might be better handled by smaller institutions than by larger one, due to their responsiveness, their agility, and the increased potential for experimentation.’

Oxbridge rivals world’s best in subject ranking

Times 29th April 2015

Despite mounting competition from well-funded universities in Asia, Britain’s top universities are continuing to dominate many of the main academic disciplines across the globe. The article mentions that the UK's strength remains in arts and humanities, with 17 universities ranked in the top 30 for these subjects, including King’s.

Artist decks warship crew in gaudy masks

Times 29th April 2015

Follow criticism from historians, The Imperial War Museum has defended its decision to allow an artist to dress up its mannequins on HMS Belfast in carnival masks. Dr Tim Benbow, Defence Studies, said: 'I am stunned that HMS Belfast let it go ahead and cannot think that any supposedly serious museum would allow it – how about asking a museum of slavery or of women’s history if they would allow someone to put silly costumes on their models. There might be a place for this sort of tosh but a historical warship is not it.' Also reported by Evening Standard.

Alcohol consumption and weight loss

BBC Radio Tees 29th April 2015

Interview at 13.27 with Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, where she discusses how weight-gain is linked to drinking and recent recommendations to label alcoholic drinks with caloric content.

What are the prospects for progress in nuclear disarmament

Telegraph 29th April 2015

Dr Hassan Elbahtimy and Dr Matthew Moran, War Studies, has written a piece about how progress is being made for nuclear disarmament, even though enthusiasm may have waned. They wrote: 'Ultimately, while the current geopolitical climate has undermined the political momentum that disarmament has gathered in recent years, this should not detract from the expanding research and development agenda in the field.'

Limits on air pollution

BBC Radio 5 Live 29th April 2015

The Supreme Court has ruled that the government should speed up efforts to limit certain types of air pollution. Client Earth brought up the case after air quality records continued to break EU standards for Nitrogen Dioxide. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, said: 'We have managed to have clean up the exhaust that comes from diesel vehicles as well as we planned. You would hope that policy would be reactive.' Also reported by BBC London Drivetime.

We are Margaret Thatcher's children: meet the north Londoners keeping the Iron Lady’s legacy alive in her old constituency

Evening Standard 29th April 2015

Piece looking at how the legacy of Finchley and Golders Green's former MP Margaret Thatcher is still in place. Prem Modgil, a retired educational psychologist and head of the Hindu Cultural Society, was interviewed on her voting preferences. She said: 'My son trained as a dentist and is now a lecturer on artificial intelligence at King’s College London and my daughter is a barrister. Thanks to the Conservatives, Finchley has excellent schools, very low crime rate and on the whole the services offered are second to none.'

WWII drama Home Fires

BBC Radio 4 Front Row 29th April 2015

Home Fires is a new ITV drama about a group of women in a Cheshire village on the brink of World War II. Following the role the Women's Institute played in war time, it stars Samantha Bond and Francesca Annis. Dr Lara Feigel, English, said: 'I think I really appreciate the move towards women's stories over the last few years. I think's it's great to have a move here to older women as heroines.'

Civil servants should either perform or perish

New Indian Express 29th April 2015

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed a number of civil servants on Civil Services Day, stressing the importance of an energetic bureaucracy for governing India. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commented on the importance of the speech: ‘The Prime Minister’s remarks were significant in the light of the government’s bold moves in recent months in shuffling the ossified bureaucracy like never before.’

Other member states want the UK in the EU

Bloomberg 29th April 2015

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, considered whether the election has had an impact on the relationship between the UK and the EU. Professor Menon said: ‘There’s slight trepidation. All of the EU states…want the UK to remain within the EU. But all of them equally have made it quite clear that they won’t just give in to anything we ask for.’

It's not just women who get hot flushes

Daily Mail 28th April 2015

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) reduces symptoms of hot flushes by 40 per cent, and their frequency by 36 per cent finds a study by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Professor Myra Hunter conducted a trial which provided CBT to 68 prostrate cancer patients experiencing hot flushes from hormone therapy, which proved successful in reducing the effects of the treatment. Professor Hunter comments: 'Beliefs about hot flushes can exacerbate symptoms', and that replacing negative thoughts about them with more positive ones can result in less of an impact.

King's press release related to 'It's not just women who get hot flushes'

Anxiety is catching and can be passed on to children

Daily Mail 28th April 2015

Professor Thalia Eley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has carried out a landmark study demonstrating that anxiety can be passed on to children through parent behaviour over and above genetic factors. She notes that: ‘While a natural tendency when your child is anxious is to try to protect them, it can be more helpful to support them in taking small age-appropriate risks. This will teach them that the world is generally a safe place and they can manage situations that initially seem stressful, developing their sense of mastery and in turn promoting resilience.' Also reported in The Times.

King's press release related to 'Anxiety is catching and can be passed on to children'

'Bribes' to get healthy only work for three months

Daily Telegraph 28th April 2015

A study between King's and Cambridge University has found that bribing people to live healthily only works for three months before they fall off the wagon. The researchers examined 34 international studies in which financial incentives were offered as a reward for healthy living. Dr Eleni Mantzari, from the Centre for the Study of Incentives in Health, said: 'Our study is the first systematic review to provide an overall estimate of the impact of financial incentives across habitual health-related behaviours and to focus explicitly on effects after the incentives stop.' Also reported by Times and Daily Star.

Nepal earthquake: How India and China vie for influence

BBC News 28th April 2015

Opinion piece on how the alacrity with which India and China have reacted to the massive earthquake in Nepal again demonstrates how the two Asian giants continue to vie for influence. Dr Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: 'Nepal is central to India. Nepal has a special place in Indian thinking. It cannot be compared to China. India's response to the earthquake would have been strong and one of a kind, anyway.'

The King's warning: expert says George VI should be anti-smoking image

Guardian 28th April 2015

Speaking to the Royal College of Surgeons on Tuesday, Professor Harold Ellis, Department of Anatomy, has suggested that images of the Queen’s father, George VI, should appear on cigarette packets as a warning of the perils of smoking. Professor Ellis said: 'I think George VI should be on every cigarette packet, because he had severe vascular disease in his legs – 99 per cent due to smoking. He had carcinoma of the lung – 99 per cent due to smoking. [And] he died of coronary thrombosis – 90 per cent due to smoking.'

Experts tell U.N. council: Feeling left out drives youth to Islamic State

Reuters 28th April 2015

A meeting was held by the United Nations Security Council to discuss the role of youth in countering violent extremism. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, who spoke at the meeting said: ‘What many, if not most of them, had in common is that they didn't feel they had a stake in their societies. They often felt that...they weren't European, they didn't belong, that they'd never succeed however hard they tried.’ Also reported in New York Times

Why an Iran deal won’t lead to nuclear proliferation

Washington Post 28th April 2015

Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, has co-written a piece following the announcement of a framework for a nuclear deal in Iran. Ms Esfandiary said of the impact of the talks in the Middle East: ‘A final agreement on the Iranian nuclear program would be a win for the region. A regional proliferation cascade is an unlikely result. There are too many barriers to it. It is time to remove the cascade assumption from the policy equation.’

Warning issued on risk of UK military procurement errors

Financial Times 27th April 2015

According to a report by the Policy Institute at King's, Britain’s next government risks making flawed decisions in spending its £34bn military budget because of a dearth of official data on the value of the UK defence industry to the economy. Professor Matthew Uttley, Defence Studies, said: 'We are not criticising the way the MoD conducts weapons acquisition. But there are questions around the long-term implications of certain choices and we were not able to identify conclusive answers. There needs to be a rigorous, evidence-based review of this area.' Also reported by Daily Telegraph.

5bn people 'lack access to surgery'

Daily Mail 27th April 2015

According to a new report by Andy Leather, King's Centre for Global Health, a large majority of people in the world do not have access to safe and affordable surgery, with In low and middle-income countries as many as nine out of 10 individuals were said to lack basic surgical care. Mr Leather said: 'The global community cannot continue to ignore this problem - millions of people are already dying unnecessarily, and the need for equitable and affordable access to surgical services is projected to increase in the coming decades, as many of the worst affected countries face rising rates of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and road accidents.' Also reported by Reuters, BBC News, BBC World Service and Independent.

Is being dehydrated really as bad for you as being drunk?

Daily Mail 27th April 2015

A new study has suggested that getting behind the wheel when dehydrated makes you just as hazardous as being under the influence of alcohol. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, was quoted saying that dehydration is likely to be the cause of why the number of people taken to A&E with painful kidney stones has soared.

Nurse training

BBC London 94.9 27th April 2015

Listeners get in touch with their views on nurse training. One listener who studied at King's refutes another listener's suggestion that there are no set courses for nurse practitioners.

Sponges' brainlessness might be a positive thing

MSNBC 27th April 2015

New research has found that that complex brains were in place as early as 520 million years ago, but animals may have evolved to lose them as they had no need for them. Frank Hirth of Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) says: "In their ancient evolutionary past, sea sponges did have neurons, but they have experienced evolved loss of these structures".

LGBT mental health: are we doing enough?

VICE 27th April 2015

Dr Qazi Rahman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience comments on the gay-shaming attitudes of straight men, saying: "It's a way of boosting social status among heterosexual male friendship networks and self-esteem by exalting the in-group (fellow heterosexuals) through holding particular kinds of prejudice". He adds: "The human tendency to form out-groups and in-groups is part of our coalitional psychology, but it is also malleable and so can change. This is why gay-straight alliances in schools are a good idea because they promote a newer kind of 'coalition' between LGBT and straight students."

Rich List 2015

Sunday Times 26th April 2015

In the Sunday Times Rich List 2015, Gautam Thapar and family are listed as a new entry. Founded by Thapar, the entry notes that the Avantha Group gave King's £3.5m to contribute towards setting up an India Institute.

Lesbos...the first Magaluf!

Daily Mail 26th April 2015

In a new BBC documentary, former Apprentice star Margaret Mountford will look at the Greek island of Lesbos and how in ancient times it was a notorious playground for straight men. Professor Edith Hall, Department of Classics, told the programme: 'Lesbos had a very particular reputation for producing very beautiful women. They really were supposed to be the sexiest people in the entire Greek world.'

Turbo-charge your life in just seven days

Sunday Mirror 26th April 2015

Scientists believe that there is a link between bacteria in the stomach and weight. Researchers at King's found that certain bacteria were more common in slim people. Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: 'Our findings show specific groups of microbes living in our gut could protect against obesity.'

UK election: The Scottish pivot

Financial Times 26th April 2015

The Conservative party has made the threat posed by possible Scottish National Party influence over a minority Labour government into a central theme of its election campaign. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, commented on how the voting system is shaping the SNP's future. He wrote: 'First past the post used to be defended on the grounds that, whatever its theoretical unfairness, it did at least yield strong and stable single-party government. In a multi-party system, it does not work.'

Mitochondria editing tried in mice

BBC News 26th April 2015

A study of mice has led researchers to developing a technique to edit out bits of mitochondrial DNA that could otherwise pass on incurable diseases. Dr Duscko Ilic, Women's Health, aid the technique had many hurdles to overcome: 'Although this clever alternative approach for correcting genetic errors in mitochondria is a technical masterpiece, it is unlikely to make it to clinic in the near future.'

Can we trust scientists' self-control?

Guardian 26th April 2015

Filippa Lentzos, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, has co-written a piece looking at how the self-control of scientists is not enough to protect us, or to secure public trust, and suggesting that national governments must step in. They wrote: 'There is more at stake than just a certain set of experiments or the degree of freedom of research. There will be further loss of public trust in scientists and in the institution of science itself if it appears that decisions about such exceptionally risky projects are taken without substantial, genuine involvement by the public and wider civil society.'

Summer school for budding oncologists at Tata Memorial Hospital

DNA India 26th April 2015

Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) will be opening a summer school in collaboration with King’s College London. The course will consist of a series of lectures and seminars over ten days.

Your middle-age health check

Times 25th April 2015

An article looking at how people's bodies change when they hit their forties. The piece mentions a recent study by Professor Stephen Harridge, director of the Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences which found that there was little physical difference between keen cyclists at 79 and at 55 and it all comes down to exercising.

Nick Clegg’s rules on coalition-building are ‘absurd’, says constitutional expert

Guardian 25th April 2015

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has described claims by Nick Clegg that a government would lack legitimacy if formed by the party that finished second as absurd. Professor Bogdanor said: 'Last time it seemed that the Liberal Democrats were closer to Labour on its policy on austerity and cuts. What are their views now? Which party are they closer to? They are deliberately not saying because they want to maximise their leverage. But is that fair to the voter?'

World crises may be multiplying, but campaign turns Britain further inward

Washington Post 25th April 2015

The 2015 General Elections are fast approaching, yet analysts in the US say that Britain is likely to continue to turn away from global issues. One way this will be displayed is in the cuts made to the UK defence budget. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, said: ‘What’s worrying is that our capacity to support any substantial overseas operation has already been diminished significantly.’

An uncertain future

The Telegraph Calcutta 25th April 2015

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discusses the upcoming 2015 British national elections. He said of the vote: ‘This is one of the most unusual elections in the country in recent memory, as there is no telling who might be the winner...No side has succeeded so far in making a winning argument.’

Huge rise in short-sighted children blamed on indoor lifestyles

Times 24th April 2015

Short-sightedness among young people has doubled over the past 50 years, with a study finding that 23 per cent of British 12 and 13-year-olds suffer from myopia compared with 10 per cent in the 1960s. According to research by Professor Chris Hammond, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, people with a degree are twice as likely to be myopic as those leaving education after primary school, which points to the rise in cases being linked to more time sitting in the classroom. Professor Hammond said: 'Clearly the simplest thing is that kids should spend more time each day not on class work, phones, tablets and books. We don’t know how much, but in an ideal world kids should be outside two hours a day.' Katie Williams was also interviewed on BBC Radio West Midlands.

Labour £6K fees policy ‘not incredibly sensible’, says IFS expert

Times Higher Education 24th April 2015

The Labour Party’s policy to lower fees to £6,000 has been described as 'not incredibly sensible' by the head of education at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Professor Alison Wolf, Department of Management, is also quoted in the article on the coalition’s policy on private providers. She said: 'Some of them, I’m sure, are great. But it’s the sort of programme which is guaranteed to produce, sooner rather than later, at least one or two examples of fraud which will blow the whole thing out the water.'

Anxiety is 'catching' and can be passed on to children, scientists warn over-protective parents

Daily Mail 24th April 2015

A new study of twins by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s shows anxiety can pass between the generations and found that the attitudes of over-anxious parents strongly affects their children’s behaviour. Professor Thalia Eley, lead author from the IoPPN, said: 'Our research shows that even if you have had to cope with high levels of anxiety yourself, it is not inevitable that this will follow in your children. There are many things that can be done at home to prevent or reduce anxiety in children and adolescents.'

Genetically modified embryos: a panacea for mankind – or a crime against scientific ethics?

Independent 24th April 2015

The announcement that Chinese scientists have attempted to genetically engineer human embryos has sparked controversy across the world, with the study being rejected by two leading journals due to ethical concerns. Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, said: 'If the technology exists, scientists will continue doing such experiments and eventually, one day, repair of mutation-causing genetic diseases can become a reality.'

French counter terrorism forces ‘at breaking point’

Newsweek 24th April 2015

Despite an investment in national security following the Charlie Hebdo attacks, discontent and fractions are increasingly evident in French police and military forces. Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, said: ‘Tensions are particularly high between police forces and the intelligence agency. The intelligence agency has stepped on the turf of the police and relations have not been good.’

Diabetes drug could hold back Alzheimer's

Daily Mail 23rd April 2015

King's College London is participating in a clinical trial that could transform the way in which Alzheimer's is treated. It follows initial research showing that a drug used to treat diabetes may reverse memory loss in mice with late-stage Alzheimer’s.

Nicole Kidman returns to the West End stage

Telegraph 23rd April 2015

17 years after her West End debut, Nicole Kidman is to return to the London stage in a new production for Michael Grandage titled Photograph 51. The title refers to an x-ray crystallography image of the DNA double helix structure produced by Franklin and a PhD student in 1952 at King’s.

UK's top prosecutor 'ignored advice of two QCs who told her to charge Janner because of overwhelming evidence and accounts of victims'

Daily Mail 23rd April 2015

Prosecutor Alison Saunders decided against pressing charges against Lord Janner, citing that it was not in the public interest due to his advanced Alzheimer’s. The article notes that Mrs Saunders appointed two of the country’s foremost dementia experts, one of which was Professor Michael Kopelman, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, who concluded his dementia is at an advanced stage and would never improve.

Question time: THE election panel grill the politicians

Times Higher Education 23rd April 2015

Times Higher Education ask a panel of experts from across higher education to put the questions that need answering to representatives from the four political parties. Amanda Goodall asks whether a few universities should be allowed to go private, given that the best universities in the world are private US institutions. Sal Brinton answered: 'In the latest THE World Reputation Rankings, the universities of Cambridge and Oxford came second and third respectively after Harvard University, while institutions such as University College London and King’s College London have been steadily climbing up the rankings.'

Obituary: Sir Christopher Bayly

Guardian 23rd April 2015

Obituary of historian Sir Christopher Bayly, who has died suddenly aged 69. The piece notes that he was made Doctor of Letters honoris causa of King’s in November last year.

Scientists genetically modify human embryos in controversial world first

Guardian 23rd April 2015

Scientists in China have genetically modified human embryos in a world first that has re-ignited the debate over the ethics and safety of genetic therapies. It has been reported that two journals rejected the paper due to ethical objections. Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, commented: 'What the paper really emphasises is that we are far away from using genomic editing because it’s not safe. The idea of using this for designer babies is very far-fetched. The technology is too far off.'

King's College London gets Strand go-ahead

Evening Standard 23rd April 2015

King's College London has been given the go-ahead to redevelop some of its buildings at the Strand in order to allow for the modernisation of one its central London campuses. A spokesperson for King's said: 'A thriving centre of excellence in education and research on the Strand brings considerable value and public benefit.'

Ex-colleague praises trader as 'legend' in student presenation

Evening Standard 23rd April 2015

Navinder Sarao was praised by former Futex employee as a 'legend' at a presentation to student at King's. Miltos Savvidis told a group of aspiring traders: 'This guy called Nav... was a legend at our firm.'

Create a clinical chief executive role in hospitals

British Medical Journal 23rd April 2015

Professor John Fabre, Transplantation Immunology & Muscosal Biology, has written in to the 'If I Ruled the NHS' pages to discuss how the absence of a national clinical leadership structure is one of the root causes as to why the NHS is in decline. He wrote: 'If I ruled the NHS I would begin by establishing a clinically strong NHS England board. Currently, only four of 17 board members have a medical or nursing background.'

Depression treatments: study finds mindfulness as effective as anti-depressants

Huffington Post (Canada) 23rd April 2015

A two-year study of 428 depression sufferers has found that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) may provide a suitable alternative to using anti-depressants, with 44 per cent relapsing in the former group compared with 47 per cent in the latter. Co-author Professor Sarah Byford from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments that: "As a group intervention, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy was relatively low cost compared to therapies provided on an individual basis".

King's press release related to 'Depression treatments: study finds mindfulness as effective as anti-depressants'

Weakened Gazprom is target

New York Times 23rd April 2015

Antitrust regulators in Europe are investigating Russian energy giant Gazprom’s pricing policies and control over natural gas pipelines. In addition to regulatory questions, the company is under the pressure of market forces. Dr Adnan Vatansever, Russia Institute, said that with competition rising: ‘It is just getting more difficult to sell its gas at its own terms.’

Tank e-cig users better at quitting

Press Association 22nd April 2015

Using less-realistic 'tank' e-cigarettes is more likely to lead to successfully quitting smoking than using 'cigalikes'. Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) followed 1,500 smokers over a year, and found that 28 per cent of those using 'tanks', which are fatter and refillable, had given up smoking, compared with 11 per cent of 'cigalike' users. Dr Sara Hitchman suggests: "Tanks might deliver nicotine more effectively and perhaps be more satisfying to users, but there may also be other factors, including price and the ways that tanks allow the user to adapt the product, such as the nicotine content and flavour of the liquid".

King's press release related to 'Tank e-cig users better at quitting'

Major asthma breakthrough as scientists discover root cause of the condition - and say a new treatment is less than 5 years away

Daily Mail 22nd April 2015

A team of scientists from King's and Cardiff University claim to have found the root cause of asthma, a breakthrough which could pave the way for a new treatment within five years. They discovered a protein within the airways which they believe triggers all asthma attacks and which could be deactivated by a drug that already exists. Also reported by Daily Express, Press Association and Times.

Ebola doctor set to run London Marathon in isolation suit

Evening Standard 22nd April 2015

Junior doctor Dr Claire Ferraro, King’s Sierra Leone Partnership, is running the London Marathon in her specialist protective gear in a bid to raise funds to help rebuild Sierra Leone's health system. She signed up for the marathon 11 weeks ago and hired Idrissa Kargbo, the country’s national marathon champion, to help her train. Dr Ferraro said: 'He is the reason I am able to run the marathon. We were running four to five times a week at 6am as it was too hot after that. It’s difficult terrain as the road surfaces are poor so I was forever avoiding potholes or jumping over piles of rock.'

Judi Dench and the anarchists: why British theatre has gone election mad

Guardian 22nd April 2015

Article looking at how British theatre has caught election fever, with Camden People’s Theatre in London running a three-week season devoted to politics. The piece mentions how interactive theatre Coney is running workshops for first-time voters and collaborating with a political economist at King’s.

Universities told to raise profile of research or pay the price

Nursing Standard 22nd April 2015

Funding for nursing research could be at risk because universities are not submitting enough work by nursing academics for scrutiny. Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, said there should be far greater investment in academic clinical careers: 'There has long been a prejudice against nurse research. Building the infrastructure and capability will help break through the prejudice.'

Death knell or new beginning for Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood?

Voice of America 22nd April 2015

Former President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison, a move criticised by human rights groups as a ‘travesty of justice’. Current Prime Minister, Abdel-Fattah el Sissi, is not concerned with ensuring rights for his former opponents, argues Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies. He said: ‘His main concerns were to establish his credibility, ensure the security situation.’

PM's Sturgeon tactics put UK at risk, says Tory peer

Guardian 21st April 2015

According to Lord Forsyth, the senior Tory peer, the Conservatives are playing a dangerous game that could threaten the future of the UK. Following the Scottish independence referendum last year, Lord Forsyth accused the the prime minister of having 'shattered' the pro-UK alliance in Scotland and of stirring up English nationalism. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, told the Guardian it was dangerous to polarise Scotland against England

Eco-cities

BBC Radio 4 Costing the Earth 21st April 2015

Dr Federico Caprotti, Geography, discusses eco-cities and in particular, Masdar City in Abu Dhabi. He said:'It's a functioning, experimental area. I don't think there is much of a society in Masdar to speak of.'

General election 2015

BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight 21st April 2015

Former Prime Minister Sir John Major has spoken out about the ' recipe for mayhem' that would be caused by a minority Labour government propped up by the Scottish National Party (SNP). Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed how the Labour-SNP fear narrative is impacting the Conservatives. He said: 'I think it's in general probably true that what we call negative campaigning, which is an appeal to fear, works better than an appeal to hope. In this election, the Conservatives are appealing to that fear that a Labour-SNP government would be unsustainable.' Professor Bogdanor has also written a piece on the era of the coalition government for the Financial Times.

Bionomics initiates phase II clinical trial of BNC210 for treatment of anxiety

Reuters (Australia) 21st April 2015

Professor Allan Young at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is conducting a study with pharmaceutical company Bionomics, evaluating the capacity of drug BNC210 to treat anxiety and depression.

Can the sex and love hormone cure anorexia

The Times 21st April 2015

Professor Janet Treasure of the Institute