Press cuttings

A summary of the latest media coverage for King's College London and Higher Education including headlines from national and international newspapers, specialist journals, television and radio programmes, with a link to the article where possible.

There is also a searchable Archive going back to 2004.

Please submit any media mentions to the Public Relations Department pr@kcl.ac.uk, 020 7848 3202.

King's stories

French accused of sending le smog across the Channel

Times 23rd April 2014

The Environmental Research Group is mentioned in relation to predictions made about pollution levels and smog making its way across the Channel. This was also reported by the Evening Standard and Huffington Post.

New migraine treatments show promise

CNN 23rd April 2014

Studies presented at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting suggest that two new drugs may prevent migraines from happening. Professor Peter Goadsby from King's and co-author of both studies says: "We've identified a new preventive treatment for migraines, something that reduces frequency, the number of attacks and severity of attacks, how bad the attacks are,"

New Insight Into Aging Brains

Washington Post 23rd April 2014

Nearly a quarter of the changes often seen in a person's intelligence level over the course of a lifetime may be due to genes, a proportion never before estimated, new research shows. Commenting on the research, Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, says: "The nature-nurture controversy is never more contentious than when it concerns the genetics of intelligence,"

Is a pill made from lobsters the secret to a longer life?

Daily Mail 22nd April 2014

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments on the news that the food supplement glucosamine, often made from shellfish, can make mice live nearly 10  per cent longer. He said: 'Glucosamine is an interesting molecule that could affect us subtly in many ways. If even a modest effect on ageing were proven, it would be a major advance. However, humans are not the same as worms or rodents and studies will need careful replication before we get overexcited.'

New exhibition in capital shows art of novelist Beryl Bainbridge

Evening Standard 22nd April 2014

Presented by the Cultural Institute at King's, the first London exhibition of the art of novelist Beryl Bainbridge will open in May at Somerset House.

Trekking twins ready for Greenland

BBC News (Online) 22nd April 2014

Identical twins, Hugo and Ross Turner, are making final preparations for very different expeditions across Greenland. Hugo Turner will be dressed in modern protective clothing, and his twin will be in similar kit to that used by polar explorers 100 years ago. The Department of Twin Research will will monitor if and how Hugo benefits from advances in modern technology and nutrition.

Freezing eggs only gives 8% chance of motherhood

Daily Mail 21st April 2014

New figures from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority indicate that career women who spend thousands of pounds freezing their eggs only have an 8 per cent chance of having a baby. Professor Susan Bewley, Women's Health, warned: 'This is a profit-driven industry, which is fuelled by marketing and positive stories.'

Secret art stash hidden in council vaults

Sky News 20th April 2014

A Sky News investigation has found that millions of pounds worth of art were lying unseen in council vaults, and there have been calls to sell these off to meet budget shortfalls. Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, debated the issue of local authority art collections, and what should be done with them.

Bullying at school affects health 40 years later

Daily Telegraph 18th April 2014

New research from King's finds that children who were bullied are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts and poor physical health when they were 50-years-old than those who had not been victimised. Professor Louise Arseneault, Institute of Psychiatry, who led the study, says: "Some children will be set on a pathway towards problems for the rest of their lives. We need to take bullying seriously and do all we can to prevent it and help those children when it does happen." Also reported by The Independent, The Times, BBC News, Daily Mail, The Sun, ITV News Online, Herald Scotland, NPR (US), USA Today, Forbes Magazine (US), Fox News, Times of India, Zee News (India), Press Association, Reuters, Xinhua (China), Shanghai Daily News. Prof Arseneault was interviewed by BBC Radio 4 (Today programme), BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio Scotland, BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Northern Ireland and Radio Canada International.

King's press release related to 'Bullying at school affects health 40 years later'

Airpocalypse now: how to solve London's pollution problems

Evening Standard 17th April 2014

In an article about tackling London's air pollution problems, Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, is quoted. He said: 'Even if you banned all private cars from London, it still wouldn’t be enough. That’s the scale of the problem.' There is also mention of research by Dr Ian Mudway of ERG, which suggests the lung capacity of children in Tower Hamlets and Hackney has been reduced through living or going to school near main roads.

‘Good’ degree awards not always in line with intake

Times Higher Education 17th April 2014

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, commented on a report by HEFCE which has revealed which universities are awarding more first and upper second class degrees than would be expected based on their students' background.

Inspiring the Next Generation of Scientists Through Citizen Science

Huffington Post 17th April 2014

In an article about inspiring schoolchildren to pursue careers in science, there is mention of research by King's College London.

Smoking cannabis will change you. That's not a 'risk', it's a certainty

Daily Telegraph 17th April 2014

Blog about recent research suggesting a link between cannabis use and changes in the brain. Professor Terrie Moffit, Institute of Psychiatry commented on the research “… it is not clear from the paper where the 20 cannabis users came from, or where the controls came from, nor how well they represent cannabis users in the real world”

British jihadists in Syria are playing into Assad's hands

Guardian 17th April 2014

In a 'Comment is Free' piece discussing foreign fighters in Syria, the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation is mentioned as stating that many of these young men are driven by what, in their minds, are humanitarian concerns for their co-religionists and the Syrian people. Shiraz Maher also contributed to discussion on foreign fighters in Syria and commented on the changing role of the internet in radicalisation for BBC Radio 4's PM programme.

Match-fixing isn't anything new! 1,700-year-old Greek contract reveals terms for foul play during a wrestling match

Daily Mail 17th April 2014

Professor Dominic Rathbone, Classics, has deciphered a contract dating from 267AD, between the father and trainers of two teen wrestlers competing in ancient Egypt. The papyrus was discovered in Oxyrhynchus, in Egypt a century ago and has only just been translated.

Blood pressure warning on pregnancy

Evening Standard 16th April 2014

Pregnant women with chronic hypertension (high blood pressure) are highly likely to suffer from adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight and neonatal death, which emphasises a need for heightened surveillance, according to research carried out at King’s. Also reported by The Daily Telegraph and Press Association.

King's press release related to 'Blood pressure warning on pregnancy '

Revealed: the radical clerics using social media to back British jihadists in Syria

Guardian 16th April 2014

Researchers at King’s International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) have created a database of social media profiles owned by foreign fighters in Syria. Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘Syria may be the first conflict in which a large number of western fighters have been documenting their involvement in conflict in real-time and where – in turn – social media represents an essential source of information and inspiration to them.’ Shiraz Maher and Joseph Carter of ICSR were both interviewed as part of a special report by BBC Newsnight. Also reported by BBC News Online.

King's press release related to 'Revealed: the radical clerics using social media to back British jihadists in Syria'

Why are Brits so reckless when it comes to drugs?

Daily Telegraph 16th April 2014

Young people in the UK are more likely to take drugs without knowing what they are than in any other country, according to this year's Global Drugs Survey. Dr Adam R Winstock, Institute of Psychiatry, a specialist in addiction and founder of the annual poll, suggested young British people’s relative willingness to experiment with unknown drugs could be linked to our attitude to alcohol.

'Climate of fear' in Army leaves female soldiers too 'terrified' to complain

Daily Telegraph 16th April 2014

Research into the well-being of women in the Armed Forces by Dr Charlotte Woodhead, King's Centre for Military Health Research, shows the importance of good role models, helplines and top-down clear messages. Also reported on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Evening Standard and Press Association.

Trying to be perfect could be ruining your health

Daily Mail 15th April 2014

Research suggests that perfectionism can cause not just psychological stress, but physical also harm including irritable bowel disease (IBS), insomnia, heart disease.The researchers followed up 620 people who had an acute episode of food poisoning and found those who developed IBS were more likely to have perfectionist tendencies, such as carrying on regardless until they were forced to rest.
'These are people who have high expectations of needing to do the right thing. Taking time off work may go against their beliefs,' says Professor Rona Moss-Morris, Institute of Psychiatry, who led the research.

Nurses at Suffolk mental health unit adopt new safety model

Nursing Times 15th April 2014

Woodlands, the Ipswich base for acute mental health services in East Suffolk, has become the first unit within Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust to adopt the Safewards model. Based on research by Professor Len Bowers, Institute of Psychiatry, the Safewards model encourages staff and patients to work together to reduce factors such as aggression and self-harm, as well as the use of interventions including extra medication, one-to-one observations and restraint.

How the top 10 UK universities use Twitter

Times Higher Education 15th April 2014

King's is among ten UK universities examined by THE for their twitter activity.

UN climate change report on how to cut emissions

Guardian 14th April 2014

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, comments on a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) into reducing global greenhouse gas emissions. He said: 'This WG3 report draws attention to a range of methods for removing CO2 from the atmosphere, including afforestation, carbon capture and storage (CCS).'

Toxic smog clouds have hit Britain 900 TIMES in just five years

Daily Express 14th April 2014

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, comments on health impact of air pollution. He said: 'The costs to society from poor air quality are on a par with those from smoking and obesity.'

Stroke care 'differences' revealed

Press Association 14th April 2014

The quality of healthcare provided after a stroke remains uneven in the UK, according to a new study led by King’s College London. Despite improvements in equal access to healthcare since 2001, patients from more deprived areas tend to receive a poorer level of care following a stroke. The impact of socioeconomic deprivation on the care given also appears to be more pronounced in black patients than in white patients.

King's press release related to 'Stroke care 'differences' revealed'

Nigerian bomb attack

Arise News 14th April 2014

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, was interviewed about a recent bomb attack in Nigeria, which killed more than 70 people.

More Canadian than British soldiers took own lives in 2013

CBC News 14th April 2014

Canadian forces report poorer mental health and lower levels of support than UK Armed Forces. In recent years, for example, the British military introduced the Enhanced Mental Health Assessment (EMHA) program to help ensure mental health issues are identified at an early stage in a soldier's career. Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, says: “Canadians don’t have a peer support program like EMHA, they have the Operational Stress Injury Social Support program, but that only helps to get troops back into their units as quickly as possible,” Also reported by CTV news (Canada) and Huffington post.

MPs to investigate London's 'invisible killer' - the air we all breathe

Evening Standard 14th April 2014

In a front-page report about London air pollution there is mention of comments from Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, who estimated that 3,000 to 5,000 people in the capital die early each year due to pollution. These figures were also mentioned in an Evening Standard editorial.

Brit Al-Qaeda jihadist ...aged 16

The Sun 13th April 2014

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, has revealed that a 16-year-old boy has joined an Al-Qaeda group in Syria: 'The source who has given me this information has been bang on the money before. This 16-year-old would be the youngest ever British fighter in Syria. I've not heard of anyone that young on the front line.'

Defra's toxis smog alerts vanish into thin air

The Sunday Times 13th April 2014

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said government ministers have shown 'political indifference' to the 29,000 deaths his committee estimates are caused by air pollution each year. He said: 'The costs to society from poor air quality are on a par with those from smoking and obesity. With greater awareness, people can protect their health.'

Follow Californian route on diesel curbs

The Sunday Times 13th April 2014

Professor Ragnar Lofstedt, Director of King's Centre for Risk Management, writes that Europe should adopt California's diesel emission standards, which are 'the toughest in the world.'

London’s Strand seeks South Bank success as the new ‘Northbank’

Financial Times 12th April 2014

In an article about redevelopment plans on London's 'Northbank', there is mention of King's College London's location on the Strand.

In review: the week's cultural highlights

BBC Radio 4 12th April 2014

Deborah Bull, Director, Cultural Partnerships at King’s joins Tom Sutcliffe to review the week’s cultural highlights.

The plural of anecdote is not data

Financial Times 11th April 2014

Deborah Bull, Director, Cultural Partnerships at King’s writes about measuring cultural impact and reflects on the growing appetite among artists and arts organisations for this kind of evidence about the value of what they do. The article is also available as a podcast: http://podcast.ft.com/index.php?sid=47.

Mini Winnie, Britain's first cloned dog

Times 10th April 2014

Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, commented on the news that the UK's first cloned dog has been born in South Korea. Dr Ilic stated that the cloning was an 'absolute waste of money'. His comments were also reported by the Guardian, ITV and the Daily Telegraph.

Women in combat

BBC Radio 4 - Woman's Hour 10th April 2014

Dr Christine Cheng, War Studies, participated in a debate on the topic of whether women should be allowed the opportunity to fight on the front line. Dr Cheng said: 'I think one of the ways in which they've [Canadian army] managed to deal with this is basically to set one standard for criteria in terms of performance.'

Should we pay drug users to get vital vaccines?

New Scientist 10th April 2014

Dr Nicola Metrebian, Institute of Psychiatry, writes about the use of financial incentives to encourage heroin addicts to complete a hep B vaccination. She says: "Using financial incentives in this way can be an effective addition to the clinical toolkit when it comes to encouraging behaviour change. It has huge potential benefits for patients and for healthcare efficacy."

King's press release related to 'Should we pay drug users to get vital vaccines?'

In detail – European Research Council

Times Higher Education 10th April 2014

Professor Max Saunders, English, has been awarded funding by the European Research Council to investigate the impact of social media on forms of self-presentation. The study will examine the shift from traditional biographical and auto-biographical forms.

Controversial trial at NHS clinics to offer cash for drug addicts who stay clean

Independent 9th April 2014

Researchers at the National Addictions Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry are running a trial to investigate whether giving heroin users supermarket vouchers can improve abstinence from the drug. The study follows successful results from another trial using vouchers to improve rates of hepatitis B vaccination in injecting drug users. The study found that only 9% of users completed the HBV vaccination programme without incentive, but if they were offered a total of £30 45-49% would complete the HBV programme. “We understand that ill-at-ease feeling because it will be what we ourselves are feeling,” said Professor John Strang, from King's and lead author of the study, “But the nature of medicine and its development is that you need to examine the evidence and improve methods of treatment.” Also reported in the Guardian, Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Daily Express, Nursing Times and Huffington Post.

King's press release related to 'Controversial trial at NHS clinics to offer cash for drug addicts who stay clean'

London seeks place in life sciences race

Daily Telegraph 9th April 2014

King's College London, Imperial and UCL have joined forces with Oxford & Cambridge to build the world's most powerful life sciences cluster. The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, launched a major new on initiative backed by some of the country’s senior academics. Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Executive Director of King's Health Partners, said: London has a great history of being less than the sum of its parts because it has this habit of competing at the expense of collaborating.' This was also reported by the Financial Times, BBC News (Online), Evening Standard, Times Higher Education.

Critical gap blights new staffing rules

Nursing Times 9th April 2014

New measures to make Trusts publish ward staffing levels do not go far enough and could burden nurses with gathering 'utterly meaningless data', it has been claimed. Jane Ball, deputy director of the National Nursing Research Unit at King's College London, said the guidance was 'a good starting point'.

Arthritis treatment 'that could add eight years to your life'

Daily Mail 9th April 2014

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, commented on the news that glucosamine, a herbal remedy used by arthritis sufferers, could help people live almost a decade longer. Professor Spector said: 'Humans are not the same as worms or rodents and studies will need careful replication before we get over-excited'. His comments were also reported by the Daily Express.

Back to nature: how outdoor learning benefits both students and staff

Guardian 9th April 2014

New research by Kings College London shows that there are significant benefits for children who are taught in natural environments.

Australians fighting in Syria: how many have joined the conflict?

Guardian 9th April 2014

Figures from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation are quoted in this article reporting the news that there is a growing number of Australians joining the conflict in Syria.

Afghanistan disclosures

BBC Two - Newsnight 9th April 2014

Professor Theo Farrell, Head of the Department of War Studies, comments on the lessons governments can learn from war. He said: ‘Armies are very good at learning the lessons of past wars. If anything they tend to over learn those lessons and so prepare for the wrong wars in the future.’ (Item begins 35.00)

Hands on and minds on: changes to A-level science mark a step forward

Guardian 9th April 2014

Professor Jonathan Osborne, who left the Department of Education & Professional Studies in 2013, comments on the role of practical work in science A Levels. He said: ‘Current science A-levels suffer from far too much attention on the measuring and not enough on the experimental design or interpreting the data.’

People not buildings are target

Financial Times 8th April 2014

A report on the threat of terrorism in urban centres mentions research from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation which states that 11 000 foreigners have gone to fight in Syria for extremist jihadi groups.

Recession fuels huge rise in commercial law suits

Times 8th April 2014

Reports have shown that large commercial disputes arising from the recession are flooding the courts, fuelled by banking scandals over mis-selling or interest rates. The report coincides with a stufy by the global law firm Eversheds which has been drawn up alongside King's.

The hospital growing noses, tear ducts and blood vessels: British scientists make custom-made body parts using stem cells

Daily Mail 8th April 2014

Dr Eileen Gentleman, Dental Institute, comments on the work by London's Free Hospital in developing stem cell techniques. She said: 'Scientists have to get things like noses and ears right before we can move onto something like a kidney, lungs or a liver, which is much more complicated.'

Nutrition

Time Out 8th April 2014

In a feature which sees a Time Out editor completing food challenges. Dr Anne Mullen, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, offered her advice and explained why eating such large amounts of unhealthy food is a bad idea.

Finance workers enjoy growing pay gap

Financial Times 7th April 2014

Article reports on the research of Dr Jo Lindley, Management, which has found that finance workers enjoy higher pay than those in other sectors, even if they are doing comparable jobs. They say that this shows they are benefiting from 'non-competitive' profits.

Six ways to avoid losing a plane

BBC Future 7th April 2014

One month on from the disappearance of flight MH370, this piece explores the ways in which planes could be redesigned to stop this happening in the future. Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, says that tweaks to design could improve battery life for black boxes: 'An important but fairly simple change would be to have the black box emit the sonar location pulse not as often as every second; if you have it send one pulse every 10 seconds, we could extend the lifetime to almost one year instead of one month – a much larger window to find the black box.'

Brace for all possible impacts

New Scientist 5th April 2014

Professor Mike Hulme is quoted in this piece for the New Scientist about how people can adapt to climate change. He said: 'Even if one had precise predictions of future meteorology, that would not mean one had precise predictions of droughts and flood'

Breath of fresh air as weather turns

Times 5th April 2014

Milder weather was bringing down pollution levels yesterday as the week's smog receded and academics from the Environmental Research Group have continued to comment on this. Martin Williams, Environmental Research Group, said: 'The levels aren’t significantly higher than in the past. We’ve had 60 events like this in the past five years.' Timothy Baker is quoted by the BBC as they consider the impact of the pollution on policy. Dr Ian Mudway also commented on the effects of diesel fumes on children's brains for the Sunday Times. Dr Gary Fuller was quoted in the Times weather reporting and said: 'The air pollution contained some Saharan dust, so made it more visible, but we found many constituents typical of air pollution episodes in springtime.' Frank Kelly was also quoted in a piece in the Evening Standard which discussed measures against already high levels of air pollution and said: 'Air pollution does not respect any barriers.'

Rwanda in Photographs

Cass Art 5th April 2014

A blog listing of the Rwanda in Photographs exhibition by King’s Cultural Institute, appeared as part of a ‘Last Chance to See’ feature: ‘This exhibition lends an international showcase to professional photographers in Rwanda for the first time, each with a story to tell; each communicating the unimaginable intricacies of survival after such atrocities.’ The exhibition has also been reviewed by Time Out.

Can religion sell?

The Conversation 4th April 2014

Dr Catherine Wheatley, Film Studies, discusses new film ‘Noah’ which is based on the biblical story. Dr Wheatley said: ‘On a pragmatic level, biblical epics provide low-cost source material for the kind of big budget, special-effects laden spectacle that Hollywood is currently wielding in its latest battle with the small screen.’

In a divided society, the minority must not be drowned out

Financial Times 4th April 2014

A letter from Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, in which he states that decisions over the future constitution 'should not be a matter for the Ukrainian majority alone'.

Breakthrough that could help paralysed walk

Daily Mail 4th April 2014

Scientists from King's and UCL have made a breakthrough using stem cell research that may allow the paralysed to walk again. The technique involves transplanting specially-designed motor neurons created from stem cells into injured nerve branches. These motor neurons are designed to react to pulses of blue light, allowing scientists to fine-tune muscle control by adjusting the intensity, duration and frequency of the light pulses. This was also reported by New Scientist.

Five Hundred Years of Friendship – A Battalion of Pals

BBC Radio 4 4th April 2014

Dr Santanu Das, English, speaks about the impact of World War One on male friendship as part of a series looking at the development and changing meaning of friendship over the centuries. He said: ‘I think the trench experience was one of the turning moments in the very history of male friendship.’ (05.00)

Schizophrenia: what's in my head?

Nature 3rd April 2014

Professor Sukhi Sherghill, Institute of Psychiatry, talks to artist Sue Morgan about hallucinations and his neuro-imaging research.

Developing countries: The outcomes paradox

Nature 3rd April 2014

Dr Craig Morgan, Institute of Psychiatry talks about his work on the Intrepid project - one of the first systematic attempts to develop and test robust psychoses research methods in diverse settings. This will lay the groundwork for a second phase aimed at studying actual causes and outcomes in large samples in each of the sites.

Building our defences

Daily Telegraph 3rd April 2014

Engineers are on the front line when it comes to protecting our shores and homes against storms and flooding. Article quotes Peter Phipps, who studied Geography at King's and has now been working in the area of coastal erosion and flood management for 20 years.

Ketamine 'exciting' depression therapy

BBC 3rd April 2014

The illegal party drug ketamine is an "exciting" and "dramatic" new treatment for depression, say doctors who have conducted the first trial in the UK. Professor David Taylor, Biomedical Sciences, said:'It shows that depression is something chemical, that it can be reversed with chemicals, it dispenses for once and for all that you can just pull your socks up. What restricts it is the potential for disturbing psychological adverse effects and the route by which is given - intravenous - does restrict it to a small number of people.'

Acts of endurance

Times Higher Education 3rd April 2014

Fern Riddell, a final year PhD student in History, discusses the art of 'Music Hall' and its deep hold on our cultural memory.

Campus close up

Times Higher Education 3rd April 2014

Brazil's sports minister, Aldo Rebelo, gave students an insight into the origins of his country's 'samba-style' football at a conference on 17 March at the Brazil Institute.

Is the US military failing its soldiers?

Channel 4 News 3rd April 2014

Dr Deirdre MacManus, Institute of Psychiatry, talks to Channel 4 News about the risk of violence in Army personnel returning from deployment and the differences in treating PTSD in the US and UK in light of the shooting in Fort Hood (US).

How is PTSD diagnosed?

BBC News 3rd April 2014

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how PTSD is diagnosed and treated in light on the Fort Hood shooting in the US.

White people the least healthy ethnic group in Britain

Daily Telegraph 2nd April 2014

Official figures from the Office for National Statistics have shown that people from white ethnic backgrounds are unhealthier than those from non-white ethnic groups. Professor Kennedy Cruickshank, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said that differing ages in the white population compared to those groups described by the ONS as 'non-white', could be a 'major factor' behind the trend. This was also reported by the Metro.

The hair-raising science of how your follicles affect fat levels

Daily Telegraph 2nd April 2014

New findings have shown a link between hair growth and fat tissue. It is being suggested that the findings could lead to cream for weight loss. Professor Fiona Watt, Centre for Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine and lead author of the study, however, has said that the research was not designed with cosmetic treatments in mind and could have more important uses: 'It is relevant to cancer and any tissue in which this type of process is going on'

Action needed on the 'sunshine' vitamin

Guardian 2nd April 2014

With an estimated 40% of young children are vitamin D deficient and the bone disease rickets is up four-fold, this article asks how the message can be spread to parents and the general population, reporting on a roundtable discussion. Professor Euan Ross, Education & Professional Studies, was present at the discussion.

Air pollution

BBC News 2nd April 2014

Experts from the Environmental Research Group at King’s have commented extremely widely on the high levels of air pollution seen in the UK this week. Andrew Grieve was interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC London 94.9, BBC Newsnight and BBC GNS regional broadcasters (various). He also monitored pollution levels on top of New Broadcasting house for BBC Breakfast. Professor Frank Kelly was interviewed by BBC Radio 4 World at One, BBC News Online, BBC London 94.9, BBC Radio 2 Jeremy Vine, BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC London News. He was also quoted by NDTV, Times, Financial Times, Daily Mail, Evening Standard, Telegraph, Press Association, Guardian, Metro, Daily Express and Asian Age (Mumbai). Dr Ben Barratt was interview on the BBC The One Show, CBBC, BBC News, Sky News, BBC News Channel and BBC News at 6. Ben was also a panellist for BBC Radio 4 PM and answered listener questions on the pollution. Dr Gary Fuller was interviewed by ITV This Morning, ITV London Tonight and Associated Press. Dr Martin Williams commented for New Scientist and was interviewed by Chinese National Radio. Tim Baker was interviewed by BBC Radio Kent and quoted by Air Quality News and the Independent.

Stem cell researcher guilty of misconduct

Guardian 2nd April 2014

Professor Fiona Watt, director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, commented on the news that Haruko Obokata, at the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, in Kobe, Japan, has been found guilty of misconduct during the research that led to her claiming that she had found a radical and simple way to create stem cells. Professor Watt said: 'I don't condone fraudulent research in any way, but I do think that senior scientists have a duty of care to their younger colleagues, and I hope that Dr Obokata will not be treated as a scapegoat.'

Obesity risk higher for future sons of young male smokers

Huffington Post (UK) 2nd April 2014

Men who start smoking before the age of 11 risk having sons who are overweight, British researchers have found. Professor Tim Spector comments: 'The data are persuasive but not yet definitive as we need to confirm the same smoking related epigenetics changes in the kids' DNA.' Also reported by the Press Association and Reuters.

Seven-a-day fruit and veg 'saves lives'

BBC News (Online) 1st April 2014

A new study has indicated that seven portions of fruit and vegetables a day is healthier than the minimum five and may cut the risk of dying from cancer or heart disease. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said that it was 'already known' that people who said they ate lots of fruit and vegetables were health conscious, educated and better-off, which could account for the drop in risk. His comments were also reported by the Daily Mail, ITN and on BBC TV News.

What Japan teaches us about better care for older people

Health Service Journal 1st April 2014

Dr Mayumi Hayashi writes about how England can learn from Japan, which has devised radical solutions to meet the unprecedented demand for health and social care from its ageing population. She said: 'Japanese people acknowledge the shameful history and limitations of family care, and accept the need for expanded public provision, albeit with increased cost burdens.'

Ukraine nuclear security fears were exaggerated

The Conversation 1st April 2014

Dr Matthew Moran and Dr Christopher Hobbs, Centre for Science & Security Studies, discuss Ukrainian nuclear fears and the focus of attention on Russia's annexation of the Crimea rather than achievements in nuclear security. They said: 'Some commentators have voiced concerns that events in Ukraine could significantly undermine international nuclear security efforts'

15 Things Only King's College London Students Will Understand

Huffington Post (UK) 1st April 2014

From the return of the sharing platter at Waterfront to the queues at Walkabout on a Wednesday, 15 of the things that only King's students will understand.

Black? Asian? Your chances of a First are lower than your white student peers, report reveals

Huffington Post (UK) 1st April 2014

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) published a report detailing a significant link between ethnicity and the likelihood of achieving an upper second or first class degree. King's is mentioned in relation to the recent 'I, too, am King's' campaign.

National science photography competition – in pictures

Guardian 31st March 2014

Dr Khuloud Al-Jamal and Izzat Suffian, both from the Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, have been awarded first place in the innovation section of the 2014 National Science Photography Competition.

Climate change

BBC Radio London - Drivetime 31st March 2014

Professor Mike Hulme is speaks about climate change following the UN report on climate change. Professor Hulme said: 'I think the most important thing that the report does is draw attention to a variety of weather hazards that are dangerous for different people in different parts of the world but also that there are many different types of interventions.' Item begins at 01.23.12

Analysis: Egypt at a Crossroads

Islam Channel 31st March 2014

Dr Carool Kersten, Middle East & Mediterrnean Studies, discusses the situation for Egypt at a crossroads as El Sisi runs for Egyptian president despite the level of repression. Dr Kersten said: 'It illustrates how polarized Egyptian society is. There is this all out war that has been declared against the Muslim Brotherhood.'

Study links salivary gene to obesity

Guardian 30th March 2014

New research, conducted at King's and Imperial, has found a link between a gene that breaks down carbohydrates and obesity. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: 'n the future, a simple blood or saliva test might be used to measure levels of key enzymes such as amylase in the body and therefore shape dietary advice for both overweight and underweight people.' This was also reported by the Daily Mail, Daily Express and Times. The news is also referenced in comments in the Health Service Journal. Dr Kirsten Ward, also from Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 - You & Yours.

This jail is effectively RUN by Muslims ..many of them are jihadists

The People 30th March 2014

Experts warned that a top-security prison where almost half the inmates are Muslims is a breeding ground for Islamic extremists. Category A Whitemoor jail is a recruiting centre for al-Qaeda, according to alarmed staff, prison inspectors and politicians. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, called for 'jihadist prisons' to isolate Islamist militants.

Classical

Sunday Times Culture 30th March 2014

A listing of Desenclos, Poulenc, Willette: Requiem, Motets and Choral Music by the undergraduate choir of King's College London.

Rwandan Genocide

Monocle 24 30th March 2014

Dr Zoe Norridge, Curator of the Rwanda in Photographs exhibition, speaks about Rwanda and the exhibiton. Dr Norridge said: 'When the killing was actually taking place we weren't taking photographs so we don't actually have any photographs of people with their arms raised holding machetes.'

Jihad by social media

Financial Times 29th March 2014

An article discussing the impact of social media on the radicalisation of Western Muslims. Quotes Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, who said: 'They're young - Facebook and Twitter have been ubiquitous in their lives...But they lack a lot of information.'

Ministers spreading private school myths, says ex-Harrow head

Daily Telegraph 29th March 2014

An article about the barriers between independent and state school systems. King's is mentioned as a Russell Group university which would like to increase admissions from state schools over the next five years.

Who would play me in a film of my life? Tony Blair

Guardian 29th March 2014

King's is mentioned in an article reporting that Rory Bremner, who studied at King's, would like Tony Blair to play him in a film on his life.

You're so hot

Guardian 29th March 2014

An article on feminism which states that one contributor first encountered feminism at King's College London.

Traditional British family 'a myth'

BBC News (Online) 29th March 2014

Professor Pat Thane argues that until World War Two, significant numbers of people never married, challenging the idea that British children grew up in typical two parent families until the permissiveness of the 1960s.

Global warming threat to health

Times 29th March 2014

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Primary Care & public Health Sciences is a signatory on a letter about global warming and climate change, demanding immediate preventative action through a drastic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and rapid transition to a zero-carbon world.

'The important thing is to move with the times'

Nature 28th March 2014

A feature on Sharon Grant, a dental therapist by day and a radiography lecturer by night, mentions King's as her place of study. She said: 'I cannot speak highly enough of King's College London. A fantastic place to study in all respects.'

Novels tell of north east's colonial past

Financial Times 27th March 2014

Professor David Treece, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, comments on history of doing business in northeast Brazil. He said: 'The big cities of the southeast and Brasilia were built by northeastern migrants, who still suffer prejudice.'

Boardrooms still too white, Cable says as number of women rises

Guardian 27th March 2014

Vince Cable has accused the UK's top companies of neglecting racial diversity in the boardroom and has urged business to use a wider talent pool when making senior appointments. Professor Richard Webber, Geography, who was involved with the study which prompted this and said that UK diversity was put at risk by a lack of diversity in senior corporate roles.

Presence haunted by absence

Times Higher Education 27th March 2014

A review of the exhibition 'Rwanda in Photographs: Death Then, Life Now.' which will be held by the Cultural Institute in the Inigo Rooms at Somerset House East Wing until 30 April.

A $1m ‘Nobel Prize’ for the world’s best teacher won’t make life easier for the rest

The Conversation 27th March 2014

Dr Bob Burstow, Department of Education & Professional Studies, writes about the new $1 million Global Teacher Prize, launched by the Varkey GEMS Foundation. He questions: 'whether this will help raise the profile of a much-hounded profession.'

Rapid breathing 'better' for premature babies

Nursing Times 27th March 2014

Article reporting on a new study led by researchers at King’s that has found that premature babies supported immediately after birth by high-frequency oscillation - a type of breathing support - had better lung function as adolescents than those who received conventional ventilation.

Why Putin might be the least of Ukraine's worries

Esquire Weekly 27th March 2014

In a piece exploring the battle for Ukraine and Putin's role in this, Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, and Dr Gulnaz Sharafutdinova, Russia Insitute, are both quoted. Professor Lieven said that the prognosis for peace in Ukraine was not looking good: 'Several of these ‘new’, leading figures, were leaders in what had been the administration — prior to the Orange revolution, of 2004 — which was, of course, a disaster.' Dr Sharafutdinova said: 'If you count by opinion polls, Svoboda only had around five per cent of the public supporting them in 2013, but they got a fifth of the ministerial seats, including very important positions of the minister of defense and prosecutor general.'

Anorexia sites ‘seek to profit from users’

The Times 26th March 2014

Dr Helen Sharpe, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on pro-anorexia websites which have begun charging for membership. She says: “One of the fears from users of these sites is that the community will be infiltrated by people who aren’t true pro-ana or pro-mia [pro-bulimia] supporters. A paid membership acts as a barrier. It adds to the appeal.”

Elvis was doomed to die young, his DNA reveals

The Times 26th March 2014

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on claims that Elvis was due to die young because of his genes. He says: “It’s kind of misleading as it plays into that misconception that because something is genetic, it’s just one gene and you either have it or you don’t. We’re normally talking about thousands of genes, each of which have a very small effect.”

Children 'under-dosed' on penicillin

BBC News 26th March 2014

Millions of children in the UK may be receiving penicillin doses that are below the recommended dose for common infections according to new research led jointly by researchers at King’s, St George’s, University of London and Imperial College London. Also reported by the Daily Mail.

Medical help at home better for schizophrenics

Times of India 26th March 2014

Treating schizophrenia in the community could help improve symptoms, according to a trial led in India by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry. Professor Graham Thornicroft (IoP) who led the trial, says: "The trial shows that this approach of using community health workers, under proper supervision, who make home visits, could play a major part in improving outcomes for people with schizophrenia in low-income countries using locally available, human resources,"

King's press release related to ' Medical help at home better for schizophrenics'

Smoking and mental health

BBC Radio 4 - Inside Health 26th March 2014

Professor Ann McNeill, Institute of Psychiatry, discuss the misconception that smoking helps reduce anxiety, and talks about her recent research which shows that stopping smoking improves mental health.

King's press release related to 'Smoking and mental health'

Abdul Fattah al-Sisi: New face of Egypt's old guard

BBC News 26th March 2014

Dr Robert Springborg, War Studies, writes for BBC News about Abdul Fattah al-Sisi who was unknown to the Egyptian public before the Spring of 2011 but now looks set to become the next president of Egypt.

Washington Landslide

Sky News 26th March 2014

Faith Taylor, Geography, is interviewed about the fatal landslide in Washington on 23 March 2014. Faith Said: 'It's almost like a tug of war between gravity that wants to pull the materials down and the factors that hold the slope in place.'

WHO: Pollution kills 7 million people every year

Daily Mail 25th March 2014

A new report from the World Health Organisation has said that air pollution kills more than 7 million people worldwide every year. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said: 'We all have to breathe, which makes pollution very hard to avoid' and that it was mostly up to governments to curb pollution levels, through measures like legislation, moving power stations away from big cities and providing cheap alternatives to indoor wood and coal stoves. Also reported by the Guardian.

After G8 snub, here's five scenarios for Russia's relations with China, Moldova And Nato

Huffington Post (UK) 25th March 2014

The world's industrialised nations have turned their back on Russia, following Moscow's annexation of Crimea. Dr Natasha Kuhrt, War Studies, comments on China's reaction: 'Privately, China probably thinks Putin has been foolhardy, and intervention in a region on ethnic grounds is never going to go down well domestically. China has very firm views about separatism and is always consistent, unlike Russia.'

Assisted suicide bill is laudable, but poorly drafted

The Conversation 25th March 2014

Isra Black, a PhD student in the Centre for Medical Law & Ethics, writes for The Conversation on a bill for physician-assisted suicide being considered by the Scottish Parliament. She said that 'the reaction to the bill has been mixed, particularly among physicians.'

Photography review: Rwanda in photographs - Death Then, Life Now

Metro 25th March 2014

The exhibition, held at the Inigo Rooms by the Cultural Institute at King's, is given 4 stars in this review. The exhibition has also been reviewed by The Londonist which said: 'Each photographer offers their own unique insight into Rwanda, and it comes across as a diverse country.'

Gender and warfare

BBC Radio 4 23rd March 2014

Dr Jonathan Fennell, Defence Studies, was interviewed on the topic of gender imbalance in warfare and how the proportion of young men in a population could make civil war or war more likely.

Stanley Shaldon

British Medical Journal 22nd March 2014

The obituary of Stanley Shaldon quotes emeritus professor at King's, Stewart Cameron, who said: '[Shaldon's] major contribution was the idea that patients could do dialysis for themselves at a time when most people thought dialysis - even in hospital - was outlandish.'

Birthdays

Times 22nd March 2014

Deborah Bull, Director, Cultural Partnerships, is mentioned by the Times, Guardian and Independent as celebrating her birthday on this day.

Missing plane

Sky News 22nd March 2014

Professor Mischa Dohler, comments again on satellite technology for Sky News as they report on development in the search for the missing plane and continued to be called upon by Sky News for comment in this area as developments progressed. Professor Dohler was also interviewed live on BBC News and LBC Radio.

Miscarriage link to low IVF success

BBC News 21st March 2014

New research carried out at the University of Birmingham and King's College London suggests that women who produce fewer eggs during IVF treatment are more likely to miscarry. Dr Sesh Sunkara, Women's Health, who co authored the research said: 'I think the information will empower women. IVF treatment can be a distressing experience, and miscarrying makes it even more agonising.'

EU place travel bans over Crimean crisis

BBC Radio 5 Live 21st March 2014

The EU has placed travel bans on 12 more people linked to the unrest in Crimea. professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, said: 'The sanctions may be intended to punish Russia or the Russian government but they will not have an effect on Russian policy.' (07.09)

Al Jazeera - 'Inside Egypt'

Al Jazeera 21st March 2014

Dr Carool Kersten, Senior Lecturer in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World, took part in a half-hour panel discussion on Al-Jazeera's 'Inside Egypt', commenting on Egypt's political milestones since 2011. He appeared together with Adel Iskandar of Georgetown University and Abdul Mawgoud Dardery, a former MP for the Freedom and Justice Party and Muslim Brotherhood spokesperson on foreign affairs.

Bright lights, big potential

Times Higher Education 20th March 2014

An article expressing the view that London universities should widen opportunities and not sacrifice quality mentions the improvement of maths teaching through the King's College London Mathematics School.

Budget 2014

BBC Radio 4 - World at One 20th March 2014

Following the announcement of reforms to pensions in George Osborne's fifth budget, Professor Anne Redston, The Dickson Poon School of Law, said: 'These are people who have saved in their pensions for many years, they've saved with a view to retirement and what the chancellor is saying is we should trust them to spend it wisely.' Professor Redston was also interview by BBC News.

Malaysian flight

Channel 4 News 20th March 2014

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, talks to Channel 4 News about the distress the families of the passengers of the disappeared Malaysian flight might be experiencing.

Licence plate driving bans 'ineffective' in cutting city air pollution

Guardian 20th March 2014

Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, comments on the Parisian ban on some cars this week based on licence plates. He said that the effects would be difficult to assess: 'The weather changes all the time, the emissions change all the time and trying to pin down whether a particular emergency scheme works or not is hard.'

The Henderson Brooks morality play

The Indian Express 20th March 2014

Dr Srinath Raghavan, India Institute, writes an opinion piece following the public release of the Henderson-Brooks report, which looks at India's conflict with China in 1962. He said: ‘Neville Maxwell’s decision to make public parts of the Henderson-Brooks Report on the 1962 war is welcome and long overdue. However, the government’s mindless refusal to declassify the report has strengthened the belief that it is the “definitive” account of the war. While the report is a very useful document, it can hardly be the last word on the subject. Indeed, it is more useful for what it tells us about the Indian army’s attempts to institutionally cope with the humiliating defeat of the 1962 war rather than why it occurred in the first place.’ The piece appeared in the National Standard (India).

Khushwant: RIP

Outlook (India) 20th March 2014

Obituary article following the death this week of esteemed King’s alumni Mr Khushwant Singh. The article features a picture of Mr Singh with Principal Professor Sir Rick Trainor, as the Principal visited Mr Singh in his home in Delhi in January 2014 to award him a Fellowship of the College.

Youth subcultures: what are they now?

Guardian 20th March 2014

Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, comments on changes in youth subcultures. She said: ‘I think it's a lot easier to be promiscuous, subculturally speaking. When I was a teenager, you had to make more commitment to music and fashion, because it took more of a financial investment.’

Student life: sporting rivalry at varsity matches

Daily Telegraph 19th March 2014

An article which explores the rivalry at varsity sporting events and says that it is about more than excessive drinking. The piece mentions that King's and UCL have expanded their varsity to include sports other than rugby this year.

Generation Y and a social logjam

Guardian 19th March 2014

A reader letter from Dr William Solesbury, Political Economy, which supports the letter of 18 March suggesting that there should be a more even approach to gender disparities in certain subjects.

Past wisdom

Nature 19th March 2014

Dr Lara Marks, Social Science, Health & Medicine, comments in a piece which explores the historical lessons that can be learned from the Nature archives, as is discussed in the 12 part Nature PastCast series. Dr Marks comments on a crisis surrounding a 1975 paper that was almost withdrawn.

Afghanistan’s choices – India would gain if Hamid Karzai signs the BSA

Telegraph (India) 19th March 2014

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, writes an opinion piece following US Secretary of State John Kerry’s comments on the USA’s growing political intolerance for continued engagement in world politics and the statement from President Hamid Karzai that Afghanistan will not enter into what is widely known as the bilateral security agreement or BSA. Dr Chaudhuri said: 'This is, (the BSA) according to most American interlocutors, an essential legal instrument designed to allow at least some US troops to remain in Afghanistan following the planned (and, in fact, ongoing) withdrawal of a majority of Western forces.'

A run can keep the brain young

Daily Telegraph 18th March 2014

Researchers at King's have said that vigorous exercise is more important than puzzles when trying to keep the brain active and stave off dementia. Professor Clive Ballard, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, said: 'If people enjoy a crossword that's great, and it's possible it does some good. But if people want the best chance of protecting themselves from dementia the answer is to go for a run or a brisk walk, the evidence is clear.'

The mask that glows in the dark to save your sight

Daily Mail 18th March 2014

New research has suggested that the most common cause of blindness (age-related macular degeneration or AMD) in older people could be tackled by wearing a mask that emits a dim green light at night. Chris Hammond, Professor of Opthalmology in Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: 'AMD is age related. We know that one of the layers of the retina thickens as we get older, so oxygen may pass through this layer less well as we age, and contribute to AMD.'

No link found between saturated fat and heart disease

Daily Telegraph 18th March 2014

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on the news that saturated fats have now been found to have no link to heart disease. Professor Sanders said: 'It really is time that we moved away from focusing on individual components of diet like saturated fat, salt and sugar and moved into better describing diets that we know are associated with a lower risk of heart disease such a Mediterranean dietary pattern or a vegetarian dietary pattern.'

Budget 2014: How will Osborne help the young unemployed and small businesses?

Huffington Post (UK) 18th March 2014

In an article looking at the effects of positive growth figures on the ground, a graduate of King's College London describes her struggles to find permanent work in a difficult job market and gives her opinion on the budget and situation.

Why Ukraine hasn't sparked a big cyber-war so far

Newsweek (USA) 18th March 2014

Article looking at whether cyber war is a major part of the turmoil in Ukraine: Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: ‘Imagine Russia had the capability to create a small blackout in the U.S. Escalating a cyber-attack would be counterproductive. Yes, some of them seem to be quite stupid. But I don’t know if they’re that stupid.’

MoD chatbots could join the secret cyberwar

Guardian 17th March 2014

The Ministry of Defence is developing a secret multi million pound research programme in to the future of cyberwarfare. Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, said: 'What is far more likely [than interstate cyberwar] is that states will seek to influence their own populations through so called 'cyber' methods.'

Skin-tight suits for space explorers

BBC News 17th March 2014

Further reporting of the new skin tight suit, being developed by researchers at King's, will try to stop astronaut's spines expanding in space. Dr David Green said: 'When man takes the first small step on Mars, there is a strong possibility the space traveller could end up with a broken hip'. Also reported by the Daily Mail.

Foreign Office excludes public from its public records day

Guardian 17th March 2014

The UK Foreign Office is holding a conference to explain how it will finally place into the public domain millions of public records that it has unlawfully held for decades – but is refusing to allow members of the public to attend. Professor Richard Drayton, History, said that reform of the Public Records Act is overdue.

Paris pollution measures will not happen in London, Boris Johnson's office says

Huffington Post (UK) 17th March 2014

Boris Johnson has said that the UK does not need to use pollution tackling measures introduced in Paris after the French capital has forced cars off roads. Dr Gary Fuller is quoted by the Huffington Post (UK) on this and said: 'Perhaps a co-ordinated action campaign with measures on all cities in the area would work better. We are all sharing the same air, and the pollution here does not just affect residents of London but the whole area'. Dr Fuller was also interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live (23.34) and is quoted in a Guardian live debate. He said that the recent Paris pollution had come from stagnant air building up under an unusually still weather pattern across much of Europe. Professor Frank Kelly has commented on the same issue for BBC London News on TV and Radio. He said: 'Private cars are only a small part of the total emissions from the transport system.'

Russia recognizes Crimea’s independence, defying new US and EU sanctions

Washington Post (USA) 17th March 2014

Article on the escalating international crisis over Ukraine, as the US and Europe imposed sanctions and Russian President Vladi¬mir Putin signed a decree recognizing the Ukrainian region of Crimea as an independent state. Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, said the sanctions were highly unlikely to influence Putin’s moves in Crimea and were instead aimed at the next flash point, eastern Ukraine. He said: ‘Crimea is lost. In practice, there’s no way that Ukraine is ever going to get it back. The question now, and it’s a vastly greater strategic question, is what happens in eastern Ukraine.’ Further coverage appeared in Quartz (USA).

Heart and Soul

BBC World Service 17th March 2014

As Lent, the most important time of the year for Catholics, begins, Fr Joseph Evans discusses confession and said: 'It's wonderful to have students coming here for confession and you really notice enormously that when somebody starts to go to confession their growth in virtue takes off.'

British satellite wizards helping the hunt for lost jet

BBC Radio 5 Live 16th March 2014

Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, comments on the communications systems used on planes as flight MH370 remains missing. Professor Dohler said: 'There are lots of different communication systems on the plane so you need to be really skilled to switch off everything.' Professor Dohler was also interviewed by Sky News and was quoted by the Sunday Mirror.

Spring weather may be wonderful but it’s far from fine for hayfever sufferers

Daily Express 15th March 2014

Further reporting of Stephen Till's comments on the effects of the early warm weather on asthma and hayfever sufferers. He said: 'Pollen can causes asthma attacks. Grass pollen is more associated with attacks than tree pollen.'

Pope appoints Fr Robert Byrne as new Auxiliary Bishop of Birmingham

Catholic News 15th March 2014

The appointment of Fr Robert Byrne is reported, article mentions that Fr Byrne studied at King's.

History never ended, it's back

The New Indian Express 14th March 2014

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece looking at how events in Eastern Europe are reminiscent of the heyday of the Cold War: 'Remember those halcyon days when pundits were declaring that the world is witnessing an end of history with liberal democracy and free market capitalism emerging triumphant after the collapse of the Soviet Union? How distant those days seem and how out of touch with reality those pronouncements,' he said.

Matias Spektor: It's a slap in the face of Brazil

O Globo (Brazil) 14th March 2014

For the analyst, the authoritarian escalation of Chavez in Venezuela threatens the integration project in South America and the Brazilian government silences dangerously. Spektor took the chair White River, which occupies at King's College, to get away from the routine and finish 18 days: when Lula and FHC teamed up to win the support of George W. Bush, his third book, scheduled for July.

Face off in Ukraine

Prospect Magazine 14th March 2014

An essay by Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, about the goals of Russia and the West in Ukraine which says that failure to find a solution could risk the destruction of this divided nation. Professor Lieven said: 'The danger comes from the possibility of clashes between the Ukrainian nationalist and neo-fascist volunteers who led the overthrow of the previous government in Kiev and opposing Moscow-backed pro-Russian volunteers in the east of the country.'

Retreat - what a retreat is

Catholic Herald 14th March 2014

Fr Joseph Evans discusses the logic and conditions of a retreat. He said: 'Only by rising above our daily life, with all its hustle and bustle, can we get an idea of what we need to change or improve'

Sexual harassment is 'normal' in clubs, but are things about to change?

Guardian 13th March 2014

King's has been mentioned in this article as one of the universities with an interest in signing a pledge to tackle the problem of sexual harassment in nightclubs head on.

‘Love’ hormone could help to beat anorexia

The Times 13th March 2014

Oxytocin, the so-called “love” hormone, could provide the first pharmaceutical treatment for anorexia, according to new research from King's. Prof Janet Treasure, Institute of Psychiatry, who led the study, explains that oxytocin may target some of the social difficulties patients with anorexia have: “These social problems, which can result in isolation, may be important in understanding both the onset and maintenance of anorexia.” Also reported by BBC News, Daily Mail, Press Association, Reuters, Evening Standard, METRO, TIME magazine, Times of India, Hindustan Times. Prof Treasure was interviewed by BBC Radio London and BBC World Service.

King's press release related to '‘Love’ hormone could help to beat anorexia'

A broader choice for sixth-form students

Independent i 13th March 2014

In a piece reporting on the growing appeal of the International Baccalaureate, King's is mentioned as one of the universities which has lowered the admissions criteria for IB students.

Institutions pass Vttae's 2-year test

Times Higher Education 13th March 2014

Eleven universities have retained their European Commission HR Excellence in Research Award after a two-year review, including King’s.

KCL agrees to pay its staff the London Living Wage

Independent 13th March 2014

King’s College London announced it will pay at least the London Living Wage to all staff for all new contracts and will renegotiate existing ones.

Dame Cicely Saunders' legacy

BBC Radio 4 - Women's Hour 13th March 2014

Dr Katherine Sleeman, Cicley Saunders Institute, speaks about Cicely Saunders' legacy and says: 'She made an enormous difference through her work. She revolutionised care of the dying in its entirety.'

Identical twins' polar trek aids scientific research

BBC News 13th March 2014

Hugo and Ross Turner, 25, from Christow in Devon, are crossing the Greenland ice cap to raise money for spinal research after Hugo was nearly paralysed in an accident on a Cornish beach eight years ago. However, the Department of Twin Research at King's is using the expedition to study how modern clothes, food and equipment protect the body.

‘Love hormone’ may help fight anorexia

Veja (Brazil) 13th March 2014

Further coverage of new research from the Institute of Psychiatry which has found that the hormone oxytocin could help treat anorexia, by stimulating the production of dopamine and serotonin. Also reported in the USA by New York Daily News, Chicago Tribune and Yahoo, in India by Times of India, National Standard (India) and The Indian Express, and in Brazil by O Globo and Terra.

Spring has sprung a nasty surprise on millions of hayfever sufferers

Daily Telegraph 12th March 2014

An article looking at weather conditions over the last week which says that they have been perfect for the first wave of trees to bring pollen in to the air. Dr Stephen Till, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, said: 'Most people who have asthma caused by pollen would have hay fever as well and vice versa.'

New academy offered 100 places at top universities

Times 12th March 2014

A pioneering school set up in a poor area of London under the free schools policy has said that 100 of its students have been offered places at Russell Group universities. This is three times the number of teenagers in the entire borough who previously went to leading universities in one year. King's is mentioned as one of the universities with the largest number of offers in the school.

Making sense of the urban sprawl

Times 12th March 2014

With populations booming there is an increased need for experts in town planning. This article mentions the King's MSc in Sustainable Cities and quotes Dr Richard Wiltshire, Geography, who designed the course: 'We felt the need to deal with issues that cut across that divide, so we could bring together environmentalists concerned about air quality, planners looking at the design of social housing, geographers concerned about resource use and those who want to discuss the governance and politics of cities.'

German archaeologist suggests British Museum's Warren Cup could be forgery

Guardian 12th March 2014

A Roman silver drinking vessel that depicts two sets of male lovers is one of the most prized jewels in the British Museum, singled out by director Neil MacGregor for his critically acclaimed History of the World in 100 Objects. At a public debate staged by King's College London, Professor Luca Giuliani, Classics, challenged the museum's view that it dates from the 1st century AD. He suggested instead that the cup was designed for the pleasure of its former owner – a wealthy American gay man, Edward Perry Warren, who bought it in Rome in 1911.

MPs will be given free vote on 'three parent babies'

Daily Telegraph 12th March 2014

Further reporting on the news of legislation on 'three parent babies' and the fact that this will be the subject of a free vote when it comes to the Commons.

The Western Sahara

Monocle 24 12th March 2014

In a piece looking beyond the Ukraine at other contested territories, Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, is interviewed on the dispute over the Western Sahara. Dr Hill said: 'Since Morocco seized control in 1975, successive governments have invested quite a lot of time and money in trying to improve conditions there and essentially win the loyalty of the local population.' Interview begins (23.56)

Destined to stereotype: How the mind’s gift for grouping gets us in trouble

Huffington Post (USA) 12th March 2014

Article on human beings’ tendency to stereotype discusses stigma around mental health issues. The article mentions a recent study by King’s which found that, in the USA and Europe, stigma is a key factor preventing people from seeking the help they need. Professor Graham Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, is quoted: ‘The profound reluctance to be 'a mental health patient' means people will put off seeing a doctor for months, years, or even at all, which in turn delays their recovery.’

Why you should NEVER keep your mobile in your bedroom

Daily Mail 11th March 2014

Article about whether or not you should sleep next to your mobile phone. 'The good news is we can't see an effect on sleep quality,' says Dr James Rubin, Institute of Psychiatry. He adds: 'This is not to say the symptoms of electrosensitivity aren't real - they are, and can be devastating. But as far as we can tell, it's not the electromagnetic field causing them.'

Soaring drug deaths turn focus on anti-overdose drug

New Scientist 11th March 2014

Prof John Strang, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the rise in heroin overdose deaths. He says what's missing is solid science to back up anecdotal findings and policy decisions - he is leading a large trial called N-ALIVE to test the effectiveness of take-home naloxone to prevent overdose deaths.

Is it OK to laugh at Women Who Eat on Tubes?

Daily Telegraph 11th March 2014

An article reporting on a new Facebook group that posts images taken secretly of female commuters eating on the underground. King's College London Feminist Society is quoted and say: 'In a society where women are already under so much pressure to conform to restrictive body ideals this vicious form of bullying only serves to fuel the insecurities many women suffer from.'

China's anti-smog drive

CNC 11th March 2014

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, is interviewed in a programme on China’s air pollution problem. He discussed London’s attempts to tackle air pollution: ‘London has been doing a very large experiment of applying dust suppressants to roads, a chemical called calcium magnesium acetate. It means that some of the pollutants stick to the roads rather than being suspended in the air.’ Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, was interviewed on the same topic by CCTV (China).

Seeing a threat at home in a fight abroad

New York Times (USA) 11th March 2014

Article on Moazzam Begg, a British former detainee of Guantánamo Bay who was re-arrested last month on suspicion of terrorism offenses related to Syria. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, is mentioned as being in touch with dozens of Britons fighting in Syria and monitoring the social network activity of those posting in English. He is quoted: 'They are there to fight an Islamic revolution; they want an Islamic caliphate. They are not fighting to establish a democracy.’

Revolution on shaky ground

Indian Express 11th March 2014

Dr Peter Kingstone, Director, International Development Institute, writes an opinion piece on the legacy of Hugo Chavez one year on from the Venezuelan leader’s death: ‘The protests began in January and grew in size and intensity, primarily in response to a series of highly visible violent crimes. What began as an explosion of student anger about crime and impunity, turned into a more generalised expression of middle class anger at a host of very real issues in Venezuela. These date back well before Chávez’s death, but have worsened noticeably under Maduro.’ The piece also appeared in the National Standard (India).

Secularism is not a strong foundation for British society, says Bishop Egan

Catholic Herald 11th March 2014

Bishop Philip Egan spoke at King's last week and said that secularism 'cannot guarantee human flourishing nor sustain the advances the British people have achieved'. Bishop Egan's visit was also reported by the Catholic Times, The Universe and The Tablet.

Gulf 's mutual suspicions give Qatar's emir his first big test

Financial Times 10th March 2014

Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, is quoted in an article reporting an unusually public spat between sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani and Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. Dr Roberts said: 'What Tamim needs to work out is the extent of the message: is it just a rude message or part of an escalation that could potentially become a big problem.'

Cameron hails new age of technological revolution

Daily Telegraph 10th March 2014

Reporting of the news that the Prime Minister has announced extra funding for the development of the new 5G internet system. This will be developed by King's alongside the Universities of Surrey and Dresden. This was also reported by the Sun and Press Association.

New Screening Tool for Osteoporosis: Osentia™ Test Will Enable People to Assess Their Risk of Suffering a Fragility Fracture

Reuters 10th March 2014

A new screening tool could help to identify those most at risk of fractures and broken bones. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: 'People are often unaware that they have fragile bones until the time of a first fracture.'

No league table is perfect: Why you shouldn’t worry about university rankings

Independent 10th March 2014

Final year student, Ben Jackson, writes for the independent on the topic of league tables and how these should be interpreted with caution.

An education revolution?

BBC Radio 4 10th March 2014

The final programme in a series looking at the phenomenal changes to education being brought about by technology. The debate is broadcast from the Great Hall at King's College London. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, was on the panel and, at the start of the discussion, said: 'It's about motivating people to learn, not through some video app, but by exciting them about what they're doing.' The series has also been discussed by the Guardian.

5 year study links Alzheimer’s and lipid levels

Philadelphia Inquirer (USA) 10th March 2014

Article reviewing recent efforts by researchers to predict the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s. Dr Richard Dobson, Institute of Psychiatry, commented on a recent study by King’s which found that low levels of two of the 10 lipids were linked to the disease, saying that a blood test has the advantage of being fast and cheap.

Social media is new weapon in war on British jihadis

Independent on Sunday 9th March 2014

Diplomats have revealed plans to utilise the popularity of social media to deter would-be jihadis from leaving the UK. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: 'Around the time of Iraq and Afghanistan, there were attempts to try to get messages online to counter the extremists, which was the old way of thinking. It is likely the Government is refining that approach. Syria has been unprecedented in the way the internet and social media have been harnessed.'

We need to rethink London to benefit us all

Observer 9th March 2014

Observer writer argues that London is growing economically, but not in a way that benefits many of its citizens. Professor Chris Hamnett, Geography, claims that the capital's property is now used by the global rich as 'a process of global asset diversification'

Schools dangle golden hellos to find maths teachers in City

Sunday Times 9th March 2014

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, comments on the news that schools are offering maths and science teachers 'recruitment points' or 'golden hellos' of up to £20 000 and six figure salaries to lure graduates away from jobs in the city. Professor Wolf said: 'In most of the schools I know it’s not a question of paying a premium to attract these teachers — schools just cannot find them. Golden hellos do make some difference but they are not solving the problem. The reality is that there is an acute shortage of qualified graduates'

Minority fears over Ukrainian crisis

BBC Radio 4 - Sunday 9th March 2014

Dr Marat Shterin, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on the ethnic and religious make up of the Crimea and the way this may be affected by the crisis. He said: 'Ukraine is immensely complex and interesting religiously.'

Deconstructing Saga: Inside the mind of the TV detective

BBC News 9th March 2014

Dr Eva Loth, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on Saga, the character from TV series 'The Bridge'. She says: "She does portray well characteristic features that many people with ASD have and struggle with, and she also brings home the message that in high-functioning people with ASD there is an awareness they are different and that they are trying to fit in sometimes to different degrees of success. "

Dictionary of Slang

Financial Express (India) 9th March 2014

Further coverage of the new book by Tony Thorn, English Language Centre, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang.

Studies confuse healthy eating debate, say experts

Financial Times 8th March 2014

An article looking at the large number of pieces of research that have recently been reported with new and confusing advice on diet. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, is quoted and said that people who want a label and instructions for their diet could go for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, a US interpretation of Mediterranean eating endorsed by the National Institutes of Health.

Ukraine standoff intensifies: Russia says sanctions will ‘boomerang’

Tribune (India) 8th March 2014

Dr Sam Greene, Director, Russia Institute, is interviewed about Russia’s statement that US sanctions imposed on Moscow over the crisis in Ukraine will boomerang back on the United States.

Careers tip: How to succeed in an interview

Independent i 7th March 2014

Helen Lovegrove, senior careers consultant for the Careers Group and currently based at King's, gives her top tips for succeeding in an interview.

Community Care Boosts Treatment of Mentally Ill in Developing Countries

Voice of America 7th March 2014

Research led by Professor Graham Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, shows that community-based care is an effective strategy for treating individuals with schizophrenia. He says: "What we wanted to do in this study is to find out, can we develop a relatively simple and affordable type of treatment that will increase the number of people who get treatment and increase the quality of care,”

King's press release related to 'Community Care Boosts Treatment of Mentally Ill in Developing Countries'

Too much meat and cheese is as bad as smoking, US study suggests

South China Morning Post 7th March 2014

A diet rich in meat, eggs, milk and cheese could be as harmful to health as smoking, according to a new study into the impact of protein consumption on longevity. Professor Peter Emery, Nutrition, commented on the findings: ‘I would urge general caution over observational studies and particularly when looking at diet, given the difficulties of disentangling one nutrient or dietary component from another.’

Rebuilding trust in the police

Evening Standard 7th March 2014

Professor Ben Bowling, The Dickson Poon School of Law, has written to the Evening Standard and argues argues that the Police are entrusted with extensive powers and it is crucial that due process is observed, especially when using covert methods.

Nursing leaders respond to apprenticeship route into nursing plans

Nursing Times 7th March 2014

Nursing leaders have said that proposals for new apprenticeships to fast-track healthcare assistants into nursing must not be used as a way to dilute the graduate-level profession nurses have worked towards for many years. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery said the policy 'raises more questions than it answers. What will the academic value of this qualification be and is it enrolled nurses by another name?.'

Crimea-Ukraine crisis continues

Sky News 7th March 2014

As the crisis continues, King's experts have continued to comment on developments. Including developments in Crimea. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, was interviewed by Sky News on the topic of relations between Russia and the West and Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, was interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live over the continued tensions between Putin and Obama.

A new way of working for scientists

Daily Telegraph 7th March 2014

The Francis Crick Institute, named after the British scientist who helped decode the structure of DNA, will house 1,200 scientists working in biomedical research when it opens at the end of 2015. King's is one of the founding partners.

The science of success: Blood, or sweat and tears?

New Scientist 6th March 2014

Article mentions a recent twin study led by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, which found that differences in children's academic performances in UK schools owe more to heritable traits than to teaching or other environmental factors.

Sugar, not fat, is real heart disease killer

Daily Mail 6th March 2014

Researchers in New York have suggested that low-fat diets do not curb heart disease or help you live longer - the real enemy is sugar and carbohydrates. Professor Tom Sanders, head of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, said Dr DiNicolantoni had misrepresented the scientific evidence. This was also reported by the Express, Daily Telegraph, BBC, Evening Standard and Daily Mirror.

King’s rises in Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings

Times 6th March 2014

King’s College London has risen to 43rd place in the Times Higher Education world rankings of universities by reputation. Professor Sir Rick Trainor, Principal & President of King’s, said: ‘During the last decade King's has capitalised on the mergers which greatly enhanced the institution during the 1980s and 1990s and has seen a marked rise in international appreciation of the quality of our research and teaching. This was reported by Evening Standard, Guardian, Times Higher Education, Times, BBC News and Press Association.

Punishing a few oligarchs in London is not enough

Financial Times 6th March 2014

John Gapper comments on the inequality in Russia's wealth. Dr Sam Greene, Russia Insitute, says that the Kremlin relies on oligarchs and if Putin's leadership became a liability, 'they would get rid of him in a way shareholders get rid of a chief executive'

Appointments - Alan Cribb

Times Higher Education 6th March 2014

Professor Alan Cribb, Department of Education & Professional Studies, has been appointed as a Health Foundation Professorial Fellow.

Your weird animal questions answered

National Geographic 6th March 2014

Professor Paul Sharpe, Dental Institute, answered the question 'whether technology that allows for the bioengineering of human teeth could be used to create authentic elephant and rhino tusk material to help break up the black market for tusks?'. Professor Sharpe said that it’s theoretically possible to make a lab-grown tooth 'if the right cells could be obtained'.

Animal protein-rich diets could be as harmful to health as smoking

Guardian 5th March 2014

New research has suggested that a diet rich in meat, eggs, milk and cheese could be as harmful to health as smoking, according to a controversial study into the impact of protein consumption on longevity. Professor Peter Emery, Head of Nutrition and Dietetics, said: 'I would urge general caution over observational studies, and particularly when looking at diet, given the difficulties of disentangling one nutrient or dietary component from another.' This was further reported by the Independent and Professor Tom Sanders, Nutrition, was also interviewed on the topic for BBC Radio 4 Today.

Fruit, water 'cut early birth risk'

Nursing Times 5th March 2014

Pregnant women who drink water and eat a diet rich in fruit, vegetables and whole grain cereal could reduce their chance of premature birth, according to research published online in the British Medical Journal. In an accompanying editorial, Professor Lucilla Poston, Women's Health, said other studies had proposed the benefit of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables in preventing premature birth. Also reported by Press Association.

Harder, better, fast, stronger - scene and heard

Private Eye 5th March 2014

The Centre for Robotics Research was featured in a cartoon for Private Eye about prosthetic limbs.

The long shadow of war

Guardian 4th March 2014

Stephen Hoare discusses war studies courses such as those run by King's. The article notes that King's runs MAs in War Studies and the History of Warfare, and is rolling out a series of public and academic events over the next five years.

Consequences of Telangana creation unclear

Bloomberg TV (USA) 4th March 2014

Dr Louise Tillin, India Institute, is interviewed on the new state of Telangana in India, stating that the manner of its creation is a departure from previous state carve-outs: ‘The settlement for Seemandhra and Telangana remains unclear.’ Dr Tillin also pointed out that there has been an increase in delegation of power and authority to states, and warned that diversity in the state policy environment has serious investment implications.

Frequent childhood nightmares linked to risk of mental illness: study

Xinhua (China) 3rd March 2014

Dr Helen Fisher, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on her research which suggests that children who have frequent nightmare are at an increased risk of psychotic experiences in adolescence. Also reported in Global Times (China) and Deccan Herald (India) amongst others

King's press release related to 'Frequent childhood nightmares linked to risk of mental illness: study'

Ukraine political crisis

Channel 4 News 3rd March 2014

King’s experts have continued to comment as events unfold in Ukraine this week. Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, spoke to BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight and said: ‘It’s always useful to dig into history because you can find out where the conflicts have come from.’ Dr Domitilla Sagramoso was interviewed for Channel 4 News where she spoke about Putin’s use of force saying: ‘I think that Putin sometimes uses force when he fails to send the message across to Europe.’ Dr Gonzalo Pozo-Martin was interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live (01.18.56) on the topic of an ‘accidental war’ and said: ‘What we do know is that there’s been talk about Ukrainians in Crimea offering some kind of opposition to Russian troops there but we don’t know what form that might take and therefore it might be a little bit too early to speak about an accidental war.’ Dr Sam Greene, Russia Institute, commented for the Financial Times on European divisions on possible sanctions and said that calling off economic co operation ‘would not be merely symbolic gestures’. PhD student, Oscar Jonsson, wrote a letter on the topic of the Crimea to the Evening Standard.

Oscars good, Razzies bad? It’s really not that simple

The Conversation 3rd March 2014

Dr Hannah Hamad, Film Studies, asks why we set such store by the prestige conferred on films marked out for attention by industry insiders with a vested interest in honouring themselves and their friends

Why Obama shouldn’t fall for Putin’s Ukrainian folly

Open Democracy 3rd March 2014

Professor Anatol Lieven, writes about Russia and the west conspiring to tear Ukraine apart. Professor Lieven said: 'It is urgently necessary that both should find ways of withdrawing from some of the positions that they have taken. Otherwise, the result could very easily be civil war, Russian invasion, the partition of Ukraine, and a conflict that will haunt Europe for generations to come.'

Scottish anxieties on independence revealed in poll

Guardian 3rd March 2014

An Ipsos Mori/Kings College London-sponsored piece of research has concluded that Scottish people are more anxious than the English and Welsh about the effect of independence on the United Kingdom as a whole.

Breastfeeding versus baby formula is not an either or debate

Guardian 3rd March 2014

A response to Erik Assadourian's commentary piece on banning all marketing of baby formula. Emily Maclean, a student midwife at King's, says that new mothers deserve an informed choice - and that includes the right to formula milk.

Time to end western meddling in Bosnia

Guardian 3rd March 2014

Letter claiming that external rule in Bosnia has failed and calling for the termination of the office of the high representative and an end to outside meddling in Bosnian affairs. Dr Stathis Kouvelakis, French, has signed.

Fiction is my first language, so why not use it to talk about art?

Huffington Post (UK) 3rd March 2014

Tony White, French, discusses why he writes short stories about art. He says that he is currently working on a new project about British performance artist Stuart Brisley, that is supported by King's.

After building a powerful recommendation for Netflix, this guy wants to help you find your next favourite book

Houston Chronicle 3rd March 2014

Profile of Nicholas Ampazis, who’s making an impact in the software industry, mentions his Master's and PhD degree in neural networks from King's.

Learn how to identify and avoid sugar on labels

O Globo (Brazil) 3rd March 2014

Report of new guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) recommending that the daily amount of sugar in the diet is reduced to half. Professor Tom Sanders, Medicine, said that the ‘limit of 5% added sugar is too hard to follow.’ Original report by BBC News.

Why Obama Shouldn't Fall for Putin's Ukrainian Folly

Huffington Post (USA) 3rd March 2014

Professor Anatol Lieven wrote about Russia and the west conspiring to tear Ukraine apart. 'It is urgently necessary that both should find ways of withdrawing from some of the positions that they have taken. Otherwise, the result could very easily be civil war.’ The piece also appeared in Time (USA) and Open Democracy.

Schumacher now unlikely to make a full recovery, say brain experts

Daily Telegraph 2nd March 2014

Professor Anthony Strong, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on Michael Schumacher. He says: "About 90 percent of the recovery is made within nine to 12 months, so this is still early days," He adds: "The longer someone is in a coma, the worse their recovery tends to be." Also reported in the Evening Standard, Associated Press, Daily Mail, Daily Express, Boston Globe, Hindustan Times, New India Express.

NHS data will not be sold

Press Association 2nd March 2014

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the news insurance companies will not be able to buy patient medical records through the NHS care.data scheme. He says: "It is excellent to see that NHS-E is indeed responding swiftly to the concerns that have been expressed in many quarters. Many will particularly welcome the strengthening of the sanctions for corporate misuse." Also reported by MSN UK news.

Researchers reveal slang explosion

Sunday Times 2nd March 2014

From buff to butters, YOLO to amazeballs, slang is ever-changing and continues to shape how people communicate. Tony Thorne explores how new slang emerges in contemporary society and asks whether its prevalence is a bad thing for the English language. Tony’s book the Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (Fourth Edition), explores the use of slang and his comments have been reported by Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, London Evening Standard, Press Association.

Checks on students undermine trust

Guardian 2nd March 2014

A reader letter, signed by Professor Patrick Wright, English, opposes the acquiescence of Universities UK members in acting as an extension of UKVI, thereby undermining the autonomy and academic freedom of UK universities and trust between academics and their students.

Commentary: field of tissue engineering is progressing at remarkable pace

Telegraph 2nd March 2014

Dr Eileen Gentleman, Dental Institute, writes about tissue engineering and said that the field is 'progressing at a remarkable pace with tailor-made tissues a real possibility in the near future.'

Know your granny slang from your Jafrican?

Sunday Times 2nd March 2014

From buff to butters, YOLO to amazeballs, slang is ever-changing and continues to shape how people communicate. Tony Thorne, English Language Centre, explores how new slang emerges in contemporary society in his new book the Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (Fourth Edition). This was reported by Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, Evening Standard, Press Association and by Times of India, Mumbai Mirror, Hindustan Times, Deccan Herald (all India).

Derek Jarman

AnOther Magazine 1st March 2014

Article about the Derek Jarman exhibition held by the Cultural Institute at King's. Further reviews appeared in the New Statesman.

The U.K. Understands How To Treat PTSD. Why Does The U.S. Lag Behind?

The New Republic (US) 1st March 2014

Research by King's Centre for Military Health Research shows that overall, UK troops report better mental health than their US peers. Dr Deirdre MacManus, IoP, says: “While it is difficult to compare rates between nations, a consistent finding of the last 20 years is that reported mental health problems tend to be higher among service personnel and veterans of the USA compared with the UK, Canada, Germany and Denmark,”

King's press release related to 'The U.K. Understands How To Treat PTSD. Why Does The U.S. Lag Behind?'

IVF babies to be born with DNA of three parents

Daily Express 28th February 2014

Babies with three genetic ­parents could be born in the UK as early as next year after the Government paved the way for controversial new fertility ­treatments. Professor Peter Braude said: 'It is true that genetic alteration of disease risk is an important step for society and should not be taken lightly.' Professor Braude's comments were also reported by the Daily Telegraph, Sun, Daily Mail, London Evening Standard, Nursing Times, Daily Mirror, Daily Express, Press Association and Reuters (UK).

News travels fast in cyberspace but can we trust it?

Evening Standard 28th February 2014

A feature on the rumours spread by Twitter and Facebook. A new project involving King's College London called Pheme is attempting, over the next 18 months, to build a web app that would work out how likely a Twitter statement is to be true or false.

US soldiers more likely to suffer from PTSD

New Republic 28th February 2014

Further coverage of a recent study by King’s which found that despite similar experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq, U.K. soldiers on average report better mental health than U.S. soldiers. King’s researchers analysed 34 studies produced over a 15-year period and found that overall there has been no increase in mental health issues among British personnel - with the exception of high rates of alcohol abuse among soldiers.

Child health problems 'linked to father's age'

BBC News 27th February 2014

Dr James MacCabe, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on research suggesting that children born from older parents are at greater risk of mental health disorders. He says: "I would make the point very strongly that men should not decide on whether or when to have children on a single study, or cumulative studies." Also reported by O Globo (Brazil)

British troops less likely to get PTSD than Americans

Daily Telegraph 27th February 2014

New research from the King's Centre for Military Health Research finds that overall, UK troops are remained 'mentally healthy' and more resilient than their US peers. Dr Deirdre MacManus, lead author of the study, said: “Overall, UK military personnel have remained relatively resilient in spite of the stresses endured in Iraq and Afghanistan.” Also reported by BBC News, Daily Mail, Reuters, The Times, MSN News, Press Association

King's press release related to 'British troops less likely to get PTSD than Americans'

Foreign doctor test

Times 27th February 2014

A letter from Professor Raymond Levy regarding the proposed introduction of a new English test for doctors coming to practice in Britain from other countries.

Soaring numbers of over-40s are taking heroin, using cannabis and binge drinking

Daily Mail 27th February 2014

Further reporting of the research conducted at King's that found that the amount of middle aged drug users was increasing.

Here's some of the most beautiful universities in the UK

Huffington Post (UK) 27th February 2014

A collection of photographs of universities deemed to be the most beautiful in the UK features an image of King's.

Morocco-France row

Monocle 24 27th February 2014

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, explains the situation between the two countries as a diplomatic row grows over allegations of human rights abuses. He said: 'The Moroccan government doesn't gain anything out of making a scapegoat and an enemy out of France.' Item begins 21.46.

How to evolve your character for a more meaningful, successful life

Huffinton Post (UK) 27th February 2014

Psychologists have identified 24 core qualities that people around the world say contributes to a fulfilling life. These include gratitude, humility, curiosity, optimism, and love, among others. King's is one of over 200 international organisations to host screenings of the film 'The Science of Character' as part of #CharacterDay on 20 March.

Nursing cutbacks linked to higher patient deaths

Times 26th February 2014

New research led by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing has found evidence that cutbacks in nursing staff are linked to higher patient death rates in hospitals. Hospital patients were also more likely to die after surgery if they were treated by nurses who did not have a bachelor's degree. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing & Midwifery, one of the report's authors, said that the fuss 'over nurses being over-educated in our view is a gross exaggeration.' Also reported by the Daily Telegraph and Professor Rafferty was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 and the research was further reported by the Nursing Standard.

Baby killer had warned he was a danger

Sky News 26th February 2014

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry (IOP), comments on the case of Liam Culverhouse, who came back from serving in Afghanistan with post-traumatic stress disorder, an subsequently killed his young daughter. Dr Deirdre MacManus, also IoP, was interviewed for BBC News and BBC Radio 4's 'The World at One'

Lee Rigby's killers sentenced

Huffington Post (UK) 26th February 2014

Professor Peter Neumann, War Studies, was interviewed by Newsnight on the subject of the sentencing of Lee Rigby's killers. The interview was further reported by the Huffington Post. Professor Neumann said: 'They don't have any incentive to change their beliefs, if anything their incentive is to stick to their beliefs as to change them would be to admit to themselves that they've wasted their lives.'

Are the crowds in Ukraine reviving an ancient Roman tradition?

BBC News (Online) 26th February 2014

In an extraordinary ceremony in Ukraine, potential cabinet members are to be paraded in front of crowds of protesters to seek their approval, it's been reported. It has strange echoes of Ancient Roman practices. Professor Charlotte Roueche, Hellenic Studies, said: 'In Kiev, the main cathedral actually has wall paintings showing activities in the Hippodrome in Constantinople, where the emperors were acclaimed.'

NICE calls for training to help victims of domestic violence

Health Service Journal 26th February 2014

Nurses, social workers, health services and the organisations they work with must be better trained to understand domestic violence and help those experiencing it, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence has said. Dr Susan Bewley, Women's Health, said: 'Domestic violence often starts or escalates in pregnancy. This is why it is important for those of us working on the frontline in maternity services to know what to look for, but also be able to ask women about it in such a way that they will tell us.'

NICE calls for better training to help victims of domestic violence

Nursing Times 26th February 2014

Professor Susan Bewley, Nursing & Midwifery, comments on new guidance aimed at helping to identify, prevent and reduce domestic violence, as well as outlining the most effective responses to it. She said :'t is important for those of us working on the frontline in maternity services to know what to look for, but also be able to ask women about it in such a way that they will tell us.'

Scientists investigate possible link between pregnant women taking paracetamol and the risk of ADHD

Independent 25th February 2014

Professor Philip Asherson, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research suggesting that children of mothers who take paracetamol during pregnancy may be at a higher risk of developing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). He says: "It is important that people are not alarmed by these findings and do not alter their use of paracetamol… it is far too early to say that the association the researchers observe plays a causal role in ADHD.”

After the Spring

O Estado de Sao Paulo 25th February 2014

Article on Cairo's potential as a tourist destination, mentions the graffiti around Tahir Square:'These artists sincerely believe that their battle against the status quo is through street art.' Soraya Morayef, King's College London.

After the Spring

O Estado de Sao Paulo 25th February 2014

Article on Cairo's potential as a tourist destination, mentions the graffiti around Tahir Square:'These artists sincerely believe that their battle against the status quo is through street art.' Soraya Morayef, King's College London.

Surge in Syria Jihadist arrests prompt security fears around Europe

Voice of America (USA) 25th February 2014

Article on how an increasing number of British citizens are going to Syria to fight with the opposition and returning with Al Qaida affiliations. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: 'The suicide bombing suggests a level of zealotry that is quite unprecedented. They are fighters, and they are on the ground to do two things: one is to remove Assad, but also to achieve martyrdom.'

Secretly Starving

Daily Telegraph 24th February 2014

Dr Helen Sharpe, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about pro-anorexia websites. The most important factor to consider, she explains, is “why people are choosing to seek out these groups - what do they give people that they can’t get elsewhere? Eating disorders can be extremely isolating conditions, and so finding a community of other people who think like you can be a powerful draw.”

Vertical film screens offer a new reality

Times of India 24th February 2014

Article on how portrait-orientated screens could the next big development in cinema. Dr Erika Balsom, Film Studies, said the popularity of vertical cinema was linked to technical developments and the 'larger variability of frame proportions that comes with digitization.'

New lung cancer research

ITV - London Tonight 24th February 2014

Scientists have begun trials at two London hospitals hoping to make a breakthrough in the treatment of an aggressive form of lung cancer often linked to exposure to asbestos. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, was interviewed and explained the relevance of stem cells to research currently happening in London.

Tourist attractions blighted by pollution

ITV - London Tonight 24th February 2014

It has been revealed that the 50 places in Britain with the highest levels of a toxic gas are in the capital with the highest levels very near to tourist attractions. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said that recent work confirms the effects of nitrogren dioxide but that the magnitude of that effect is not yet clear.

Charlton's £1m strike against landmines

Sunday Times 23rd February 2014

The former England and Manchester United footballer, Sir Bobby Charlton, has raised more than £1m to fund scientific research into accelerating the clearance of the world's estimated 110m unexploded landmines. Find A Better Way is working with the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to fund further projects, one of which is at King's.

Could cinema be heading for vertical reality

Independent 23rd February 2014

Dr Erika Balsom, Film Studies, discusses development in film including the introduction of 'vertical cinema'. She said that the popularity of veritcal cinema was linked to technical developments and the 'larger variability of frame proportions that comes with digitisation' as opposed to previous eras when the aspect image ratio had to mirror that of the filmstrip itself.

Welfare Cuts: Have Christian Leaders Become The New Voice Of The Left?

Huffington Post (UK) 23rd February 2014

Dr Anna Rowlands, a lecturer in Theology and Ministry at Kings College London comments on church leaders involvement in political issues. She said: 'With the absence of leadership on these issues from the main political parties, it feels to many as if the Churches are expressing that opposition.'

Rewards of medical record research 'could be enormous'

BBC Radio 4 - Today 21st February 2014

Professor Matthew Hotopf, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the importance of electronic medical records for patient benefit, and how the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) at the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the Maudsley and King's.

The Colonial Troops who Fought the Allies War

AFP 21st February 2014

Article on the contribution of British colonial forces - from Algeria to Australia and Jamaica - to the 1st World War. Professor Ashley Jackson, History, said: 'The First World War showed the empire's capacity to mobilise people on a scale never before witnessed.'

Middle class ‘cling-ons’ squeezed out of London property market

Financial Times 21st February 2014

Professor Chris Hamnett, Geography, has charted the 'gentrification' of London over half a century and said, in this piece about how high earners are being locked out of the housing market, that the capital was now 'a global centre for the international rich', whose desire to secure a home in the capital amounted to 'a process of global asset diversification'.

Ukraine peace deal

ITV Daybreak 21st February 2014

As a peace deal in Ukraine begins to be reached, Dr Gonzalo Pozo-Martin, European & International Studies, comments on the impact of a peace deal. He said: 'With that degree of violence, the president has to stand down and there has to be some deep constitutional reform or the protestors won't back down.' Dr Domitilla Sagramoso commented on the situation in Ukraine for BBC News, saying 'It's very hard to predict, I think that the situation is really getting a bit out of hand. Let's hope that the parliament manages to pass a resolution where they agree on the holding of the new elections.' Professor Anatol Lieven also wrote a piece for the Evening Standard, saying: 'The newly dominant political forces have to maintain their unity and the authority of the state in circumstances where they may have little in common but their hatred of the former regime.'

Air pollution: how big a problem is it for cyclists?

Guardian 20th February 2014

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, comments on the dangers caused by diesel engines in urban areas. He said: 'People should be worrying about diesel traffic and particle exposure, and also about nitrogen dioxide. The thing about these is they haven’t really improved in urban areas for the last decade or so. We’ve managed to clean up air pollution emissions in terms of nitrogen dioxide from petrol cars.'

Psychotic traits in young linked to changing schools

BBC News 20th February 2014

Dr Craig Morgan, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which suggests that children who have repeatedly moved schools may be more likely to develop psychotic-like symptoms as young teenagers. He said it was important to remember 80% of cases where psychotic traits were shown did not lead to psychosis.

Women over 60 make up nearly a third of all hospital admissions for anxiety

Daily Mail 20th February 2014

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry comments on news that a third of all hospital admissions for anxiety are women over 60. She said: ‘It’s difficult to take things at face value without having some idea about what’s going on physically. In that age group there may be changes in financial income due to retirement.
They may have changes in income and they may have anxiety around not working.’ Also reported in the Daily Telegraph and Press Association.

UK faces £300m fine over failure to meet air pollution targets by 2010

The Independent 20th February 2014

Report on how The European Commission said yesterday it was taking legal action against the UK because it had not come with a plan to get the amount of nitrogen dioxide below agreed limits. Dr Ben Barratt,Environmental Research Group, warns that air quality in the UK was "not good enough". Dr Barratt added that "some technology introduced to try to make engines clear has actually made the burden of nitrogen dioxide worse".

Genes

BBC Radio 4 - Inside Science 20th February 2014

A discussion of the differences in pain levels between people looks at epigenetics. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, speaks about current twin studies in this area. He said: 'We're exploring a whole range of differences and similarities, trying to pinpoint what the key genes are or what the key environmental factors are that make them either very different or very similar.' Item begins 13.21

Researchers create 'lie detector' for social networks

O Globo (Brazil) 20th February 2014

A project involving several European universities, including King's, is developing a lie detector to check rumors circulating in online forums and social networks. The project, called Pheme, has created a system that will be able to analyze in real time if a publication is true and identify if an account or a social network profile was created just for spreading false information.

Why intelligence studies are a smart career move

Independent i 19th February 2014

A feature on Masters courses in security and intelligence quotes Professor Joe Maiolo, War Studies, who said: 'We weed out the fantasists. James Bond is good for recruiting candidates on to our MA in security and intelligence but he's also useful as a cliché for dispelling the notion that the world of intelligence is anything like that'. The article also quotes MA student, Kirsty Hogg, who says she was attracted by the multinational 'flavour' at King's and mentions King's connections in central London

How to tell if a tweet is telling the truth

Times 19th February 2014

King's is collaborating on the development of the ultimate 'lie detector' for the digital age — a system that can test information in tweets quickly and track its provenance. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph and BBC Online.

Flood warnings still in place

BBC Radio 4 - Today 19th February 2014

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, discusses climate change in the wake of heated debate over whether climate change is to blame for the severe weather. He said: 'I think understanding the science behind weather and climate change is important but I think what these last weeks have shown us is that there are other things that are more important which is how we as as society want to live with our extreme weather.' Interview begins 02.51.54.

Scientists develop a lie detector for tweets

Daily Telegraph 19th February 2014

Scientists have developed the ultimate lie detector for social media – a system that can tell whether a tweeter is telling the truth. The project is an international collaboration involving researchers at King's. Also reported in The Times

Why Derek Jarman's life was even more influential then his films

Independent i 19th February 2014

Feature on Derek Jarman mentioned the exhibition currently held at King's.

Patients’ records ‘will be safer on database than in the GP’s surgery’

The Times 18th February 2014

Patient records are more vulnerable in GP surgeries than on a controversial new database, according to Prof Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry. He says: “The legal framework for access to this kind of data hasn’t been changed. There are the same incredibly high hurdles that people like me have to get through, and the key is that it’s got to be for the promotion of health and social care. They’re not allowed to get data and use it for marketing. It’s illegal.”

Psychologist on a mission to give every child a Learning Chip

Guardian 18th February 2014

A profile interview with Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, who wants educators to take notice of genes, and has a new big idea – personalised learning.

The medical data revolution is good for your health

Daily Telegraph 18th February 2014

In an article about patient data, George Freeman MP mentions a project with King’s College London where MRI brain scans and medical histories from 250,000 patients in the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust were put into one database, which academic researchers are now able to study – in anonymised form – to find new treatments for hard-to-treat diseases such as schizophrenia and depression.

Test could predict which teen boys get depression

Daily Mail 18th February 2014

A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help identify those who will later develop major depression, a new study says. Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, says: "This gives us a biological model to understand mental health problems the way we understand other medical conditions," Also reported in New Scientist, Associated Press, Fox News, ABC News, CBS News, Washington Post, TIME. Dr Oliver Howes was also interviewed in Reuters.

Gulen's shadowy network is a formidable enemy

Financial Times 18th February 2014

Bill Park, Defence Studies, writes about anti-corruption raids by Turkish police. He said: 'Illegal wiretaps and press leaks are being turned against Erdogan's former allies in an effort to discredit them.'

Babies with hearty appetite at risk of obesity

Xinhua (China) 18th February 2014

Research by King's College London sheds light on the way that appetite, particularly low satiety responsiveness, acts as one of the mechanisms underlying genetic predisposition to obesity. Also reported in China Daily and Global Times (China).

'Psychedelic' - Jarman's unseen dance film

Guardian 18th February 2014

Almost exactly 20 years after his death, a previously unseen film by Derek Jarman has come to light, shot inside a gay nightclub in east London, and will be premiered next month. The article mentions Cultural Institute at King's exhibition on Jarman: Pandemonium.

HSJ Live 18.02.2014 care.data programme postponed by six months

Health Service Journal 18th February 2014

NHS England has has delayed plans to begin collecting patient data from GP surgeries to later this year following mouting criticism, plus the rest of today’s news and comment. Professor Sir Simon Wesley, Institute of Psychiatry, said fear that insurance companies would be able to identify individual patients was a 'red herring' and that the benefits far outweighed theoretical risks. Professor Wessley also commented on this in the Times.

Air pollution

BBC Radio 4 - Inside Health 18th February 2014

A landmark European study published last month found a link between invisible particles of soot and heart attacks. Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, describes the study and is interviewed on his thoughts about these links and said: 'That increased risk was relatively small (5-10 per cent) but it's still a risk and there's 45 000 people die from heart attacks in the UK every year and if we can help that component of that sector by minimising the risk then I think everybody would be very grateful.' Item begins at 20.33.

Fifty British jihadis back from Syria war 'plotting a new 7/7 attack'

Daily Mirror 17th February 2014

Further reporting of the threat to Britain from British jihadis returning to the UK after fighting in Syria. Shiraz Maher comments further on the issue and said: 'The Brits in Syria fight hard. Even though they do not plan to come back, some accept it is possible they will have to one day.' He also commented on this alongside the issue of women travelling to Syria to marry jihadists in the Times.

A first class degree? I'd rather get a job.

Guardian 17th February 2014

More students are focusing on their employability skills to try and get a graduate job than their grades. Article quotes War Studies student, Calum Murray who is trying to secure employment in the defence and security sector.

Gay genetics research still causes irrational fears

The Conversation 17th February 2014

Professor Tim Spector asks why the 'gay gene' paper still causes such a stir in the public interest. He says: 'One reason people react so violently to these studies is a lack of understanding of basic biology and science, and realising that homosexuality is for a scientist just another human characteristic or trait, like sporting ability, obesity, optimism or depression.'

Freud's hysteria theory backed by patients brain scans

Bloomberg (USA) 17th February 2014

Scientists from King’s and the University of Melbourne have found, using brain scans, that psychological stress may be to blame for unexplained physical symptoms, including paralysis and seizures. Also reported by Washington Post (USA) and LiveMint (India).

King’s College London’s School of Law is Renamed The Dickson Poon School of Law

Tatler (Hong Kong) 17th February 2014

Article reporting that King's School of Law sees a name change to acknowledge Hong Kong entrepreneur Dickson Poon’s donation to the university: 'This time around Poon is extending his name beyond retail and leaving his ink (in the form of a philanthropic donation) in the field of education, as it is announced that King’s College London, one of the most prominent schools in the United Kingdom, will see a name change in its Faculty of Law in honour of Dickson, who holds a CBE.'

Derek Jarman “Pandemonium” at King’s College London

Mousse Magazine 17th February 2014

A description of the exhibition held by the Cultural Institute at King's features on the Mousse Magazine website. The exhibition has also been featured in the Catholic Herald, QX Magazine, and Where London.

Egypt president trial

BBC Radio 5 Live 16th February 2014

Gillian Kennedy, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, comments on Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi who is due to stand trial in Cairo facing new charges of espionage. She said: 'He's been in jail since the coup on July 3 last year. He's been in court now on 3 different occasions. The whole legal process has basically been delayed for a few reasons.' Item begins 07.55

Extreme weather

Sky News 16th February 2014

Professor David Demeritt, Geography, comments on flood management and the relation to climate change. He says that the science of climate change is beside the point and, more important, is what we are going to do about the current situation.

The irresistible appeal of the romantic ideal

Financial Times 14th February 2014

Professor Simon May, visiting professor of Philosophy, discusses why we have a festival for romantic love, but not one for love of nature or friendship.

Being gay is in your genes, say scientists in controversial new DNA study

Daily Mail 14th February 2014

Scientists have found two stretches of DNA linked to homosexuality in men. The confirmation of the existence of a ‘gay gene’ or genes will strengthen arguments that homosexuality is a matter of biology, rather than choice. Article quotes Dr Qazi Rhaman, Institute of Psychiatry, who said that genes are thought account for up to 40 per cent of a person’s sexual orientation and that it is likely that many genes are involved. Also reported by the Times, Guardian and Sun. The story appeared internationally in O Globo (Brazil) and Dr Qazi Rahman was also interviewed by Voice of Russia http://bit.ly/1kHof1Z

Are you cleverer than an i student?

Independent 14th February 2014

King’s Ukulele Society took part in the Independent’s iQuiz final, held at the Herbert Art Gallery in Coventry. The group said they decided to take part after being booked as the half-time entertainment at the King’s heats in November .

New Year care conundrum

Press Association 14th February 2014

New research reveals that one lingering effect of the festive season is a realisation that elderly parents may be in desperate need of home care. Article quotes Professor Jill Manthorpe, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, who says, 'Family members play a vital role in persuading parents that support is there and that they will often feel happier with it.'

Bible Hunters

BBC 2 14th February 2014

Dr Edward Adams and Dr Michael Ledger-Lomas, Theology & Religious Studies, are interviewed for this two part documentary revealing the remarkable stories of the dedicated men and women who travelled across Egypt in the 19th and early 20th century to uncover the earliest Christian texts.

Autoimmune attack behind some cases of schizophrenia

New Scientist 13th February 2014

As many as 1 in 10 cases of schizophrenia may be triggered by an autoimmune reaction against brain cells, according to a new study. Prof Sir Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry, says "the question is whether a larger percentage of cases might have other antibodies which we cannot yet detect."

Breast cancer drug that extends life by 6 months gets go-ahead

Daily Mail 13th February 2014

A new drug for breast cancer which extends women's lives by almost six months while reducing toxic side effects including hair loss is now available for patients. Professor Paul Ellis, Cancer Studies, said: Kadcyla represents a new way of targeting HER2-positive breast cancer, which ultimately means that we could extend patients' lives compared to existing chemotherapy treatment.'

Ignored and forgotten

Times Higher Education 13th February 2014

Fern Riddell, a PhD student in History, discusses the challenges facing graduate teaching assistants. She said: 'Much is made of undergraduate opportunities and of the life of salaried lecturers, but for those at the very beginning of their academic career there is far less support and recognition.'

Why research needs nurses

Nursing Standard 13th February 2014

As this year's Florence Nightingale Foundation conference draws nearer, three of the event's top speakers will be calling for more investment in some of the big questions facing nursing. One speaker is Christine Norton, Nursing & Midwifery, a strong advocate for practice-based research in nursing.

Developing a new confidence

Nursing Standard 13th February 2014

An article looking at the College of Medicine student conference on long-term conditions/self-care which will be held at King's in September.

iLiver

Nursing Standard 13th February 2014

Holle Howe Watson, a student in Nursing & Midwifery, recommends the iLiver app to workers and patients with an interest in the area and says that it would be particularly useful to student nurses on placement in a liver ward. The app hosts detailed information about 22 types of liver disease.

Threat to mental health programme that aims to get patients back to work

Guardian (Healthcare network) 12th February 2014

King's College London and the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust launched a joint randomised controlled trial to look at clinical evidence for a programme providing tailored careers advice and coaching to patients.

Exclusive: Quality and quantity of student placements at risk from staff shortages

Nursing Times 12th February 2014

Student nurses are struggling to get good practice placements because hospital wards are over-stretched and staff too busy to supervise them, according to an investigation by Nursing Times. The article mentions King's as an institution which employs clinical teachers who are primarily based with placement providers.

A (bio) revolutionary night at the museum

Evening Standard 12th February 2014

Londoners can explore some of the newest advances in medical research at the next Science Museum's latest event. Visitors will be able to take part in tests used by scientists researching areas from telepathy in twins to cell development in zebra fish. Visitors will also be able to take part in cognitive tests used by the Department of twin Research at King's.

Flooding

BBC Three Counties 12th February 2014

Professor David Demeritt has commented on flooding for BBC Three Counties and LBC Radio. He said: 'For 50 years now we have had a strategic policy that involves the careful use of cost-benefit analysis to prioritise spending to ensure that it gets to the greatest need. What would appear to have happened, is that in the face of all kinds of political pressure we are just tossing money around in response to whoever squeaks the loudest.' (Item begins 18.16)

Stoicism can kill you! Warning to Brits who ignore signs of cancer

Daily Mail 11th February 2014

Research conducted by King's in 2011 is mentioned in this piece about how long UK people might wait once they notice a possible cancer symptom before seeing their GP. The research mentioned found that two thirds waiting at least a week before making an appointment and warned that patients were being too stoical about cancer symptoms.

How dementia patients' rages may have a very surprising cause

Daily Mail 11th February 2014

A case study which looks at how untreated pain in dementia sufferers can cause the random outbursts of rage commonly associated with the condition. Scientists from King's found that when they gave daily pain treatment to patients with 'significant behavioural disturbance', their agitation was 'severely reduced'. Their study, published in the British Medical Journal in 2011, said that properly treating pain could reduce 'unnecessary prescriptions for psychotropic drugs' - drugs such as antipsychotics.

Scientists find gene linking brain's grey matter to intelligence

Reuters 11th February 2014

Researchers at King's have found a gene linking intelligence to the thickness of so-called "grey matter" in the brain. Dr Sylvane Desrivieres, Institute of Psychiatry who led the study, says: "This may help us understand what happens at a neuronal level in certain forms of intellectual impairments, where the ability of the neurons to communicate effectively is somehow compromised." Also reported by O Globo (Brazil), Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Times, The Guardian, Huffington Post

King's press release related to ' Scientists find gene linking brain's grey matter to intelligence'

Inside Health - Alcohol addiction

BBC Radio 4 11th February 2014

Professor Colin Drummond, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the role of medicine in treating alcohol addiction. (Begins 11.34)

Number of data interception requests to GCHQ 'possibly too large', says official

Guardian 11th February 2014

An Ipsos Mori poll, published in conjunction with a debate on privacy at King's, shows that large majority of British citizens have concerns about the way in which governments collect information about them. Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, is also mentioned in his capacity as the former head of GCHQ.

Ankylosis: The girl whose mouth was locked shut

BBC News (Online) 11th February 2014

Mr Shaun Matthews, a Consultant Maxilofacial Surgeon at the Dental Institute, has carried out radical jaw surgery enabling a six year old girl suffering with a condition called ankylosis where her right jaw joint had become fused to smile, yawn, talk and eat properly for the first time.

World Diary

Financial Times 10th February 2014

School of Economics holds a public lecture on 'Israel: the Arab Spring, domestic politics and the future of the Arab-Israeli peace process' from King's College London author Dr Ahron Bregman

Male and pale boardrooms still the norm, report warns

Financial Times 10th February 2014

Research has found that two-thirds of FTSE 100 companies still have an all-white executive leadership. It warns that an ethnic and gender 'diversity deficit' is putting their global competitiveness at risk. Professor Richard Webber, Geography, who developed the mosaic computer classification system was involved with this research.

Labour pledges new diversity quotas in all-white FTSE boards

Independent 10th February 2014

King's recently interviewed a group of big-business CEOs to understand what they see as the hurdles preventing women from reaching senior management roles. The research was led by Dr Elisabeth Kelan, Management.

DDT, other environmental toxins linked to late-onset alzheimer’s disease

Scientific American 10th February 2014

Article describing how Alzheimer’s disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., yet researchers still do not know what causes the degenerative neurological disorder. Scientists suspect that, along with genetic factors, toxins and pollutants may increase the risk of developing this debilitating disorder. The article mentions work by Dr Ruoling Chen, Public Health, who studied the effects of secondhand cigarette smoke on China’s cognitive health. His research team assessed almost 6,000 people over age 60 in China’s cities and rural areas for their exposure to secondhand smoke. He found that those with the most severe dementia had been subjected to high levels of secondhand smoke.

A tiny dose of peanuts seemed to help some children allergic to that legume

Washington Post 10th February 2014

Report on how for some children, even trace amounts of peanuts can be deadly. But these kids have no option other than to avoid the legumes completely. The results of a new clinical trial may change that. Scientists have found that feeding allergic children small amounts of peanut protein every day can help them lead a normal life. For some children, even trace amounts of peanuts can be deadly.

Why the Swiss voted to cap immigration

Washington Post 10th February 2014

Dr Alexandre Afonso, Political Economy writes an opinion piece on why on Sunday, a majority of Swiss voters voted to introduce a global immigration cap applying to all categories of migrants, including workers, asylum seekers and family members of current residents: ‘The most significant feature of the initiative is that it succeeded. Very few initiatives opposed by the government are passed. Moreover, the detailed results are not what you might expect: Cantons - Switzerland’s equivalent of states - with fewer immigrants were more likely to accept the cap, while those with more immigrants opposed it,’ he said.

Health apps

Observer 9th February 2014

An app called 'The Walk' which is a game aimed to increase walking in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is mentioned in this piece looking at health apps. It is mentioned that King's is evaluating the effectiveness of 'The Walk'.

The punk prospero of dungeness

Mail on Sunday 9th February 2014

Exhibition at the Cultural Institute at King's, Derek Jarman: Pandemonium, is reviewed and given 4 stars. It is described as 'a phantasmagoric melange of megalithic earthworks, suburban housing estates, punks, demons and orgiastic campness.'

Can peanut allergies be cured?

Guardian 9th February 2014

In an article discussing recent studies in to peanut allergies, research from King's pointed out that countries in which young children eat peanut products had low rates of peanut allergy. They compared children in Israel with those in the UK – 69% of the former had eaten something containing peanuts by nine months, compared with 10% of the latter. UK children had 10 times the rate of peanut allergy.

Georgina Henry

Times 8th February 2014

An obituary for Georgina Henry, the pioneering Guardian journalist who anticipated the importance of social media. She was educated at King's. this was also reported by the Guardian.

Why Marie Antoinette's diet was the 5:2 of its day

Daily Mail 8th February 2014

In an article reporting Marie Antoinette's unusual diet and its effect on her size and shape, studies at King's that established that broths made by boiling bones contain as much calcium as an equivalent serving of milk are mentioned.

Let's not celebrate victory in First World War, says minister

Times 7th February 2014

Helen Grant, the minister in charge of marking the centenary has said that victory in the First World War should not be celebrated. Professor Ned Lebow, War Studies, said that it was a welcome change after a strident exchange of views between Mr Gove and Mr Hunt.

How soon is too soon to make movies about a war?

BBC News (Online) 7th February 2014

An article exploring how long should be left between the end of a war and the making of a film about that war. Dr Peter Busch, War Studies, comments on this and said: 'When it comes to fiction, to film and movies, you can say generally those done very close to the war, or shortly afterwards in the case of WW2, look very different to later depictions'

Jihadists in Syria hail British suicide bomber

Times 7th February 2014

A Briton is reported to have carried out a suicide truck-bombing in Syria. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation has commented on this news and said he had exchanged messages with a British jihadist known to be in Syria who confirmed the news. This was reported by the Times, Independent i, Daily Mirror, Sky News, BBC Radio 4 Today, Press Association and Daily Express. Shiraz also wrote an analysis column for the Daily Mirror on this topic. As the news unfolded, Shiraz commented further on the developments in the Times, Daily Telegraph, Huffington Post (UK), Independent, Daily Mail, Sky News, Times, and Daily Mirror. As the news broke of the tenth British death in Syria, Shiraz commented again for the Daily Telegraph.

Only regional intervention can break cycle of violence in Central African Republic

The Conversation 7th February 2014

Olaf Bachmann, War Studies, writes an opinion piece on the need for regional intervention in the CAR: ‘But even before the current wave of violence, one could scarcely speak of the CAR as a “state” in any functional sense. Although the constant intra-elite fighting over power and wealth was always accompanied by some sort of efforts for settlement (or at least damage limitation), these efforts were always thwarted or aborted when one side felt it could gain superiority,’ he said.

Schizophrenia: Talking therapies 'effective as drugs'

BBC News 6th February 2014

Professor Sir Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry comments on new research which suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy could help treat people with schizophrenia who refuse antipsychotic medication. He says: "This study suggests that there may be a better option and that offering CBT is better than just leaving such patients to languish." Prof Murray was also interviewed on BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

Cancer patients ‘must pay for their treatment’ claims NHS specialist Dr Ajay Aggarwal

Daily Express 6th February 2014

Dr Ajay Aggarwal has suggested that some cancer treatments should be part funded by those being treated, in a paper/study co-authored by Professor Richard Sullivan, King's Centre for Global Health.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 6th February 2014

Dr Setusko Sahara, MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, has been awarded a research grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

London Underground dispute

BBC 1 - Question Time 6th February 2014

Discussion of the London Underground industrial action and the possibility of withdrawing the right to strike. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, is on the panel and said: 'I was astonished to discover that we are the only country in Europe that does not have a coherent body of law defining essential services and defining what you have to do in the event of a strike. It's not about 'you're never allowed to strike' but it's that if you do go on strike there is a basic minimum that you are obliged to maintain.' Discussion begins at 32.10.

Women in science

BBC 2 - Newsnight 6th February 2014

A government report has found that there is a lack of women in top science, engineering and maths jobs, such as those in academia. Post-doctoral research associate, Dr Lauren Tedaldi, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, comments on this issue and her decision to leave academia. Item begins at 34.20.

Science weekly podcast: Affairs of the human heart

Guardian 6th February 2014

Professor Michael Shattock, Medicine, has contributed to this podcast discussing the physiology, chemistry and dynamics of the human heart and how research into tissue regeneration is opening up a new frontier in the treatment of damaged hearts.

From Projects To Parliament, Britain's 'Rev. Rose' Breaks Barriers

NPR (USA) 6th February 2014

Dr Michael Ledger-Lomas, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on the appointment of Rev. Rose Hudson-Wilkin – the first black woman to serve as chaplain to the speaker in the House of Commons. ‘Only around 2 percent of clergy come from ethnic minorities,’ he said. ‘About 20 percent of all worshippers within London, for instance, belong to ethnic minorities. So I think there's no question that there's a demonstration effect.’

'Dimmer switch' may lead to better painkiller

Times 5th February 2014

Scientists have found that genes linked to pain sensitivity play a role in the way life experiences can alter a person's pain threshold by becoming more or less active over time. It is thought that the discovery could lead to new types of painkiller. Dr Jordana Bell, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said that the results were 'very exciting and could lead to more effective treatment for patients with chronic pain'. This was reported by the Telegraph, BBC News, New Scientist, BBC World News, and internationally by Xinhua (China), Forbes and O Globo (Brazil).

New strain of 'deadly' bird flu

BBC News 5th February 2014

Experts are concerned about the spread of a new strain of bird flu that has already killed one woman in China. Dr Linda Klavinskis, Immunology, Infection & Inflammatory Disease , said there was no immediate threat.

Impact of culture change revealed one year after Francis

Health Service Journal 5th February 2014

HSJ research has revealed that staff wellbeing and organisational culture are being taken far more seriously by acute trust boards, one year after the Francis report was released. Dr Jill Maben, director of the National Nursing Research Unit said that she had observed a growing acceptance of this connection among NHS leaders, however, she questioned whether this had an impact on frontline staff.

Letter: Why We Are Fighting the Student Debt Sell Off

Huffington Post (UK) 5th February 2014

Areeb Ullah, Kings College London Students' Union Vice President of Academic Affairs signs this letter calling for the stepping up of the campaign to stop the government's plan to privatise student loans through a national week of protests, rallies and creative direct action.

How to teach maths

BBC Radio 4 5th February 2014

Professor Mike Askew who was Professor of Maths Education at King's before moving to his current post at Monash University in Melbourne comments on the issues surrounding the teaching of maths. He said that children need to learn basic skills such as memorising multiplication tables as well as gaining a mathematical understanding in school. Interview begins at 18.02.

Science can’t settle what should be done about climate change

The Conversation 4th February 2014

Professor Mike Hulme writes about climate change following speakers known to dispute the scientific evidence supporting climate change being called to speak at a parliamentary select committee on the latest IPCC report. He said: 'The most important questions to be asked about climate change extend well beyond science.'

Depression in pregnancy

BBC Radio 4 - Inside Health 4th February 2014

Professor Louise Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the research on the use of anti-depressants during pregnancy (begins at 08.00)

Derek Jarman: Pandemonium is a fascinating, multi-genre journey

Metro 3rd February 2014

A review of the Cultural Institute at King's exhibition to mark the 20th anniversary of Derek Jarman's death: Pandemonium. It says: 'Most striking of all is a selection of richly coloured oil paintings and set designs, often featuring triangles, circles and hieroglyphs loaded with arcane meaning.'

Oil companies having a tough time

BBC Radio 4 - Today 3rd February 2014

Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, discusses on the reports that oil companies are struggling with Shell announcing a 50% drop in profits and withdrawal from the Arctic. BP has also had continuing issues with payouts from the worst oil spill in history. He said: 'It is company specific. Each of the companies have their own challenges.'

Positive signs on the pupil premium effect

Guardian 3rd February 2014

A letter in response to the Guardian's report on pupil premium is signed by Professor Becky Francis. It states that: 'The most recent data for key stage 2 shows the gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and all other pupils narrowed from 20 per cent (2011) to 17 per cent.'(2012)

Flooding is predicted

BBC Radio 4 - World at One 3rd February 2014

With more bad weather expected, the areas of the country that are already suffering with flooding face further problems. The Environment Agency is facing continuing criticism regarding what to do and how to pay for it. Professor David Demerritt, Geography, comments on the problems and said: 'It really comes down to choices and cost so in the Netherlands for instance they have decided to defend against the waters come what may.' Item begins at 32.44.

The philosophy of Russell Brand

BBC Radio 4 - Analysis 3rd February 2014

A piece analysing Russell Brand and his political and economical opinions as a result of his interview on Newsnight in 2013. Dr Paolo Gerbaudo sees the interview as a symptom of a growing trend. He said: 'I think that Russell Brand's interview reflects this emerging political culture that I've named anarcho-populism.'

Would you admit to being a teacher today

The Conversation 3rd February 2014

Dr Bob Burstow asks whether teachers would admit what they do for a living when asked. He said: 'Before the government was involved, teachers were thought of as practitioners of a craft. Once legislation increased, the view of teachers shifted towards the professional'.

Philip Seymour Hoffman: What makes someone relapse into addiction?

BBC News 3rd February 2014

Commenting on the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, Prof John Marsden, Institute of Psychiatry, says: "Heroin abuse is a persistent and pernicious disorder and it's difficult to break free from it."

At least David Cameron kept his kit on... unlike Winston Churchill: The surprising history of the prime minister as host

Independent 2nd February 2014

Ian Johnston looks at the various ways Prime Ministers have chosen to meet with visiting dignitaries. The article mentions that David Cameron took Francois Hollande to the Swan Inn in Oxfordshire. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: The 'informal' nature of British prime minister allowed Mr Cameron to host a more relaxed event.

Who wants a male pill?

Observer 1st February 2014

An article reporting on progress in developing the male contraceptive pill. Back in November 2006 Dr Nnaemeka Amobi, a physiologist at King's had cracked the male pill – the product of 17 years in development.

Fighting First World War ‘was the greatest error in our history’

Times 31st January 2014

Professor Ned Lebow, War Studies, on TV historian Niall Ferguson's opinion that Britain's entry to the First World War was a mistake. He said that that Britain’s foreign policy had for centuries been geared towards preventing any state from winning hegemony in Europe, and that staying out of the war would not have been realistic.

Jihadists flock to Turkish camps to plan new atrocities in Europe

Times 31st January 2014

Al-Qaeda groups operating in Syria have set up three bases in southern Turkey to train foreign fighters for terrorist attacks on the US and Europe, according to intelligence sources. The article includes a set of figures, sourced from King's College London, on the nationalities of Al-Qaeda's foreign fighters.

Hope for Michael Schumacher as F1 legend 'responds' to doctors' tests

Daily Express 31st January 2014

Professor Anthony Strong, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on news that doctors are beginning to wake F1 racer Michael Schumacher from his induced coma. He said that once the sedatives wear off, Schumacher's doctors would see if he can breathe on his own and if he responds to mild pain stimulus, like gentle pressing on his eyebrows. He said: "Doctors will want to see if he can say 'hello'…and to see if he can recognise family members and remember his own identity."

Also reported in the Daily Mail, Evening Standard, Associated Press, Washington Post, ABC News, Fox News, Huffington Post, USA Today, The Australian, CBC News.

Dickens is more than just 'an old, bearded Victorian'

Times Educational Supplement 31st January 2014

This article explores the issues with teaching Charles Dickens to children. It suggests that should be taught about his life as well as his novels in order to ignite their interest. Dr Bethan Marshall, Education & Professional Studies, agrees and said: 'If Dickens is taught badly, he can be hideously dull,” she said. “People can be put off him for life. I’m not sure Charles Dickens would want kids to plough through David Copperfield just because he’s notable and kids ought to know him. But Dickens taught well can be very good.'

Joint extremists work to intensify

Press Association 31st January 2014

Figures from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, based at King's, are quoted in this piece reporting on new efforts to track down French and British nationals heading to join extremists in Syria.

A new Asian Alliance

Outlook (India) 31st January 2014

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece analysing how China’s rise is leading India to seek new partners like Japan and South Korea: ‘Tensions between Beijing and Tokyo over disputed islands in the East China Sea reflect growing major power rivalry in Asia. Indian foreign policy is gearing up to manage this major power dynamic in Asia, making the region central to its strategic calculus,’ he said. The piece was also featured in Yale Global (USA).

Vitamins ‘effective in treating ADHD symptoms’

BBC News 30th January 2014

Professor Philip Asherson, Institute of Psychiatry comments on new research suggesting that vitamins and minerals could be useful for treating ADHD. He says: "It's a good study, which is very interesting, but really needs replicating,"

Peanut allergies

Sky News 30th January 2014

Professor Gideon Lack comments on new trials for sufferers with peanut allergies who are exposed to small amounts of peanut, with this being gradually increased to retrain their body's reaction. He said: 'This is certainly an important step forward for the field of peanut allergy but I should stress it is not a cure and I do not believe it is ready yet for use as a clinical treatment.'

Literary find

BBC 2 - Newsnight 30th January 2014

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, comments on the discovery of two new poems from the most famous Greek female poet, Sappho. Professor Hall said: 'Well it's certainly going to inspire a great deal of new study. This really changes how we think about women and sisters on the island of Lesbos in this period of time.'

Uncertain future for Turkey

Financial Times - Analysis Review 30th January 2014

Bill Park, Defence Studies, discusses political corruption in Turkey with the Financial Times Europe editor, Tony Barber. He said: ‘There’s no doubt the Turkish economy has problems. I think what’s really driven this lack of confidence is the political crisis.’

Technique facilitates 'production' of stem cells

Estado de Minas (Brazil) 30th January 2014

Further coverage of the comments from last week by Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, on the latest stem cell breakthrough by Japanese scientists. Dr Ilic was also interviewed by BBC World News and Al Jazeera.

Key component of Syria talks elusive

Voice of America (USA) 30th January 2014

Dr Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, is interviewed on the prospect of "transitional government" in Syria and what such a government might look like – and whether there is a chance of a better managed transition in Syria than we have seen in Libya or Egypt.

'Stem cells' created in less than 30 minutes in 'groundbreaking' discovery

Telegraph 29th January 2014

Scientists have turned adult cells back to their embryonic form in under 30 minutes by simply treating them with acid in a breakthrough which could revolutionise personalised medicine. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, said the findings were ‘revolutionary.’ 'The papers describe a major scientific discovery and they will be opening a new era in stem cell biology,' said Dr llic. Dr Ilic's comments were also reported by the Guardian, Daily Mail, Times, BBC News (Online), and Huffington Post (UK).

Education committee watch

BBC News 29th January 2014

Members of the Education Committee took evidence on underachievement in Education of White Working Class Children on 29 January 2014. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, is on the panel. Professor Wolf said: 'A lot of the low achievement that is concentrated in white working class children is also related to where they live.'

Joseph Lister's unknown operation uncovered

BBC News (Online) 29th January 2014

Dr Ruth Richardson, Centre for Life Writing Research, has discovered evidence of a previously unknown operation carried out by Joseph Lister at the hospital on Gower Street in 1851. Dr Richardson said: 'I was working on something else, and I don't know what made me do it but I looked him up on the Old Bailey online and this case came up, I mentioned it to Bryan Rhodes and I said to him, 'Is this unusual?', and his eyebrows went right up and he said, 'This is very unusual'.

The little niggles you mustn't just dismiss as signs of ageing

Daily Mail 28th January 2014

Professor Robert Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on early symptoms of possible dementia, and what to look out for. He says: 'Our memory declines from our late 20s. One theory is we may produce less of a key protein as we age. However, sometimes you may struggle to remember something simply because you are doing too much at once and you aren't giving it your full attention.'

Rating DIY DNA test kits

The Sun 28th January 2014

As the sales of DIY DNA test kits increases, the Sun rates a variety of home DNA test kits. The piece quotes Dr Stephan Menzel, who said: 'For most people, home DNA kits are a waste of money because too little in known about the genetic factors that change the risk for common diseases.'

Frost fair: When an elephant walked on the frozen River Thames

BBC News (Online) 28th January 2014

It is 200 years ago since the last "frost fair" - an impromptu festival on a frozen Thames, complete with dancing, skittles and temporary pubs. Dr George Adamson, Geography, said that 1814 was the third coldest January since 1659, when the Central England Temperature records began. 'I'd be surprised if it froze again to the extent where we'd be able to allow large numbers of people on the Thames' he added.

Fresh call for UK bill of rights

Press Association 28th January 2014

The piece mentions a survey quoted by King's College London seems to support the idea there is increasing British public opinion in favour of a UK Bill of Rights.

Taking multivitamins 'can raise risk of a miscarriage'

Daily Mail 27th January 2014

Professor Lucilla Posoton, Women's Health, has urged women not to panic following the new finding which has suggested that women who take multivitamins whilst pregnant, may be at a higher risk of miscarriage. She said: 'It is critical that the data are not interpreted as evidence against current recommendations for folate supplementation. The authors rightly recommend that further studies are needed. In the meantime, supplements should be taken in accordance with current clinical guidelines.’

Peak car?

Financial Times 27th January 2014

Demand for oil could be approaching a peak, as companies grow more energy efficient and use cars less. Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, tells John Authers that the shift could mean lower oil prices. He said: 'Clearly, the recession and the downturn in the European economy over the last few years has had some impact but that's not the only factor.' This video was also referred to in another FT article 'Emerging markets turbulence maintains pressure on equities.'

World War One's financial crisis

BBC News (Online) 27th January 2014

An article comparing the financial crisis during WW1 to that of 2008. Professor Richard Roberts, Institute of Contemporary British History, argues that the events of 1914 were as bad as the city had seen either before or since. He said: 'It was the most serious systemic financial crisis that has ever overtaken Britain - or indeed the world.'

World War One's financial crisis

BBC News (Online) 27th January 2014

An article comparing the financial crisis during WW1 to that of 2008. Professor Richard Roberts, Institute of Contemporary British History, argues that the events of 1914 were as bad as the city had seen either before or since. He said: 'It was the most serious systemic financial crisis that has ever overtaken Britain - or indeed the world.'

Space skinsuit could stop astronauts developing back problems

Wired (UK) 27th January 2014

Researchers at King’s are working with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop a high-tech, tight-fitted space ‘skinsuit’ to help astronauts overcome back problems in space.

Turkey's struggle: Erdoğan vs Gülen

Open Democracy 27th January 2014

A series of escalating crises in Turkey is reshaping political alliance and enmities. It also casts a shadow over the country's democratic future, says Bill Park, Defence Studies.

The Why Factor - Homosexuality

BBC World Service 26th January 2014

Dr Qazi Rahman, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the origins of homosexuality.

How to boost your daughter’s self-esteem

The Times 26th January 2014

Dr Helen Sharpe, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on how we can improve girls' self-esteem. She says: “We know from research that body image comes out near the top of girls’ worries every time — it’s a big deal.” Hating your body is insidious and infectious among groups of teenage girls, and fat-talking is an increasing problem, she adds.

Science students do a bang-up job in assisting MoD

Times 25th January 2014

MSc Forensic Science student, Leo Salvia, has been working with Dr Leon Barron, Forensic Science, to investigate mass spectrometry which will improve the capability of the MoD to screen a wide range of explosives.

Byzantine heritage

Times 25th January 2014

A letter regarding the management of Byzantine heritage in Turkey is signed by Professor Roderick Beaton, Hellenic Studies.

Britons returning from Syria face arrest, says police chief

BBC News 25th January 2014

The International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, based at King's is mentioned in this article reporting the news that Britons returning from Syria will face arrest at the border. The centre said: 'most British jihadists are university-educated Muslims of British Pakistani origin in their 20s.'

Children are not the only learners

Times Educational Supplement 24th January 2014

Dr Bob Burstow, Education & Professional Studies, comments on professional development for teachers. He said: 'It's usually better for new teachers to get settled in their job for a year or two. That said, some high-flyers go straight in to a master's and do very well.'

Celebrating Derek Jarman 20 years after his death

Guardian 24th January 2014

Neil Bartlett writes about the vigil he will hold in the King's Chapel on the 20th anniversary of his death. Jarman is thought to have taken his first steps as an artist whilst studying at King's. The article also mentions the exhibition - Derek Jarman: Pandemonium - which is organised by the Cultural Institute.

Elderly cancer care concern

Sky News 24th January 2014

Charity, Macmillan Cancer Support, has raised concerns that people over 65 are considered 'too old for treatment' for cancer. Dr Jonathan Koffman comments and said: 'If they are treated, the chances of survival are pretty good.'

Obama is wrong to downplay the dangers of cannabis

Daily Telegraph 23rd January 2014

Research by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London suggests a link between skunk and the development of mental illness. They found that people who smoked it were 18 times more likely to suffer a psychotic episode that those who smoked old-style cannabis.

Front-line casualties in WWI severely underestimated

Voice of Russia 23rd January 2014

Professor Edgar Jones, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on reports that casualties and numbers of men suffering psychological symptoms from WW1 were severely under-estimated. He says: "Even in the official figures, there is a suggestion that 85,000 servicemen received a war pension for neurological or psychological illness, which would generally describe shellshock. Extrapolating from that, there must have been many more who suffered from the disorder but never received a pension. We know that a lot of people didn't apply because of stigma, or they applied but the pension wasn't awarded."

Appointments - Host-Microbiome Interactions Centre

Times Higher Education 23rd January 2014

Professor Stanislav Dusko Ehrlich has been named director of the new Host-Microbiome Interactions Centre at the King's Dental Institute.

New migraine treatment receives approval and is now available on the NHS

Independent 22nd January 2014

A device that sends magnetic pulses through the skull to combat severe headaches has received qualified approval from Britain’s health guidance authority for the treatment of migraine. Professor Peter Goadsby, director of the National Headache Centre, said: 'single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation is a wonderful example of clinical and laboratory research delivering a real improvement in migraine treatment that is both effective and extremely well tolerated'

Popping pills for flu fever might make things worse

New Scientist 22nd January 2014

The general medical advice in the UK for flu sufferers is to take painkillers such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) or aspirin but painkillers also lower fever, which can make the virus worse. Dr Edward Purssell, Nursing, says that it is best to avoid using these drugs routinely and recommended last year that painkillers in children under 5 are used only to relieve pain and not fever.

Girls 'still think careers in science are for boys'

Evening Standard 22nd January 2014

Professor Louise Archer, Department of Education and Professional Studies, has been part of some research which has found that the stereotype of male 'boffins' was widespread. She said that many young people ruled themselves out if they were not the cleverest person in their class and thought a career in science meant being a doctor, science teacher or 'brainy' scientist.

Call to increase staff engagement as a way of improving satisfaction and care

Nursing Standard 22nd January 2014

Professor Jill Maben, National Nursing Research Unit, comments on the calls to increase staff engagement and therefore improve said: 'Nurses know what needs to be done and empowering them to make changes can really be satisfying.'

More power for Charles - but can he learn the art of silence?

Independent 21st January 2014

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the 'gentle succession' between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles which sees the Prince taking over some of the Queen's official duties. He comments on the Queen's tendancy to stay out of politics and whether Prince Charles will endeavour to do the same. He said: 'That might be the expectation. How it will work out in practice, which rests on self-restraint, remains to be seen.' Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, also discusses the news that the Prince is due to take over some of the Queen's official duties in the Telegraph.

Top universities ‘will not expand for fear of damaging their status’

Times 21st January 2014

King's is mentioned in this piece looking at university expansion and the scrapping of student number controls.

NHS must value its nursing staff, warns report

Nursing Times 21st January 2014

The NHS must do more to look after and listen to nurses, according to the authors of a report by the Point of Care Foundation that highlights the link between happy staff and patient welfare. Professor Jill Maben, director of the National Nursing Research Unit at King’s College London and a trustee of the foundation, said staff engagement was all the more important in tough times.

Terror risk from Syria 'will last two generations'

Evening Standard 21st January 2014

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, has had his comments from his warning to the Home Affairs Select Committee reported in coverage of ongoing issues in Syria. He said that there was already a 'critical mass' of Britons fighting in Syria who would become 'charismatic leaders' and inspire others in to violent extremism.

Guardian Weekly Letters

Guardian 21st January 2014

A letter to the Guardian in response to an article in praise of crystallography says that the real discoverer of DNA was Rosalind Franklin at King's College London.

Syria's conflict in numbers

Evening Standard 21st January 2014

Feature collecting various statistics about the Syrian conflict. It states that 11,000 fighters from overseas are now believed to be in Syria, according to research by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King’s College, London.

Civil war in Syria

BBC Radio 4 PM 21st January 2014

Professor William Philpott, War Studies, spoke about the brutality of civil war in comparison to conventional war and said: ‘I think the stress in civil wars is conflict within societies, in some ways it has a different perspective compared to conflict between armed forces which is somehow seen as legitimate.’

Death toll of First World War ‘too low by one million men’

The Times 20th January 2014

New claims suggest that as many as a million more men were killed in WW1 than previously believed, while the number of soldiers left with “shell shock” was also massively underestimated. Professor Sir Simon Wessely, King's Centre for Military Health Research, called the assessment of shell shock “almost certainly correct and almost impossible to prove”.

Chocolate and red wine may help to prevent diabetes

Telegraph 20th January 2014

Ingredients found in chocolate, tea and berries could guard against diabetes. Eating high levels of flavonoids including anthocyanins and other compounds (found in berries, tea, and chocolate) could offer protection from type 2 diabetes - according to research from King’s College London and the University of East Anglia. This was also reported by Press Association, Sky News, Huffington Post UK, Daily Mail, Daily Express, Daily Mirror, Sun, Financial Times, Nursing Times and Metro.

Britons sent by al-Qaeda to launch attacks on us

Daily Telegraph 20th January 2014

An estimate from Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, that 50 British fighters have already returned home from Syria has been mentioned on the front page of the Telegraph, reporting that British people are being trained in Syria and then returning to the UK to launch attacks on home soil.

Lonely hearts blog for al-Qaeda fighters

Times 20th January 2014

It is reported that women have been using the internet to seek husbands among young British men fighting with al-Qaeda in Syria. He said: 'Although some fighters don’t have a problem with taking their wives, apart from the logistical hurdles, the issue of single women is far more controversial, because many jihadists don’t believe women have a role on the battlefield.'

The glamorous outsider with a passion for life

Daily Telegraph 20th January 2014

King's Cultural Institute's exhibition - Derek Jarman: Pandemonium, has been mentioned in a piece written by Rupert Christiansen for the 20th anniversary of Jarman's death.

The computer avatars freeing schizophrenics from their hellish demons

Sunday Express 19th January 2014

Computer-generated avatars and virtual worlds look set to revolutionise the way debilitating ­mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. Researchers at King’s are leading a two year trial in the hope it will provide a far quicker and more successful treatment for severe auditory hallucinations than the pharmaceutical drugs and talking therapies currently on offer. Professor Tom Craig, Institute of Psychiatry, said: “If it is ­successful it can be in the NHS very quickly, as there are already plenty of people who have the basic skills as practising clinical psychologists to carry out this therapy."

The Archers' storyline that touched a nation

The Daily Telegraph 19th January 2014

A recent storyline in the Archers explores the reality of Alzheimer’s disease that the medical experts say has no equal in drama. Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry, describes it as “one of the most accurate, sensitive, moving and just true portrayals of dementia I have ever encountered”.

NHS 'has upped game' on stress disorder

BBC Radio 4 - Today 18th January 2014

Ex-soldier Liam Culverhouse was was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder when he caused the death of his baby daughter. Dr Deirdre MacManus, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the effects of active service on soldiers. Dr MacManus was also interviewed on BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC1 10 o'clock news and British Forces Broadcasting News.

The costs of clandestine talks with Syria's strongman

Financial Times 18th January 2014

This article questions why western governments are renewing relations with Syria's Bashar Al-Assad instead of plotting his departure. It says that the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, based at King's, believes that the number of foreign fighters in Syria swelled in the second half of last year, largely because westerners joined in.

Push for Pragmatic Dhaka Policy

New Indian Express 18th January 2014

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an op-ed on how Bangladesh is entering a turbulent phase after the controversial general elections of January 5 and with the continuing post-poll violence. He says New Delhi needs to pay special attention to its neighbour, as 'the fallout from continuing instability in Bangladesh will have significant implications for India and the larger South Asian region'.

The Spectator book review that brought down Macmillian's government

The Spectator 17th January 2014

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about the cover story in The Spectator that helped to bring down a Conservative government fifty years ago. It claimed that Macmillan had fixed the succession so as to scupper the chances of the natural candidate.

How Japan stood up to old age

Financial Times 17th January 2014

25 per cent of Japanese people are over 65. The Japanese not only live longer but they work longer, stay healthier, care for their elderly better and have found ways to pay for it. Dr Mayumi Hayashi, Social Science, Health and Medicine, who said that Japan has the highest provision of day centres for the elderly in the world.

Pain care: overhaul education for the next generation

Nursing Times 17th January 2014

King's College London's professional pain training, introduced three years ago, is mentioned in this article looking at the effects of pain and the necessity for pain management training. It says that as well as enhancing knowledge, it provides opportunities to rehearse and refine skills.

Trusting police

Sky News 17th January 2014

Dr Benjamin Bowling, comments on sus laws and said: 'I'm not at all surprised that people have lost trust in the police. I think it's shocking that half the population of England and Wales feel that they can't really trust the police. Stop and search is a really crucial issue in this.'

Comedians have ‘high levels of psychotic traits’

BBC News 16th January 2014

A new study suggests that comedians have personality types linked with psychosis. Commenting on the research, Dr James MacCabe, Institute of Psychiatry, says: "This study tells us some interesting things about the differences between comedians and actors but not about the link with psychosis." His comments were also reported in the Guardian

Broken by war: the Army reservist still battling with combat stress

Independent 16th January 2014

Research from King's Centre for Military Health Research (KCMHR) has shown that reservists are at greater risk of mental health problems. The Armed Forces are increasingly relying on reservists, yet the number of psychiatrists in the military is decreasing. Professor Neil Greenberg, KCMHR, says: “It doesn’t make any sense. If you know there are increased risks among reservists then why not respond? You’re also shooting yourself in the foot. If we are going to rely more on reservists in future conflict, we need to make sure they’re ready for the job.”

Queer without fear

Evening Standard 16th January 2014

The exhibition hosted by the King's Cultural Institute - Derek Jarman: Pandemonium - is mentioned in this article looking at the events planned to mark the 20th anniversary of Jarman's death.

Cycling in London

ITV London 16th January 2014

Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, assists ITV weatherman, Martin Stew, in carrying out a small study in to the levels of air pollution London cyclists are exposed to. Dr Barratt was also interviewed by Radio 4's Today programme on the topic of air pollution, particularly in relation to the risk of heart attacks.

60 seconds with Angela Thavaraj

Nursing Times 15th January 2014

An interview with Angela Thavaraj, advancing practice nurse at St Christopher's Hospice, London, mentions that she trained at King's College London.

Psychology of drinking

BBC Radio 4 - The Human Zoo 15th January 2014

Dr Kyle Dyer, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his research investigating whether posters designed to reduce alcohol related harm result in people drinking less.

Syrian conflict

BBC Radio 4 - Today 15th January 2014

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comments following the news that Western intelligence agencies have visited Damascus for talks on combating radical Islamist groups. He said: 'We produced a set of figures, published last month, in which we estimated somewhere between 200 and 366 British nationals to have gone over and participated in the conflict. At the moment the powers which are being used are prerogative powers to strip people of their passports. I think we would favour a legislative approach to that.' Item begins 01.13.32.

Growing in to the role

Nursing Standard 15th January 2014

Recent research from the National Nursing Research Unit at King's found that one of the main attractions for students considering a health visiting career was the desire to make a difference to children and families. The article reports that a new era of health visiting is taking shape, with a greater recognition of the part that health visitors play in the wellbeing and development of young children.

It was a privilege to see a patient benefit from my emotional support

Nursing Standard 15th January 2014

Sarah Wright, a first year nursing student, writes about her real world experience. She describes providing emotional support to a patient who suffered a leg amputation. She said: 'As I move forward in my nursing career, I will remember this experience, and the difference it made that I took the time to listen and offer emotional support.'

Al Jazeera Newshour - Egypt

Al Jazeera Newshour 15th January 2014

Dr Carool Kersten, a senior lecturer in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, made a number of live appearances on Aljazeera's Newshour, assessing the implications of the referendum on Egypt’s new constitution for the country’s political future and the role of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Historians criticise Foreign Office over hoard of secret files

Guardian 14th January 2014

Further reporting of the revelation that the Foreign Office has unlawfully kept secret a large amount of files. Professor Richard Drayton, History, comments on the pledge to hand over a proportion of the documents with in six years, calling it 'weak and evasive'.

Could the menopause be making your wife snore worse than you? It's not just overweight men who wreck their other half's sleep

Daily Mail 14th January 2014

Adrian Williams, Professor of Sleep Medicine, comments on the snoring as a result of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) which can be associated with the menopause. He said: 'Hormones that drive the appetite are altered by lack of sleep. One hormone that signals satiety is reduced, while the one that signals appetite is increased - this can lead to weight gain, which can only make OSA worse.'

Is it time to start cutting down on the sweet stuff?

Express 14th January 2014

Professor Tom Sanders comments on the sugar content of fruit in a piece which looks out our sugar intake and the unlikely foods that are high in sugar. He said: 'Sugar is empty calories. Generally it is better to get most of your carbohydrate intake from starchy foods such as bread, rice, potatoes and pasta because they also contain useful amounts of other nutrients such as proteins and vitamins.'

Ion Jinga: Romanians in the UK do not abuse the benefits system. They contribute.

Telegraph 14th January 2014

An IpsoMori and King’s College London survey shows that a third of Britons think the government spends more on Job Seeker’s Allowance than on pensions. In fact, pensions take up 15 times the budget of JSA.

Distance learning options

Independent i 14th January 2014

Courses offered by King's as part of the Open University's FutureLearn are mentioned in this article which explores the rise of online learning for post graduate study.

Residential tower next to the Shard to be designed by Renzo Piano

Guardian 14th January 2014

Reporting of the new residential tower which will be built next to the shard and will provide views over King's College London's Guy's campus and the proposed science gallery for the first time. Also reported by the Telegraph.

Program may help diabetics head off low blood sugar

Reuters (UK) 14th January 2014

Professor Stephanie Amiel, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences has evaluated a six-week behavior-modification program which is thought to help people with diabetes overcome anxieties and prevent plunging blood sugar.

A bittersweet legacy: a new liver and a lifetime of pills

Daily Telegraph 13th January 2014

A feature on the children who received some of the earliest liver transplants and how their lives have been impacted. A study at King's looks at a suite of personal narratives from an emerging ‘new’ ageing population have been gathered from the surviving members of the first cohort of paediatric liver transplant recipients, who received their transplant up to 30 years ago at Addenbrooke’s or King’s College Hospital

Meningitis vaccine must be introduced

Times 13th January 2014

A letter sent by 118 healthcare professionals urges the government to implement the meningococcal B (MenB) vaccine for children in the UK. It is signed by Dr Guy Thwaites, Immunology, Infection & Inflammatory Disease.

The best time to wage cyberwar

Nature 13th January 2014

A feature exploring whether it is worth waiting to hit enemies at their most vulnerable when hacking in to computers. Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, disagrees with one model and said: 'The more important policy question, as [a US presidential panel report] recognised last year, is whether using offensive resources is productive in the first place.'

President Hollande scandal

BBC Radio 4 - World at One 13th January 2014

Professor Dominique Moisi, Political Economy, comments on the dilemma for President Hollande following the revelation that he may be having an affair. He said: 'Officially, the French are saying that they don't care and that what they expect from the President is to give answers on the future of the economy and on the reforms he's going to propose. In reality, I think they are quite hypocritical and the subject of the love life of the French President is in everybody's mind.' Item begins 34.28

King's at Doon

Times of India 13th January 2014

Article on King’s announcement that it conduct a two-week residential winter school for 16-18-year-olds, to be taught by the college’s faculty and held at The Doon School in Dehradun. ‘King’s at Doon’ is a new flagship pre-university programme in India, longer and more intensive than any others currently offered by King’s in India and is open to students from all schools.

Islam Channel - Egypt

Islam Channel 13th January 2014

Dr Carool Kersten, Senior Lecturer in the Study of Islam and the Muslim World, took part in a one-hour panel discussion on the new constitution for Egypt on the Islam Channel.

Daily pot tied to age of first psychotic episode

Reuters 12th January 2014

In a study of adults who experienced psychosis for the first time, having smoked marijuana daily was linked to an earlier age of onset of the disorder. Dr Marta Di Forti, Institute of Psychiatry, who led the study, says: "This is not a study about the association between cannabis and psychosis, but about the association between specific patterns of cannabis use . . . and an earlier onset of psychotic disorders." Also reported in the Daily Mail, the Chicago Tribune, Yahoo News and Reuters India

Agamemnon

BBC Radio 3 12th January 2014

Professor Edith Hall, Hellenic Studies, gives an introduction to the first of the three plays in Aeschylus' classic trilogy about murder, revenge and justice.

Terroist trainees to get life in prison

The Sun 11th January 2014

Extremists who take part in terrorist training camps will be jailed for life. The Ministry of Justice wants tougher sentencing to crack down on the growing problem. Professor Peter Neumann, War Studies, said that the move was 'over the top' and that 'not everyone who goes abroad to train and fight in 'Muslim lands' will become terrorists.

How to breathe yourself happier

Daily Mail 11th January 2014

Meditation is gaining recognition as a way of treating pain and depression. Professor Lance McCraken, Institute of Psychiatry, says: ‘Mindfulness infuses everything we do. Our patients tend to become very keen on it. When they have a little taste of mindfulness, and see how it can transform their lives for the better, they become very committed to meditation.’

FactCheck: does the case for stop and search stack up?

Channel 4 11th January 2014

In an article exploring stop and search, Professor Ben Bowling, Dickson Poon School of Law, said that he feels the grounds for searches are often flimsy: 'The kinds of grounds that are given are movements - running, hurrying and loitering, as a grounds for suspicions. The objects for search tend to be drugs or stolen or goods, but the grounds for the search tend to be flimsy'

Indian Envoy Returns Home After U.S. Indictment

Wall Street Journal 10th January 2014

Article on the Indian consular official indicted in the U.S. for alleged visa fraud. Dr Harsh Pant, India Institute, is quoted: 'If a controversy like this could shake the foundations of the relationship, it shows that it's built on fragile foundations, and there has been neglect on both sides.'

Alzheimer's experts have target in sights

Daily Mirror 9th January 2014

A report by Dr Miriam Stoppard discusses the possibility of a cure for Alzheimer's. She quotes Professor Roger Morris, Head of Biomedical Sciences, who said: '

Measured changes: top 10 Wellcome Trust grant-funded institutions

Times Higher Education 9th January 2014

A table charting the funding received by various universities from the Wellcome Trust. It states that King's was the only university to increase funding on 2012 with a 14 per cent rise.

Happy campers common ground

Times Higher Education 9th January 2014

Dr Natalie Gold, Philosophy, reviews 'Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason and the Gap Between Us and Them' by Joshua Greene.

Q&A with Joanna Newman

Times Higher Education 9th January 2014

Question are put to Dr Joanna Newman, newly appointed Vice Principal (International). She said: 'There's a perception internationally that the UK visa system works against prospective international students. A lot more work needs to be done to convince the world that the UK is open for business and welcomes international talent.'

Award launched for enterprising university societies

Telegraph 9th January 2014

King’s College London is mentioned in this article which reports an Enterprising Student Society Accreditation (ESSA) scheme that awards enterprising student societies. The King’s College London Business Club has been accredited by the ESSA

Art, dance, rockets and diplomacy

Financial Times 8th January 2014

An article looking at the UK-Russia year of culture and how it aims to give each country a different view of the each other, includes a comment from Sam Greene, Director of the King's Russia Institute: 'When you’re getting involved with creative people you have a lot of competing agendas at the same time . . . Creative communities might like to see this as an opportunity to make a point. So both governments will be keen to see it doesn’t get out of their control.'

MoD funds research in to hackers - and music fans

Guardian 8th January 2014

The Ministry of Defence is reported to be paying out large sums for postgraduate research such as research in to online hackers, being conducted at King's.

The 3,000-year-old PLONK: Ancient Hebrew text unearthed in Jerusalem revealed to be a label for cheap wine reserved for slaves

MailOnline 8th January 2014

Dr Jonathan Stokl, Theology and Religious Studies, commented on the discovery of a 3000 year old inscription on a pottery jug used to hold wine, thought to be reserved for slaves. Dr Stokl said: ‘Irrespective of what the reading of the inscription is, it attests to someone writing Hebrew (or a closely related language) in the 10th century in Jerusalem, probably for administrative reasons’.

Mark Duggan killing

BBC London News 8th January 2014

Professor Ben Bowling, Law, is interviewed on the topic of police body cameras in the wake of the return of the verdict that Mark Duggan's death was lawful. 'I can see why a camera might be thought of as a way to verify events. I'm concerned about mission creep and surveillance creep.'

Learning drugs reawaken grown-up brain's inner child

New Scientist 8th January 2014

A drug that allows adults to master new skills easily including learning perfect pitch may be possible if we can restore the brain's youthful ability to create new circuits. To test whether the drug might reawaken the critical period in humans, researchers including Professor Allan Young, Institute of Psychiatry, had to settle on a skill that appears impossible for adults to acquire. They chose perfect pitch because it is a rare ability and is usually seen only in some people who were taught music before the age of 6.

Al-Qaeda hasn't gone away, and is gaining

USA Today 8th January 2014

Article on how the death of leader Osama bin Laden has not ended the spread of al-Qaeda, say analysts, and may even have helped it. Efraim Karsh, a professor of Middle East Studies at Bar Ilan University and Kings College, London, predicted the phenomenon of global jihad will only grow, especially in Iraq, now that the U.S. is out of the picture.

Article quotes Professor Efraim Karsh, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies: 'America managed to calm down the situation, but the Iraqi government hasn't kept a lid on the problem.. the problem is that Americans and the West don't realize that this is a very devout region and values like nationalism and liberalism aren't deeply entrenched.'

Experts who think anger can be cured with an aspirin

Daily Mail 7th January 2014

The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V) has introduced a new illness, called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, to cover intensive temper tantrums in children aged six to ten. This is defined as severe temper outbursts at least three times a week, or feeling sad, irritable or angry almost every day. A report by Dr Argyris Stringaris, Institute of Psychiatry, estimated that up to 3 per cent of children could be diagnosed - that's 360,000 British under-18s.

'ADHD doesn't exist': Neurologist claims condition is masking less serious problems and causing needless use of addictive drugs

Daily Mail 7th January 2014

More people are being diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), leading some experts to claim the condition is masking less serious problems and causing needless use of addictive drugs. But Professor Eric Taylor, Institute of Psychiatry, said the UK was different because NHS guidelines already recommend careful specialist assessment, with psychological treatments given priority over medication in most cases. ‘Probably too few children here get help’ he said.

UK weather: flood siren at Chesil beach

Guardian 7th January 2014

Dr Thomas Smith, Geography, has commented on tidal levels for the Guardian's live feed on the extreme weather conditions. Dr Smith said: 'the latest on the tidal gauge shows that the sea is receding. Not close to the levels seen at last night’s high tide. Probably due to weakening winds and higher air pressure.'

Make corporations 'account for water usage'

Independent 6th January 2014

Professor Tony Allan, Geography, has called for major companies to formally record their water usage in order to ensure that the full cost of production is properly recognised. Professor Allan said that it is vital that major companies, such as Coca-Cola and Kraft, together with powerful supermarkets including Walmart, take a lead in establishing measures to 'capture the value of water'. This was also reported by Independent i.

Britain's space industry

BBC 1 - Breakfast 6th January 2014

Chris Barber, Director of the International Space School Education Trust, mentions King's College London during an interview about the space industry in the UK.

Extremism

BBC London 6th January 2014

In a piece which explores how educating mothers can prevent teenagers from turning in to extremists, Rupert Sutton, a former researcher at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, based at King's is interviewed.

Food unwrapped diet special

Channel 4 6th January 2014

King's is featured in this programme as part of a conversation about the assimilation of dairy fat in the body.

Comment: The Tories should not withdraw Britain from the European Convention on Human Rights

Pink News 6th January 2014

Professor Robert Wintemute warns against plans by the Conservative Party to withdraw Britain from European arrangements protecting human rights as it could have serious repressions for the LGBT community. He said: 'LGBT and other minority voters should think long and hard before supporting the Conservative plan to pull Britain out of the 63-year-old European human rights system.'

The trouble with the best laid plans

Sunday Times 5th January 2014

A book by Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman entitled 'Strategy: A History' has been reviewed by Bruce Anderson. Anderson said that the book 'ranges well beyond military history and displays an awesome scope, from Milton's Satan to General David Petraeus who receives cautious acclaim for harmonising political and military factors in his strategy during America's 'surge' in Iraq'

Amritsar massacre: how Britain lost the will to rule

Sunday Telegraph 5th January 2014

Dr Nick Lloyd, Defence Studies, writes about the effects of the First World War on India and how it ushered in the final phase of Britain's 300-year involvement in the sub continent.

On the bottle

Sunday Times 5th January 2014

In Kate Spicer's wine column, Professor Tom Sanders is quoted: 'The beneficial effect [of wine] on cardiovascular disease is almost entirely attributable to alcohol because it also applies to other alcoholic beverages such as beer and spirits. The polyphenolic agenda has been hyped by the industry.'

As we enter the centenary, Gove is right to question First World War myths

Independent 5th January 2014

Christopher Newton, PhD student in War Studies, comments on the backlash against Michael Gove's criticism of the 'lions led by donkeys' portrayal of the First World War. Newton says that Gove is right to highlight the work of revisionist historians such as Gary Sheffield and Professor William Philpott, War Studies.

Patients deserve the truth: health screening can do more harm than good

Guardian 3rd January 2014

Professor Susan Bewley, Women's Health, has chosen not to have breast cancer screening on the basis of information about over diagnosis. Professor Bewley said: 'My worry is that I have made my decision on the basis of information that is not readily available to my patients'

Surge in student feminism: Meet the new generation of 'bold, hilarious feminists'

Telegraph 3rd January 2014

The KCL Intersectional Feminist Society has been mentioned in this piece that looks at the rise of student feminism during 2013.

Arifa Akbar: Does a book make its title or the other way around?

Independent 3rd January 2014

An article discussing the importance of book titles mentions Dr Christopher Hamilton's book which talks about tackling adversity.

Londoners to watch in 2014

Evening Standard 2nd January 2014

King's Political Economy student, David Wilkinson, has been mentioned by the Evening Standard as a 'tech star' and one of 14 young Londoners to watch in 2014.

The scholarly web

Times Higher Education 2nd January 2014

Dr Alexandre Afonso, Political Economy, is mentioned in this discussion of the academic job market as this idea is the premise of Dr Afonso's own blog in which he compares the market to a 'drug gang' saying that it has: 'an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders.'

Sherlock Holmes: a very British superhero

Times Higher Education 2nd January 2014

Fern Riddell, a final year PhD student, History, discusses the third series of the BBC One television show about Sherlock Holmes and his 21st century reincarnation. Riddell said: 'Although he has been updated by the BBC, Sherlock Holmes has been a British pin-up for well over a century.'

Airport din linked to stroke, psychoses

Times of India 2nd January 2014

Article on a recent study by King's College London which confirmed that people who live in neighbourhoods surrounding an airport are prone to various ailments due to the high decibel blasts.

Britain at the crossroads – but which path will it take in 2014?

Guardian 1st January 2014

An exhibition, held at the King's Cultural Institute - Derek Jarman: Pandemonium, is mentioned in this list of highlights that 2014 is to bring.

From a career in GP academia to editing the BJGP

Pulse 1st January 2014

Professor Roger Jones, Medicine, describes his role at the helm of RCGP's medical journal. He said: 'My central task at the BJGP is to deal with the 500 or so original research papers we are sent each year. I have to decide whether they merit peer review and, if so, who to send them to.'

Monty Python controversy

BBC Radio 4 - Today 30th December 2013

The Revd Professor Richard Burridge, Dean of King's College London and Professor of Biblical Interpretation has commented on Monty Python's 'Life of Brian' during a feature in which Michael Palin relives the controversy that surrounded the film at its release. Professor Burridge says that this portrayal was probably more historically accurate than many Hollywood films and that he is dissapointed in the nature of the discussion that took place at the time. This was also reported by the Telegraph and Sun.

Russian bomb attacks

BBC News 30th December 2013

Following the bomb attacks in Volgograd, Russia, Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, has been interviewed and given analysis of the situation.

Even in 1971, Awami League wasn't stating it wanted independence

Times of India 30th December 2013

Article on Bangladesh's upcoming elections, and whether it can break with past violence. Dr Srinath Raghavan, India Institute, answers questions on why Bangladesh's creation was a global affair, the influences shaping this — and how even Israel apparently got involved.

Midwives warn new NHS fees endanger migrants

Guardian 28th December 2013

Charity, Maternity Action, has found that pregnant immigrants are endangering their lives by disappearing from ante-natal care to give birth at home because they can not afford their NHS maternity charges. Dr Susan Bewley, Women's Health, commented that: 'If health professionals misinterpret their duties towards this group of women they might not come for scans, other checks or to deliver their babies.'

Translation tech

BBC One - Breakfast 26th December 2013

Professor Shalom Lappin, Philosophy, comments on the application of voice recognition to translation. He says that when you translate from one language to another you have to make decisions about words and phrases. This interview was also featured in BBC News - Click.

The Medici

BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time 26th December 2013

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Medici family, who dominated Florence's political and cultural life for three centuries. Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice Principal (Arts & Sciences) and Professor of Renaissance Studies, participates in the discussion and begins by outlining the background of the Medici family and the setting up of the Medici bank.

The rise and rise of legal highs

Men's Health 25th December 2013

In UK drug culture the chemist is king. Class A drugs are having their molecular structures tweaked and made legally available, leaving the authorities flat-footed. Relative purity is most commonly said to justify the use of legal highs with abandon. But experts agree this is a dangerous logic. “The purity of a drug does not mean much unless we know potency and effect,” reasons Dr Adam Winstock, Institute of Psychiatry.

Army recruitment could be hit by charities portraying troops as victims

Telegraph 25th December 2013

Dr Helen McCartney, Defence Studies, has said that charities are risking the undermining of army recruitment by portraying veterans as damaged victims. She says the image portrayed by charity marketing campaigns may put off young people from signing up and may even affect the chances of troops getting jobs when they leave the army. This was also reported by the Times.

Hate sprouts but can't say no to more pud? Blame it on your genes!

Daily Mail 24th December 2013

Professor Rob George, Cicely Saunders Institute, comments in this feature about things that genes can be 'blamed' for. Professor George said: 'Animal experiments already show that the presence or absence of certain genes alter pain or drug sensitivities as much as a 100-fold.'

Israel tracks Syria's Western jihadis, worried about their return

Reuters 24th December 2013

A piece reporting the concerns over Western jihadis states that the Israeli estimates for the number of Western combatants in Syria largely correspond to those cited in a report last week by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, based at King's College London.

Blind identical twins Dan and Michael Smith

BBC Radio 4 24th December 2013

Peter White speaks King's Geography student Michael Smith and his identical twin brother Dan. Both brothers are blind as a result of a rare condition known as Leber’s Optic Neuropathy which results in a sudden and rapid loss of vision cased by the death of cells in the optic nerve.

Dictatorial Ferguson 'from same mould as Lenin'

Times 23rd December 2013

Dr John Bew, War Studies, has compared Sir Alex Ferguson's leadership of Manchester United to that of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. Dr Bew said that the Scottish football manager and the Bolshevik leader appeared to have the same desire for control.

Joseph Lister's first operation

BBC London Radio 23rd December 2013

Dr Ruth Richardson, Centre for Life-Writing Research, discusses Lister's first operation, when he was still a medical student, to repair a woman's eviscerated bowel from abdominal stab wounds. The operation was successful.

Was Pedro Hernandez pushed by NYPD to falsely confess to the murder of Etan Patz?

Huffington Post 23rd December 2013

Professor Gisli Gudjonsson has commented on the confession given by Pedro Hernandez to the murder of Etan Patz in 1979. It is suggested that this confession may have been forced and there are not suitable records of the events that took place during interrogation. Professor Gudjonsson determined that, without corroborating evidence, relying on the statements Hernandez made to police and prosecutors would be "profoundly unsafe."

The nursing year 2013

Nursing Times 23rd December 2013

An overview of the year in nursing mentioned research conducted by the National Nursing Unit at King's which found that more than eight out of 10 hospital nurses had to leave care undone on their last shift because of staffing shortages.

Chief exec to lead safe staffing drive

Nursing Times 23rd December 2013

Professor Jane Ball, Deputy Director of the National Nursing Research Unit at King's will collaborate with Professor Peter Griffiths, University of Southampton, on a literature for guidance in to safe staffing levels as a result of the government response to the Francis report.

The incarnation is the thawing of our wintry world

Times 21st December 2013

Reverend Professor Alister McGrath, Head of the Centre for Theology, Religion and Culture, discusses his ideas about God, Jesus and Christmas. Professor McGrath said: 'There seems to be a disconnection between the singular life of Jesus of Nazareth and the universal relevance of God.'

Crick institute: the future of medical research

Telegraph 20th December 2013

Further coverage of the opening of the Francis Crick Institute in 2015. King's College London is one of 6 scientific and academic organisations involved in this collaboration.

Scientists discover key to reversing the ageing process

Daily Mail 20th December 2013

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research, has commented on new research from Harvard Medical School which claims to have identified and reversed one of the causes of aging. Professor Spector said: ‘This is an intriguing and exciting finding that some aspects of the aging process are reversible. It is however a long and tough way to go from these nice mouse experiments to showing real anti-aging effects in humans without side effects.’ Professor Spector’s comments were reported in the Times, Sun, Scottish Sun, Press Association, BBC (Online) and Daily Mail.

Almost a third of professional parents have moved home for a good school

Telegraph 20th December 2013

Research conducted by Professor Becky Francis, Education and Professional Studies, has found that around one in three (32 per cent) professional parents with children aged five to 16 has moved to an area because they thought it had ‘good’ schools. It also found that 18 per cent have moved to live in the catchment area of a specific school.. Professor Francis said: 'Our findings also demonstrate the extent to which some working class parents are enacting 'informed choice' and policymakers may also learn from their practices.' This was reported by Independent i, Independent, Daily Mail, Press Association, Telegraph, Times, LBC, Sky News, BBC Radio 5 Live (00.06.30) and various regional broadcasts.

A funny play about anorexia

BMJ 19th December 2013

A review of Mess, a play about anorexia which was performed at the Institute of Psychiatry in December 2013.

Managerialism

Times 19th December 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a letter which comments on management at the BBC.

Books of 2013

Times Higher Education 19th December 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, describes the book that he most values from the past year - The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union

Cameron’s careless Chinese whispers

Times Higher Education 19th December 2013

Correspondence from King's College London's Erica Carter, head of German, and Patrick Ffrench, head of French, who discuss the comments made by Prime Minister David Cameron regarding UK school pupils needing to 'look beyond...French and German.'

Lee Rigby murder trial verdict

BBC Radio 5 Live 19th December 2013

Academics from King’s have commented following the returning of a guilty verdict for the two men on trial for his murder. Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, was interview by BBC News, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 5 Live (item begins 02.16.17). Dr Rogers said: ‘I would say that it’s a social identity issue, it’s really not a religious issue at all. It’s the difficulty that individuals find in fitting in with different groups.’ Dr Peter Neumann was interviewed on the same topic on BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight (16.00). He comments on the media attention surrounding Islam and says that this is where the focus has been: ‘Over the past two or three years we have seen a resurgence of populist right wing movements and so accordingly, the focus of the government has shifted.’

Hospital chief exec to chair NICE nurse staffing group

Nursing Times 19th December 2013

As part of the government’s response to the Francis report into care failings at Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust, health secretary Jeremy Hunt asked the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence to develop guidance on safe staffing. Professor Jane Ball, Nursing, will contribute to this review.

Experience and resilience to the fore in drama about profession

Nursing Standard 18th December 2013

Nurses who travelled the world working in the former British colonies gathered in London last week for a reading of a play inspired by their collective experiences. Playwright Vanessa Rosenthal was commissioned by King's College London to write the play.

Thinking Allowed

BBC Radio 4 18th December 2013

Eloise Radcliffe, a research student in the Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, speaks about her study in to how couples cope when one develops a chronic illness. Eloise said that the couples she studied were very keen to present themselves as coping together and maintained a level of humour despite severe disabilities. (02.00)

London Emissions

ITV London Tonight 18th December 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, commented for ITV London Tonight on air pollution targets following the introduction of London’s first ever fully electric buses.

From dementia to liver damage, the real toll of too much SUGAR

Daily Mail 17th December 2013

Dr Andy Dowson, Director of Headache Services, says that the sugar slump associated with sweet foods can cause headaches. This is part of an article reporting on the health effects of too much sugar, particularly at the levels eaten at Christmas. Dr Dowson said: 'Migraines tend to be triggered by changes, such as a change in sleep patterns or what you're eating. If you have a lot of sugar, your body can over react and deal with it very quickly, so your blood sugar levels peak then trough.

Why a cat bite could trigger depression

Daily Mail 17th December 2013

A recent study found that more than 40 per cent of those who'd been bitten by a cat went on to be diagnosed with depression. Commenting on the possible link to depression, Prof Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, said, “much more work is needed. Essentially, they found that people who had cats were more likely to have depression. One explanation, for example, might be that people who are lonely are more likely to have a pet, and be more prone to depression."

Parents buy second homes to win top state school places: Cunning tactics of wealthy laid bare in report

Daily Mail 17th December 2013

Research conducted by Professor Becky Francis, Education and Professional Studies, has found that a third of professional parents have moved home in order to be near 'good' schools for their children. Professor Francis said: 'Our findings also demonstrate the extent to which some working class parents are enacting 'informed choice' and policymakers may also learn from their practices.' Also reported by Independent i, Press Association, Telegraph, Press Association and BBC Radio 5 Live.

King's press release related to 'Parents buy second homes to win top state school places: Cunning tactics of wealthy laid bare in report'

British surgeon jailed in Syria dies in detention - family

Reuters (UK) 17th December 2013

A British surgeon who was arrested last November within 48 hours of arriving in Syria to volunteer as an emergency doctor has died in jail. The news follows a report issued earlier compiled by a partnership of five universities based at King's College London that between 3,300 and 11,000 fighters from more than 70 nations, including a rising number from Western Europe, have joined the struggle in Syria against President Bashar al-Assad.

Self-harm 'four times more likely' in female prisoners

BBC News 16th December 2013

A recent report into self-harm amongst women in prison revels that while only making up 5% of the prison population, women account for half of all self-harm incidents. Commenting on the new report, Dr Andrew Forrester, Institute of Psychiatry, calls for more research to address how the self-harm rate in prisons in England and Wales can be reduced.

New 'Tech Levels' created in drive to boost practical skills

Telegraph 16th December 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, has commented on 'tech level' qualifications. A new range of practical alternatives to A Levels. Professor Wolf said: 'High-quality and respected qualifications are at the heart of any excellent vocational education system.'I am delighted that the government has taken this major step towards establishing such a system for England: one that will serve the needs of motivated and ambitious young people, of employers, and of the country as a whole.'

My father was a lovely gentleman. But as dementia gripped, his fate was cruel.

Observer 15th December 2013

An argument made by Professor Martin Prince, Institute of Psychiatry, that 'the increase of £66m for UK research is less than 0.5% of the annual cost to society from dementia, which runs to billions - a cost that rises still higher if unpaid carers are included' is mentioned in this article in which the story of a man suffering dementia is told by his daughter.

Dementia comes out of the shadows at last

The Times 13th December 2013

A letter to the editor regarding the recent G8 Summit on Dementia in London, which Professor Martin Prince, Institute of Psychiatry, participated in.

Similar but not identical: study reveals more about twins than about education

The Independent 13th December 2013

The heritability of general intelligence among humans rises with age. In infancy, about 20 per cent of a child’s intelligence is attributed to genes, whereas in adults it can be as high as 70 or even 80 per cent, according to Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, who led a twins study into educational achievement.

Trust shelve super merger plans to create a £2.3bn organisation

Health Service Journal 13th December 2013

A merger that would have created the largest provider organisation in England has been shelved. King’s College Hospital, Guy’s and St Thomas’ and South London and Maudsley foundation trusts were investigating becoming one organisation, along with the university King’s College London.

Kidnap ransoms ‘fuelling terrorism’ – UK Foreign Office

BBC News (Online) 13th December 2013

The UK Foreign Office has warned that ransom payments made to kidnappers are directly fuelling terrorism, and that the problem is getting worse. Alexander Hitchens, War Studies, has named the European governments he believes have secretly been paying off the kidnappers. Hitchens said: ‘In the past the German government has been criticised for being the first to do this in the early 2000s.But really, most recently, it's been the French and Spanish and Italian governments.’ Alexander Hitchens was also interviewed on BBC Radio 4 Today. Also reported by Financial Times (Online).

A taste of no-tech life in a post-apocalyptic bunker

New Scientist 13th December 2013

A report on the Welcome to Happy Redoubt exhibition, an art installation at Somerset House, King's College London.

Empire state of mind

New Statesman 12th December 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes this review of Camilla Schofield's 'Enoch Powell and the Making of Post-Colonial Britain'

Genetics accounts for more than half of variation in exam results

The Guardian 12th December 2013

A recently published study into genetics and schooling, led by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, finds differences in children's exam results at secondary school owe more to genetics than teachers, schools or the family environment.

This story appeared in the Independent, Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph, New Scientist, BBC News, SkyNews, The Times, South China Morning Post, BBC Chinese, GloboVision (Brazil), Evening Standard, New Zealand Herald, Press Association, Yahoo News, Times of India. Prof Plomin was interviewed on BBC4 Radio Today and the research was discussed on BBC Rdaio 2, BBC Radio 5 Live, SkyNews

The maverick founder of modern seismology

Nature 12th December 2013

King's is mentioned in this piece which discusses the film 'The Man who Mapped the Shaking Earth', a film on John Milne who's work in Japan put earthquake science on the map. John Milne began this journey by studying science at King's.

Order of Merit: the list of members

Telegraph 12th December 2013

This is the full list of living recipients of the Order of Merit. One is British military historian Sir Michael Howard OM CH CBE MC was founder of the Department of War Studies, King's College London. Howard has been described in the Financial Times as ‘Britain's greatest living historian’.

David Cameron's old college

Times Higher Education 12th December 2013

Further reporting of the comments made by David Cameron that his former college tutor, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, still sends him emails with critique of his work.

Book review: Racisms by Francisco Bethencourt

Prospect Magazine 12th December 2013

A book written by Professor Francisco Bethencourt, History, is reviewed. The review says: ‘Bethencourt’s incisive analysis ought to be compulsory reading in the think tanks, chanceries and ministries of the developed world.’

Hundreds reveal drink and drug experiences

The Herald Scotland 11th December 2013

MORE than 600 Scots have taken part in the world's biggest drugs survey which aims to assess the truth about drink and drug use.
Dr Adam Winstock, from the Institute of Psychiatry and the consultant psychiatrist and addiction specialist behind the survey, said that in general there is "very little" real data about how most people use drugs.

G8 summit on Dementia

BBC Radio 4 11th December 2013

Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the current G8 Summit that is taking place in the United Kingdom and what can be done to tackle Dementia.

This story begins at 02:10:15

When an itch during pregnancy is a sign your baby is at risk.

Daily Mail 10th December 2013

This article reports on the risks of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and tells the story of a mother who, sadly, lost her a child as a result of the characteristic itch being overlooked. The article mentions Professor Catherine Williamson, Women's Health, who explains the disease and led a study which found that ICP can significantly increase the risk of still birth.

How do you change teenagers' negative body images?

BBC Radio 4 - All in the Mind 10th December 2013

Dr Helen Sharpe talks about how body image lessons can improve teenagers' body esteem. She says the programme she developed helps target negative behaviours.

King's press release related to 'How do you change teenagers' negative body images?'

The Asian oligarchs you've never heard of who bought up London - and knocked the Duke of Westminster off No1

Telegraph 10th December 2013

A feature on the Estates Gazette Rich List notes that in seventh spot is art lover Joseph Lau who gave £6m to King's College London to foster Chinese research.

PTSD: 'I am the girl who didn’t die'

The Daily Telegraph 9th December 2013

PTSD is estimated to affect one in every three people who have a traumatic experience. Those who have previously suffered a trauma, or who lack social support, are particularly vulnerable. Triggers can range from assaults to natural disasters to serious road accidents. Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, stresses that PTSD can affect anyone who has had a frightening or distressing experience. He said, “Even in the military, PTSD can be caused by assaults and road traffic accidents. It’s important that we don’t assume PTSD is caused only by the Taliban.”

Pensioners with Sixties drug habit

The Daily Telegraph 9th December 2013

A record number of pensioners are being admitted to hospital after taking recreational drugs as the Swinging Sixties generation reaches old age, new figures have shown. An earlier study co-authored by Professor Robert Stewart, Institute of Psychiatry, found cannabis, cocaine and amphetamine use by people aged over 50 had risen dramatically since the early 1990s. It predicted that illicit drug taking would become more common in pensioners over the next two decades.

This story also appeared in the Mirror, Daily Mail, International Business Times, The Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph and The Independent.

Blood test for Alzheimer's 'close to being developed', say scientists

Channel 4 News 9th December 2013

Researchers at Kings College London say they have made a “significant step” in developing a test which could allow doctors to detect Alzheimer’s at a much earlier stage before any noticeable warning signs. Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry, said the study’s data was “more promising than I think I have seen before”.

This story was also reported in The Daily Telegraph.

How traffic fumes can be deadly

Daily Mail 9th December 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on new research which found that exposure to traffic pollutants can push up the risk of dying by seven per cent. He said: 'This study enhances an increasing scientific evidence base that PM2.5 poses a danger to health at concentrations below current EU limit values and supports the ongoing WHO review of European air quality policies.'

Louise Mensch, Trudie Styler and Will.i.am: ADHD affects adults as well as children, but can it help as well as hinder?

Daily Mail 8th December 2013

Two to four per cent of the global adult population is estimated to have ADHD, which equates to 1.7 million sufferers in the UK. According to the Institute of Psychiatry’s Professor Philip Asherson, whose NHS clinic for ADHD adults was the first in the country, most could be unaware they have it. "ADHD was only picked up in children from 2000 onwards," he says. "Those who’d already left school would have missed any diagnosis".

Tall stories from Wayne's world

Mail on Sunday 8th December 2013

The working title for the three-part programme is Big Ballet, which to me brings to mind Disney elephants in tutus. Do we have to democratise absolutely everything? Not everyone can be a jockey, a model, a painter or a writer. For the programme, 500 applicants were whittled down to 16 women and two men, aged from 18 to 52, and who range in size from a 12 to a 20, to be coached by Wayne and dancer Monica Loughman, with insight from the former creative director of the Royal Opera House Deborah Bull, now director of Cultural Partnerships at King’s.

Pupils lack competitive streak of Far East peers

The Sunday Times 8th December 2013

Letter on the subject of education in the UK and how pupils lack the competitive streak of their peers in the Far East. Quotes Professor Alison Wolf, Management, who said that parents of different cultures value education differently.

Sleep, from A to Zzzzzzz

Sunday Telegraph 8th December 2013

Professor Adrian Williams, Medicine, says that 'everything sleeps, not just humans' in this piece exploring the mysteries behind sleep. He mentions that studies he has been involved with, such as the genetics of sleep, have involved fruit flies.

Why it's time for brain science to ditch the 'Venus and Mars' cliche

The Observer 7th December 2013

When gender differences are uncovered by researchers they are frequently found to be trivial, a point made by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, whose studies have found that a mere 3% of the variation in young children's verbal development is due to their gender. Even more critical is Dr Marco Catani, Institute of Psychiatry, he said, "The study's main conclusions about possible cognitive differences between males and females are not supported by the findings of the study".

Honours, awards, appointments

British Dental Journal 6th December 2013

Mandeep Gosal, Dental Institute, has been awarded the 2013 William Houston Gold Medal for achieving the most outstanding performance in the Membership of Orthodontics examination of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

I'm also an expert on

Times Higher Education 5th December 2013

Dr Daniel Matlin, History, writes about African American scholars historically gaining prominence only by exercising their intellect in the cause of racial justice. He asks whether anything has changed and whether academics are still sacrificing recognition in their chosen field.

A-Team approach: students love it when a town plan comes together

Times Higher Education 5th December 2013

This is an overview of the 3rd European Immersive Education Summit at King's College London.

Grime, crime and art sublime

Times Higher Education 5th December 2013

Professor Clare Brant, English, reviews 'The First Bohemians' by Vic Gatrell.

Building on a tradition of discovery

Financial Times 4th December 2013

This piece mentions King's College London as it asks whether new institutions being developed in London could lead to it becoming the 'leading scientific city on the planet'.

Cameron's latest lesson from his old professor

Daily Telegraph 4th December 2013

This article mentions Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, who was David Cameron's politics tutor at Oxford University. This follow David Cameron's revelation that Professor Bogdanor still provides him with feedback on his work.

Yemen bomb makers 'working on new devices'

BBC News (Online) 4th December 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, is quoted in this piece reporting that bomb makers in Yemen are creating bombs that are ever harder to detect in order to smuggle them on to planes. Professor Neumann said that Western governments are confronting the threat on two fronts: intelligence and technology. Professor Neumann's comments were also reported by BBC Radio 4 and BBC World Service Radio.

London terror threat

BBC London 4th December 2013

New measures to tackle those who preach hate and extremist websites have been proposed by a task force set up following Lee Rigby's murder. Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, comments: 'A lot of this is about long term engagement sand building up relationships with communities and if we break down the trust that we've taken so long to build up through community cohesion and engagement, they're going to be less willing to talk to us and less willing to share their views and concerns with us.'

Dementia epidemic looms with 135 million sufferers seen by 2050

Reuters 4th December 2013

Many governments are woefully unprepared for an epidemic of dementia currently affecting 44 million people worldwide and set to more than treble to 135 million people by 2050, health experts and campaigners said on Thursday. In a policy report published along with the new data, Martin Prince, Institute of Psychiatry, said "most governments are woefully unprepared for the dementia epidemic". His report said only 13 countries have national dementia plans. Also reported in the Huffington Post, South China Morning Post, Le Monde, FOX News and MSN News amongst others.

King's press release related to 'Dementia epidemic looms with 135 million sufferers seen by 2050'

Well above average

Guardian 3rd December 2013

Susan Stebbing who was a Professor of Philosophy at King's, is mentioned in a letter for introducing the ideas of the Vienna circle to Britain.

Could a 4p blood pressure pill treat dementia?

Daily Mail 3rd December 2013

Professor Robert Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on a new trial for a blood pressure drug as a treatment for dementia. He says: "For many years we have told our patients when they have asked us how to avoid dementia, that what is good for the heart (such as treating high blood pressure) is likely to be good for the brain."

All in the Mind

BBC Radio 4 3rd December 2013

Dr Gareth Owen, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about capacity to consent and the mental health act.

Charity says coal kills 1600 a year as MPs vote on new curbs

Guardian 2nd December 2013

New figures from the Health and Environment Alliance show that Britain's coal powered fire stations are responsible for 1,600 premature deaths every year. Dr Michal Krzyzanowski, Analytical and Environment Sciences, said: 'The scientific evidence that air pollution causes disease is no longer in doubt. Energy policy must seriously consider the significant health costs resulting from the sue of coal'. Also reported by New Scientist.

Do all these supplements really help us battle winter?

Daily Telegraph 2nd December 2013

Dr Anne Mullen, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on the true worth of the pills and extracts we rely on. She says that echinacea is hard to evaluate as it comes in so many different forms and that vitamin C can help support the immune system's defence.

UK schools stuck at back of the class

Sunday Times 1st December 2013

This week, worldwide rankings based on tests of 500 000 pupils in 65 countries will show UK teenagers falling far behind the top nations of China, Singapore and South Korea in science, reading and maths. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, said: 'It is not just about better teachers, it is also about the home environment.' Also report by Daily Mail.

Public opinion hardens against private firms in NHS, poll finds

Guardian 30th November 2013

An Ipsos Mori poll for King's College London has concluded that 47% of people disagree with the idea that public health services can be provided by private companies, as long as they remain free of charge. Also reported by Health Service Journal and British Medical Journal.

Robots rule in post-apocalypse interactive exhibition

BBC News (Online) 30th November 2013

An article reporting the new exhibition, Welcome to Happy Redoubt, which runs until 15th December at King's College London. The project is the brainchild of Juneau Projects who have collaborated with the professors and students at King's College London to create their vision of a future without today's gadgets or money.

Academic experts criticise Boris Johnson IQ claims

The Guardian 29th November 2013

Commenting on Boris Johnson's claims that society should focus on high IQ people, Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, says there is a moderate correlation between IQ and educational attainment ... income, occupational status. He said: "If Boris actually said, 'We are to therefore put more of our resources into the higher IQ [bracket]', that's wrong ... it's applying values."

Genetics professor hits back

The Guardian 29th November 2013

A world expert on behavioural genetics, recently championed by Conservative education advisers, has said it is wrong to abandon those with the lowest IQs, as Boris Johnson suggested in a highly provocative speech on Wednesday.
The London mayor said those with IQs below 85 were less wealthy and implied that society should be ploughing more resources into helping those with higher IQs.
Professor Rober Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, said while those with high IQs stood a better chance of being wealthy, this was in no way "fixed" and that Johnson's assertions about resources, "didn't flow from the facts".

The girl whose skin never heals

BBC News 29th November 2013

This case study of a girl who suffers from epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a condition which leaves her with wounds and skin blisters at the slightest friction. She is one of 10 patients testing a new cell therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital. This trial is lead by Professor John McGrath, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, who is cautiously optimistic of the results and says: 'We expect the anti-inflammatory and better wound healing effects of these cells will last for between six and nine months, perhaps even a year.'

Climate science: can geoengineering save the world?

Guardian (Online) 29th November 2013

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, participates in an online discussion about geoengineering. Professor Hulme argues against the idea of geoengineering, which suggests that humans can artifically moderate the earth's climate, saying that: 'I find it hard to envisage any scenario in which the world's nations will agree to a thermostat in the sky.'

Drug driving

BBC Radio 5 Live 29th November 2013

Transport Minister, Stephen Hammond, would like to extend drug driving laws to include legal highs. Dr Kim Wolff, Pharmaceutical Science, comments on testing of legals highs at the roadside and said: 'There are methods available but they haven't been widely used at the roadside environment so it's an ongoing situation I think.' (01.54.00)

Call for CCTV to monitor welfare of lab animals

Times 28th November 2013

Labs carrying out experiments on primates are being urged to install CCTV to ensure animal welfare and maintain a culture of transparency. The piece mentions King's College London's marmoset facility which does research in to Parkinson's and is thought to be essential in developing treatment for neurodegenerative conditions. Dr Sarah Salvage, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, said: 'The really important thing is the work here has been shown to be translational'

Group-level extinction

Times Higher Education 28th November 2013

Ourania Filippakou and Ted Tapper consider whether
the age of the mission group is drawing to a close. King's College London is mentioned as a member of the Russell Group as the significance of membership is discussed.

Can virtual reality be used to tackle racism

BBC News 28th November 2013

Scientists say that most people have an ingrained racial bias but have found that this can be reduced when participants are immersed in a virtual body of a different race. Ziada Ayorech, a student of Psychosis Studies said: 'When we think of something as implicit racial bias you think that it's already ingrained and there's nothing you can do, but in reality these studies show that by simply having people relate to someone with a different ethnicity - you can already change that.' This was also reported by Radio 4’s PM (39.32).

Plain cigarette packaging

BBC Radio Five Live Drive 28th November 2013

With the government currently reviewing its decision on plain packaging for cigarettes and tobacco, Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Health & Social Care Research, comments on this, saying that in Australia, where plain packaging already exists, more of the cheaper brands are sold now that the packaging does not differ (03.20). Professor John Moxham, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, has also commented on this for BBC News and said: ‘The crucial point for me is that people start smoking when they’re children and there are lots of studies on the way cigarette packaging looks from the past that demonstrates that children are influenced by the attractiveness.’

Acupuncture could help in the dentist’s chair

Reuters (UK) 28th November 2013

Patients who reflexively gag during procedures such as teeth impressions may find relief in acupuncture, according to researchers. In order for a large, randomized controlled trial - the gold standard in medical research - to be done on this subject, dental offices and academic institutions may have to work together, said Chris Dickinson of King's College London Dental Institute at Guy's Hospital in England.

Twin studies shows genes are switched on and off

ABC News (Australia) 28th November 2013

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research, gives an interview on how the study of the differences between identical twins has turned all the old theories about how a person’s genetics pre-determines their genes, on their heads.

Twin studies shows genes are switched on and off

ABC News (Australia) 28th November 2013

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research, gives an interview on how the study of the differences between identical twins has turned all the old theories about how a person’s genetics pre-determines their genes, on their heads.

Psychiatry needs a broader focus

The Guardian (Online) 27th November 2013

Professor Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry and president-elect of the World Psychiatry Association believes, “Every school should have a health professional knowing the basics about mental health", in an interview in The Guardian.

Modafinil Reduces Depression's Severity When Taken With Antidepressants

Science Daily 27th November 2013

A new study has concluded that taking the drug modafinil, typically used to treat sleep disorders, in combination with antidepressants reduces the severity of depression more effectively than taking antidepressants alone. Professor Cynthia Fu, Institute of Psychiatry, who worked on the study said, "This is good news for individuals struggling to fight depression".

Senior nurses give their verdict on government response

Nursing Standard 27th November 2013

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing & Midwifery, reacts to the key points of the government's response to the Frances inquiry into Mid Staffs. Professor Rafferty said: 'The decision to publish staffing levels and move towards greater openness is a step in the right direction. But we need defined minimum staffing levels.

Should all nurses be mentors?

Nursing Times 27th November 2013

Researchers at the National Nursing Research Unit at King's College London have asked whether it is time to 'rethink the role of the mentor in nurses' careers'.

Heading up the famous Hampstead School: my leadership formula

Guardian 27th November 2013

The former head of Hampstead School discusses the principles she held during her headship. She mentions becoming involved with a mathematics project run by King's College London.

Simon Wessely: A man with “a joking seriousness”

BMJ 27th November 2013

An interview with Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry. When asked what personal ambition he still has, he says: "To give something more back to my profession, helping the best students go for the best medical specialty."

China's navy breaks out to high seas

Reuters 27th November 2013

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, comments on the flotillas of Chinese warships and submarines which in October sliced through passages in the Japanese archipelago and out into the western Pacific for 15 days of war games. Dr Patalano comments on China’s PLAN (People’s Liberation Army and Navy), whose warships are now warships are now highly visible in all major oceans: ‘The PLAN is a relatively young organization building up their capabilities and certainly not the ‘senior service' in China.. It's important for its leadership and its members to establish their credentials and increase their profile,’ he said. His comments appeared in Reuters US and Reuters India and were used by Yahoo (Hong Kong), ABS-CBN (US) and Deutsche Welle (Germany).

My Afro is Melting

Time 27th November 2013

A feature on how Islamist fighters attempt to lure more foreigners to the Syrian struggle, increasingly promoting the image of a “five-star jihad” on social media, urging Western volunteers to pack tablets and toiletries for the holy war. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation said: ‘Compared to the privations of living in Kandahar, these guys in Syria are tweeting pictures of KitKat bars and Red Bull drinks. They know they are going to die, martyr themselves for jihad, but they are saying that on the way, you might as well ‘have a break, have a KitKat.’

Pope finds a new enemy – capitalism

CNBC 27th November 2013

Pope Francis' attack on some values of capitalism has reignited a long-running debate about whether the free market is compatible with Christianity. Anna Rowlands, Theology, said: ‘There have always been parts of the Catholic Church which are more left- and more right-leaning..the really new development in this is the attack on the trickle-down theory’.

Democracy debate

BBC Radio 4 - PM 26th November 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has been a guest on BBC Radio 4’s PM panel this week, discussing issues around democracy. He discussed the issue of gender representation in politics and the possibility of having a male and female MP for each constituency. Professor Bogdanor said: 'It's fair to say that under a number of systems of proportional representation you do have multi member constituencies. The single transferable vote for example, where it’s much more likely you'll get a balance.' (Item begins 23.30). He also commented, later in the week, on how politicians are paid and the experience they should have. He said: 'I think we could all agree that we want more politicians with practical experience. I'm against making that any sort of legal requirement. I think the answer is to widen the basis of selection for MPs.' He also discussed representation in parliament and on positive and negative voting.

How Girls With Autism Are Being Shortchanged

The Huffington Post (US) 26th November 2013

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, autism spectrum disorders, or ASDs, are five times more common among boys than girls. But a growing body of research hints that the significant sex-based differences in autism diagnoses are a result not just of biological differences, but of a failure to recognize ASD in girls. Professor Francesca Happe, Institute of Psychiatry, says, "It's likely that we are missing girls who are high-functioning and don't have additional co-morbid problems”. Professor Happe cautioned against overstating the new study's potential implications but called it interesting.

India marginalised in backyard

The New Indian Express 26th November 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece on India’s relationship with the Maldives: ‘India has to trudge very carefully in Maldives. With just 3,20,000 nationals, Maldives has assumed a disproportionately large profile primarily due to its geopolitical position astride strategic sea lines of communication and China’s attempt to win influence. The rivalry was brought to light when Maldives cancelled a lucrative contract granted to Indian and Malaysia companies amid speculation that a Chinese firm was behind the move, although the reality could be more prosaic,’ he said.

West Asia's Changing Countours

DNA (India) 26th November 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece on how several factors have led to US hegemony in the region coming under a cloud. Several factors have led to US hegemony in the region coming under a cloud: ‘The US interest in West Asia is declining as domestic economic and political uncertainties make it look more and more inwards…These trends are reshaping the regional order in West Asia and New Delhi will have to respond pro-actively to preserve and enhance its own interests in a strategically critical region,’ he said.

Exclusive: Numbers choosing to leave nursing rise by 26%

Nursing Times 25th November 2013

The numbers of nurses actively choosing to leave the profession has jumped 26% since the coalition government came into power,

Many carers paid less than minimum wage - report finds

BBC News (Online) 25th November 2013

A study by Dr Shereen Hussein, King's Policy Institute, revealed that up to 124,000 care workers are being paid less than the minimum wage because they are not paid for the time they spend travelling between homes. Dr Hussein was interviewed on BBC Radio 5 Live about this situation.

Scottish independence: What would it mean for the rest of the UK?

BBC News (Online) 25th November 2013

In September next year voters in Scotland will go to the polls to decide whether or not to become independent. This piece investigates the effects on the rest of the UK and Europe. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, says it would be a mistake to over-egg the impact and that the most likely change would be that 'Labour would have to tailor its message more to voters in England' which may lead to more Blairite policies.

Sixth British jihadist reportedly killed in Syria

Independent 25th November 2013

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the study of Radicalisation, has been quoted in this piece reporting the death of a another British fighter in Syria.

Daily Politics

BBC 2 25th November 2013

Deborah Bull, Executive Director of King's Cultural Institute, is a guest on the programme and speaks about government intervention in pay day loans.

Democracy debate

BBC Radio 4 - PM 25th November 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, is a guest on the programme and discusses the issue of representation in politics, particularly with reference to gender representation and the possibility of having a male and female MP for each constituency. Professor Bogdanor said: 'It's fair to say that under a number of systems of proportional representation you do have multi member constituencies. The single transferable vote for example which is used for the election of the Irish parliament and there its much more likely you'll get a balance.' Item begins 23.30

Live chat: tackling inequality in middle income countries

Guardian (Online) 25th November 2013

Dr Paul Segal, King's International Development Institute, is on the panel for a live chat on Thursday 28 November which will discuss whether it is time development focused on poor people rather than poor countries?

Geneva talks are just the start of years of diplomacy

Sunday Times 24th November 2013

An editorial comment from Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, who says that there is no method which can guarantee that Iran will not become a nuclear power.

House of slaves

Sunday Times 24th November 2013

The Lambeth women rescued from decades of slavery may have feared the outside world after being brainwashed into developing a paranoid view of it, according to mental health experts. Professor Tom Fahy, Institute of Psychiatry, said: “It’s not unusual for people who have been abused or have been in cult situations to begin to identify with the abuser or the aggressor or the dominant individual." Professor Neil Greenberg, also from the IoP says: “People who are kept captive develop emotional bonds with their captors because they feel their welfare is completely in another person’s hands.”

Why even successful women are insecure about their looks

BBC News 23rd November 2013

Dr Helen Sharpe, Institute of Psychiatry suggests that even high-achieving women can feel very conscious about the way they look. She says: "There is this subtle message running through all mass media and reflected in conversations with friends and family that beauty is equated with happiness and success. You can't just be successful, you've got to have the looks at well."

How South London 'slaves' may rebuild their lives

New Scientist 23rd November 2013

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the psychological issues the women will face and how will they start rebuilding their lives. Also interviewed on Channel 4 News, ITV daybreak

India and Vietnam add a new punch to their relationship

Business Standard (India) 23rd November 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece on how Delhi is progressing its ties with Vietnam, particularly on the defence front, in an attempt to ally with other Asian nations concerned about China's rise: ‘In a significant move, India has also decided to offer a $100-million credit line to Vietnam to purchase military equipment,’ he said.

Fruit recipe for healthier pregnancy

The Times 22nd November 2013

Leading a healthy lifestyle in the months prior to conception as well as during pregnancy could potentially decrease the chance of complications such as pre-eclampsia or premature birth, according to a new study led by scientists at King’s College London. Researchers suggest that maintaining a healthy weight and blood pressure prior to conception, could boost women’s chances of an uncomplicated pregnancy, and say these findings could help women make informed lifestyle changes. Reported by Independent, Daily Telegraph, Metro, Press Association, Nursing Times, BBC London 94.9 and Xinhua (China).

King's press release related to 'Fruit recipe for healthier pregnancy'

Universities should use Twitter to engage with students

Guardian 22nd November 2013

A geography student at King's is quoted in this piece about the merits of using Twitter at universities to engage with students. The geography students says that they would like to see deadline reminders on Twitter.

Report reveals why personalizing support for women with breast cancer could save lives

Reuters 22nd November 2013

Research suggests that personalizing support for women living with breast cancer could help them achieve better health outcomes through improved adherence. Professor John Weinman, Institute of Psychiatry, "Research shows there are certain factors that contribute to non-adherence in breast cancer, including treatment side effects, an individual's personal beliefs about their treatment and condition, and the quality of their healthcare consultations." Also reported by Press Association

Report reveals why personalizing support for women with breast cancer could save lives

Reuters 22nd November 2013

Personalising support for women living with breast cancer could help them achieve better health outcomes, according to a new white paper published by Atlantis Healthcare. ‘Research indicates as many as 41% of women choose to discontinue their breast cancer treatment,’ confirmed Professor John Weinman, Medicine, who reviewed the new report.

Living with schizophrenia

BBC Radio 4 - Woman's Hour 21st November 2013

Professor Elizabeth Kuipers, Institute of Psychiatry, was awarded a WISE lifetime achievement award. On BBC Radio 4 she talks about schizophrenia and her work on developing family therapies for schizophrenia.

King's press release related to 'Living with schizophrenia'

Lie detector tests

BBC Radio 5 Live 21st November 2013

Dr Jamie Horder, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses whether lie detector tests work or not. He says there isn't enough evidence that polygraph tests work.

Drone strike kills Haqqani network's No. 2, other Taliban commanders

NBC News (US) 21st November 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, commented: This will undoubtedly incline the Haqqani network still further against any peace talks with the American and Afghan governments and will give them an even stronger motive to disrupt next year’s elections.’

UK offers scholarships to 12 Indians

Press Trust of India 21st November 2013

Several reports in India following the announcement that King’s is to take part in the Chevening Gurukul Scholarships for Leadership & Excellence, FCO's premium scholarship scheme for India (full story to follow). The story was reported by Press Trust of India and Economic Times (India).

Kate Middleton out again to support children's charity in Canary Wharf

Daily Mirror 20th November 2013

the Duchess of Cambridge will listen to guest speakers in support of school-based mental health charity Place2Be. Speakers include Professor Stephen Scott, Institute of Psychiatry, who will talk about helping parents to raise well-adjusted children. Also reported by Press Association, Daily Mail, Evening Standard and Daily Telegraph.

UNIFESP recruiting Brazilians to respond to a research study on drugs

Globo.com 20th November 2013

The Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp) is coordinating a global survey to map drug use around the world, how people have access to substances and consumption patterns, in collaboration with researchers at King’s.

Any GP you want: so long as you're healthy

The Guardian 19th November 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how proposed reforms to GP surgeries, including abolishing practice boundaries, and allowing patients to choose their GPs will be bad for people with mental health problems. He says: "It is hard to think of a single policy that will do more to extend the health gap between rich and poor than Hunt's latest plans."

Drug use soars among over-50s as Sixties swingers reach retirement age

The Times 19th November 2013

Illegal drug use among the over 50s has risen tenfold since the 1990s as the “Swinging Sixties” generation heads toward retirement. Just over 0.5 per cent of those aged 50-64 had had a line of cocaine, according to a study by the Institute of Psychiatry.

Scots urged to reveal truth about alcohol and drug abuse

Herald Scotland 19th November 2013

Dr Adam Winstock, Institute of Psychiatry, heads up the Global Drugs Survey, targeting Scotland and 17 other countries to understand the nature of drug use. He says: "There are people who develop serious drug and alcohol problems and run into serious harm. We run the Global Drug Survey to provide real time information on drug use on the majority of people and use it to inform them and governments about how they can keep themselves safe."

Could eating cheese give you diabetes?

Daily Mail 19th November 2013

Eating a diet rich in meat and cheese has been suggested as a factor which will increase your risk of type 2 diabetes. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, comments on the findings and says that the study does suggest a link between a high acid diet and diabetes but that this is based purely on statistics rather than medical evidence. Professor Sanders said: ‘Diabetes levels are also high among black and Asian communities who don't eat many dairy products. The main risk factor is weight.’

Written in your blood

New Scientist 19th November 2013

In a piece looking at the advanced nature of DNA profiling, Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research and Epidemiology, comments that: ‘The epigenome is a snapshot of the major events in your life’ and says that he can get an indication for things like smoking, diet and illnesses, simply by looking at the DNA contained in a drop of blood.

Nurses: The engine of the NHS

BBC News (Online) 19th November 2013

Nurses are an integral part of hospital care and guidelines for staffing levels are being based on research from King’s which shows that above the ratio one to eight, excess death levels begin to rise.

Investigating the NHS's treatment of people with brain injuries

BBC Two - Newsnight 18th November 2013

Professor Lynne Turner Stokes comments on the NHs’s treatment of patients with brain injuries following evidence to suggest that rehabilitation care is not good enough. Professor Turner Stokes said: ‘I think that it really underlines the necessity to have patients who have complex disabilities cared for by staff who’ve had the expert training’. Interview begins 11.23.

The idea of India

NDTV 18th November 2013

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, took part in a panel discussion on NDTV’s Dialogues about redefining the idea of India, saying that there is broad consensus among historians but still differences in interpretation and nuance. ‘It’s not an ideology, it’s an idea – it’s not a readymade, purchased version of what India is or what Indian nationalism is, it’s a set of principals – there is basic agreement,’ he said.

Pakistan slide

Voice of Russia 18th November 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, was interviewed by Voice of Russia on the trial of former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf. ‘What is also demonstrates is that these sectarian tensions are not simply the work of very small groups of terrorists and extremists, but they are becoming more widely spread in society, which means that the extremists have a real social base,’ he said.

Michael Gove and the question of genetics in schooling

The Independent on Sunday 17th November 2013

Research by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, into cognitive development showed that cognitive skills such as learning to read, maths and understanding science, are "some of the most heritable, the most genetically influenced traits that we have, far more than personality or mental illness." He argues that ignoring genetics when making policy decisions made no sense.

UK’s military veterans not damaged or broken

Sunday Times (letters) 17th November 2013

In a letter to the Sunday Times, Prof Neil Greenberg, King's Centre for Military Health Research says there is not an epidemic of post-traumatic stress disorder or suicide affecting our service personnel and veterans. In fact, most service-leavers who were deployed in high-threat roles do well in civilian life.

New personal safety app allows smartphone users to tell friends and family when they are in danger

Mail Online 17th November 2013

This report of the release of a personal safety app which can be used to send alerts to family and friends when a person feels in danger, mentions research from King's and Ipsos Mori which found that two thirds of adults do not believe that crime rates are falling.

Varied, rigourous, global: Will the IB make the grade?

Daily Telegraph 16th November 2013

This article reports that top universities are beginning to acknowledge the true value of the International Baccalaureate with King's College London being mentioned as a university that will accept 35 points (out of 45) as equivalent to 2 As at A Level for admission next autumn as opposed the the 29 points that have been considered equivalent previousy.

New GCSE grading 'will de-motivate less able pupils'

BBC (Online) 16th November 2013

Dr Bethan Marshall, Department of Education and Professional Studies, has commented on the grading system of the new GCSEs which will have only 2 grades below the 'C' equivalent rather than the current 4. She says that this grading will be 'hugely demoralising'.

The man who weighed thoughts

New Scientist 15th November 2013

Dr Marco Catani and Stefane Sandrone, Institute of Psychiatry, talk about the Angelo Mosso, the 19th-century physiologist had apparently found a way to measure changing neural activity using little more than a balance. Dr Catani says: "Modern neuroimaging is linked to an old concept. You can't measure neural activity directly, but you can look at shadows, and one of these has always been changes in blood flow."

The man who shot JFK

Guardian 15th November 2013

In a piece which explores how Zapruder’s fuzzy home movie depicting the assassination of JFK became a great cultural artefact of our time, Dr Clare Birchall, Institute of North American Studies, comments on the fact that, despite the fact it appears to be video evidence, it has not been enough to quash conspiracy theories. She said: ‘The camera ‘never lies’, and yet it is precisely that which allows one to lie.’

Commonwealth summit

BBC Radio 5 Live 15th November 2013

Dr Ruth Craggs commented on the criticism received by David Cameron for attending a meeting in Sri Lanka with the President. She said: 'This is not a simple story, it's a complex one and lots of civil wars have lots of abuses on either side. I think what's needed is a real open reflection of what's gone on...It would be a good thing if that could be something that came out of this Commonwealth meeting.' (01.12.45). Dr Craggs was also interviewed about this on the BBC News.

Doping bans

Sky News 15th November 2013

The world anti-doping agency has doubled the length of the ban it believes atheletes should serve when they test positive to drugs, from January 2015 atheletes could be suspended for 4 years. Professor David Cowan, Director of the Drug Control Centre, comments on drug testing in sport saying: 'It's very clear that until doping control is extended right the way around the world, we won't be able to get that level playing field.'

On the CASE

Times Educational Supplement 15th November 2013

A letter from Laurie Smith, Department of Educational and Professional Studies, says that children can learn to focus their attention, something which is thought to be an indicator of future success. The Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE) programme suggests that this does not require separate lessons.

Cold War, Hot Jets

BBC 2 15th November 2013

Professor David Edgerton, History, was in both episodes of Cold War, Hot Jets (8 and 15 November), the subject of which was jet aviation in the Cold War.

Trapped in a never ending menopause

Daily Mail 14th November 2013

A study by King's College London recently found in a study of 10,000 post-menopausal women that more than half were still experiencing symptoms up to the age of 65. 'We looked at a large number of older post-menopausal women and were surprised to find menopausal symptoms persisted in over half of the women,' says study co-author Professor Myra Hunter from the Institute of Psychiatry. 'They were having hot flushes ten years after their last period.'

Air pollution blights London life

New Scientist 14th November 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, commented on the high levels of pollution in London: ‘The climate-change linked policy of favouring diesel over petrol has really backfired for Europe because of the increased pollution.’ Dr Ian Mudway, ERG, also spoke about the issue as part of research conducted by King’s. He said that the quality of the air in London is not improving as a result of the low emissions zone. Dr Mudway was also interviewed on ITV’s London Tonight.

Business is creating new forms of English

Financial Times 14th November 2013

A feature which looks at the use of the English language in world business quotes Nuha Alharbi, Centre of Language, Discourse and Communication, who found, during her research in a Saudi health insurance company, that senior staff incorporated Arabic words in to their English conversations to each other.

Broaden horizons by studying in the US, urges minister

Daily Telegraph 14th November 2013

Universities minister, David Willets, has urged school leavers to consider continuing their studies in the United States in order to broaden their horizons and create overseas contacts. King’s Liberal Arts degree is mentioned as the minister calls for the numbers of similar courses to grow.

US blocks publication of Chilcot’s Iraq report

Independent 14th November 2013

Washington is playing a lead role in stalling the report in to how Britain went to war with Iraq as officials have refused to sanction the declassification of communication between Bush and Blair. Sir John Chilcot heads an inquiry team of which Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, is also part of.

The best of the MOOCs

The Standard (Hong Kong) 14th November 2013

A review of various Massive Open Online Courses (‘MOOCs’) that are now available, including the UK’s FutureLearn initiative, mentioning King’s: ‘However, one benefit of the British site is that a lot of courses are offered by university departments that are amongst the top specialists in the country, for example, War Studies at King's College London or Forensic Science at the University of Strathclyde.’

Dead generals are not always the best business advisers

Financial Times 13th November 2013

Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, writes about the military metaphors that exist in business and how many senior business managers may hold up military figures as role models. He comments that: ‘Companies should treat military metaphors with care, especially if they turn every conflict into a pitiless fight to the finish’.

NICE to start work on safe staffing guideline

Nursing Times 13th November 2013

The first government backed guidance for staffing levels in acute adult in-patient wards is expected to be ready by next summer. The news is welcomed but some academics have questioned the tight timetable and asked why work had taken so long to start. Professor Jill Maben, director of the National Nursing Research Unit, said: ‘It is great news that this work is being undertaken, as it is much needed. However, I wonder if the time and money allocated to do this piece of work reflects its importance.’

Katherine Sleeman: Dying people need care, not just care plans

British Medical Journal 13th November 2013

Dr Katherine Sleeman, Cicely Saunders Institute for Palliative Care, has written this piece in which she suggests that healthcare professionals should try to move away from care plans and focus on the care they give, rather than simply trying to tick all the right boxes.

If there are Blurred Lines around sexual harassment, let’s clear them up

Guardian 13th November 2013

Recent King’s graduate, Ruth Hardy, is quoted in this piece stating that lad culture is part of the problem which leads to sexual violence and harassment being seen as ‘normal’.

Taliban leader Mullah Abdul Salam Zaeef hints at India's hunt for new allies in uncertain Afghan scenario

Times of India 13th November 2013

A piece on Western efforts to reach out to Taliban leaders, mentioning a seminar held at King’s in 2010 that ‘provided a forum for former Pakistani military officers, mediapersons, including some from India, activists and intelligence officials.’

Boost attention span to ensure lifelong success

Times Educational Supplement 12th November 2013

The article considers whether the ability to focus is a better predictor than test scores and mentions research by Prof Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, which finds that as said that genetics could account for up to 70 per cent of a child's cognitive abilities. He says: "It's a fundamental misinterpretation to assume that if genetics is important, there's nothing you can do about it,"

How have attitudes to mental health changed over the past 25 years?

BBC Radio 4 - All in the Mind 12th November 2013

Professor Graham Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, joins a discussion on how attitudes to mental health have changed over the past 25 years to mark the 25th anniversary of All in the Mind.

Unequal society

Times 12th November 2013

Professor Charles Turner FREng, Informatics, comments on the proportion of privately educated people in public life and suggests that they lack the knowledge and skills needed for decision making in the modern world.

Energy price rises

Sky News 12th November 2013

Nick Butler, King’s Policy Institute, comments on rising energy bills and energy company transparency. Mr Butler said: ‘I think they just have very poor ways of explaining to the consumer what they’re doing and why the bills are so high’.

Boost attention span to ensure lifelong success

Times Educational Supplement 12th November 2013

The article considers whether the ability to focus is a better predictor than test scores and mentions research by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, which finds that as said that genetics could account for up to 70 per cent of a child's cognitive abilities. He says: ‘It's a fundamental misinterpretation to assume that if genetics is important, there's nothing you can do about it,’

Maths teaching has been stuck in a vicious circle to our economy’s detriment

City AM 11th November 2013

A piece written by Professor Alison Wolf, Management, explores the importance of maths education to the modern economy and warns that it should not be neglected by the school system. Professor Wolf says: ‘Politicians seem, finally, to have realised that ignoring maths is neither glamorous nor sensible.’

A post-racial age? Slavery’s legacy still endures

Guardian 11th November 2013

Professor Paul Gilroy, English, writes about the controversy that surround new film, 12 years a slave, and suggests that this means racism remains a potent force and has not faded away. Professor Gilroy said: ‘The particular experience of the slaves is not posed against a universal meaning but infused with it.’

Scholar: China can learn from the social security reform Nordic welfare model

China Radio International 11th November 2013

Dr Magnus Ryner, European & International Studies, spoke to China Radio International on Chinese welfare reform and comparisons with Nordic countries. The story was also reported by Sina.com (Hong Kong), Sina.com (China), China.com, Phoenix TV (Hong Kong), and other online news outlets in China.

Artificial Soul

BBC Radio 4 - Something Understood 10th November 2013

This programme asks whether there is any aspect of humanity that can never be programmed in to a machine. Professor Michael Luck, Dr Sanjay Modgil, Dr Elizabeth Black and Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Informatics, reflect on the possibility of creating artificial emotions, morality and creativity and ask whether there will come a time when it is impossible to tell a machine from its maker.

Roger Williams: at the forefront of hepatology

The Lancet 9th November 2013

A profile of Roger Williams, which notes that he set up the Institute of Liver Studies at King's College London in 1966. He also set up the UK's first liver transplant programme at King's College in 1968.

Iran’s nuclear programme

BBC Radio 5 Live 9th November 2013

Professor Wyn Bowen comments on Iran’s nuclear programme in the wake of discussion in Geneva on the future of the programme. Professor Bowen says: ‘I don’t expect to see a comprehensive deal coming out of any discussions this weekend; we may see an interim deal and then in due course moving towards a more comprenhensive solution within the next 6 to 12 months.’

Where should the line be drawn on spying?

Channel 4 News 7th November 2013

Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, has commented on the issue of intelligence in the wake of the evidence given by the heads of GCHQ, MI5 and MI6 to parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee. He was interviewed on Channel 4 News about his views on the levels of spying and risks to British security and said: ‘I thought the hearing this afternoon was thoroughly worthwhile both from the point of view of the committee that has to establish its credibility and from the point of view of the witnesses who had the chance to rebut some of the wilder accusations that have been thrown around since the Snowden revelations.’ Professor Sir David Omand was also interviewed on Radio 4’s Today programme on this topic and said that Glenn Greenwald was dodging around the issue of public security as, because of the revelations, we know less about those who are a threat to British security. Sir David’s comments were also picked up by the Press Association and BBC News (Online).

Godly and cream

Times Higher Education 7th November 2013

Further reporting of the news that the Revd Professor Richard Burridge is the first non-Catholic to win the Ratzinger prize.

Universities ‘will need more money’, say vice-chancellors

Daily Telegraph 7th November 2013

A partnership which includes work with King’s College London has been mentioned in this piece which reports on warnings from university leaders about funding which has not been boosted by the rise in tuition fees.

‘Jaw dropping’ gene discovery to fight HIV and cancer

Evening Standard 7th November 2013

Scientists have hailed a genetic breakthrough which may be able to treat genetic defects in IVF embryos and help treat HIV and cancer. Professor Peter Braude, Reproductive Medicine, commented that: ‘There is a long way to go in relation to IVF’.

Hundred of Britons fighting in Syria – MI5 chief

Evening Standard 7th November 2013

The Centre for the Study of Radicalisation has been quoted as saying that most British jihadists are in their 20s, university-educated and Muslims of British Pakistani origin in this piece which reports on intelligence that hundred of British Islamists have gone to Syria to fight the war there.

The game was up for the Germans — but Tommy Atkins didn’t know

Evening Standard 7th November 2013

A book written by Dr Nick Lloyd, Defence Studies – ‘Hundred Days: The End of the Great War’ is reviewed: ‘What Lloyd’s book shows is that although few realised it at the time, the game was already up for the Germans.’

Heathrow airlines ranked by noise for first time

BBC News (Online) 6th November 2013

Further coverage of research conducted at King's which found that the risk of stroke and heart disease were increased in areas with high levels of aircraft noise.

50 years after his assassination, what is John F Kennedy's legacy?

Metro 6th November 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, talks about JFK's legacy, 50 years after his assassination in 1963. Dr Boys comments that: 'More than any other president, JFK’s judged to a great extent on his promise, as opposed to specific achievements in office, but that shouldn’t undermine either the feeling of euphoria he brought to the presidency or the great achievement of saving the world in the Cuban Missile Crisis’. Dr Boys also discussed JFK's legacy on BBC World News.

BAE jobs loss

BBC Radio 4 - The World Tonight 6th November 2013

Professor Andrew Dorman, Defence Studies, is interviewed about the cutting of shipbuilding jobs by BAE. He says that there is a future for some shipbuilding in the UK.

Question marks over mentoring

Nursing Times 6th November 2013

Researchers from the National Nursing Research Unit at King's College London have asked whether it is time to rethink the role of mentor in nurses' careers.

The culture show 2013/2014

BBC 2 6th November 2013

This episode was based on the book ‘The Love Charm of Bombs’ by Dr Lara Feigal, English, and explores the literary creativity that was found as a result of the bombings suffered by Britain during the blitz.

Blood checks may save lives of unborn babies

Daily Mail 5th November 2013

A new blood test that can show mothers at risk of pre-eclampsia has been developed by researchers at King's College London and could prevent the deaths of hundreds of babies. Dr Lucy Chappell, Women's Health, said: 'The PLGF test will allow us to identify these women who require closer monitoring, giving the right package of care to the right women.' Also reported by Daily Telegraph, Times, BBC Breakfast, BBC London News & Press Association.

MS 'develops faster in black people'

Evening Standard 5th November 2013

A study carried out by the Cicely Saunders Institute at King's found that black Caribbean patients with multiple sclerosis became disabled 'faster' that white

Al Jazeera Newshour - Egypt

Al Jazeera Newshour 4th November 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, A Senior Lecturer in the Study of Islam at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, commented live on Al-Jazeera Newshour on the trial of the ousted President Mohamed Morsi and other leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood.

English lit must stay a core subject

Sunday Times 3rd November 2013

Dr Bethan Marshall, Department of Education & Professional Studies, is a signatory on an opinion letter which suggests that the removal of English Literature from the core GCSE curriculum is a bad move and will lead to less students pursuing the subject at A Level or university.

English lit must stay a core subject

Sunday Times 3rd November 2013

Dr Bethan Marshall, Department of Education & Professional Studies, is a signatory on an opinion letter which suggests that the removal of English Literature from the core GCSE curriculum is a bad move and will lead to less students pursuing the subject at A Level or university.

New drug to relieve Parkinson's psychosis

Daily Mail 1st November 2013

A new drug may offer the first safe and effective treatment for psychotic symptoms caused by Parkinson’s disease, according to a randomised trial led by scientists at King’s. Professor Clive Ballard, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, said: ‘A treatment that can safely and effectively reduce these symptoms has the potential to really improve people’s lives.’ Also reported by Daily Telegraph.

King's press release related to 'New drug to relieve Parkinson's psychosis'

Sugary drinks tax 'effective public health measure'

BBC News (Online) 1st November 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Head of Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, responded to research which suggests that a tax on sugary drinks would reduce obesity in the UK. He said: ‘The cost of sugar-sweetened beverages is currently so low that any price increase would be so marginal that it would be unlikely to affect intake.’ His comments were also reported by Guardian, BBC Radio 5 Live, Press Association and The Times.

Sugary drinks tax 'effective public health measure'

BBC News (Online) 1st November 2013

Researchers in the British Medical Journal have said that a 20% tax on sugary drinks would reduce the number of obese adults in the UK by 180 000 and have a huge impact on the under 30s. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, commented that: 'The cost of sugar-sweetened beverages is currently so low that any price increase would be so marginal that it would be unlikely to affect intake' and said that he felt the finding were 'naive'. Also reported by London Evening Standard and Press Association.

Root of maths genius sought

The Psychologist 1st November 2013

Dr Joseph Chilcot, Institute of Psychiatry, received the Early Career Research award from the Division of Health Psychology and is mentioned in this piece.

Staff feel they are ‘unable to handle’ eating disorders

The Psychologist 1st November 2013

The majority of teachers believe that young people can learn more about eating disorders from by reading tabloids and celebrity magazines than they can at school, according to new research from King’s. Researchers said that: ‘Eating disorder prevention and early intervention are key to ensuring successful long-term outcomes. School staff are in an excellent position to facilitate this process.’

HowTheLightGetsIn Philosophy Festival

HowTheLightGetsIn 1st November 2013

Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology and Religious Studies, has been involved in various debates for the festival.

Euthanasia in Belgium

Daily Mail 31st October 2013

Professor Penney Lewis, Dickson Poon School of Law, comments on potential new euthanasia laws in Belgium, which could give children the right to end their own lives with parental consent. Professor Lewis said: 'People elsewhere in Europe are focused on assisted dying for the terminally ill and they are running away from what's happening in Belgium. If the Belgian statutes go ahead, this will be a key boundary that is crossed.'

Ali Smith on Antigone

BBC Radio 4 31st October 2013

Edith Hall, Professor of Classics, was interviewed about Ali Smith’s latest book, which she says is ‘astonishingly faithful’ to Sophocles’ version of the tragedy ‘Antigone’. Item begins at 34.00.

The Berlin Conference

BBC Radio 4 31st October 2013

Professor Richard Drayton, History, discussed the Berlin Conference of 1884, at which Europe’s leading statesman met to discuss trade and colonial activities in Africa. Professor Drayton said Africa was a ‘critical part’ of the European global trading economy.

Academe assailed

The Times 31st October 2013

In a letter to the Editor, academics from the Department of War Studies – Professors Mervyn Frost, Ned Lebow and Guglielmo Verdirame – argue that British universities are increasingly subject to control and direction by the Government, which is stifling originality and innovation.

Climate panel is ripe for examination

Nature 31st October 2013

Professor Mike Hulme and Dr Martin Mahony, Geography, comment on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and how it should 'recognise itself as a legitimate object for scholarly investigation this time around.'

Durham PCC Ron Hogg backs drug consumption rooms

BBC News (Online) 30th October 2013

Durham PPC, Ron Hogg, has said that drug users should have access to consumption rooms where they can inject prescribed heroin legally following a call from Home Office minister, Norman Baker, to decriminalise hard drugs. A trial conducted at King’s between 2005 and 2011 is mentioned. The trial is also mentioned in the reporting of this by BBC London 94.9. Item begins 01.01.22.

Stiff upper lip 'could make things worse'

The Telegraph 29th October 2013

Maintaining the traditional British stiff upper lip may be bad for your health because suppressing how you feel could lead to depression, scientists claim. Research by Dr Linday Forbes, Institute of Psychiatry, earlier this year suggested that the UK's poor cancer survival rates could be down to our reluctance to see a doctor with symptoms which could be serious, leading to later diagnosis.

Young troops 'at greater PTSD risk'

Express 28th October 2013

Young soldiers from disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to suffer from mental health problems, a new report claims. research from King's Centre for Military Health in 2010 reported a 4% rate of PTSD within the armed forces, in line with the civilian population which showed a range of 3%-7% of PTSD in the general population and is mentioned in this article.

Young Recruits

BBC Radio 4 (PM) 28th October 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses whether 16 year olds should be allowed to join the Army. He points to the need for balance and says that many young people gain very valuable skills by joining the Army.

Generational analysis is key to preparing for the future

Guardian 28th October 2013

Bobby Duffy, Managing Director of the Ipsos MORI social research institute and Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the School of Social Science & Public Policy, writes about cross-generational sympathy for the tough ride young people currently face and says that inter-generational equity should be key to policy debates over decisions which may make the situation worse for young people.

No to young recruits

BBC Radio 4 - PM 28th October 2013

Young army recruits from poorer backgrounds are thought to be at a high risk from PTSD. Professor Simon Wessely said: 'Some people have been disadvantaged by joining the armed forces too early. But I think what's missing is the other side of the coin, how many other people may well have gained tremendous benefits from structure, self esteeem, pride, gaining and occupation and so on and so forth.' Interview begins at 35.20

The government's healthy eating campaign

BBC Radio 5 Live 26th October 2013

Professor Alan Maryon-Davies said: 'It's good to see that some of the food industry are beginning to reduce this but my worry is it is only a very small part of the food industry that are doing it and also that it's taken quite long time to come to this decision and it's still just a pledge'. Item begins 00.01.22

Candace Pert and Tony Pawson: Honoring 2 Revolutionary Scientists

Huffington Post UK 25th October 2013

In this piece honoring two scientists who have sadly, recently died, King's College London is mentioned as the institution at which Dr Tony Pawson earned his PhD in 1976.

Joining Forces in the Fight for the Right to the City

Huffington Post UK 25th October 2013

Dr Jeff Garmany, Brazil Institute is mentioned as a speaker at the Right to the City event on 07 November.

Honours, awards, appointments

British Dental Journal 25th October 2013

Professor Dianne Rekow, has been awarded the title of honorary visiting professor at Osaka Dental University.

Micro-educational opportunities in outreach clinical dental education

British Dental Journal 25th October 2013

This opinion piece on dental education is co-written by Dr David Radford, Dental Institute, and discusses the values of micro-educational opportunities.

Angela Merkel phone tapping

BBC Radio 4 24th October 2013

Peter Neumann, War Studies, is interviewed by the Today programme about the allegations that the US has been tapping phone calls made by the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel. Professor Neumann said: 'One always assumes that other intelligence services are trying to get whatever information is out there but once you realise and once it gets very very close to the head of government it does become very sensitive.'The item begins at 01.09.07. Professor Neumann also discussed this issue on Sky News.

Tinseltown's shameful alliance

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

Dr Jennifer Altehenger, History, has reviewed 'The Tragedy of Liberation: A History of the Chinese Revolution'. She said: 'This is a gripping and fluidly written account of the first decade of the people's republic of China'.

The dambuster

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

This piece explores the turning point in higher education that is the publication of the Report of the Committee appointed by the Prime Minister under the Chairmanship of Lord Robbins, commissioned in 1961, which led the sector on to the path of expansion. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, argues that the motive for this was more a political one. He says that this was part of an anxiety to rebut accusations that his government was simply full of aristocrats.

Intellectual fruit of neoliberal seed

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

Professor Alison Wolf's, Management, view is mentioned in this comment regarding higher education research. Professor Wolf's view is that the real focus should be on supporting non-university education that is sensitive to other forms of talent.

FutureLearn is go but is not quite the finished article

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

Thie piece explores the progress of the FutureLearn platform and mentions King's College London's 'Causes of War' course which will be run using this platform.

Show and tell: journal's visual cues for following the instructions

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

In a piece that looks at the Journal of Visual Experiments, King's College London is mentioned as subscribing.

Students have the right to redress, so give them a fair hearing

Times Higher Education 24th October 2013

Dr Daniel Sokol, Centre for Medical Law & Ethics, writes that some appeal panels put complaints at a disadvantage and how he has set up a company to help students challenge academic decisions. He says that academics should not criticise students for exercising their right to appeal decisions.

PM criticises Facebook

BBC Radio 5 Live 23rd October 2013

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on Facebook's decision to allow beheading to be viewed online. She says that continual exposure can have a desensitising effect, and can lead to viewers being more violent.

Whitehall's no place for the GOD delusion

Daily Telegraph 23rd October 2013

In a piece which looks at how who you know is still influential when filling important positions at Whitehall, Sue Cameron mentions research recently conducted at King's College London which has found that government 'tsars' are appointed after little more than a private chat.

School in drive to end stigma of boys studying the arts

Evening Standard London 23rd October 2013

The city of London School for boys has launched a campaign to end the stigma around boys studying arts subjects. Dr Daniel Glaser, Director of the Science Gallery at King's, is mentioned as an expert who will give a speech on collaboration between science and the arts.

Prince George and the royal polling numbers

Huffington Post UK 23rd October 2013

Research conducted by the Huffington Post for King's College London showed the Queen's approval scores running at 90% satisfied and public confidence in the monarchy reached a 20 year high.

£35m boost for cancer imaging sites

Press Association 23rd October 2013

King's College London, in partnership with UCL is one of the recipients of funding for cancer imaging centres.

Neuro Linguistic Programming: Mental health veterans therapy fear

BBC News 22nd October 2013

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about 'neurolinguistic programming' and unregulated therapy for PTSD which a charity have been asked to stop using. He said: "If this group who are not medically qualified and don't know a person's whole treatment history, because they haven't got that, that could cause some real problems, it could be quite dangerous."

An expensive nuclear deal that ignores all the energy alternatives

Financial Times 22nd October 2013

Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, writes this piece regarding the Hinkley Point reactors. He says that other methods of creating energy have not been properly explored and that the reality is that there are alternatives, making Hinkley Point a very poor deal.

Why there can be a bitter price to pay for having a child genius in the family

Daily Mail 22nd October 2013

Research by Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, which suggests that intelligence is inherited has been mentioned by this article looking at child geniuses that have come out of less affluent backgrounds.

First human trial of new bone-marrow transplant method

BBC News 22nd October 2013

A pioneering new method of transplanting bone marrow has been used for the first time. It could avoid problems with a shortage of donors as it does not require an exact match. A British child was among the first three children in the world to try the new method. A full report about this has been published by King's College London, Great Ormand Street Hospital and the Institute of Child Health.

Reputations at stake in Gulf links

Financial Times 21st October 2013

An increase in the financial ties between top British, North American and French universities with their regional political allies in the gulf such as Qatar and the United Arab Emirates has been the result of funding crises in the West as universities seek to maintain their reputations for academic excellence. However, it would seem that these links are affecting academic research and discussion in controversial areas. Ghanem Nuseibeh, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, said: 'Foreign universities tend to accept that there are unwritten rules about what can and cannot be said in the context of specific projects.'

Teacher training faces crisis

Independent 21st October 2013

Professor Margaret Brown, Department of Education & Professional Studies, is a signatory on a letter to the editor which states that the Secretary of State should take full responsibility for the emerging crisis in school places and teacher supply as a result of a shortfall in teacher trainees.

Search for dementia cure is fading fast, warns expert

Times 19th October 2013

One of the world's leading neuroscientists has said that progress on treating dementia and mental illness has come to a halt as despite an exponential rise in the number of studies published each year, people suffering from these illnesses are not benefiting. Professor Roger Morris, Head of Biomedical Sciences, agreed with the dismissal of the impact of a lot of current research commenting: 'much work on neurodegeneration is phenomenological because there is no certain relationship between cause and event.'

Campaigners hail breakthrough as air pollution is linked to cancer

Guardian 18th October 2013

Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, comments on the IARC report which found that air pollution is linked to cancer. He called for more control over air pollution saying: 'There is clear evidence, stemming from human, experimental and mechanistic studies, that polluted outdoor air is harmful to human health and a major cause of cancer. As the major sources are man-made, much can and should be done to protect the world’s population from exposure, particularly those in urban and industrialised environments. Reductions in emissions will have significant long-term benefits for disease prevention.'

Universities recruiting near miss students

Times 18th October 2013

Universities are increasingly accepting poor and disadvantaged students who miss the a level grades that they were originally offered. A report has been published calling for every secondary school to be classified by how selective it is to be used in the university admissions process. Dr Anna Mountford-Zimdars, King's Learning Institute, was the report's lead author and she said that universities wanted more data to help them identify bright applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Lonely elderly people

BBC Radio 4 - Today 18th October 2013

Following Jeremy Hunt’s urge for society to do more to help old people who are lonely, Professor Anthea Tinker, Gerontology, commented that living with a family that doesn't necessarily mean that older people are less lonely. Professor Tinker's comments were also reported by the Daily Telegraph where she said that Jeremy Hunt's comments that the elderly were better cared for in Asia were not 'helpful' stating: 'In eastern Asia there is great respect and reverence for elderly people but the reality is with one-child families the children are just often not there because they've moved to a city.' Professor Tinker was also interviewed by BBC News about this issue.

India Turns to the East

Business Standard (India) 18th October 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an op-ed on how India has enhanced its presence in East Asia, while Indonesia is taken the lead in bringing India closer to Asean: ‘India's engagement with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) now forms the cornerstone of Delhi's 'Look East' policy,’ he said.

Foreign experts advise on initiatives to tackle China's air pollution

Xinhua (China) 18th October 2013

A Chinese media and government delegation met with King’s Environmental Research Group (ERG) last week, to exchange ideas on how to tackle China’s growing air pollution problem. Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, is interviewed in this report. There was further coverage in Sohu (China) and China.com.

Bedside sepsis diagnosis could save thousands

Xinhua (China) 18th October 2013

Researchers at King’s have identified a biomarker – a ‘fingerprint’ – for sepsis in blood, opening the possibility of diagnosing the condition within two hours by screening a patient’s blood at the bedside. Professor Graham Lord, Medicine, said: ‘If our early phase result holds up in a large trial, it could have significant effects in saving thousands of lives and reducing the use of unnecessary antibiotics.’

Foreign Office hoarding 1m historic files in secret archive

Guardian 18th October 2013

A secret archive holding more than a million files which should have already been handed over to the National Archives has been discovered. Professor Richard Drayton, History, said that the size of the archive was staggering and that it was 'scandalous' that papers of such significance could be concealed for such a long time. He said: 'It's a working archive, for a department which believes it has a long-term, historic interest in many parts of the world.' Professor Drayton also wrote a feature piece about this issue in the Guardian.

Challenging homelessness by King's College London Muslim students

Huffington Post UK 18th October 2013

Medical student, Faisel Alam, has written this piece for the Huffington Post about the Acts of Random Kindness (ARK) project which was founded under the guidance of King's College London Islamic Society (ISOC). This project sees volunteers taking time out to visit the elderly, offering food and basic necessities to the homeless or providing sick children with gifts to cheer them up.

A German Europe? A union disunited

Al Jazeera (English) 18th October 2013

Professor Christoph Meyer, European & International Studies, spoke to Al Jazeera’s Empire on the future for the European Union. ‘There is currently no mechanism for channelling political leadership,’ he said.

2 hour test to detect killer blood poisoning

BBC News 17th October 2013

Research conducted at King's College London, alongside Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust has found a biomarker in the blood which indicates sepsis. This can diagnose sepsis within two hours. This was reported by Daily Mail, Times, ITV, the Sun, BBC World News, Press Association, Mirror and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to '2 hour test to detect killer blood poisoning'

University ties with industry offer mutually assured development

Financial Times 17th October 2013

King's College London is mentioned in this piece looking at access to intellectual property as joining the easy access IP scheme under the responsibility of Dr Alison Campbell.

Research partnership investment fund

Times Higher Education 17th October 2013

The money contributed King's College London's new cancer centre is mentioned in Times Higher Education news in brief.

Ada Lovelace Day

BBC Radio 4 - Women's Hour 16th October 2013

Emma Palmer, PhD student at the Institute of Psychiatry, joins a discussion about women in science to mark Ada Lovelace day. She talks about the recent Wikipedia edit-a-thon where she created an entry for Prof Janet Treasure in the Eating Disorders Section at the IoP (Begins at 08.07)

King's press release related to 'Ada Lovelace Day'

Pathway does not improve care for dying, study finds

Daily Telegraph 16th October 2013

But ministers announced this summer that the LCP would be phased out after an independent review uncovered evidence of abuse, including patients being unnecessarily sedated and denied food and water. A new study advises that 'any future scheme aimed at replacing the LCP in England should be grounded in scientific evidence and tested in trials before being implemented.' Professor Irene Higginson, Health & Social Care Research, said: 'We must face this challenge head-on and ensure scientific evidence forms the foundations for any new initiative if end-of-life care is to be genuinely improved for patients and their families in England.' This was also reported by the Times and the Daily Mail.

Chinese energy price will be 'too high' for UK consumer

BBC News 16th October 2013

Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, comments that the deal between George Osborne and a state owned Chinese company to build power stations in the UK is already pretty much completed. He said that: 'The price of energy will be set and will be "too high for the UK consumer.' Nick Butler was also interviewed on BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

Carol Icahn and Daniel Loeb can't be shut out

Financial Times 15th October 2013

Dr Dionysia Katelouzou, Law, has been mentioned in this piece in the Financial Times as identifying 3 categories of activism in her research ranging from gentle to aggressive. Her conclusion is very similar to that of an earlier paper about the US: many assumptions about hedge fund activists are myths.

Code of practice call over government 'tsars'

BBC News 15th October 2013

Research conducted at King's College London has prompted a new code of practice to be launched to improve the way that 'tsars' are appointed. Ruth Levitt, Political Economy, said: 'The new code of practice is designed to safeguard the public interest and the public purse by encouraging debate about how ministers obtain and use external expertise.' This was also reported by the Independent, London Evening Standard, Guardian,Independent, and Press Association.

King's press release related to 'Code of practice call over government 'tsars''

Straving thousands escape 10 month Damascus seige

Times 15th October 2013

Thousands of beseiged Syrians emerged yesterday after escaping from a town near Damascus. There is growing fear that terrorists now have access to biological weapons. Dr Susan Martin, War Studies, said that turning biological research in to germ warfare was difficult as weaponisation is one of the most difficult stages of developing biological weapons.

'Wicked' critics of GM crops blamed for children's deaths

Times 15th October 2013

Leading scientists have welcomed an attack by the Environment Secretary on the opponents of GM crops and have blamed them for the malnutrition and death of children around the world. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: 'Unfounded scare stories by well fed people living in developed countries suggesting genetically modified rice might be harmful help nobody.'

Grow your own...

Daily Mail 15th October 2013

Professor Paul Sharpe, Dental Institute, is working on bioengineered teeth made from a patients gum cells which may be able to replace traditional dentures or tooth implants.

Terror threat to the UK

BBC Radio 4 PM 15th October 2013

The Home Secretary has warned that there is a security threat from British residents who have gone to fight in Syria. Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said: 'Syria seems to dominate the global jihadi mind, it is the premier location in the world to fight jihad today.' Interview starts 40.40. Shiraz has also commented on this issue for the BBC News website and BBC World Service Radio.

Dame Kelly: Eat your greens

Evening Standard 15th October 2013

Double Olympic gold winner, Dame Kelly Holmes, is backing a new project to encourage children to eat more fruit and vegetables. Nutrition and diet experts at King's College London partner on the project.

One hospital in 3 is going abroad in hunt for new nurses

Daily Mail 14th October 2013

Further coverage of research which involved King's, and found that staffing levels in hospitals are too low and nurses are being sourced from abroad.

Politics means industry is not being allowed to do what it does best

Financial Times 14th October 2013

Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, has written this opinion piece about how the energy sector finds itself in the midst of at least 3 political debates.

Are you benefiting from beautynomics?

Evening Standard 14th October 2013

This piece explores the self fulfilling prophecy which finds that 'beautiful people' are more likely to be offered opportunities because it is expected that they will be successful.

Cancer cost European Union countries 'billions'

BBC News 14th October 2013

Cancer costs countries in the European Union 126bn euro (£107bn) a year, according to the first EU-wide analysis of the economic impact of the disease, conducted by King's College London and the University of Oxford. Professor Richard Sullivan, King's Centre for Global Health, said: "It is vital that decision-makers across Europe use this information to identify and prioritise key areas.

Staff must be supported to put patient care first

Health Service Journal 14th October 2013

Professor Jill Maben, Nursing & Midwifery, discusses work conducted at King's College London in to staff wellbeing in the workplace. She said: 'Really relating to patients takes courage, humility and compassion on the part of staff. It also requires recognition, reinforcement and support from colleagues and managers. Rounds help organisations to deliver tiiose values that cannot be taken for granted in a staff group that is asked to go the extra mile at work every day.'

The lessons our schools must learn

Sunday Times 13th October 2013

This piece looks at what UK schools can learn from the education systems of other countries, following the OECD report. Professor Alison Wolf is quoted and also suggests that the UK school leaving age should be raised and she said: 'What this survey shows is that we have walked away from teaching maths and English, even though they are the most important skills you can have in the modern workplace.

The ethics of animal tests: inside the lab where marmosets are given Parkinson's

Observer 13th October 2013

This piece explores the controversial issue of animal testing with a focus on the facilities at King's College London. It mentions that whilst animal research is still very much a contentious issue, the animals at King's are well cared for and by using them, drugs have been developed that have significantly improved the quality of life for Parkinson's sufferers. Professor Roger Morris, Biomedical Sciences, said: 'About 80% of all drugs for Parkinson's have been developed and tested using marmosets from this laboratory. Of all species, only they provide a reliable model of the disease in humans.' A reaction to this from a reader was published in the Observer the following week.

Alzheimer's breakthrough hailed as 'turning point'

BBC Brasil 13th October 2013

Further coverage of comments from Professor Roger Morris, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, on a new breakthrough in Alzheimer's research. Professor Morris said: 'This finding, I suspect, will be judged by history as a turning point in the search for medicines to control and prevent Alzheimer's disease.' His comments also appeared in Globo (Brazil), Terra.com (Brazil).

Iran - India relations will remain constrained in the near future

The National (UAE) 13th October 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes about the ‘diplomatic dance’ between Iran and the United States, with the rest of the world is keen to work out the implications of a possible rapprochement between Tehran and Washington: ‘One of the countries that is looking very closely at the possible realignment is India,’ he said.

Wonder drugs cut toll of strokes by 40%

Daily Mail 12th October 2013

Research by King's College London, which has found that the overall rate of strokes in the UK has decreased by 40%, has been mentioned in this piece looking at the use of drugs to reduce the risk of stroke. This was also reported by Guardian, Daily Telegraph, Press Association, Mirror and London Evening Standard. This research was also reported by the Daily Mail in a piece about soaring rates of strokes in the under 64s.

King's press release related to 'Wonder drugs cut toll of strokes by 40%'

Curved soles 'no better' than trainers for back pain

BBC News (Online) 12th October 2013

Further coverage of the research, conducted by King's, which found that 'rocker' sole shoes, sold to alleviate lower back pain, do not actually have any benefits for sufferers. This has also been recently reported by the Daily Telegraph, Times and Daily Mirror.

Ugly duckling with swan ambition

Financial Times 12th October 2013

This piece which looks at the regeneration of Canada Water mentions possible plans to expand King's College London campus and accommodation facilities.

All or nothing? What's the point of theories of everything?

New Scientist 12th October 2013

Professor John Ellis FRS, Physics, said: '"I regard string theory as the only serious candidate for being a framework for a theory of everything.' in this piece which looks at the theories united by their attempt to unify our understanding of everything under one banner.

Snowden leaks 'worst blow to British intelligence ever'

Times 11th October 2013

Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, has commented on the theft and leak of tens of thousands of top secret files by the former CIA employee, Edward Snowden. This piece explores the leaks as being the worst blow to British intelligence and Sir David said that British officials assumed the material taken by Snowden was now being analysed by Russian and Chinese spy agencies.

'Display staffing levels to show importance placed on safe care'

Nursing Times 11th October 2013

In this 'comment' made by the Salford Royal Foundation Trust (SRFT) about safe staffing levels in hospitals and whether these levels should be displayed, King's College London is mentioned as the research basis upon which the recommendations were made.

Nobel prize controversy, award goes to chemical weapons watchdog

Detroit Free Press 11th October 2013

Article on the award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2013 to the OPCW, a chemical weapons watchdog. Paul Schulte, Defence Studies, is quoted: ‘It's motivational rather than for what the organization has already achieved in Syria. It's a good thing, I think, because it will improve its legitimacy and standing in the world. But the OPCW has not yet faced a major test.’ Mr Schulte’s quote also appeared in Xinhua (China) and Sohu (China).

Restore PMO's authority

New Indian Express 11th October 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an op-ed on the relationship between India’s Congress and the Prime Minister’s Office, following Rahul Ghandi’s much publicised outburst to the PM.

Nigeria attack

Sky News 11th October 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, War Studies, is interviewed again on the Al-Shabab attack in Nairobi, Kenya.

Not often and early but rarely and late

Huffington Post UK 10th October 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, discusses the trend for professional women in the UK to have children later in their lives. She also quotes Professor Peter Braude who said that the likelihood of successful pregnancy decreases significantly with age and, even though the information is available for women: 'people don't want to hear that, they really don't.'

Toddler brain scan gives language insight

BBC News 10th October 2013

Research by the Institute of Psychiatry reveals how the 'wiring' in toddlers' brains develops to successfully learn language. The study suggests that the brain has a critical window for language development between the ages of two and four. Dr Jonathan O'Muircheartaigh, who led the study, said: "Since our work seems to indicate that brain circuits associated with language are more flexible before the age of four, early intervention for children with delayed language attainment should be initiated before this critical age. This may be relevant to many developmental disorders, such as autism, since delayed language is a common early trait."

King's press release related to 'Toddler brain scan gives language insight'

Does a mum-to-be's junk food lower baby's IQ?

Daily Mail 10th October 2013

Research by the Institute of Psychiatry suggests that depression and poor diet during pregnancy 'can affect child cognitive function'. Dr Edward Barker, lead author of the study, says: ‘During pregnancy, the diet of the mother directly influences the nutritional environment of the foetus, which presumably will affect the development of the foetal nervous system including the brain.’

King's press release related to 'Does a mum-to-be's junk food lower baby's IQ?'

Depression risk 'starts in the womb'

BBC News 10th October 2013

New research suggests children whose mothers are depressed during pregnancy have a small increased risk of depression in adulthood. Prof Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, comments: "The message is clear - helping women who are depressed in pregnancy will not only alleviate their suffering but also the suffering of the next generation." Also reported by the Guardian, the Daily Mail.

Can you train your brain to make better decisions?

CNN News 10th October 2013

Dr Tamara Russell, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how mindfullness training could help people make better decisions. She says: "The term mindfulness refers to a particular state of mind, one that is alert, aware and fully present to what is unfolding on a moment by moment basis in the mental and physical landscape."

Alzheimer's breakthrough hailed as 'turning point'

BBC News 10th October 2013

Comments from Professor Roger Morris, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, have been reported widely by the media regarding a new breakthrough in Alzheimer's research. Professor Morris said: 'This finding, I suspect, will be judged by history as a turning point in the search for medicines to control and prevent Alzheimer's disease.' This was also reported by the Times, Telegraph, Mirror, Independent, Press Association, Guardian, Express, BBC Radio 4, Huffington Post (UK), ITV News, London Evening Standard and Sky News.

Men get anxiety about the size of their manhood REGARDLESS of how they measure up

Daily Mail 10th October 2013

Ongoing research by Dr David Veale, Institute of Psychiatry, suggests that a man’s level of anxiety about his penis size does not correlate to its size. Dr Veale believes that the level of a man’s penis size anxiety is more likely to be determined by their experiences than by their actual size. Also reported in the Huffington Post and Yahoo UK

Call for body image lessons in UK schools

BBC News 10th October 2013

Research from the Institute of Psychiatry suggests that the self-esteem of teenage girls could be improved by training teachers to deliver classes in body image. Dr Helen Sharpe says: "We're hopeful that as we continue with this research we'll be able to make the programme even more effective and that it could then go on to be effective in reducing disordered eating - things like binge eating and unhelpful weight loss."

King's press release related to 'Call for body image lessons in UK schools'

The dangers for students addicted to brain Viagra: Drugs claimed to boost your intellect are sweeping universities - but at what cost?

Daily Mail 10th October 2013

This piece investigates increasing numbers of students who are turning to cognitive enhancing drugs, such a Modafinil, to get them through their studies. Professor Ilina Singh, Social Science, Health & Medicine, commented on the figures, saying that there is very little reliable evidence about Modafinil use in the UK, but suggested that probably ‘around 10 per cent’ of students have used it at least once.

Try again. Fail again. Fail better.

Times Higher Education 10th October 2013

As part of the Inside Out Festival 2013, the facade of the King's College London Strand campus will be transforming itself in an artwork called 'bending light' by Dan Shorten of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Professor Mary Margaret McCabe, Philosophy, is also mentioned in this piece as she is one of three King's philosophers who will be contributing in a series of salons. There is also an event at the King's College London Chapel on October 24th exploring the narratives surrounding the Middle East.

A thoroughly decent life

Times Higher Education 10th October 2013

Professor Pat Thane, Institute of Contemporary British History, reviews 'Working Lives: Gender, Migration and Employment in Britain', 1945- 2007, by Linda McDowell.

UK undergraduate doctors may be unprepared to manage pain - one of the most common problems they will encounter in clinical practice, expert group warns

Press Association 10th October 2013

A Europe wide study has revealed a lack of compulsory modules for pain within UK medical schools. Dr Emma Briggs, Nursing & Midwifery said: 'It is essential that the provision of undergraduate pain education across the UK is fit for purpose to address the current and growing unmet public health need.'

Mummified head thought to belong to King Henry IV of France has NO royal link at all, claims geneticist

Daily Mail 10th October 2013

The ancestory of a mummified head, centuries old, which has been believed to be that of King Henri the IV of France and was removed during the French Revolution is being questioned by a new study which reveals that DNA does not match that of the King's ancestors. Professor Michael Rowe commented on the historical context and said there wasn't much evidence one way or the other to suggest what happened to Henry's head, but added the king's reputation as one of France's best kings might have saved his body from decapitation.

King's student wins Urban Photographer of the Year

Mirror 10th October 2013

A student competition run in parallel to the main competition was won by King's student, Tom Pepper, with his picture 'Waiting for a Train' depicting the New York subway. Tom was also mentioned in the Times and Huffington Post (UK) coverage of the competition winners.

Stanford's Nobel Chemistry prize honours computer science

San Jose Mercury News 10th October 2013

Further coverage of the award of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry to Professor Michael Levitt, who studied physics at King’s, graduating with a BSc in 1967.

Peter Higgs Awarded Nobel Prize for Physics

ABC (Australia) from AFP 10th October 2013

Further coverage of the award of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Physics to Fellow and Honorary Doctor Professor Peter Higgs, who received his PhD from King’s in 1954. The King’s connection was reported by ABC News (Australia), EFE (Spain), Correio Braziliense, Yahoo (Hong Kong), France 24, China.com, Sina.com, Sohu.com, Xinhua, South China Morning Post (Chinese), DNA (India), NDTV (India),Times of India, New Indian Express, Hindustan Times (India) and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Plane noise linked to higher heart risk

Times of India 10th October 2013

Risks of hospital admissions and deaths from stroke and heart disease are higher in areas with high levels of aircraft noise, according to a study by researchers at King's and Imperial College London.

Plane noise linked to higher heart risk

BBC News 9th October 2013

Risks of hospital admissions and deaths from stroke and heart disease are higher in areas with high levels of aircraft noise, according to a study by researchers at King's College London and Imperial College London. Findings have been published in the British Medical Journal and the story has been covered by Daily Telegraph, BBC Breakfast, Sky News, Evening Standard, Independent, Daily Mail, ITV News, Sun and BBC News.

King's press release related to 'Plane noise linked to higher heart risk'

Father of 'God particle' wins the Nobel Prize

Times 9th October 2013

King's alumnus, Professor Peter Higgs, has been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics. Profiles of him and coverage of the news has been reported by the Times, Daily Mail, Independent, London Evening Standard, BBC News and the Press Association.

King's press release related to 'Father of 'God particle' wins the Nobel Prize'

Employers embark on occupational dermatitis trial

Nursing Standard 9th October 2013

The National Institute for Health Research has awarded a grant to Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust to lead an18-month trial involving 2,080 nurses. King's College London clinical trials unit manager Caroline Murphy, a nurse, will be part of the team of dermatology and academic experts leading the study.

Captain Phillips: film about piracy

BBC News 9th October 2013

Dr Anja Shortland, Political Economy, has been interviewed by BBC News in the run up to a new film, starring Tom Hanks, about the real life story of Captain Phillips who was in charge of a cargo ship en route to Kenya when it was hijacked by Somali pirates. Dr Shortland commented on the nature of piracy in both that and the current context and said: 'It's something that has really receded in this year, we're down to 4 actual attacks from hundreds in previous years.'

Can you train your brain to make better decisions?

CNN 9th October 2013

Dr Tamara Russell, Institute of Psychiatry, writes a special feature on how to use mindfulness techniques and to improve performance and optimize mental and physical wellbeing: ‘The term mindfulness refers to a particular state of mind, one that is alert, aware and fully present to what is unfolding on a moment by moment basis in the mental and physical landscape,’ she said.

Stanley Milgram’s famous test of human cruelty ‘was manipulated’

The Times 8th October 2013

Prof Gisli Gudjonsson, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on claims that the famous Milgram experiments were manipulated. He says that the claims indeed undermine certain findings, but that "we must not loose sight of the fundamental truth that ordinary people are capable of very cruel things when put in certain circumstances."

Universities: Academics work with industry to convert knowledge into products

Financial Times 8th October 2013

The Easy Access Initiative, a collaboration initiated by Bristol, Glasgow and King’s College London that involves 18 universities, has been mentioned in this piece which explores the Uk commercialisation of research.

Teenagers to sit new qualification in 'real life' maths

Telegraph 8th October 2013

Money will be invested in to a 'core maths' programme for 16 to 18 year olds in an attempt to encourage more students to continue studying maths in sixth form, even if they do not decide to complete a full a level. Professor Jeremy Hodgen, education & Professional Studies, comments that: 'It is essential young people with GCSE study maths for longer to develop greater understanding. These proposals present an exciting opportunity for young people to develop this capacity to apply and use mathematics.'

Tommy Robinson steps down from the EDL

BBC Radio 4 8th October 2013

The leader of the EDL and his deputy, Kevin Caroll, have announced that they are stepping down. Shiraz Maher comments on this decision saying that if senior members of the EDL do decide to leave, this represents an existential crisis.

OECD literacy leagues: poverty and inequality blamed for England's results

Guardian 8th October 2013

A failure to sustain education post 16 and the deep-rooted problems of poverty and social inequality have been blamed for England's poor showing in the OECD survey of adult skills. Professor Alison Wolf, Management, commented 'The obvious point to make is that, until this year, we have been pretty much unique in the world in allowing our young people to give up maths and English at age 16, at a time when every other developed country has been increasing its general education requirements for 16-19 year olds.'

Chemical Weapons and Syria

Al Arabiya (Arabic) 8th October 2013

Dr Wyn Bowen, War Studies, is interviewed on chemical weapons and Syria.

EDL resignations

BBC World Service Newshour 8th October 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, War Studies, was interviewed on BBC WS Newshour programme on the resignation of the English Defence League (EDL) leader Tommy Robinson (starts 14.00). He was also interviewed by Radio 4 (starts 30.53) and BBC News. Shiraz Maher, ICSR, was also interviewd by Radio 4 (see UK coverage, above).

Crime victims with mental illness ignored, research suggests

BBC News 7th October 2013

Research by the Institute of Psychiatry shows that people with mental health problems are up to 10 times more likely to be victims of crime. Also reported in the Evening Standard, ITV News, Press Association, Daily Mirror, Daily Express

King's press release related to 'Crime victims with mental illness ignored, research suggests'

Looking down at the rest of us...Are you a snob?

Metro 7th October 2013

Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, comments on class and snobbery in a piece which investigates whether we have all becomes 'snobs'. Dr Adams said: 'The newspapers people read are a convenient way to pin them into society and new money gives people an opportunity to be snobbish. It dates back to the industrial revolution when the aristocracy always had a suspicion about new money.'

The problem with education? Children aren't feral enough

Guardian 7th October 2013

Research in to outdoor education conducted at King's College London has been mentioned in this piece which describes how beneficial learning outdoors can be for schoolchildren.

Hefty twins shed light on obesity paradox

New Scientist 6th October 2013

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research, comments on a study which sheds light on the medical mystery surrounding cases of identical twins where one is 'fat' and the other is 'thin'. He said: 'It clearly shows that there are two types of obesity, and that bad obesity is characterised by a fatty liver.'

Women in Islam and terrorism

BBC Radio 4 6th October 2013

Dr Katherine Brown, Defence Studies, comments on the role of women in terrorism. Often you hear the idea that women are overly emotional and that's why they participated but I would say that you also see that with men yet at the same time they also do it for political, rational grievances.'

The human cost of the US shutdown

Al Jazeera (English) 6th October 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, is interviewed in a programme looking at the human impact of the US government shutdown. Dr Boys discusses the ‘debt-ceiling’ and fears that the US may default on its debt.

Tutors admit they often ignore students' personal statements

Times 5th October 2013

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, has conducted a study which has looked at views of the importance of personal statements to university applications. She found that views ranged from finding them worthless to finding them to be a vital resource for assessing a candidates motivations for and suitability to certain courses. Professor Francis said that centralised admissions teams treated personal statements very differently to admissions teams which involved academics.

Lack of folk acid in pregnancy hits generations

New Scientist 5th October 2013

Whether or not a parent has enough folic acid in their diet could affect not only the health of the child, but also that of future generations. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, commented that 'The work supports the growing evidence that trans-generational epigenetic changes exist and are important for human health.'

London Pollution

BBC London News 4th October 2013

Dr Ian Mudway, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, comments on the plans for more tunnels in London and how this would affect pollution levels. He said that you would be taking a bad situation and making it considerably worse.

The price of equality

The New York Times 4th October 2013

A review of new book ‘The XX Factor’ by Professor Alison Wolf, Mangement, which argues that universal sisterhood is dead, with an elite of well-educated women moving away from the rest: ‘Whereas through most of human history it made sense to talk about ‘women’ en masse,’ Wolf writes, ‘today it very rarely does.’

New push for clues in Madeleine McCann case

ABC News (Australia) 4th October 2013

Commenting on the British police decision to scour 1000s of mobile phone records relating to the McCann case, Dr. Tim Stevens, War Studies, said that the initiative ‘smacked a bit of desperation.’ Commenting on the timing of the police's mobile data mining, Stevens said, ‘there's either a specific investigative reason or it's a box that hasn't been ticked.’

Violence erupts in Egypt

Al-Jazeera 4th October 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, has commented on political violence in Egypt.

Times Higher Education World University Rankings

Times Higher Education 3rd October 2013

King's College London has risen significantly to 38th in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. This has been reported by the Times, Daily Telegraph, Press Association, BBC (Online), Guardian, Independent, Huffington Post (UK) and the Evening Standard.

Peter Higgs profile: the self-deprecating physicist revered by his peers

Guardian 3rd October 2013

This piece delves in to the life of Physicist, Professor Peter Higgs, who is an alumnus and fellow of King's College London. The life of Peter Higgs is also profiled by the Sunday Times.

Faking cats and dogs: shades of grey among the eBay 'Lowrys'

Times Higher Education 3rd October 2013

In this piece, written by Dr Richard Howells, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, he discusses the nature of artistic authenticity and his collection of fake Lowry drawings.

For your daily dose of demigod

Times Higher Education 3rd October 2013

Professor Clare Brant, English, reviews The Beau Monde: Fashionable Society in Georgian London by Hannah Greig.

US firm patents DNA-analysis tool for planning a baby

New Scientist 3rd October 2013

A US genetics company has patented a DNA-analysis tool that allows people to pick sperm and egg donors based on what kind of offspring they want. Dr Stuart Hogarth, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: 'There's a tension between their claims to be open and transparent and the corporate need to find new revenue generation.'

Four top universities in London

BBC Indonesian 3rd October 2013

King’s is mentioned as one of London’s four universities that belong to the THE (Times Higher Education) Ranking top 40 best universities in the world.

Monaco award honours food security pioneer

BBC News (Online) 2nd October 2013

Professor Tony Allan, Geography, has received an award from the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation for his work on water security.

PTSD Fears Over Plan For More Army Reservists

Sky News 2nd October 2013

Research conducted at King's College London has been reported in this piece which looks at the increased risk of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder for the tens of thousands of reservists which are planned to replace full time soldiers. The research found that 6% of reservists suffered from PTSD compared with 3% in a control group and 5 years later they were still found to have greater levels of PTSD and marital instability than regular soldiers. This was also reported by the Mail Online, Independent and the Daily Telegraph. Profesor Sir Simon Wessely, Centre for Military Health, has also commented on the mental health of war veterans more generally, saying: 'Given everything they have been going through, the mental and psychological health of the Forces has been pretty resilient.'

RCN warns of burnout as nurses feel pressure to work despite being ill

Nursing Standard 2nd October 2013

Jane Ball, Nursing & Midwifery, comments that when nursing staff levels fall below one nurse to eight patients, that patients are at risk. This is in a piece which discusses the fact that an RCN report has found that around half of nurses surveyed said they felt ill due to stress or workload.

Lack of folic acid echoes through the generations

New Scientist 2nd October 2013

Whether or not a parent has enough folic acid in their diet could affect not only the health of the child, but also that of future generations. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said that the work supports the growing evidence that trans-generational epigenetic changes exist and are important for human health.

Ethics: Taboo genetics

Nature 2nd October 2013

This article looks at probing the biological basis of certain traits and the controversy it ignites. In a discussion looking at the genetic trait of 'intelligence' Professor Robert Plomin said that he has high hopes that this project and other sequencing ventures will help to pinpoint the many genetic contributors to the trait.

An Artificial Construct

India Today 2nd October 2013

A fundamental contradiction lies at the heart of BRICS as a political idea, argues Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, in an opinion piece. China and Russia have a stake in preserving the global, political, institutional status quo while India, Brazil and South Africa seek a redistribution.

USP University ranking plummets

Folha de Sao Paulo (Brazil) 2nd October 2013

Article on how USP, one of Brazil’s top universities, has plummeted in the international rakings according to the THE (Times Higher Education).

Air guitar can hit all the right notes for musicians

Times 1st October 2013

Research that King's has been involved with has found that air guitar can be a useful technique for musicians, helping them to find ideas outside of traditional practising. This was also reported by Independent, Guardian, BBC News and Metro.

IPCC report on climate change

BBC Radio 4 1st October 2013

Professor Mike Hulme is part of a discussion about the findings of the report. Professor Hulme thinks that the report is a distraction from the real difficulties faced and said: 'More important aspects of how future climate risks will evolve is still deeply uncertain.'

Students dig the high life

Metro 1st October 2013

A student at King's College London, Rebecca Chow, is mentioned in this article which reports about high end student accommodation.

How to write a personal statement for medicine

Guardian 1st October 2013

Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, is quoted in this piece which gives advice to students writing personal statements for medicine.

Take advantage of the new era in Iranian foreign policy

Guardian 1st October 2013

Professor Wyn Bowen and Dr Matthew Moran, War Studies, have written this guest blog for Julian Borger's Global Security Blog. It argues that Rouhani's election has opened a window for diplomacy that will soon shut if the West does not respond pragmatically.

Rahul Ghandi’s fire claims Manmohan Singh’s US visit

DNA (India) 1st October 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an op-ed on the undermining of the Indian prime minister’s authority as he visited the US: ‘It’s indeed a grave tragedy that Rahul Gandhi chose to undermine the authority of the Prime Minister when he was about to embark on two important diplomatic missions: trying to salvage US-India ties and setting a new tone on Indo-Pak relations,’ he said.

Al-Shabab attack unlikely to promote western intervention

VOA (US) 1st October 2013

In an interview on the possibility of western intervention following the Al-Shabab attack in Nairobi, Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) said Western powers are far more cautious, after tough interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq: ‘I think the West now favors having localized countries who are responding to regional crises taking the lead,’ he said. Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, was also quoted following the attack in Sina (China).

UK becomes first state to admit to offensive cyber attack capability

Financial Times 30th September 2013

Britain has declared that it is developing the capability to carry out offensive cyber attacks on other nations. Other countries have been presumed to have this capability but have not declared this officially. Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, commented: 'Such aggressive statements can be counter-productive. Other actors will want to react in kind, making everybody less secure.' Dr Rid's comments were also reported in the Washington Post.

Will my disability affect my graduate job application?

Guardian 30th September 2013

A case study used in this piece is of 22 year old Michael Smith, who lost his sight in his first year at King's College London and has now just graduated.

Syria test of European security relationship

Xinhua (China) 30th September 2013

Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, is quoted in an overview of European-US relations following the UK parliament decision not to back military intervention in Syria.

Richard Drayton: New forms of power

Al Jazeera (English) 30th September 2013

Professor Richard Drayton, History, lends a historical perspective on imperial logic and the connection between power and intervention, in the programme Empire.

Silver screen takes on new dimension as east meets west

China Daily 30th September 2013

Article on the Chinese film industry which has seen an explosion in size but remains stunted in quality. Professor Chris Berry, Film Studies is quoted: ‘At a time when China is emerging as a power that may set the agenda for the world in the future, we all feel we want to know more,’ he said.

Charles Dickens and the London 'dead-house' mystery

BBC News 29th September 2013

Dr Ruth Richardson, Centre for Life Writing Research, has unearthed letters between Charles Dickens and philanthropist Angela Burdett-Coutts in connection to a scandal at St George's hospital in the late 1850s.

Students paid £10,000 more after leaving top universities

Daily Telegraph 28th September 2013

In a piece looking at the average starting salaries of graduates, King's College London is mentioned as third highest for graduate starting salaries. This was also reported by the Press Association and picked up by Yahoo! News as well as being reported by the Express, London Evening Standard.

Where's all that grief going?

Guardian 28th September 2013

This piece explores the millions of women for whom IVF is not successful and why their stories are not reported. The piece quotes Dr Susan Bewley, Medicine, who gives an example to show that it is a market which will one day clash with human decency. She said that clinics never tell women that fresh sperm works much better than frozen sperm as frozen sperm has been screened despite these being the nominal risks one might take with their husband.

Joseph Lister's domestic science

The Lancet 28th September 2013

Joseph Lister's 1877 inaugural lecture is being restaged at King's College London on 02 October 2013 to mark the start of the new medical and academic year. This piece looks and Lister's life and work and mentions the prominence of King's to this.

New breast screening leaflet still denies women the full picture, says critic

BMJ 28th September 2013

The new breast cancer screening leaflet for women, which was updated last week, still fails to spell out the true risks of mammography and denies women the chance to make a properly informed choice. Dr Susan Bewley, Medicine, comments: 'The leaflet does not contain crucial information derived by an independent panel last year: that for every 15 women who are given a diagnosis through screening and who will undergo treatment, only one life will be saved while three women will have been treated unnecessarily.'

How to sell wars to public - MOD study

Guardian 27th September 2013

Families of soldiers are angry at proposals to make war more palatable by lowering the profile of repatriation ceremonies. Professor Christopher Dandeker, War Studies, said that: 'It made sense that the military would pay greater attention to the role of military families, who were becoming a more politically active, questioning independent stakeholder in the military community.'

Showjump champion dies at 26 after 5 year anorexia battle

Times 27th September 2013

A recent study involving King's College London which found that diagnoses of eating disorders had risen 15% since 2000 is cited in an article reporting the sad death of Laura Ferguson, a 26 year old showjumping champion who struggled with anorexia.

The National Trust and the Big Brother house

Channel 5 News 27th September 2013

Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, was interviewed by Sky News about the National Trust opening up the Big Brother house for the public to visit. There is some debate over whether this is a good or bad thing for the National Trust. She said: 'Heritage is an infinitely expandable concept and that will include things that are good about our history and things that people think are bad.' Dr Adams was also interviewed about this for Sky News.

The 'White Widow': the new face of terror

Daily Telegraph 27th September 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven has commented in a piece which looks at a rise in female terrorism, in the wake of the Nairobi mall attack. He said that a Pakistani cleric, Abdul Rashid Ghazi, who led a madrasa – an Islamic school – for women in Islamabad’s hardline Red Mosque shortly before he was killed in a siege in 2007, had told him 'If you convert a man, you convert one man. If you convert a woman, you convert an entire family.'

How dancers suppress dizziness

BBC Radio 4 27th September 2013

Research has found that the rigorous training undertaken by ballet dancers has the ability to suppress signals from the inner ear to the brain. It has been suggested that this may have practical applications for those who suffer from chronic dizziness. Deborah Bull, Executive Director of King's Cultural Institute and former principal of The Royal Ballet, comments on some of the techniques used by dancers to avoid becoming dizzy when spinning. The item begins at 2.22.40. This was also reported by BBC News Online.

How will Syria's chemical weapons be destroyed?

The Hindu (India) 27th September 2013

Professor Wyn Bowen, War Studies, writes an op-ed following Bashar Assad’s decision to sign up Syria to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), committing Syria to giving up possession of chemical weapons and their production capabilities: ‘It will be the responsibility of the Hague-based Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) – the international organisation set up to verify signatory states’ compliance with the Convention – to verify the process of disarmament in Syria,’ he said.

Softly-softly thought police brought to book at last

Times Higher Education 26th September 2013

The department of Digital Humanities at King's, in conjunction with the School of Advanced Study and the National Archives at Kew, has now secured
a four-year research grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council worth close to £800,000 to produce a publications and communications history of the Ministry of Information.

Lifting a tattoo taboo has put colour in my life

Times Higher Education 26th September 2013

Dr Rivka Isaacson, Chemistry, tells about her fascination with the art of tattoos in this piece for the Times Higher Education culture section.

Man-made climate change causes 'even more certain'

BBC News 26th September 2013

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, comments on the climate change, prior to the publishing of IPCC report on 27 September. He said: 'What's happened in the last ten or fifteen years has shown much greater complexities.' Professor Hulme also commented subsequently to the publishing of the report, stating that this week's meeting should have been held in public in the Times and warned there needs to be a more 'pragmatic' approach, reported by the Press Association.

Labouring for invention

Times Higher Education 26th September 2013

In a piece investigating whether new editions of Shakespeare's plays do anything to increase our understanding of the man and his works, the work of Dr Sarah Dustagheer, English, is mentioned as it looks at the differences between outdoor and indoor performances of his plays.

Just under half of wards have 'unsafe staffing'

Nursing Standard 25th September 2013

A survey of 3000 nurses by the national nursing research unit, which is based at King's College London, has suggested that 43% of wards had a ratio higher than 8 patients to every nurse.

White heat at 50: Wilson's techno-futurism distracts us from his real goals

Guardian 25th September 2013

Professor David Edgerton, History, writes about the elusive and confusing notions of 'science' and 'technology' and says that Harold Wilson's speech shows that intelligent people then spoke much the same nonsense as they do today.

Gentrification 'distorting' Peckham

BBC News 24th September 2013

Peckham Vision, a community group in south London, has raised concerns about how increasing property prices are changing the area. Warren Nettleford spoke to Professor Chris Hamnett, Geography, about changes in property values in Peckham. Professor Hamnett said: 'A lot of the former working class residents of London have simply dissapeared as their jobs have gone and that has been essentially intensified by the increasing attractiveness of London to the international rich as a property safe haven.'

Kenya mourns terrorist attack

BBC Radio 5 Live Drive 24th September 2013

Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, comments on the involvement of Western terrorists. She said: 'It does not surprise me if we have links with Western countries through this attack.' The item begins 02.22.21. Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens has also spoken in this area on Sky News.

Study found that during sleep specific smells eliminate phobias

Xinhua (China) 24th September 2013

Report of a study that has identified a new technique to eliminate phobias. Dr Jennifer Wilder, Institute of Psychiatry, is quoted: ‘Many people have experienced a traumatic event such as a fire or accident, memories that trigger psychological fear often include odor.’

Tackling fears 'while you sleep'

BBC News 23rd September 2013

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which suggests that smells could be used to calm fears - while people sleep. She says: "The sleep study is excellent and has implications for treating phobias and stress disorders, such as post-traumatic stress, where there are a whole range of cues."

A smart degree is only the first step

The Times 23rd September 2013

Students are demanding more opportunities for high quality work placements and internships as employment skills and experience become a central part of the university experience. The study, run by King's College London, questioned 150 students about the kind of learning experience they expected and results will be published next month.

Kenya Terrorism

BBC Radio 5 Live Drive 23rd September 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, War Studies, comments on the situation in Kenya. The Somali Islamist group Al-Shabaab says it's behind the attacks. Mr Meleagrou-Hitchens said: 'Kenyan Muslims have been recruited on the basis of this being a part of the global Jihad effort.' Interview begins at 02.05. Mr Meleagrou-Hitchens was also interviewed on Sky News and Professor Peter Neumann commmented on the situation on a piece on the Radio 4 PM programme.

Global number of dependent older people will nearly treble to 277m by 2050

The Independent 22nd September 2013

The World Alzheimer's Report 2013 highlights the need for governments to put into place national dementia plans to ensure the future of long-term care for people with dementia. Professor Martin Prince, from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry and author of the report, said: "We need to value the unpaid contribution of family caregivers more, and reward paid caregivers better. We can build quality into our care systems, but to do so while containing costs and achieving equity of access for all will be a challenge." Also reported by BBC News, LA Times, CBS News, BBC Brasil, Reuters, Times of India, Huffington Post, Die Zeit, Chicago Tribune, Voice of America amongst others.

King's press release related to 'Global number of dependent older people will nearly treble to 277m by 2050'

Power corrupts but it also plays with your mind

The Independent 22nd September 2013

Commenting on 'Hubris Syndrome', Dr Gareth Owen, Institute of Psychiatry said: "The idea of power being a manifestation of psychopathology is new to medicine. The question of whether it can be prevented, screened or treated is not yet clear. More research is needed in recognising its symptoms if we are to find more effective interventions."

Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era

Observer 22nd September 2013

Dr Vaughan Bell, Institute of Psychiatry, writes in the Observer, about how research efforts are now devoted to altering the function of specific neural circuits by physical intervention in the brain, rather than only focusing on developing pills.

Does using Facebook really make people miserable?

The Conversation 22nd September 2013

Dr Rebecca Syed, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on whether facebook really does make people unhappy.

The Sunday Times University Guide

The Sunday Times 22nd September 2013

King's College London's ranking in the university guide rates King's at 82% for graduate prospects and is ranked by the Sunday Times at 27

Green energy pays for itself in lives saved from smog

New Scientist 22nd September 2013

Dr Martin Williams, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, cautions that pollution will only fall if we cut emissions in the right way in a piece which discusses how many lives could be saved by cutting levels of pollution.

Funding: Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases tackles diabetes

The Lancet 21st September 2013

To meet the challenge in emerging economies, the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases (GACD) has launched a call for research proposals to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. The research proposals are centred on GACD's eight member nations pairing up with less developed countries to tackle regional or country-specific problems. Dr Janaka Karalliedde, Cardiovascular Division, comments that: 'In countries like India and Sri Lanka the infrastructure and funding streams are limited, and so the pairing would be very useful'

Chemical weapons

BBC Radio 5 Live 21st September 2013

Martin Navias, Centre for Defence Studies, comments on the fac that the Syrian government has started handing over details of its chemical weapons to a watchdog in the Hague. The item begins at 11.26.

Guide warns patients to be sceptical of internet "miracle cures"

BMJ 21st September 2013

A new guide has been published to help patients
make informed decisions when confronted with
the plethora of treatments that are widely promoted on the internet. Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi, Neurology and Complex Disease, said that many people with motor neurone disease sought out unproved treatments because of
the very difficult situation they faced.

Google searches... for secrets of a long life

Metro 20th September 2013

Google chief executive and co-founder Larry Page has teamed up with Apple’s chairman Arthur Levinson to lead research into ageing. It will use technology to look for potential cures for age related diseases. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said that he thinks Google’s new venture is a ‘great idea’.

Daughters are a blessing, not a burden

BBC Radio 5 Live Breakfast 20th September 2013

Dr Robert Bradnock, Geography, comments on discrimination against girls in many parts of South Asia following a series of horrific cases that have come to light in Pakistan relating to disadvantages for girls and attacks on girls. Dr Bradnock said ‘What the Muslim community, right across the world, is very anxious to demonstrate is that this not a matter of religious faith, that there is a huge sense that women play a very important part indeed a vital part in the whole of life and so they should be valued.’ The interview begins at 2.53.43.

King's College London wins permission to build new Docklands campus

Evening Standard 20th September 2013

Plans for a new King's College London campus in Docklands have been reported by the Evening Standard.

How we made the 1984 Digital Double mobile app

Guardian 20th September 2013

Theatre company, Headlong, has been discussing the possibility of working on a project exploring the relationship between digital technology and performance with King's Cultural Institute since early this year. Dr Btihaj Ajana, Digital Humanities, introduced the concept of the 'digital double' an online version of ourselves that is tracked by organisations whose interests range from marketing to national security. This online version of ourselves is not necessarily an accurate representation of our real world identity. The first aim of the app was to provide the user a summary of their online identity.

The teenage hormone that triggers puberty and prevents cancer

New Statesman 20th September 2013

Professor Kevin O'Bryne, Women's Health, discussed the "enigma" of GnRH at a conference at the
University of Bristol and this is mentioned by this piece which looks at what activates kisspeptin (the hormone which triggers puberty) to release GnRH

The unromantic hero

New Statesman 20th September 2013

Dr John Bew, War Studies, writes for New Statesman about the parliamentary vote stopping David Cameron joining Obama in lawlessly attacking Syria and the hostility of most British people to bombing other nations.

Senior professionals face 'loss of identity'

Financial Times 19th September 2013

Work plays a big part in defining the identity of senior professionals but, increasingly, a greater value is being placed on youth and rapid career progress. Dr Helen Yallop, History, says that this is 'threatening cherished notions of selfhood and meaning' as people are living and working longer.

Right to reply

Times Higher Education 19th September 2013

Anthony Seldon, who is master of Wellington College mentions doing his PGCE at King's College London in this piece.

Dubious deterrent

Times 19th September 2013

Dr David Fisher and Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, have both shown support for Baroness Falkner of Margravine, the co-chair of the Liberal Democrat backbench international affairs committee, that a UK nuclear posture based on deploying submarines with unarmed missiles does not constitute a credible deterrent capability.

India on central Asia's fringes

New Indian Express 19th September 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece on the need for India to develop stronger bilateral partnerships in central Asia: 'India views itself as a stabiliser and security provider in Central Asia and with its growing economic clout in recent years, an attractive economic power.'

Syria: how Bashar al-Assad's chemical arsenal became a strategic liability

Daily Telegraph 19th September 2013

Professor Wyn Bowen and Dr Matthew Moran, War Studies, have written together an op-ed about how chemical weapons have become a strategic liability for Syria. They said: 'It is somewhat ironic that these weapons of mass destruction, for so long a prized asset in the Syrian arsenal, have become the source of the Assad regime's greatest threat.'

The benefits behind challenging US-Brazilian relations

BBC News (Online) 19th September 2013

Dr Eduardo Gomez, King’s International Development Institute, writes that the decision of Brazil’s President, Dilma Rousseff, to postpone her visit to the US is viewed by many as a setback to US-Brazilian relations. Dr Gomez said that this is unlikely to ruin Brazil’s relationship with the US in the long term. Professor Matias Spektor, Brazil Institute, was also quoted on this subject in The Economist.

TrialReach launches new platform giving patients greater access to clinical trials

Reuters 19th September 2013

A new platform has been unveiled by TrialReach that will reduce the time and costs required to find clinical trial patients. Professor Steve Williams, Neuroimaging, said: ‘TrialReach is helping us to solve one of the biggest challenges in medical research - making it much easier for patients to find us, learn more and then volunteer to be in our clinical trials.’

Inside Science: Chemical weapons

Radio 4 19th September 2013

In an item looking at why poisons used in warfare are treated so differently to conventional methods of killing. Dr Joanna Kidd, King’s Policy Institute, gives a brief history of chemical warfare. She said: ‘Poisons have been used to kill people throughout the ages although there has been a general reluctance to use them in warfare.’ This item begins at 01.48.

Alarm over shortage of nurses on NHS wards

Times 18th September 2013

The results of research from the National Nursing Research Unit at King's College London which found that 43% of wards have a staffing level lower than 1 nurse per 8 patients are featured on the front page of the Times. Jane Ball, , said: 'I would have hoped that less than 10% of wards would be at these danger levels.' This was also reported by BBC News and BBC Radio 5 Live, Independent and Independent i.

FutureLearn

BBC Radio 2 18th September 2013

King's College London is one of the institutions that will be providing free online courses to allow people across the globe access to top universities. The 'Causes of War' course, run by King's through FutureLearn, is mentioned on Radio 2. Item begins 01.35.14. This was also reported by Financial Times, Daily Telegraph, The Sunday Times, Huffington Post (UK),

Gene discovery could lead to new types of HIV treatments

Reuters 18th September 2013

Researchers at King's have identified a gene that may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body. Professor Michael Malim, Infectious Diseases, said that the finding advances scientists' understanding of how HIV interacts with the immune system. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph, Times Higher Education and the Times of India.

King's press release related to 'Gene discovery could lead to new types of HIV treatments'

Skill academy will help HCAs to access better training courses

Nursing Standard 18th September 2013

A UK-wide skills academy for healthcare assistants has been launched amid concerns about inconsistent training of staff. Professor Jill Maben, Nursing & Midwifery, said that specialist skills provided by nurses are often not factored in to decisions about staff numbers.

Religious rights and divisive politics

Guardian 18th September 2013

Sebastiaan Debrouwere and Areeb Ullah, President and Vice President of the King's College London Student's Union respectively, have both signed to show rejection of the proposal for national debate on the right of Muslim women to choose to wear the veil and other forms of religious dress.

Novel gene discovery could lead to new HIV treatments

Xinhua (China) - English language 18th September 2013

Report on new research led by King's that has identified a new gene, which may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body. Professor Mike Malim, Medicine, said: 'This research advances our understanding of how HIV virus interacts with the immune system and opens up opportunities to develop new therapies.'

Gene discovery could lead to new types of HIV treatments

Reuters (India) 18th September 2013

Report on new research led by King's that has identified a new gene, which may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body.

Gene discovery could lead to new types of HIV treatments

Financial Express (India) 18th September 2013

Report on new research led by King's that has identified a new gene, which may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body. Professor Mike Malim, Medicine, said: 'This research advances our understanding of how HIV virus interacts with the immune system and opens up opportunities to develop new therapies.'

Gene discovery could lead to new types of HIV treatments

Times of India 18th September 2013

Report on new research led by King's that has identified a new gene, which may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body. Professor Mike Malim, Medicine, said: 'This research advances our understanding of how HIV virus interacts with the immune system and opens up opportunities to develop new therapies.'

New gene that could prevent spread of HIV discovered

News Track India 18th September 2013

Report on new research led by King's that has identified a new gene, which may have the ability to prevent HIV from spreading after it enters the body.

Universities join online education revolution

AFP 18th September 2013

Report on the launch of FutureLearn, a collective portal offering free online courses from dozens of British universities, including a course 'Causes of War' from King's.
Karen O'Brien, Vice Principal, said: 'It offers an opportunity to open up some of our most innovative and popular courses to a global audience and allows learners to study flexibly anytime, anywhere.'

Full-face veils aren't barbaric, but our response can be

Guardian 17th September 2013

Professor Maleiha Malik, Law, writes about the debates that surround the wearing of a full face veil by Muslim women, and comments that the women themselves should not be excluded from discussion. She said: 'It is crucial to distinguish such legitimate debate, and reasonable regulation, from political and legal responses such as those in France and Belgium that construct Muslim religious differences as barbaric.'

Young bloods

Evening Standard 17th September 2013

In a piece looking at the most up and coming 25 young people under 25, ex student Chibundu Onuzo, is mentioned as she is publishing her first book 'The Spider King's Daughter' which she wrote whilst studying History at King's.

Which university societies should you join?

Guardian 17th September 2013

In a piece looking at the positives and negatives of university societies. A King's College London graduate, Tom Riddington, and a current student, Alanna Sargent, are both quoted speaking about their experiences.

Prospects for a Middle East peace

Guardian 17th September 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the Oslo accords in a letter which replied to an article written by Avi Shlaim.

Japan quietly builds limited counter -A2/AD capabilities

Defense News 17th September 2013

Report on Japan's military strategy. Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, said: 'There are two points about the buildup. One is strategic. Japan has always had a denial strategy and the main theater of focus has moved from Russia to China. The second is technological. Japan is buying into lots of hardware that can be used for fleet air and missile defense. The new Aegis ships have highly advanced capabilities that are essential for these missions.'

Why does the use of chemical weapons cause such revulsion?

Folha de Sao Paulo (Brazil) 17th September 2013

Syndicated coverage from an original
article which appeared in the New York Times last week. Dr Joanna Kidd, King's Policy Institute, is quoted on how the Geneva Protocol was not the first effort to ban the use of poison in war: 'Throughout history, there has been a general revulsion against the use of poisons against human beings in warfare, going back to the Greeks,'she said. Some date a first effort to ban such weaponry to 1675, when France and the Holy Roman Empire agreed in Strasbourg not to use poisoned bullets.

Patient involvement in research pays dividends, says study

Times Higher Education 16th September 2013

Research led by Professor Til Wykes, Institute of Psychiatry, finds that patient involvement in research increases the likelihood of studies recruiting to target. Prof Wykes says: "At the individual level, we know that being involved in research promotes social inclusion and provides a sense of wellbeing for patients, but this is the first time we can see that patient involvement in research is linked to higher likelihood of reaching [a] recruitment target"

King's press release related to 'Patient involvement in research pays dividends, says study'

Fake food: the tech companies working to revolutionise how we eat protein

Guardian 16th September 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, comments on the potential of fake meat for entering the market. He said: 'Alternatives made from natural foods are a better way forward. Proteins from different plant sources, when combined, provide high-quality protein equivalent to that of meat.'

Top universities offer free online courses to the world

Times 16th September 2013

King's College London is mentioned as an institution which is among 24 universities to have created free online courses for the platform FutureLearn which will allow people anywhere in the world to access course materials for free.

Beyond Belief - Sunni and Shia in Islam

BBC Radio 4 16th September 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, joins Ernie Rae to discuss the Sunni-Shia divide.

Is Cyberwar really war?

Boston Globe 15th September 2013

Article on the threat of a catastrophic digital attack - otherwise known as 'cyberwar' - discussing the argument from Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, that 'cyberwar' is a hype and that this category error could have real and dangerous consequences.

Chronicle of death foretold?

Independent 14th September 2013

Professor Marc Saperstein, Theology & Religious Studies, discusses and reviews Simon Schama's book 'The Story of the Jews: Finding the words.'

Stem cell research

BBC Radio 4 12th September 2013

Professor Fiona Watt, Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine, explained how you re-programme a stem cell on Inside Science. She comments on the risks of this and said: 'One of the concerns about the relevance of these IPS cells was that some people have argued that they are just something that you make in a cell culture dish and we don't know the relevance to the in vivo situation.' Interview begins 04.11

London Pollution

BBC London Radio 11th September 2013

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, was interviewed about levels of pollution in central London, the health effects of such high levels and the banning of cars in central London. He said: 'All the time there's new evidence emerging from studies in London and studies around the world and their all pointing in the same direction, that air pollution exerts quite a health burden on the population. There's new evidence emerging for instance of effects on children's lung growth.' Interview begins at 24.07.

Robo-mate exoskeleton under development in Europe

BBC News 11th September 2013

Professor Darwin Caldwell, Centre for Robotics Research, comments on the usefulness of robotic suits in the workplace for jobs that may otherwise be considered dangerous and therefore could reduce workplace injuries. Engineers are currently mindful of the risks involved and he said: 'At the minute, the motors or hydraulic systems required tend to be rather large and clumsy'. This was also reported by Huffington Post (UK).

Frontline founder: 'Social work needs life-changing professionals'

The Guardian 11th September 2013

The Institute of Psychiatry will partner with the University of Bedfordshire and the Institute of Family Therapy to provide the academic component of Frontline a "Teach First for social work". Also reported in the Times Higher Education

Syria: The Battle for Hearts and Minds

Huffington Post 11th September 2013

John Bew, War Studies, is quoted in an article on potential outcomes to intervention in Syria:'If there is one thing the west has learned, it is that prolonged and sustained conflicts that attract international jihadis have long-lasting consequences. The emergence of new ungoverned spaces has given such groups the space to train, mobilize and act.'

Israel troubled by Russia's plan to help Iran

USA Today 11th September 2013

Article on Israel's reaction to reports Russia may supply Iran with missiles and build a new nuclear facility. Professor Efraim Karsh, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, is quoted: 'Obama is viewed in the Middle East as a weak president and this is an opportunity for Russia to reassert some of its influence at the West's expense.'

King's College London ranked in top 20 in world

India Education Diary 11th September 2013

Article about King's ranking 19th in QS international university rankings for 2013

Too much pressure: NHS employers must invest in nurses' wellbeing

Nursing Standard 11th September 2013

Anxiety, stress and depression have been found to be the leading causes of sickness absence among nurses by the Nursing Standard. Jane Ball, Nursing & Midwifery, said that there is often a mismatch between planned staffing levels and actual staffing levels and part of this is down to staff absence.

Sex: A Horizon Guide

BBC Four 11th September 2013

Professor Thomas Lehner, Immunology & Molecular Oncology, explains the role of the Langerhans cells in allowing HIV to enter the body. Therefore they can be of critical importance in preventing HIV through circumcision of the male genital organ. The interview begins 28.36.

Could going vegan two days a week ease your creaky knees?

Daily Mail 10th September 2013

Research at King's College London has shown that a compound in soya called genistein can hinder access of sperm to the egg. This suggests that eating large amounts of soya, popular with vegans and vegetarians, can affect fertility.

Jeremy Hunt told 'forget it' over memory tests for elderly patients

The Times 10th September 2013

Commenting on new research highlighting the potential dangers of over diagnosing dementia, Professor Robert Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, said: “It is easy to argue that information about diagnosis is useful in terms of planning for the future and accessing the (admittedly modest) benefits that the current dementia drugs offer. On the downside, this is a devastating diagnosis to receive and we do not currently have any effective therapies that can slow down or stop the progressive decline in cognition and function." Also reported in the Daily Mail

More British universities join global elite

Daily Telegraph 10th September 2013

Record numbers of British universities have been named among the world's elite with 6 British institutions in the top 20 compared with 4 a year ago. King's College London has risen, this year, to equal 19th place. This was also reported by Guardian, Independent, Times, Huffington Post (UK), Press Association, BBC Chinese, The Week Trade, Yahoo!, AFP, ITV.com BBC News & BBC Breakfast.

Diplomatic deals between US and Russia

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th September 2013

Paul Schulte, War Studies, is interviewed about diplomatic deals which are reducing the chances of an attack by the US on Syria which have come as a result of comments made by John Kerry, US Secretary of State stating action could be called off if weapons were handed over. Mr Schulte said: 'How do you know that the Syrians are serious, until they put forward some list of holdings?' The item begins at 1.09.02. Paul Schulte's opinions were also included in coverage by BBC Radio 2. Dr James Boys has also spoken about Obama's plans to put a military strike on hold on BBC Radio 5 Live Breakfast. Dr Boys said: 'Kerry had clearly gone beyond his brief and the Russians, who's main aspiration here is to keep Assad in power, have jumped all over this.' Dr Sam Greene, Russia Institute, discussed a slightly 'backing off' from the Russian resolution to disarm Syria on Sky News. Professor Wyn Bowen has also discussed the 'complicated situation' that is the handing over of Syrian weapons on BBC News.

London has three of the world's top 20 universities

BBC London News 10th September 2013

In a piece looking at the three London universities which are part of the QS world rankings top 20, The Principal of King's College London, Professor Sir Rick Trainor, spoke about the rise of King's College London to equal 19. The Principal said: 'What's remarkable is that in the face of a huge rise in competition from university systems in other countries that UK universities still retain such a large share of the QS league table. I think it shows that there are enduring strengths in the reality and the reputation of UK universities.' Item begins at 03.37.

MIT tops list of world university rankings

India Vision 10th September 2013

Article about the new QS university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013.

MIT and Harvard top world university list

AFP 10th September 2013

King's is mentioned in an article about publication of the QS international university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013.

Harvard, MIT top university rankings

The Standard (Hong Kong) 10th September 2013

King's is mentioned in an article about publication of the QS international university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013.

Indian universities fail to make world's top 200; MIT, Harvard top the list

Deccan Chronicle 10th September 2013

Article about the new QS university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013; no Indian university makes the world's top 200.

MIT tops list of world university rankings

Malaysia Sun 10th September 2013

Article on the new QS university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013.

MIT and Harvard top world university list

The Star (Malaysia) 10th September 2013

Article on the new QS university rankings for 2013. King's is ranked 19th.

MIT and Harvard top world university list

Straits Times (Singapore) 10th September 2013

Article on the new QS university rankings. King's is 19th in 2013.

MIT and Harvard top world university list

Sky News 10th September 2013

Article on the QS university rankings. King's is ranked 19th in 2013.

A nation of pill poppers

The Sunday Times 8th September 2013

A 2011 report by the National Addiction Centre at King's College London is quoted in thus article investigating the growing numbers of British people using tranquillisers and painkillers. The report said that a third of prescriptions for benzodiazepines from 1990 onwards were for more than 8 weeks when official advice says it should only be used for 4.

How to live longer - the experts' guide to ageing

The Observer 8th September 2013

Dr Sandrine Thuret, Institute of Psychiatry, investigates how environmental factors, such as diet, can boost brain cells and improve memory. She says research has shown that in people over 70, intermittent fasting led to a 30% improvement in verbal memory after three months.

Hospital safe staffing ratios

BBC Radio 5 Live 8th September 2013

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing & Midwifery, is interviewed on safe staffing ratios in hospitals. She discusses a recent study looking at the links between staffing levels and patient outcomes, particularly care left undone. She says that the link between staffing and mortality is a strong one.

Hundreds of thousands of elderly people were abused last year

The Observer 8th September 2013

In an article investigating the fact that as many as 370 000 older people have been abused in their own homes by a carer, relative or friend in the last year, research carried out by King's College London alongside the National Centre for Social Research found that the majority of abusers (53%) were living in the respondents house at the time of the abuse. Of those, 65% were recorded as having committed physical, psychological or sexual abuse. This was also reported by the Times.

E-cigarettes as good as nicotine patches in helping smokers quit

Reuters 7th September 2013

Professor Ann McNeill, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which finds that smokers who switch to electronic cigarettes to try to kick their habit are at least as likely to succeed in quitting or cutting down as users of nicotine patches. She says: "Electronic cigarettes are the most exciting new development in tobacco control over the last few decades as we have witnessed a rapid uptake of these much less harmful products by smokers." Also reported by ABC.es, New York Daily News and Fox News

The Syria crisis post G20

BBC News 7th September 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, is interviewed on BBC News about the results of the stalemate in St Petersburg as well as support and public opinion surrounding military intervention. He said: 'What you're seeing now are the various world leaders returning home, trying to figure out how on earth to do anything next.' Dr Boys was also interviewed by Sky News and discussed levels of support for intervention.

Cancer screening is critical: Docs

Deccan Chronicle (India) 7th September 2013

Professor Arnie Purushotham, Research Onocology, is mentioned in this article as comparing the cancer scenario of India and the UK and says there are lessons that could be learned.

A weapon seen as too horrible, even in war

New York Times 6th September 2013

Dr Joanna Kidd is quoted in an article on how the Geneva Protocol was not the first effort to ban the use of poison in war:'Throughout history, there has been a general revulsion against the use of poisons against human beings in warfare, going back to the Greeks,'she said. Some date a first effort to ban such weaponry to 1675, when France and the Holy Roman Empire agreed in Strasbourg not to use poisoned bullets.

Pipeline for COPD drugs flows with combination candidates

Nature Medicine 6th September 2013

A key committee in the European Medicines agency has given the thumbs up to Novartis' QVA149, the first of a handful combination drugs aimed at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Professor Clive Page, Pharmaceutical Science, comments on the advantage the drug will have as one of the earliest to be marketed, saying: 'If they're first to market that can be a good thing. You're going to have to fight harder with a new combination to say why you're better.'

No model state

Indian Express 6th September 2013

Professor Christophe Jaffrelot, India Institute, writes about the Gujarat pattern of development as social indicators do not match economic performance.

Brain-training video games may help reverse cognitive decline in old age

The Guardian 5th September 2013

Professor Rob Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, commented on new research which found that playing brain-training video games may help reverse the natural decline in cognitive abilities among older people. He said: "We are still a very long way from being able to recommend cognitive training as a preventative or treatment measure."

Sharia and English law can work together with honesty and respect

The Times 5th September 2013

Professor Maleiha Malik, The Dickson Poon School of Law, is mentioned in this article discussing persecuted minorities and how the state can work can work with Islamic associations to protect (for example) women in unregistered marriages.

Researchers develop new model to treat Graves’ disease

Med India 5th September 2013

The first animal model simulating the eye condition associated with the thyroid condition Graves’ disease is being developed by researchers. Professor Paul Banga, Diabetes, is the lead author of the study and said: ‘Better treatments are needed for Graves' orbitopathy to reduce the risks of permanent disfigurement and social stigma.

West struggles to cope with online recruitment for Syria jihad.

Yahoo! 4th September 2013

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comments on the growing presence of radical propaganda on social media. He describes it as a 'Sisyphean task' and said: 'It's practically impossible to [challenge], it's out there in such quantity.' This was reported by Reuters.

Integrated care is here and it works

Nursing Standard 4th September 2013

In this article reporting a 'radical realignment of health and care services' which can bring hospital level care to people's homes, King's College London is mentioned as part of a group that have joined forces to try and reduce the admission of elderly people to hospital unnecessarily.

Imminent threat of China brings Vietnam and the US closer to us

DNA (India) 4th September 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes that from India's ‘Look-East’ policy Vietnam has emerged ‘as an ally to tackle the Asian dragon’.

A Mind-Blowing Discovery About Varicose Veins

Huffington Post 3rd September 2013

Research led by Professor Alberto Smith, Cardiovascular Division, has shown that varicose veins could be treated by 'switching off' certain genes. Also reported by Huffington Post (UK).

Michael Ignatieff and the Red Cross Crisis

BBC Radio 4 3rd September 2013

Dr Randolph Kent, King's policy Institute, comments on International Red Cross pilot schemes in the favelas of Rio and Mexico City. There is question over whether the governments of these states want ICRC assistance and Dr Kent said: 'Now what one's seeing more and more is greater state centricity, more efforts by individual states to determine who does what in their own states.'(15.54)

'Hacking' and 'Yacking' about the digital humanities

Chronicle of Higher Education (USA) 3rd September 2013

A piece mentioning Professor Willard McCarty, Digital Humanities, who has won the lifetime achievement award at the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. Author of the ‘field-defining book’ Humanities Computing, he was introduced at the conference as the ‘Obi-Wan Kenobi of the digital humanities’.

College on wheels

Hindustan Times (India) 3rd September 2013

Delhi University has taken a batch of 900 students to Haryana and Punjab on board the Gyanodaya Express, its trademark educational train. The students are being joined by 120 students and faculty members from King's.

Hoarding Can Be a Deadly Business

Scientific American 2nd September 2013

Research led by Professor David Mataix-Cols, Institute of Psychiatry, showed that 80 percent or more of people who engage in extreme hoarding do not meet criteria for OCD, suggesting hoarding is not a sub-type of OCD, but a seperate disorder - now recognised in the American Psychiatric Association's latest diagnostic manual (DSM-5).

This education C change is long overdue

The Times 2nd September 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Department of Management, writes in the Times about the government reforms to post-16 education which will require students to continue with GCSEs in English and Maths until they achieve a grade C. These reforms have been a result of recommendations made by the Wolf Report in 2011. Professor Wolf's comments have also been mentioned in reports of the reforms by Financial Times, Metro, Evening Standard, Huffington Post (UK), Guardian, Sky News, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 5 Live, Press Association, London Evening Standard, Daily Mail, Daily Express & Daily Mirror.

The Elephant Man

BBC Radio 4 2nd September 2013

Dr Michael Simpson, Department of Medical & Molecular Genetics, was interviewed about a DNA recovery project at King's which seeks to identify genetic deformities that might have caused the Elephant Man's severe physical deformities (item begins at 42.47).

Why 250 pound 'super trainers' won't put an extra spring in your step

Mail on Sunday 1st September 2013

Researchers at King's College London have looked into claims made by MBT shoes, the makers of the 'rocker' sole shoes which supposedly help alleviate lower back pain. The study, funded by MBT shoes, found that 'Rocker sole shoes appear to be no more beneficial than flat sole shoes in reducing pain in people with chronic lower back problems' and in some cases that pain may be aggravated by wearing MBT's shoes.

Attack Syria, Talk to Iran

New York Times 1st September 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, writes an op-ed on Syria: 'The need for an immediate U.S. response in Syria to discourage the further use of chemical weapons does not change the fundamental dilemma of U.S. policy, which is that for very good reasons, the United States does not want either side to win this war. Victory for either side would mean dreadful massacres and ethnic cleansing, as well as an increased threat of international terrorism.'

What do they really think of us?

ABC News (Australia) 1st September 2013

Dr Jatinder Mann, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, was interviewed on the upcoming election in Australia and its coverage in the UK: ‘It's interesting – you kind of mention the comparison between the rough and tumble of Australian politics and British politics. I mean, you know, when it comes to Question Time, they're both up there in my opinion in terms of being quite lively, shall we say, although I'd say the Australian one perhaps just beats the British one just a tad.’

Sunday Dialogue - Economics ups and downs

New York Times 31st August 2013

Dr Alexander Douglas, Philosophy, is among contributors to a reader debate on the nature of economics and science. He said: ‘This debate so far seems to be focused on neoclassical economics, but the most mainstream part of a discipline is not guaranteed to be the most scientific.’

What will be the impact of the British 'no' to intervention in Syria?

BBC Radio 4 30th August 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, is interviewed on The World Tonight. Dr Boys comments on Britain's role as a 'cheerleader' to Syrian intervention. He said that the relationship between David Cameron and Barack Obama is solid and built upon the military (Interview begins 26.06). Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke to AFP and said: 'For some people this is like a re-run of Iraq - only this time around they didn't want to make the same mistake that was made last time.' This was reported by Yahoo! Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, also commented on this and said: 'What's new about yesterday's vote is that Parliament has begun to assert its powers for the first time, many people say, since the late 18th century it's denied the Prime Minister the right to go to war. The danger is it could hobble foreign policy because a Parliament of 650 MPs can't make foreign policy, only the Government can do that.'

British experts see influence on ties with US from Syrian voting

Xinhua (China) - English language 30th August 2013

Dr. James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, is quoted on the impact developments in Syria have had on US-UK relations:
'This will be a short term headache for the U.S. President and the British Prime Minister but within a few months this will be forgotten.'

Syria crisis

BBC Newsnight 30th August 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about the parliament vote on military intervention in Syria. He said it is the first time since the 18th Century that parliament has denied the Prime Minister's right to go to war. Begins at 28.40.

Why do the Miliband haters carp and groan? He's the favourite - the rest is noise

New Statesman 30th August 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the idea of public opinion and ratings in British politics. He said: 'The British people have tended to show a marked distrust of charismatic leaders.'

The Syrian atrocities

New Statesman 30th August 2013

Dr John Bew, War Studies, writing for the New Statesman, discusses the issues in Syria along with President Obama's non-intervention strategies at length.

Marijuana Top Illegal Drug Used Worldwide

NPR 29th August 2013

Professor Michael Lynskey, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on a worldwide study of drug abuse published in the Lancet. He says: "The illicit use of prescribed opiates in the U.S. has only happened in the last 10 years or so. It's possible in another 20 years, patterns will again change in ways we can't predict." Also reported by Associated Press, FOX news, Huffington Post, NBC, ABC, CBC & Daily Mail

Independence has core benefits

Times Higher Education 29th August 2013

The Francis Crick Institute, a £700 million centre opening in St Pancras is a partnership between MRC, CRUK, the Wellcome Trust, University College London,Imperial College London and King's
College London. This article reports that scientists in their early 'creative' years will be supported by 12 years of core funding.

Household politics: Conflict in early modern England

Times Higher Education 29th August 2013

Dr Lucy Wooding, History, writes a review of this book for Times Higher Education.

Regeneration in London has pushed poor families out

Guardian 29th August 2013

Professor Loretta Lees, Geography, writes an article for the Guardian discussing the fact that urban regeneration creates widening economic and social inequalities. There are some positive impacts, however, with new developments being built on sties that were once industrial and reversing population decline. This was mentioned again on 23/09/2013 in an article disagreeing with her comments.

Unlocking the secrets of the Elephant Man

BBC News (Online) 29th August 2013

The skeleton of Joseph Merrick, the Elephant Man, is being used to extract DNA which may be able to benefit modern medical science. Dr Michael Simpson, Medical & Molecular Genetics, is leading the team of geneticists extracting DNA and working on techniques to extract DNA from a skeleton which has been bleached many times in the 123 years since Joseph Merrick died. This was also reported by BBC Radio 4.

Careworkers underpaid report finds

BBC Newsnight 28th August 2013

In an item that discusses the recent finding that careworkers are often paid less than the national minimum wage, Dr Shareen Hussain, King's Policy Institute, estimates that as many as 100 000 careworkers in England are being paid less than 6.19 an hour. It is thought that this is down to workers not being paid for the time it takes for them to travel to clients. Item begins at 37.40. Also reported by Guardian.

Quick fix staffing at poor performing trusts

Nursing Standard 28th August 2013

Following an investigation into higher than expected mortality rates, a number of hospitals have launched overseas recruitment drives. Professor Jill Maben, Nursing & Midwifery, says that overseas recruitment is only a 'short term fix'. Professor Maben commented on this again in the Nursing Standard, saying that many highly skilled nurses are being recruited from overseas as a short term fix but that they are often deployed outside their specialty due to these shortages.

Boozy soaps blamed for encouraging teens to drink

Daily Mail 27th August 2013

Research from the National Addictions Centre at King's finds that prime-time television is a major source of exposure to alcohol imagery among children, and as such is likely to be contributing to uptake and consumption of alcohol among young people in the UK. Also reported by BBC London radio 94.9FM & the Daily Star

Cocaine 'rapidly changes the brain'

BBC News 27th August 2013

Dr Gerome Breen, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which shows that taking cocaine can change the structure of the brain within hours. He says: "This study gives us a solid understanding of how addiction occurs - it shows us how addiction is learned by the brain." Also on BBC Mundo.

Doctor becomes bone marrow donor

Press Association 27th August 2013

A doctor, Kaanthan Jawahar, who joined the bone marrow register whilst he was studying at King's and a part of the KCL Marrow volunteering society has saved a strangers life by donating bone marrow. He is now encouraging more people from Asian backgrounds to consider joining the register as there aren't enough donors from ethnic minority backgrounds.

Smoking

BBC Radio 5 Live 27th August 2013

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Public Health Sciences, speaks about smoking in Britain following a halt to the government's plans to require cigarettes to be sold in unbranded packaging. He says that the government needs to go further in putting pressure on the tobacco and retail industry to take up responsibility for the changes which are being suggested. Item begins at 19.20.

Word of Mouth - Language Laws

BBC Radio 4 27th August 2013

Professor Laura Gowing, History, discusses defamation cases in history in a programme which explores the laws which govern what we can and can't say. She says that taking an insult to court was a way of it being recognized and your name being cleared (Interview begins at 19.22)

A study has shown that cocaine can change brain structure in two hours

Terra Brasil 26th August 2013

Dr Gerome Breen, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on findings that new brain structure changes in relation to memory when cocaine is used. He said that the study can give a solid understanding of how addiction occurs.

Manmohan Singh returns to Rao, finally

Business Standard 25th August 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, King’s India Institute, writes about Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s mention of the late P V Narasimha Rao in his last speech from the ramparts of the Red Fort.

Debate: Regional issues are not the biggest obstacles to Arab-Israeli peace

Asharq Al-Awsat 25th August 2013

Professor Rory Miller, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, discusses the first peace talks between Israel and the Arab party since the start of the Arab Spring in this article he has written for Asharq Al-Awsat. He says: 'The Arab Spring has not created an unprecedented window for peace.'

Acclaimed doctor wants to help shape UAE's healthcare system

The National (UAE) 24th August 2013

King's student doctor, Dr Al Mahri, plans to assist in shaping a healthcare system when she returns home to Abu Dhabi that will stop her countrymen feeling like they have to travel overseas for treatment. She says: 'My goal is to make an impact on a wider scale and make our UAE healthcare system one of the best in the world.' Her research at King's has found that doctors can look for evidence of chromosomal abnormalities that can lead to genetic disorders, without the risk of miscarriage.

Up to 20 NHS trusts seeking healthcare deals in India

Independent 23rd August 2013

This article reports the news that as many as 20 NHS trusts are planning to go into business with Indian healthcare providers in a bid to help close the NHS funding gap by boosting income overseas. Agreed contracts involve a plan for King's Health Partners, a partnership that involves King's College London and three London NHS trusts, to set up clinics in Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Also reported by the Telegraph. Also reported by Huffington Post (UK).

Should we give 16 year olds the vote?

The Times 23rd August 2013

In the 'Letters to the Editor' section, Professor Vernon Bogdanor gives his opinion on this issue. He says that: 'Our constitutional evolution and the evolution of the commonwealth should surely have taught us that the best way to induce a sense of responsibility among the excluded is to give them responsibility.'

Labour hedges bets on next Indian PM

Guardian 23rd August 2013

Dr Kriti Kapila, Dr Katherine Schofield, Dr Jahnavi Phalkey, Dr Sunil M Kumar, Professpr Christophe Jaffrelot, all from the King's India Institute and Sridhar Venkatapuram, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, are all part of a group of academics who have written to the Guardian to express surprise and concern about the invitation of Narenda Modi, the Chief Minister of the Gujarat, to address parliament.

Any questions - Syria

BBC Radio 4 23rd August 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Department of Management comments on the Syrian situation as part of a panel involved in the 'Any Questions' programme on BBC Radio 4. She says that the situation reminds her of what happened in Bosnia until the US intervened.

Support for cyberbullying victims should start at school

Guardian 23rd August 2013

Ben Jackson, editor of Roar! News, the King's College London student newspaper, shares his experiences of bullying and calls on schools to put better practices in place for dealing with the problem at the source in the wake of recent suicides related to online cyberbullying.

Russia urges Syrian government to give UN weapon inspectors access to attack site

BBC News 23rd August 2013

Dr Sam Greene, King's Russia Institute, has also commented on BBC News about the fact that Russia has subsequently urged Assad's Government to allow access for UN weapons inspectors to an area near Damascus where the alleged attack took place. Dr Greene says that the Russian desire for Assad's Government to allow inspectors in is genuine. Dr Greene was also featured on Radio Five Live discussing this issue.

Science and fun can go together

New Indian Express 23rd August 2013

Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Department of Education & Professional Studies, is quoted by the New Indian Express on the subject of a formulae being developed for the perfect cheese on toast. He says that the formula ‘shouldn’t be mocked.’

Aristolochia: a very toxic herb

Le Figaro 23rd August 2013

Further coverage of the story from earlier this year on the risks of aristolochic acids featuring research conducted at King’s College London.

Appointments

Times Higher Education 22nd August 2013

Appointments made at King's College London are mentioned in the Times Higher Education. Professor Christine Norton has been appointed a Florence Nightingale Foundation chair in clinical nursing practice research.

GCSE results 2013 - Live

Guardian 22nd August 2013

Research conducted by King's College London and Durham Unviersity in 2009 is mentioned in this article reporting the fall in GCSE pass rates.The research found that pupil's abilities to answer basic maths problems have barely changed yet GCSE pass rates have more than doubled.

British intervention in Syria

Channel 4 News 22nd August 2013

Professor Andrew Dorman, Defence Studies, says that he feels the likelihood of military intervention is very slight in an article which looks at whether Britain would be capable of intervening in Syria. Paul Schulte, Department of War Studies, subsequently discussed the nature of possible military action in Syria on Channel 4 News and also for the Press Association and BBC Radio 5 Live. Paul Schulte also commented on rebel responsibility in the Guardian and on Syrian retaliation in the Metro. Mr Schulte also discusses .Item begins at 08.20. Professor Wyn Bowen, Department of War Studies, has also commented on the situation in Syria on BBC Radio Five Live. Professor Bowen was a UN weapons inspector during the 1990s in Iraq and says that there are multiple forms of evidence that could be collected in this context. Professor Bowen was also featured speaking in this area on BBC London radio. A tweet from Ghanem Nuseibeh was also included in the BBC live coverage of the crisis on 29/08/2013. Professor Vernon Bogdanor was also interviewed on BBC Radio 5 Live Drive and spoke about the politics behind possible action in Syria.

End is nigh for Oxbridge 'hegemony', predicts head

The Times 21st August 2013

In an article looking at the hegemony maintained by Oxford and Cambridge, King's College London is suggested as one of the group of top universities in terms of research funding. Also reported by the Telegraph.

If you really want a natural delivery...call the midwife

Daily Mail 21st August 2013

Professor Jane Sandall, Department of Women's Health, has been involved with a study looking at the care of pregnant women. The study suggests that women who's care is led by a midwife are more likely to have natural births without complications. Also reported by New York Daily News and Reuters.

King's press release related to 'If you really want a natural delivery...call the midwife'

A blood test for suicide?

The Independent 21st August 2013

Professor Matthew Hotopf, Institute of Psychiatry, commented on new research which claims molecules measured in the bloodstream could identify people intent on taking their own life. He said: "It's one thing to find a biomarker which might be associated at a statistical level with suicide/suicidal behaviour. It's quite another to use it to make any kind of prediction which has clinical utility." Also reported by the Daily Mail and Press Association.

Syrian chemical attacks

Express 21st August 2013

Both Professor Bhupendra Jasani and Paul Schulte have commented on the alleged chemical attacks in Syria through various media outlets. In this Express article, Paul Schulte said: 'This is either a deception and a provocation or it is a major and disturbing change in the Syrian government's strategy.' Mr Schulte also commented on the situation in Syria on Five Live Drive and BBC News. Professor Jasani appeared on Sky News and said that the possible use of chemical weapons was surprising due to the presence of weapon inspectors in Damascus.

Drafting in of Danish health visitors is just a short-term fix, says Unison

Nursing Standard 21st August 2013

Professor Dame Sarah Cowley comments in an article discussing the recruiting of health visitors from Denmark to meet targets. She says that this is a 'typical short-term fix' instead of a 'sustainable solution'.

Where the heart is

Nursing Standard 21st August 2013

In an article discussing the fact that some nurses may become so involved in their work that the only way to escape stress and burnout is to become detached from it, Professor Ian Norman, School of Nursing & Midwifery comments. He says that high levels of occupational stress can result from long periods of being very involved with patients cases.

Assessment for learning: are you using it effectively in your classroom?

Guardian 20th August 2013

Dr Christine Harrison, Department of Education & Professional Studies, writes for the Guardian and asks are schools using the Assessment for Learning model properly as many schools seem to find it difficult to implement.

The Russell Group

Daily Mail 20th August 2013

A question posed about the Russell Group and how it came in to existence in the 'Answers to Correspondents' section of the Daily Mail, mentions King's College London as a member of the Russell Group.

College: It's not just 'Made in the USA'

LA Times 20th August 2013

In an article by Dr Aaron Rosen, Theology & Religious Studies, which looks at the growing attraction of European university study for American students, he mentions King's College London's new Liberal Arts degree programme.

9 UK universities in the latest world top 100

Independent 20th August 2013

In an article reporting the 9 UK universities which made it into the league table compiled by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, King's College London is mentioned as increasing by one place in the rankings.

Egypt crisis: How regional players are responding

BBC News (Online) 20th August 2013

Roger Hardy, Department of Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, discusses the situation with Egypt's key allies. He says 'Where the West see a dilemma, the Saudis see an opportunity.

British Newspaper Has Advantages in Battle With Government Over Secrets

New York Times 20th August 2013

Professor Robert Wintemute, The Dickson Poon School of Law, comments on the detention of David Miranda. Professor Wintemute said: 'I hope this is an aberration rather than a signal of a wider clampdown' on press freedom and human rights.

If b=bread, c=cheese and t=time, what is the point of all these formulae?

Independent 19th August 2013

In an article discussing useful value of a the formula for the perfect cheese on toast which has been published just days after a formula to predict the murder rate in Brazil was also published, Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Department of Education & Professional Studies, comments: 'A recipe is a formula' and that the cheese on toast formula shouldn't be mocked as we have to find ways to have fun with maths. Also reported by Independent i.

Glee as story of Britain's DNA genius becomes a rap musical

The Sunday Times 18th August 2013

The life of Rosalind Franklin may become a Broadway musical thanks to a group of teenagers in California using rap and hip hop to learn. Many scientists believe that, without x-ray pictures taken by Franklin at King's College London, Francis Crick and James Watson could not have unveiled the double helix shape of human DNA. A teacher in the San Francisco Bay Area encourages the use of rap as a form of learning to inspire students who otherwise would prefer listening to music to discuss the scientific methods behind the lives of the scientists. The 'Franklin rap' has now gone viral.

The heat is on

Sunday Times 18th August 2013

An article looking at the rise in cases of skin cancer in teenagers mentions a recent King's research study. Professor Antony Young, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, co-authored the study and found that participants did not suitably protect themselves from harmful UV exposure. He said: 'The increase in malignant melanoma in young people may well be due to the rise in them taking cheap flights for short breaks.'

Two arrested over alleged assisted suicide plan

Guardian 18th August 2013

Following the news that two British people have been arrested on suspicion of encouraging or assisting suicide, Dr Daniel Sokol, Centre of Medical Law & Ethics, says that it is notoriously difficult to decide if someone is able to give informed consent.

Universities accused of discriminating against private school students

Daily Telegraph 17th August 2013

In an article looking at attempts to increase state university admissions from state schools in line with Government demands for a more socially balanced student body, King's is mentioned as an institution wanting to increase intake of state school pupils over the next five years.

How rats could point the way to a new heart attack treatment

ITV News 16th August 2013

A King's College London study has found that the heart has a supply of stem cells which can home in on damaged areas after a heart attack. The study found that cells repaired damage even if removed and re-injected in mice. Also reported by The Times, Press Association, Yahoo!, Metro London, India Vision, Deccan Chronicle and Business Standard

Panic on the streets of Birmingham? It'll take more than a terror attack

Independent 16th August 2013

A mock terror attack which took place in Birmingham city centre on 15 August 2013 involved 150 volunteers and allowed research to be undertaken by King's researchers including Brooke Rogers, Department of War Studies. This research looked at the reactions of volunteers to emergency situations and found that volunteers reacted calmly to the emergency. These findings will inform future emergency response plans. Also reported by Independent i, MailOnline, Sky News (Online), BBC News (Online), Capital FM, Times Higher Education, Yahoo! and Metro London. This story also had significant coverage in many regional media outlets.

Why you can bank on the humanities to launch a City career

City AM 16th August 2013

King’s College London is mentioned in this piece discussing the fact that an increasing number of humanities graduates are contributing to the financial sector and other ‘key City professions’ such as law. The creation of a liberal arts course at King’s is mentioned as part of a ‘mini-revival’ in the tradition of a well-rounded education.

Egypt – after the massacre

Al Jazeera 16th August 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, speaks to Al Jazeera’s Inside Story on risks of ignoring the different groups within the country. He was also interviewed by Al Jazeera on 02 September on the trial of former Egyptian President Morsi on charges of incitement to murder.

Brain "folds" may predict if drugs will help psychosis

Reuters 15th August 2013

Research led by Dr Paola Dazzan, Institute of Psychiatry, has identified neuroimaging markers in the brain which could predict whether people response to antipsychotic medication or not. She says: "We could envisage using a marker like this one to identify people who are least likely to respond to existing medications and focus our efforts on developing new medication specifically adapted to this group." Also reported by Voice of America, Reuters India, Huffington Post, Chicago Tribune.

King's press release related to 'Brain "folds" may predict if drugs will help psychosis'

Professor Allan Young

Times Higher Education 15th August 2013

Professor Allan Young has recently joined the Institute of Psychiatry to head up the new Centre for Affective Disorders - a centre of excellence focusing on mood and anxiety disorders. He said, it is essential to educate people “that there are really dire consequences for these disorders and that they are suitable for care, consideration and treatment”.

King's press release related to 'Professor Allan Young'

Apocalypse Britain: Terrifying images show Parliament wrecked by flooding and Edinburgh Castle hit by swarm of tornadoes

MailOnline 15th August 2013

A poll of 2000 people for the UK Natural Disaster Report has found that 21% were worried they would be devastated by a natural disaster and compiled a list of the top ten natural disasters people were worried about. The risks associated with this list were assessed by Dr Bruce Malamud, Department of Geography, using data from the Government's National Risk Register of Civil Emergencies. The report was released to coincide with the premiere of TV show Perfect Storms: Disasters that change the World.

Drugs and driving: Road tripping

The Economist 15th August 2013

In an article looking at the issue of drug driving, Dr Kim Wolff, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, comments on the difficulties of using data which comes from 'contributory factors' recorded by police at the scene of an incident.

Hold bad news about grades until after NSS

Times Higher Education 15th August 2013

In an article reporting tactic used by universities to improve their NSS results, Dr Duna Sabri, Department of Social Science and Public Policy, discusses the various 'gaming strategies' that emerged as a result of interviews she was conducting for a paper about the NSS. She found that some institutions were considering delaying module results to boost satisfaction.

Competition questions over rule that restricts applications to Oxbridge

Times Higher Education 15th August 2013

Students are currently required to choose between Oxford and Cambridge when applying as a result of an agreement between the two institutions that avoids competition for students once applications have been submitted. In a piece looking at whether this practice is a breach of competition law, Dr Christopher Townley, The Dicksoon Poon School of Law, said that 'competition law does have lots of implications in universities we haven't thought through'.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 15th August 2013

Professor Martin Gulliford, Health and Social Care Research, is mentioned in Times Higher Education as winning a grant towards towards a randomised controlled trial examining enhanced invitation methods to increase uptake of NHS health checks.

Liverpool Care Pathway investigated

BBC Radio 4 - The Report 15th August 2013

Irene Higginson, Health and Social Care Research, says that it was well known that families were particularly concerned about poor comunication in this report investigating why the Government has decided to scrap it's use in English NHS hospitals.

Inside Story - Egypt 'After the Massacre'

Al Jazeera 15th August 2013

Dr Carool Kersten is a panelist on a programme looking at Egypt 'After the Massacre' and asking what the risks are of ignoring the different groups within Egypt as violence continues to spike in Cairo.

Guide helps sign-off mentors assess students

Nursing Standard 14th August 2013

Sign-off mentors are now provided with information on what they should assess during the final 12 week placement at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.

India's naval ambitions

BBC World News 14th August 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, was interviewed in a report on an explosion and fire on an Indian submarine in a Mumbai dockyard, with 18 sailors feared dead.

India launches first aircraft carrier

Wall Street Journal 13th August 2013

In an article reporting the launch of India's first homegrown aircraft carrier as part of a campaign to strengthen its naval presence in regional waters, Dr Harsh Pant, King's India Institute says:'India does not want its commercial or energy trade or its dominance eclipsed by China'.

Why are patients banned from trying untested drugs that are their last hope?

Daily Mail 13th August 2013

Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi, Institute of Psychiatry, explains why patients with terminal illnesses are not allowed to take untested drugs. He says: ‘Licensed drugs have to go through rigorous trials. Even if an unlicensed drug works in some way, it might kill you in another way or cause problems.’

Apps are used to monitor health

BBC Radio 4 - Today Programme 12th August 2013

In a discussion of the potential for apps to be used in medicine, Professor Gill Rowlands GP, Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, is part of a discussion of the use of technology to monitor our health. Professor Rowlands says that these applications can have a place in medical care but that applications should be quality tested. Item begins at 2.22. Also reported by BBC News UK (Online)

Eric Holder lays out plan to reform US drugs laws and cut prison population

Telegraph (Online) 12th August 2013

A statistic from the International Centre for Prison Studies at King's College London has been quoted in this Telegraph article which discusses the fact that high numbers of prisoners in US jails can not be maintained. The International Centre for Prison Studies found that the US locks up 716 people per 100 000 of the population.

What to do if your A Level results are better than you ever dared hope?

Guardian (Online) 12th August 2013

In an article looking at the UCAS 'Adjustment' process, King's College London is mentioned as an institution not entering clearing but still considering high achieving students through adjustment.

Fake Britain - Counterfeit Equipment

BBC 1 12th August 2013

Donald Emerton, King's Imaging Technology Evaluation Centre, conducts tests on a fake dental x-ray unit for this episode of Fake Britain. He finds that these counterfeit machines emit dangerously high levels of radiation both to patients and dentists.

Why ping pong just might be the elixir of youth

Channel 4 News 12th August 2013

Dr Matthew Kempton, Institute of Psychiatry, says that table tennis has the potential to be helpful for older people with dementia in particular because it combines physical activity with spatial skills, cognition and keeping social. He says: "Previous research has shown that exercise has actually increased the volume of an area in the brain called the hippocampus,"

Laser death test can tell you when you are going to die

Huffington Post UK 11th August 2013

A laser test has been developed by scientists that can tell how long a person has left to live. Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, is quoted: 'Scientists have known for a long time that a person's weight at the time of birth is an important determinant of health in middle and old age.'Also reported in the International Business Times UK.

When Philosophy Meets Psychiatry

New York Times 11th August 2013

Dr Gareth Owen, Institute of Psychiatry, describes the Maudsley Philosophy Group. He says “We started out as a reading group for trainee psychiatrists. Then, gradually, we developed and started inviting philosophers — at first it was quite low key. We would talk about our clinical experiences and then they would relate those experiences to their way of thinking.”

Now, a 15 minute brain scan to reveal autism in adults with 90% accuracy

DNA (India) 11th August 2013

Scientists at the IoP said that the new methods could lead to autism screening for children. Dr Christine Ecker said: ‘It could help to alleviate the need for the emotional, time consuming and expensive diagnosis process which ASD patients and families currently have to endure.’

Click - Translator apps

BBC Breakfast 10th August 2013

In an item discussing the technological issues surrounding translator apps, Professor Shalom Lappin, Deparment of Philosophy, comments on the issue of voice recognition when using these apps and the other technological issues which can affect our use of languages in the digital age.

The Liverpool care pathway: a cautionary tale

BMJ 10th August 2013

Dr Katherine Sleeman, Department of Palliative Care, warns that more evidence is needed to guide policy and practice in palliative care. She says that the decision to phase out the Liverpool care pathway without independent evidence 'should serve to warn us of the dangers of the national
implementation of tools that are not properly evidence based'.

Psychiatry, drugs and the future of mental healthcare

Guardian 8th August 2013

In a letter to the Guardian, Professor David Goldberg, Institute of Psychiatry, respond to Will Self's article about psychiatric medication. He says that psychotherapy and social interventions are extremely important, but the contribution of drugs should not be so lightly dismissed.

Ambitious aims: the international push to understand and treat autism

Guardian 8th August 2013

EU-AIMS, a major collaboration between the Institute of Psychiatry, Cambridge University and four other research centres across Europe aims to scan hundreds of brains of people with autism, in the hope that it will pave the way for new treatments for autism and facilitate earlier diagnosis.

i is looking for Student Brand Ambassadors

The Independent - i 8th August 2013

i is on the lookout for self-motivated, energetic and organised Student Brand Ambassadors across selected UK university campuses including King's College London.

Flies help solve body-in-suitcase murder probes

BBC News (Online) 8th August 2013

Poulomi Bhadra, studying for an MSc in Forensic Science, has carried out research into the behaviour of flies around different types of zips as they try to feed on animal meat or blood. This develops on findings about the impact flies have on bodies by the Metropolitan Police and the Natural History Museum. Poulomi says that if a body has been disposed in a suitcase then there is question over whether flies could have access to it - the question she is investigating. Also reported by BBC Breakfast, ITV (Online), The Tribune (New Delhi), Hindustan Times (India), Independent and The Times.

Gene Patenting

BBC Radio 4 8th August 2013

Now that the US Supreme Court has ruled against the patenting of genes, a question surrounds the future of the biotech business. Stuart Hogarth, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, comments on the financial and business issues surrounding genetic research. Interview begins 22.16.

Do we really understand what makes Russia tick?

BBC Newsnight 8th August 2013

Dr Sam Greene, King's Russia Institute, comments on Putin's consolidation of power in an item discussing Russia's 'Cold War mentality', Putin's agenda and other surrounding issues. Begins 05.35.

The touch of madness, the stroke of genius

The Hindu 8th August 2013

Dr James MacCabe, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the link between mental illness and creativity.

Can cognitive behavioural therapy really change our brains?

BBC Science 7th August 2013

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, explains how CBT works, and that, for some disorders, it is as effective as medication. She says: "In the trials we've run with post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD] and social anxiety disorder, we've seen that even when people stop the therapy, they continue improving because they have new tools in place and they've made behavioural and thinking style changes."

Inside my mind

BBC Three 7th August 2013

Dr James MacCabe, Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) and PhD student Jessica McClelland, IoP, contributed to a documentary about the science of mental illness. Dr MacCabe spoke about bipolar disorder and the link with creativity. Jessica explained the differences in the brain between people with anorexia and healthy people and explained how brain stimulation may help reduce symptoms of anorexia,.

One year on from the Higgs Boson find, has physics hit the buffers?

The Guardian 7th August 2013

Professor John Ellis, Clerk Maxwell Professor of Theoretical Physics, is quoted in this article which looks at the difficulties in finding evidence for the follow up theory to the Standard Model of particle physics - known as supersymmetry. He said: "After you've run the LHC for another 10 years or more and explored lots of parameter space and you still haven't found supersymmetry at that stage, I'll probably be retired. It's often said that it's not theories that die, it's theorists that die."

The Pregnant Brain

BBC Radio 4 7th August 2013

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about antenatal depression. He says that research shows that children of mothers who are depressed during pregnancy, are more likely to have psychological problems in childhood. (Begins at 16.40)

Minnie Driver - Who do you think you are?

BBC One 7th August 2013

Professor Edgar Jones, Institute of Psychiatry, talks to Minnie Driver about her father, Ronnie, who was in the RAF and admitted to a psychiatric hospital following a traumatic experience. (Begins at 25 mins)

Chinese anger as Japan launches biggest warship since WW2

Telegraph 7th August 2013

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, comments on tensions between China and Japan as Japan launches its biggest war ship since World War Two. He says that the new vessel is not a reaction to tensions with China but a steady course towards the goal of replacing an aging fleet.

Alcohol addiction - Paul Gascoigne

Sky News 6th August 2013

Paul Gascoigne has been fined for being drunk and disorderly and common assault on a ticket collector. Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how people can recover from alcohol addiction.

Jeremy Hunt urged to set safe staffing levels after Mid Staffs scandal

The Independent (Online) 6th August 2013

A call by Campaigners on the eve of a major report into patient safety has urged that every hospital ward in England must abide by a new minimum "safe staffing level". Research from King's College London has been cited in this article by The Safe Staffing Alliance which shows that hospitals with eight patients per registered nurse saw around 20 more deaths a year than better-staffed hospitals. The article also refers to another recent study by King's which found wide variation in patient-nurse ratios at NHS hospitals, ranging from five patients per nurse to 11 patients per nurse at some hospitals.

Astronaut twins could reveal genetics of space health

New Scientist 6th August 2013

Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research, comments on the strengths and weaknesses of research using twins in relation to a NASA study which will aim to disentangle the health effects of space from those of genetics. He points out that epigenetic changes, which are due to environmental factors, can create genetic variations between identical twins' DNA sequences.

India-Pakistan talks in jeopardy as Indian soldiers killed

Reuters 6th August 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, King's India Institute, is quoted: "It is in the interest of both of these nuclear-armed countries to ratchet this down," in an article reporting the threat of derailing peace talks as a result of an alleged ambush along the disputed border in Kashmir.

India regions make 'do or die' push for states

Financial Times 5th August 2013

Dr Louise Tillin, India Institute, is quoted in this news analysis on the run up to the Indian elections. She said: "In the run-up to the parliamentary elections, there are political and electoral reasons why other statehood demands might gain traction. These issues could well be an important part of the bargaining in coalition formation after the elections."

Women and the workplace

BBC World Service Radio 5th August 2013

Dr Lucy Delap, Department of History and Institute of Contemporary British History, is interviewed on the subject of women in the workplace and the way the roles of working women and housewives have changed historically. (Interview begins: 4.05)

Neural nets and neologisms

Times Higher Education 1st August 2013

Scientists at the Institute of Psychiatry have identified how a unique pathway in the human brain allows people to learn new words.

King's press release related to 'Neural nets and neologisms'

Cell sex matters

Nature 1st August 2013

In an article looking at the differences in behaviour between male and female cells, Elizabeth Pollitzer mentions being introduced to the topic of social responsibility in science by Maurice Wilkins who was then the head of the newly created biophysics department at King's College London.

Churchill's First World War

BBC 4 1st August 2013

This drama-documentary about Winston Churchill's experiences during the Great War features Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies.

UK soldiers 'banned from pubs'

BBC Radio 4 - Today Programme 31st July 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, King's Centre for Military Health Research, discusses public attitudes to the armed forces. He says that the public are generally able to differentiate between support for personnel in the Armed Forces and support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. (Begins at 2:33:00). Also reported by BBC News online

Are vitamin supplements really the answer to our health prayers?

Metro UK 31st July 2013

In an article about the use of vitamin supplements there is mention of research at King's, which found that Vitamin D has the potential to significantly reduce the symptoms of asthma. Also reported by Daily Express.

What new Telangana state means for India

BBC News (Online) 31st July 2013

Dr Louise Tillin, India Institute, writes about the implications of forming a new state of Telangana in India. She said: 'The creation of Telangana has been prompted by short-term electoral manoeuvres. But it reflects longer term histories of political decentralisation and economic change.'

Academic breaks down as he tearfully apologises to parents of schoolgirl who died after taking ecstasy at unsupervised house party

Daily Mail 31st July 2013

Professor Robin Braithwaite, Department of Forensic Science, commented on the case of Isobel Jones-Reilly, who died after taking ecstasy. He said: 'It may have been possible that she would have survived had help been summoned earlier when her temperature was not quite so high and she was unwell.'

Nurses forced to ration care

BBC News (Online) 30th July 2013

Nurses in England are having to 'ration' care because of time pressures, according to research by the National Nursing Research Unit (NNRU) in the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery at King's. Jane Ball, Deputy Director of the NNRU, said: 'Our findings raise difficult questions for hospitals in a climate where many are looking to reduce not increase ”their expenditure on nurse staffing.' Also reported by Independent, Guardian, The Times, Daily Telegraph, ITV News, Daily Mail, Metro, Daily Express, Daily Mirror, Evening Standard, Nursing Times, BBC Radio 4, The Sunday Times and Sky News.

King's press release related to 'Nurses forced to ration care'

Cyber crime - a bigger threat than nuclear attack?

Channel 4 News (Online) 30th July 2013

A new report by the Home Affairs Select Committee warns that the threat to national security from cyber attacks is 'real and growing'. On comparisons between cyber attacks and nuclear attacks, Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: 'If you look at the potential damage there is no comparison to a nuclear attack. The worst case wouldn't remotely come close to a nuclear attack.'

West needs to criticise Putin but not support his rivals

Financial Times 28th July 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, writes that the West needs to criticise Putin but not pick sides in Russia's political battles. He said: 'We should not allow a blind hatred of Mr Putin to lead us into a blind support for any opposition to him.'

Iain Macleod and the British Empire

BBC Radio 4 28th July 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about the role of Conservative politician Iain Macleod in bringing the rule of the British Empire to an end. Interview begins at 30.10.

Mentally ill hit 'twice as hard' by unemployment

The Times 27th July 2013

New research led by Dr Sara Evans-Lacko, Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) finds that following the recession, unemployment has hit mental health issues twice as hard as people without. Dr Evans-Lacko said: "This is the first study to show that the European economic crisis has had a profound impact on people with mental health problems, compared to those without.' Also reported by BBC News, i (the paper for today), The Daily Express, The Scotsman, ITV News online, Huffington Post (UK), Evening Standard, El Mundo (Spain) and BBC News Indonesia.

King's press release related to 'Mentally ill hit 'twice as hard' by unemployment'

Open day at King's College shows Rosalind Franklin's DNA discovery

Evening Standard 26th July 2013

Coverage of the Photo 51 exhibition at King's Cultural Institute. Referring to a special family open day at Somerset House East Wing, Dr Richard Wingate, MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, said: 'It's an event for families so they can meet neuroscientists and learn about the structure of DNA which is one of the most exciting discoveries of the last century.'

From MRI scans to microphotography: The beautiful medical images that transform the beating heart into an award-winning work of art

Daily Mail 26th July 2013

Dr Andrew Cobb, Cardiovascular Division, was 'highly commended' by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) for his heart-shaped image of a nucleus from a single vascular smooth muscle cell. The image was entered into the BHF's 'Reflections of Research' competition.

King's press release related to 'From MRI scans to microphotography: The beautiful medical images that transform the beating heart into an award-winning work of art'

GCSE results 'influenced by children's genes, not teaching'

Daily Telegraph 25th July 2013

Research led by Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, shows that inherited intelligence may account for almost 60 per cent of teenagers' scores in GCSEs while other factors such as school performance only sway results by a third. Prof Plomin says: "If we can read their DNA, we can tailor the teaching to help a kid with learning difficulties." Also reported in the Evening Standard and the Daily Mail. Prof Plomin was interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC Radio 4 (The World Tonight)

Google Doodle celebrates 93rd birthday of DNA scientist Rosalind Franklin

The Independent 25th July 2013

Google has commemorated the 93rd birthday of King's DNA scientist Rosalind Franklin with a personalised 'doodle'. Also reported by the Guardian.

King's press release related to 'Google Doodle celebrates 93rd birthday of DNA scientist Rosalind Franklin '

Cornwall fish can survive high contaminated waters

ITV News (Online) 25th July 2013

Trout in the River Hayle in Cornwall can survive in highly contaminated waters that would otherwise be lethal to other fish, according to King's research.

King's press release related to 'Cornwall fish can survive high contaminated waters'

What's in a name? Naming Baby Cambridge

History & Policy 24th July 2013

Matthew Glencross, a PhD student of the Institute of Contemporary British History, considers the historical significance of baby names apparently being considered by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

iPad generation will learn fewer words

Daily Mail 23rd July 2013

Research led by Dr Marco Catani, Institute of Psychiatry, shows that hearing sound and then verbally imitating speech was key to understanding.He said: The brain is wired to learn sound through auditory processes, not visual. That is why we have oral traditions, with knowledge passed from generation to generation.' Also reported in the Daily Telegraph.

King's press release related to 'iPad generation will learn fewer words'

For those with mental health problems, exercise can be more effective than antidepressants

Daily Mail 23rd July 2013

Dr Sandrine Thuret, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on whether exercise can help overcome depression. She says: 'People with depression often have low levels of new brain cells, so we think this is one way exercise can help.'

Embryonic stem cells could help restore sight to blind

Guardian 22nd July 2013

Scientists have shown that light-sensitive retinal cells, grown in the lab from stem cells, can successfully integrate into the eye when implanted into blind mice. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, said that the work was an important step but that it was only a small step on a long road to clinical trials and eventually therapeutic use in humans.

London tops university crime risk rankings

BBC News (Online) 22nd July 2013

London universities topped a ranking of local crime rates around universities in England and Wales. King's issued a statement, widely reported in the national media, which noted that the Complete University Guide tables list reported incidents within three miles of the College's central London campus, including the major tansport hubs of Waterloo and London Bridge. The rankings were also reported by The Independent, Huffington Post, The Times and Daily Mail. In the Guardian, a King's student highlighted flaws in how the data is collected and raised concerns that students could be misled by the rankings.

Nye Bevin and the NHS

BBC Radio 4 21st July 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about Nye Bevin and his impact on UK politics. Bevin is credited as being the chief architect of the NHS. Interview begins at 30.20.

The Forum: Survival at Sea

BBC World Service 21st July 2013

Professor Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how we cope with disaster and adversity. He suggests that suggests that your attitudes to your family and wider community also play a crucial role in how we cope.

Why is killer diesel still poisoning our air?

The Daily Telegraph 20th July 2013

Article on the dangers of air pollution from diesel vehicles, which draws on research by the Environmental Research Group at King's.

Eczema primes children for food allergies

The Daily Telegraph 19th July 2013

Eczema may play a key role in the development of food allergy in infants, according to researchers at King's. Their study has shown that eczema causes the barrier formed by the skin to breakdown, exposing the young immune system to allergens from foods like peanuts and cow’s milk. Dr Carsten Flohr, Senior Lecturer at King's, said: 'We thought that food allergies are triggered from the inside out but our work shows that in some children it could be from the outside in, via the skin.'

King's press release related to 'Eczema primes children for food allergies'

Social services for vulnerable children in England to be privatised

Guardian 19th July 2013

Academics from King's have found limited evidence for relocating public services for children in out-of-home care to the private sector, following the evaluation of pilots in six areas.

Prejudice towards regional accents

BBC Newcastle 19th July 2013

Dr Julia Snell, Department of Education and Professional Studies, was interviewed about prejudice surrounding regional accents following a complaint from journalist Steph McGovern at the BBC. Interview starts at 2.36.25. Dr Snell was also interviewed on BBC Radio Leeds.

Alcohol deaths in young women show 'worrying rise'

BBC News 19th July 2013

Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry (IoP), comments on a new report about the rise of alcohol related deaths in women. She was also interviewed on Channel 5 News, BBC Radio 4 Today programme, BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Radio 2 (Jeremy Vine), ITV News. Professor Colin Drummond (IoP) was interviewed by BBC News - The World Tonight.

Beneath the white coat: the radical science movement

Guardian 18th July 2013

Feature on the Science for the People movement of the 1970's noting that Professor Maurice Wilkins of King's College London was one it's early supporters and opened the inaugural meeting of the British Society for Social Responsibility in Science (BSSRS).

Liberal arts, British style

Times Higher Education 18th July 2013

Dr Aaron Rosen, Theology & Religious Studies, discusses a recent report by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which has made a new case for the US' 200-year-old model of liberal arts education. Dr Rosen notes that in the UK, liberal arts degrees have sprung up at many universities, including King's.

End-of-life care scheme axed because of poor record

New Scientist 18th July 2013

Palliative care researchers from King's Cicely Saunders Institute respond to the Liverpool Care Pathway review, which recommended that the Pathway should be phased out and replaced by individual end of life care plans. Dr Katherine Sleeman welcomed the call for greater resources: 'In 2010, the UK National Cancer Research Institute spent £508 million on research, but only around 0.24 per cent of it on palliative and end-of-life care. That equates to just 31 pence for every £100 spent on research.' Dr Felicity Murtagh is also quoted.

King's press release related to 'End-of-life care scheme axed because of poor record'

Background still matters in too many cases

Prospect 18th July 2013

David Willetts writes that King's medical school provides 'a striking example of the sort of creative thinking that can make a difference', in relation to university admissions. King's medical school admits 50 students a year from state schools in the city's poorest boroughs with three Bs at A Level, writes David Willetts.

Wild beaver spotted in England for first time in 800 years

The Independent 18th July 2013

The first wild beaver living in England for more than 800 years is believed to have been spotted in Devon. The article refers to a Natural England report that was co-authored by Professor David Demerritt, Department of Geography,and Professor Angela Gurnell, previously of King's.

Was 1978 really the best year in Britain? What is your favourite year?

Metro UK 17th July 2013

Professor Richard Roberts, Institute of Contemporary British History, said he was 'a bit suprised that 1978 came out on top' in research that assessed the best year for Britain in terms of social and environmental prosperity, as well as financial growth. He said: 'In terms of financial or economic history, the period between 1973 and 1982 is one of huge turmoil: huge currency turmoil, huge interest rate turmoil, huge amount of inflation.'

Letter to Malala

Channel 4 News 17th July 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, comments on the news that Malala Yousafzai, victim of a shooting by the Taliban, has received a letter from a senior commander of the Pakistani Taliban expressing regret at the incident. He said the letter indicates that the commander 'obviously feels he has a case to answer' to the Pakistani people. Professor Lieven was also interviewed by CNN.

Air pollution kills over 2 million people each year

New Scientist 16th July 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group, commented on figures which suggest that air pollution kills more than two million people each year. He said: 'These shocking figures are so high because many of these deaths occur in Asia, where population numbers are high and where air pollution has increased markedly in recent years.'

Crisis in the NHS

BBC Radio Five Live 16th July 2013

Jane Ball, Nursing, was interviewed about high death rates in 14 hospitals in England. She discussed research at King's National Nursing Research Unit looking at the workload of nurses. Item begins at 2.06.30.

Supplements fingered in sprinters' positive dope tests

New Scientist 15th July 2013

Professor David Cowan, Head of the Drug Control Centre at King's, says it is 'definitely feasible' that Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell inadvertently doped, after both failed drug tests.

Cyber security

BBC Radio 4 15th July 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, downplayed the threat of cyber attacks in an interview on The World At One. He said that use of the word 'warfare' is inaccurate because there has never been a casualty as a result of a cyber attack. Interview begins at 40.45.

We should mock our politicans only after we've examined their policies

Guardian 14th July 2013

Article refers to research by King's and Ipsos MORI, which highlights misconceptions among the British public on key social policy issues. Tanya Gold writes: 'The results expose our self-deceit, and the dystopia we have created in our minds.'

The amazing story of IVF: 35 years and five million babies later

Guardian 12th July 2013

Professor Peter Braude, head of the Department of Women's Heath, comments on the birthday of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, who is 35 this month. He said: 'If you talk to people today about human reproductive cloning, the feeling you get that it is playing God is just how it was in 1978 with IVF.'

DNA breakthrough could transform gene therapy

The Independent 11th July 2013

King's College London's role in the discovery of the structure of DNA is mentioned in an article about a breakthrough in gene therapy research.

Platform for science

Times Higher Education 11th July 2013

A £12 million science gallery is set to open at King's, which will bring together science and the arts at its Guy’s campus in London Bridge in 2015. 'The Science Gallery at King’s College London will give us a completely new way to engage audiences with science, art and innovation,' said Daniel Glaser, the gallery’s director.

King's press release related to 'Platform for science'

UK forces in Helmand 'made matters worse', says report

The Guardian 10th July 2013

The Taliban will try to ‘retake’ the Afghan province of Helmand once foreign forces withdraw at the end of 2014, according to a study by academics from the Department of War Studies - Professor Theo Farrell and Dr Antonio Giustozzi. Professor Farrell was also interviewed by BBC Radio 4.

Night workers risk miscarriages

Daily Express 10th July 2013

Dr Susan Bewley, Maternal Fetal Medicine, and reseachers at Princess Anne Hospital conducted a study which concluded that women who work night shifts are 80 per cent more likely to have fertility problems including the risk of a miscarriage than those doing regular hours. This was also reported by Press Association.

The Truth About Personality

BBC Two 10th July 2013

BBC's Horizon programme visited King's Department of Twin Research, where they interviewed Professor Tim Spector about the interplay between nature and nurture in the creation of personality. Item begins at 36.50.

Scientists unlock secrets of ageing

Metro 9th July 2013

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research, commented on the finding that key metabolites in blood, which are chemical 'fingerprints' left behind after molecular changes before birth or in infancy, can provide the vital clues to a person's long-term overall health and rate of ageing in later life. He said that the discovery was 'very significant and exciting'. This appeared on the front page of the Metro and the Daily Express, as well as being reported by Press Association and New Scientist.

Protecting Children

The Daily Telegraph 9th July 2013

Stephen Gilmore, Child and Family Law at King's College London, writes about the Children and Families Bill. He wrote that without parliament's intervention, the wrongness of this decision will, sadly, be demonstrated by the death of a child.

Amazon brain injury 'made sniper embellish memories'

The Times 9th July 2013

Professor Gisli Gudjonsson, Institute of Psychiatry, gave evidence for the defence in a case against an SAS soldier accused of possessing a pistol and ammunition. He said, 'In view of his brain injury and in view of his memory problems, including confabulation, extreme caution should be exercised in relying upon accounts that he gives.'

Survey into public perception

BBC News 9th July 2013

A new survey by Ipsos MORI for the Royal Statistical Society and King's highlights how wrong the British public can be on the make-up of the population and the scale of key social policy issues, including teenage pregnancy, crime and religion. Bobby Duffy, Managing Director, Ipsos MORI Social Research Institute and Visiting Senior Research Fellow, King's, said the scale of people's misconceptions is 'surprising'. This was also reported in the Guardian, the Independent, Financial Times, Channel 4, BBC Radio 4 and Huffington Post.

King's press release related to 'Survey into public perception'

Putting students centre stage: how experience and engagement differ

The Guardian 9th July 2013

Professor Paul Blackmore, King's Learning Institute, spoke at a roundtable, held by the Guardian in association with the Higher Education Academy (HEA), that discussed the implications for institutions of the government's policy aims to switch the focus of higher education towards teaching and learning, rather than research.

Universities urged to back maths schools

BBC News 9th July 2013

An article reporting Education Minister, Elizabeth Truss's suggestion that universities follow the example of King's College London by opening maths free schools. Also reported by Press Association, Independent and Daily Telegraph.

Protecting children

The Daily Telegraph 9th July 2013

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, Stephen Gilmore, Senior Lecturer in Child and Family Law, wrote that 'Parliament must urgently consider an amendment' to The Children and Families Bill, which, in its current form, 'means local authorities cannot obtain supervision orders to make checks on children's welfare.'

As a political force Englishness is on the rise and Labour mustn't forget it

The Guardian 8th July 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about how Labour ought to deal with the issue of Scottish nationalism and concerns about immigration.

Pollutionwatch: Rising smoke and falling particles

The Guardian 8th July 2013

An article about a fire in Smethwick mentions scientists at King's College London and Public Health England who have tracked smoke from major fires, including those at construction sites, warehouses, waste depots and the August 2010 riots in London.

Envy

esonance 8th July 2013

Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology and Religious Studies, has commented on the issue of envy for this radio interview.

Envy

Resonance 104.4 FM - The Thred 8th July 2013

Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology and Religious Studies, comments on the issue of envy in this radio interview.

Third of children think of suicide by 16

SkyNews 5th July 2013

Professor Emily Simonoff, Institute of Psychiatry, was interviewed on SkyNews commenting on new research into child and adolescent mental health. She said it's important to recognise the difference between 'normal' teenage moods, and long-lasting periods of depression.

Las Vegas rules don't apply in Syria

New Statesman 5th July 2013

Dr John Bew, War Studies, writes about whether the West is able to prevent conflict in Syria and discusses the politics of intervention. He said: 'The current debate about Syria is stalked by
the ghosts of more recent history, from Bosnia to Afghanistan to Iraq to Libya.'

Research in brief

Guardian 5th July 2013

In collaboration with UCL and Imperial College London, King's has found that long term cannabis users tend to produce less dopamine, a chemical in the brain linked to motivation.

Girls 'beat boys' in skills-based science subjects

BBC News 5th July 2013

An article reporting that girls out-perform boys in STEM subjects quotes Mehreen Rana, a student who is soon to study computer science at King's. She said: 'I hope more girls will follow in my footsteps and realise studying a Stem-related subject at school, college and university could be right for them too.'

Maths to 18 for all

Daily Telegraph 4th July 2013

A new report argues that all young people should continue to study maths at least until they are 18 because the GCSE curriculum fails to give them the practical skills they need in the modern workplace. Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Education & Professional Studies, said: 'Our review suggests there are significant features of workplace mathematics not generally reflected in school mathematics.' This was reported by Press Association, The Times, Daily Express, Daily Telegraph, Independent, Evening Standard and Huffington Post UK.

Liver grown in lab raises hope

Daily Mail 4th July 2013

Dr Dusko Illic, Stem Cell Science, comments on news that Japanese scientists have grown a tiny liver. He said: 'The strategy is very promising and a huge step forward.' Also reported by the Independent, Metro, BBC News and Huffington Post.

The art of teaching them to love science

Independent 4th July 2013

An article on engaging students in sciences mentions King's involvement in Enterprising Science, the largest UK-wide science learning programme of its kind.

Unrest in Egypt

BBC Radio 4 4th July 2013

Dr Ami Abou-Bakr, Political Economy, discussed the political chaos in Egypt on the Today programme. She said: 'I think this is a continuation of the revolution that started in 2011.' Dr Abou-Bakr also spoke to BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC News Channel, Sky News and Channel 5 News.

Suncreen

BBC Radio 4 4th July 2013

Dr Paul Long, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, and Professor Antony Young, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, discussed how the secrets of the natural world can be applied in contemporary science. Dr Long said: 'I saw that coral was exposed to the sunlight in the same way I am and I was burning. What was stopping the coral from burning as well?'

Smoking weed blunts brain

Times of India 3rd July 2013

A study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Imperial College and UCL found that dopamine levels in a part of the brain called the striatum were lower in people who smoke more cannabis and those who began taking the drug at a younger age. Also reported in the Deccan Herald

Some forms of IVF linked to risk of autism, mental disability

Reuters 3rd July 2013

New research led by the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) finds that IVF treatments for male infertility are associated with an increased risk of autism and intellectual disability. Autism and intellectual disability remain a rare outcome for IVF and most children born following IVF will be born perfectly healthy but the study provides important information for parent and clinicians on the relative risks of modern IVF treatments. Dr Avi Reichenberg (IoP) says: "The exact mechanism is unclear, but there are a number of risk factors, from selection of IVF procedures, to multiple embryos, and to preterm birth." Also reported by the Independent, the Daily Telegraph, the Daily Mail, the Guardian, ITV News, Agence France Presse, Press Association, The Times, The Sun, CNN, Bloomberg, HealthDay News, France24, The Australian, Yahoo News, Huffington Post, Times of India, Fox News, Xinhua (China), EFE (Spain)

King's press release related to ' Some forms of IVF linked to risk of autism, mental disability'

Map of deep brain surface hints at ADHD risk among premature babies

Los Angeles Times 3rd July 2013

Dr Chiara Nosarti, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which suggests that subtle surface deformities in a deep brain region vital for movement and learning are linked to risks of ADHD among premature infants. She said the approach was novel and could offer additional insights into mood disorders and psychosis among adolescents.

Gallery to show art of science

Evening Standard 3rd July 2013

King's has received £7 mililon funding to develop a free science gallery at Guy's Campus, which aims to showcase the fusion of art and science.

Avatar therapy for schizophrenia

BBC Radio 4 - Today 2nd July 2013

Professor Tom Craig, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses how avatar therapy for schizophrenia works, and what his new trial will involve. (Begins 1:43:00)

King's press release related to 'Avatar therapy for schizophrenia'

Hidden epidemic of the allergy that can even be triggered by roadworks

Daily Mail 2nd July 2013

Professor Jonathan Brostoff, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on how people allergic to latex may also experience a reaction from certain foods. He said: 'The body mistakes proteins in fruits and vegetables for the proteins in latex and mounts an allergic response.'

Are men LESS into sex than they realise?

Daily Mail 2nd July 2013

An article about the differences between men and women's interest in sex mentions research by King's which questioned 2000 female twins on the subject.

Gap year kids are not the new face of the Imperial Raj

The Times 29th June 2013

Philosophy student Kathryn Nave has won The London Library/The Times Student Prize 2013. She argues that gap-year students should not be compared to colonialists: 'Even the most hedonistic, alcohol-fuelled travel plans rarely involve the aspiration of taking control of a country.'

Soldiers' rights ruling may mean more drones

Daily Telegraph 29th June 2013

Professor Christopher Dandeker, War Studies, commented on a ruling that would allow families of soldiers killed overseas to sue the government for negligence. He said the government 'may well wish to alter the balance between technology and people.'

False dreams of uniting Europe

Sunday Times 29th June 2013

A review of 'The Restoration of Rome' by Professor Peter Heather, History.

PM says thank you to British Troops

Channel 4 News 29th June 2013

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, comments on the possibility of the West corresponding with the Taliban. He said: 'In many ways negotiations are a bit like a public relations exercise.'

National Teaching Fellows 2013

Guardian 28th June 2013

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) has announced that 55 higher education staff have been awarded National Teaching Fellowships. The Guardian reports that Professor Paul Blackmore, King's Learning Institute, and Professor Mark Woolford, Dental Institute, have each been awarded a Fellowship.

Pete Townshend, Johnny Marr and other stars on favourite Glastonbury memories

The Times 27th June 2013

Deborah Bull, King's Cultural Institute, commented on her memories of Glastonbury Festival. She said: 'The moment that really sticks in my mind is the first time I went, in 2003. I was taken to the top of the site, beyond the stone circle. I turned around and, spread out before me, in the middle of the black English countryside, was this incredible circus of light.'

Sunscreen pill could be available within five years, scientists say

Guardian 27th June 2013

Scientists at King’s have uncovered the unique way coral shields itself against harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, and believe the discovery could pave the way for a sunscreen revolution with a tablet that protects both skin and eyes. Dr Paul Long, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, said: ‘What we have found is that the algae living within the coral makes a compound and we are very close to being able to reproduce this compound in the lab.’

Police warned about rising risk of false confessions

Guardian 27th June 2013

Professor Gisli Gudjonsson, Institute of Psychiatry, said false confessions were a significant phenomenon of which the criminal justice system should be more aware. He said: ‘Among people who are repeatedly arrested and actively involved in crime, a high proportion claim to have made a false confession.’

Intensity of Brazilian protests waning

Bloomberg 27th June 2013

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, discusses the ongoing protests in Brazil, the government's response to the unrest and the economic impact on the nation.

South Asia's Boiling Cauldron

The Tribune (India) 27th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes an opinion piece following a Taliban attack in Afghanistan one week after the organisation opened an office in Qatar to pursue talks with the United States on a political solution to the conflict.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 26th June 2013

An article on various grant winners mentions Professor Guy Cook, Education & Professional Studies, who has been awarded £250,000 for his project People, products, pets and pests with Alison Sealey from the University of Birmingham.

The characters of a dynasty

Times Higher Education 26th June 2013

Dr Jennifer Altehenger, History, reviews 'The Lius of Shanghai' by Sherman Cochran and Andrew Hsieh.

A clockwork universe unboxed

Times Higher Education 26th June 2013

Dr Lucy Wooding, History, reviews, 'Women and the Bible in Early Modern England: Religious Reading and Writing' by Femke Molekamp.

Carers walk the cancer journey with patients but need more support'

Guardian 26th June 2013

Professor Emma Ream, Nursing & Midwifery, comments on the need for support for the carers of cancer patients. She said: 'Research into the needs of carers of people undergoing chemotherapy has been neglected. We found there's a lot of anxiety among carers and a lack of confidence about what is normal and what isn't. Insufficient knowledge of chemotherapy side effects can result in life-threatening delays in seeking help when symptoms arise.'

Stephen Lawrence inquiry

Sky News 26th June 2013

Professor Ben Bowling, Law, has commented on the recent news that police officers undermined the family of Stephen Lawrence during the investigation of his murder. Professor Bowling also spoke to BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio London and LBC.

Crime in the Armed Forces

BBC Radio 4 - Thinking Allowed 26th June 2013

Dr Deirdre MacManus, Institute of Psychiatry, joins a discussion on crime in the armed forces and talks about her recent study on the relationship between combat experience and violent crime amongst British soldiers returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan. (Begins at 21.38)

The hi-tech kits turning us into superhumans

Metro UK 25th June 2013

Professor Nikolas Rose, Head of the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, comments on the future of neural implants. He said: 'These implants involve the implantation of electrodes deep into different areas of the brain and the application of small electrical currents. However, it's rather unproven and not at all clear how it works.' He added: 'There is also a strong social, ethical and safety argument regarding their use.'

A tale of two BJPs

Indian Express 25th June 2013

Professor Christophe Jaffrelot, India Institute, writes an opinion piece on the tensions between Hindu nationalism and moderation in the BJP party.

End-of-life care in focus

BBC Radio 2 24th June 2013

Dr Rob George, Professor of Palliative Care, Cicely Saunders Institute, was interviewed about end-of-life care following reports that Nelson Mandela's condition in hospital is 'critical'. He said dying is a 'social event, not just a biological one', adding that 'goodbyes and thankyous are central to the experience of the person who is dying and the people left behind.' Item begins at 7.30.

You can't teach history without imagination

The Daily Telegraph 24th June 2013

Dr Eliza Filby, History, writes that academics should welcome Michael Gove's new history curriculum, including the greater emphasis on global history and the idea of dedicating more time to medieval period. According to Dr Filby 'Gove has been listening to teachers and historians more intently than reports suggest.'

Oxford carbon emissions tested

BBC News (Online) 23rd June 2013

Researchers from King's are carrying out carbon emission tests in Oxford in a bit to cut pollution. Max Priestman, from the Environmental Research Group, said: 'The measurements give us exact detail of the origin of pollutants. We've seen in recent years reductions in the concentration of some pollutants, but others haven't reduced as fast as expected. The instruments measure up to 2,000 vehicles a day giving a broad outlook on the nature of pollution in Oxford.'

Kerry under pressure ahead of New Delhi visit

Wall Street Journal 23rd June 2013

News report on John Kerry's visit to India quoting Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies: 'There is a danger that stagnancy might become the dominant narrative of the relationship.'

The mental illness taboo is a problem for all of us

New Scientist 21st June 2013

In an editorial for New Scientist, Professor Graham Thornicroft and Dr Diana Rose, Institute of Psychiatry, discuss how stigma and discrimination have long been major barriers to people with mental illness.

Taliban 'impossible to eradicate'

BBC Radio 4 21st June 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, speaks on the Today programme about US plans to open discussion with the Taliban. He said: 'What has been demonstrated over the years and this has been recognised by the US military is that while the Taliban can be contained, it is impossible to eradicate them.' Professor Lieven also wrote an article on the US-Taliban talks for the International Herald Tribune.

Police oversight

The Times 20th June 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, wrote about the removal from office of the Chief Constable of Gwent by the Police and Crime Commissioner, which he said raises profound constitutional issues.

Babies given antibiotics before they're one 'are more prone to eczema': Drugs increase risk by 40%

Daily Mail 20th June 2013

Use of antibiotics in early life may increase the risk of developing eczema by up to 40 per cent, according to research led by Dr Carsten Flohr, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas'. Dr Flohr said some previous studies had implied a link, but this was the first systematic large-scale review. Also reported by Press Association, Independent, Daily Express and Daily Star.

King's press release related to 'Babies given antibiotics before they're one 'are more prone to eczema': Drugs increase risk by 40%'

Remembering the future in a land of forgotten dreams

Times Higher Education 20th June 2013

Dr Aaron Rosen, Theology & Religious Studies, reviews the V&A's new exhibition, 'Memory Palace'.

US talks with the Taliban

ITV 1 20th June 2013

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, was interviewed about peace talks between the US and the Taliban. He said both sides accept that military victory is out of the question. Interview begins at 14.05.

Wagner and Verdi: A harmony of opposites

Guardian 20th June 2013

Professor Roger Parker, Music, writes about the 'twin giants of 19th-century opera', Wagner and Verdi, ahead of this year's Glyndebourne Festival.

Dealing with Russia

New York Times 20th June 2013

Denis Corboy, War Studies, writes about the West’s interactions with Russia in an op-ed with William Courtney and Michael Hatzel. He said: ‘Western leaders have been largely silent while President Vladimir Putin unleashes a campaign of police-state tactics against Russians who voice opposition to him. Yet by emphasizing human rights, the West can inspire those in Russia who seek more freedom, without putting at risk most other important goals with Russia.’

Kerry's brief to reboot India relations

Wall Street Journal 20th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes about the forthcoming visit of US Secretary of State, John Kerry, to New Delhi for the fourth round of the US-India Strategic Dialogue.

Universities urged to sponsor free schools specialising in maths

Guardian 19th June 2013

Universities are being urged by the government to sponsor new free schools specialising in mathematics to encourage talented students from disadvantaged backgrounds to study maths at degree level. There is mention of King's plans for the King's College London Mathematics School, expected to open in September 2014.

Ballet dancer David Wall dies

BBC Radio 4 19th June 2013

Deborah Bull, Director, Cultural Partnerships, was interviewed about the death of ballet dancer David Wall. Discussing David's impact on the world of ballet, Deborah said: 'When David was dancing in the 1960s, that was when it really grew up.. the first time there was this coterie of male principals and David was at the forefront of that.' Interview begins at 2.28.28.

Obama speech in Berlin

Al Jazeera English 19th June 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about Barack Obama's speech in Berlin. He said it was 'dangerous' to try to emulate John F Kennedy's historic speech in Berlin 50 years ago, adding that Obama 'came up short' in comparison.

King's principal to take over at Exeter College

Times Higher Education 19th June 2013

Professor Sir Rick Trainor will become rector of Exeter College, Oxford, when he steps down as Principal of King's next year. He said: 'I am thrilled and honoured to join Exeter's students and fellows at such a pivotal point in the college's history.'

Chances of success in Taliban talks are 'remote’, says report

The Daily Telegraph 19th June 2013

Coinciding with US-Taliban talks in Doha, the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), has published a report which says the chances of the talks proving successful are 'remote'. Dr John Bew, lead author of the report, said: 'The whole process has been too secretive, when we should have been open about talks and clear leadership should have been provided. Like the whole campaign, it wasn’t clear why we were doing what we were doing.'

Obama speech in Berlin

Al Jazeera 19th June 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about Barack Obama's speech in Berlin. He said it was 'dangerous' to try to emulate John F Kennedy's historic speech in Berlin 50 years ago, adding that Obama 'came up short' in comparison.

Two masters for the price of one

Guardian 18th June 2013

Article about universities in the UK joining with others across the world to provide joint masters courses. There is mention of King's partnership with Georgetown University in Washington DC to offer an MA in global, international and comparative history. According to Christopher Payne, Head of King's US office, the course allows King's to offer something extra by combining its world-class expertise in British, Euriopean and imperial history with Georgetown's strong reputation for Middle Eastern, Eastern European, south-east Asian and American history.

Don't expect robots to do it all for you - or steal your jobs

The Times 18th June 2013

Min Li, a PhD candidate in the Department of Informatics, was interviewed about her research into a 'robot assistant' for surgeons.

US talks with the Taliban

BBC Newsnight 18th June 2013

Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, War Studies, was interviewed about discussions between political representatives of the Taliban and Afghan and US officials in Doha. Dr Chaudhuri said this is just the beginning of a lengthy dialogue process and that although the talks will only involve a small faction of the Taliban, it is an 'important faction'. Interview begins at 7.06.

Ambivalence towards Tel Aviv will cost New Delhi

DNA (India) 18th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, discusses a recent report released by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills suggesting that Israel has exported military equipment including hi-tech gear used in fighter jets over the past five years to Pakistan.

An intelligence expert's view on The Americans

Guardian 17th June 2013

Dr Michael Goodman, War Studies, provides an intelligence expert's view on TV series 'The Americans.' He said: 'This series about a pair of Russian spies posing as an American couple in Washington DC in the 1980s has some basis in reality, but it has been over-dramatised for TV.'

Religion and politics

BBC Radio 4 17th June 2013

Dr Eliza Filby, History, was interviewed about the Christian values of Margaret Thatcher and the role of religion in politics.

Intelligence leaks

Al Jazeera English 17th June 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about intelligence leaks and recent incidents of 'whistleblowing'.

Twins - celebrating 21 years of genetic research

BBC One 17th June 2013

The One Show reports on the 21st Birthday of the Department of Twin Research at King's. Includes an interview with Professor Tim Spector, Director of Twins UK. Item begins at 0.55.

New Delhi Rebalancing Defence Relationships

The Japan Times 17th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, discusses America’s ‘pivot’ to the Asia-Pacific. He said: ‘Much of this pivot to the Asia-Pacific continues and expands policies already undertaken by previous administrations, as well as earlier in President Barack Obama’s term.’

Intelligence leaks

Al Jazeera 17th June 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about intelligence leaks and recent incidents of 'whistleblowing'.

Big data meets the Bard

Financial Times 15th June 2013

In an article about the digitisation of literary essays and books, Andrew Prescott, Head of Digital Humanities, is quoted: 'There are hundreds of digital projects in the humanities taking place.' He added that the emerging field is 'best understood as an umbrella term covering a wide range of activities, from online preservation and digital mapping to data mining.'

The Persian Puzzle

Business Standard (India) 15th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, arguesthat Indian policy-makers will hope for the return of stability and moderation to Iran, especially with regard to the nuclear question, after the presidential elections.

Mental health issues linked to cannabis increase by half in four years

Daily Telegraph 13th June 2013

Figures released to MPs show that the number of hospital admission for mental or behavioural issues due to cannabis rose from 651 in 2008/09 to 1,003 in 2011/12. In 2008, research by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London suggested a direct link between skunk and the development of mental illness.

Student work experience 'essential'

Press Association 13th June 2013

King's is named among leading universities at which students had the highest success rates when applying for jobs. Also reported by Huffington Post and MSN UK.

DNA discovery could have been earlier if not for 'mistaken decision' by Rosalind Franklin

The Daily Telegraph 13th June 2013

King's is mentioned in an article about the discovery of the structure of DNA.

How private care firms have got away with breaking the law on pay

Guardian 13th June 2013

In an article about the care industry there is mention of research carried out by King's Social Care Workforce Research Unit in 2011, which estimated that there were between 150,000 and 220,000 care workers being paid below the minimum wage.

Japanese lessons on dementia

Guardian 12th June 2013

Dr Mayumi Hayashi, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, writes about the Japanese approach to dementia care and what British policy-makers can learn from the country.

NSA leaks

Guardian 12th June 2013

Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, writes about internet surveillance and how to make it both ethical and effective. Professor Omand sets out six principles for intelligence agencies.

Author Chibundu Onuzo: 'Don't let anyone tell you that you're too young to contribute'

The Daily Telegraph 12th June 2013

Interview with Chibundu Onuzo, a King's alumna, who became the youngest female to sign to publishers Faber & Faber at 19, and released her first book, 'The Spider King's Daughter' at 21.

GM diet 'can lead to disease in pigs'

Daily Mail 12th June 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, commented on a study into the effects of GM crops on pigs. He said: 'There were no differences in growth and mortality rates and pigs appeared in similar health.'

Sunnis and Shias - the key questions

Channel 4 News (Online) 12th June 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on the religious divide at the heart of Syria's civil war. He said: 'There was a schism very early on [between Sunni and Shia Muslims] and theological differences developed from this.'

Britain takes security gamble with Northern Ireland G8

Reuters UK 11th June 2013

Dr John Bew, War Studies, commented on Prime Minister David Cameron's decision to hold the G8 meeting in North Ireland next week. He said: 'In some ways it's more manageable. In some ways it's more of a gamble.' Dr Bew added: 'It's a golden opportunity (for the dissidents) in terrain they know very well.' Also reported by International Business Times.

Having kidney disease didn't stop me dancing

Daily Express 11th June 2013

David Goldsmith, professor of cardio-renal medicine at King’s, commented on the symptoms of IgA nephropathy, a condition suffered by ballerina Mara Galeazzi.

GCSE overhaul

Daily Mail 11th June 2013

In an article about the overhaul of GCSEs, there is mention of a study by researchers from the Department of Education and Professional Studies at King's, which found that maths attainment had changed little since the mid-1970s.

The sun cream and vitamin D debate debunked

The Daily Telegraph 11th June 2013

Despite concerns that suncream may stop skin producing vitamin D, research led by Professor Antony Young, Genetics & Molecular Medicine at King's, suggests that this isn't the case. Results showed that even participants who applied lots of suncream had a considerable increase in their vitamin D levels following a week's holiday.

Beer company threatens legal action

BBC London 94.9 11th June 2013

Dr Barbara Lauriat, Law, was interviewed about a legal case involving the US corporation Anheuser-Busch, which is threatening a local brewing company in London with legal action unless it changes its name. Interview begins at 1.49.

Academics call for return of polytechnics

The Times 10th June 2013

Vice-Chancellors of leading universities, including King's, have called for the return of polytechnics in a revamp of higher education.

'I know more about cancer than cancer specialists'

The Times 10th June 2013

In an interview with Dr James Watson there is mention of Rosalind Franklin's role in the discovery of the structure of DNA at King's.

Legal Challenge

Times of India 10th June 2013

Further coverage of the interview with Professor David Caron, The Dickson Poon School of Law, into what top law firms are looking for in graduates.

King's press release related to 'Legal Challenge'

Learning from Fruit Flies

South China Morning Post 10th June 2013

Dr Frank Hirth, IoP, comments on the use of fruit flies in scientific research. ‘Flies, crabs, mice and humans all experience hunger, need sleep and have a preference for a comfortable temperature, so we speculated there must be a similar mechanism regulating these behaviours. We were amazed to find just how deep the similarities go, despite the differences in size and appearance of these species and their brains,’ he said.

Fighting terrorism: Do 'deradicalisation' camps really work?

Guardian 9th June 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, commented on the effectiveness of 'deradicalisation' in tackling terrorism. He said: 'Around 2009 to 2010, this was very fashionable. It really looked like the answer. Now it is looking like a bit of a fad.'

New visions of the human heart

Financial Times 8th June 2013

Article about new imaging techniques, including three new approaches to cardiac imaging under development at King's Division of Imaging Sciences & Biomedical Engineering.

Urban living affects brain, body, Mumbai holds clue

Times of India (Bangalore, Kolkata, Mumbai) 8th June 2013

Coverage of a story about a new project in Social Science, Health & Medicine, led by Professor Nik Rose.

King's press release related to 'Urban living affects brain, body, Mumbai holds clue'

North Korea - Angling for Peace?

Al Jazeera (Inside Story) 8th June 2013

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, comments for Al Jazeera’s Inside Story.

600 papers, 12,000 participants. TwinsUK is helping the future of medicine

Economic Times (Chennai, Mumbai, Bangalore, Delhi) 8th June 2013

Further coverage of story on the anniversary of genetics research using twins, led by Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research.

King's press release related to '600 papers, 12,000 participants. TwinsUK is helping the future of medicine '

Early Down's test 'more sensitive'

BBC News (Online) 7th June 2013

Researchers at King'ss have developed a new, non-invasive blood test that can reliably detect whether or not an unborn baby has Down's syndrome. The test can be given earlier in pregnancy and is more accurate than current checks. Professor Kypros Nicolaides, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, said: 'This study has shown that the main advantage of cfDNA testing, compared with the combined test, is the substantial reduction in false positive rate.' The story was reported by the Press Association, BBC Radio Five Live, Sky News, The Independent, Daily Telegraph, Guardian, Daily Mail, The Sunday Times, Metro and The Sun.

King's press release related to 'Early Down's test 'more sensitive''

New Downs Syndrome Blood Test may be less invasive option

CBS (US) 7th June 2013

Further coverage of a story led by Professor Kypros Nicolaides, Fetal Medicine. Also covered by UPI (USA), BBC Brasil, Correio do Brasil, Globo (Brazil) and UOL (Brazil).

King's press release related to 'New Downs Syndrome Blood Test may be less invasive option '

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 6th June 2013

It is reported that Professor Jill Manthorpe, King's Policy Institute, has been awarded a grant from the National Institute for Health Research.

Double vision: The twins who are helping scientists to discover more than 400 novel genes associated with over 30 diseases

The Independent 6th June 2013

The Department of Twin Research, based at St Thomas’ Hospital, celebrates 21 years of genetic research this week, highlighting key achievements and looking to the future of genetic research. Professor Tim Spector, Director of TwinsUK, said: 'This is a huge milestone for us and represents a coming of age landmark.' This was reported by the Observer, Evening Standard, Metro, ITV News and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'Double vision: The twins who are helping scientists to discover more than 400 novel genes associated with over 30 diseases '

Looking East, pragmatically

Business Standard (India) 6th June 2013

Further comment on India-Japan ties from Zorawar Daulet Singh, India Institute. ‘Although the conceptual underpinnings of an Asian order remain contested, India and Japan will be important pillars of any future order.’

Revolts continue in Turkey

Bloomberg News 5th June 2013

Dr Simon Waldman, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, spoke to Bloomberg’s Inside Business on the protests this week in Turkey. ‘This is essentially the silent majority of Turkey revolting against what they perceive to be the authoritarian nature of Prime Minister Edogan’s rule. They are protesting not so much economic measures… but they are frustrated with sweeping legislation which has been passed by Erdogan and his party without public debate and discussion, which often cuts to the very heart of Turkish identity – the question of secularism, and the role of Islam and society,’ he said. Dr Waldman also spoke to Voice of Russia and wrote a piece for Haaretz.com (Israel).

'Long Hours' work culture

BBC Radio 4 5th June 2013

Dr Jane Sturges, Department of Management, discusses her research into professionals caught up, both reluctantly as well as willingly, in a 'long hours' work culture.

Avatar therapy may silence schizophrenia sufferers' demons

Time (USA) 5th June 2013

Further coverage of a story from the Institute of Psychiatry about the use of avatars for the treatment of schizophrenia.

King's press release related to 'Avatar therapy may silence schizophrenia sufferers' demons'

Revolts continue in Turkey

Bloomberg News 5th June 2013

Dr Simon Waldman, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, spoke to Bloomberg’s Inside Business on the protests this week in Turkey. ‘This is essentially the silent majority of Turkey revolting against what they perceive to be the authoritarian nature of Prime Minister Edogan’s rule. They are protesting not so much economic measures… but they are frustrated with sweeping legislation which has been passed by Erdogan and his party without public debate and discussion, which often cuts to the very heart of Turkish identity – the question of secularism, and the role of Islam and society,’ he said. Dr Waldman also spoke to Voice of Russia and wrote a piece for Haaretz.com (Israel).

Worried suncream blocks vitamin D? Here's good news...

Daily Mail 4th June 2013

Despite concerns that suncream may stop skin producing vitamin D, research led by Professor Antony Young, Genetics & Molecular Medicine at King's, suggests that this isn't the case. Results showed that even participants who applied lots of suncream had a considerable increase in their vitamin D levels following a week's holiday.

University Guide 2014

Guardian 4th June 2013

King's College London is ranked 32nd in the Guardian's University Guide 2014.

How the rise of the alpha woman is creating a more unequal society

City AM 4th June 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, writes about the rise of the 'alpha woman' and the impact on society.

Nato suffered 2,500 cyber attacks in 2012

The Daily Telegraph 4th June 2013

Following a meeting on the threat of cyber attacks by defence ministers at Nato's headquarters, Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, said that the greatest threat lies in spying rather than sabotage. He said: 'When people talk about cyber war, they think about planes falling from the skies, trains being derailed and gas plants exploding. That's a very unlikely scenario. We haven't seen anything like that. We have never seen a single person injured in a cyber attack.'

King's launches first Summer School in Delhi

Press Trust of India 4th June 2013

King’s has opened its first Summer School in Delhi, following the successful launch of the university’s India 2013 programme in Mumbai earlier this year. Tayyeb Shah, Director of International Strategy, said: ‘We have been delighted with the success of our tailor-made India programmes this year and the positive reaction from all our students.’ The story was reported widely in Indian national and education press, including Press Trust of India, Times of India, Economic Times, Business Times, The Telegraph, Business Standard, The Pioneer, Telegraph of India, Financial Express, India Info Online and Siasat Daily.

King's press release related to 'King's launches first Summer School in Delhi'

Bridging the soldier-scholar divide

The Hindu 4th June 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes about Indian defence policy, mentioning the Indian government’s initiative to establish a national defence university and efforts to enhance professional military education. ‘The Indian military needs to evolve a culture of independent strategic thinking on an urgent basis, one that allows its soldiers to comprehend national security in all its various dimensions’.

EU 'needs new fundamental law' - MEP Verhofstadt

BBC News (Online) 3rd June 2013

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, thinks French President Francois Hollande would be among those reluctant to hold a new referendum on the EU.

Terrorism trends

Channel 4 3rd June 2013

Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, is interviewed on an episode of Dispatches, focusing on the threat of terrorism in the modern world.

Terrorism trends

Channel 4 3rd June 2013

Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, was interviewed on an episode of Dispatches, focusing on the threat of terrorism in the modern world.

Does Brazil deserve its 'B' for BRIC?

CNN 3rd June 2013

An opinion piece by Professor Anthony Pereira, King’s Brazil Institute on Brazil’s status in the BRIC group of emerging markets. ‘It is true that Brazil's rate of economic growth is slow compared to China and India. But so are the growth rates of most countries. Brazil tends to be the focus of exaggerated analyses of its economy,’ he said.

Why do identical twins end up having such different lives?

The Observer 2nd June 2013

Interview with Professor Tim Spector, Director of the Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, whose pioneering Twins UK research unit at King's celebrates its 21st birthday this month.

Hay Festival: The Downton Abbey blind spot and servant denial

The Daily Telegraph 1st June 2013

Dr Lucy Delap, History, spoke about the employment of domestic servants at the Telegraph Hay Festival. She said 'the servant keeping era has never really gone away.'

Adding a touch of glamour to mathematics

Times Educational Supplement 31st May 2013

Interview with Dan Abramson, Head of the new King’s College London Mathematics School. He said: 'The underlying message from King's College London Mathematics School is that if you come here and work hard, and think in ways we encourage you to think, then you'll get to a top university.'

What neurons look like – in the eyes of students, trainee scientists and leading neuroscientists

The Atlantic (USA) 31st May 2013

A recent study by researchers at King's has found marked differences in the drawings of brain cells by undergraduate students, trainee scientists and leading neuroscience researchers, suggesting that research experience leads to different visual cultures. Dr David Hay, King's Learning Institute, said: 'This study highlights the need to exchange teaching textbook science for teaching which is modelled on the experimental signatures of leading researchers.' The story was reported by Yahoo! (USA) and highlighted in the ‘Editor’s Choice’ section of Science (USA).

King's press release related to 'What neurons look like – in the eyes of students, trainee scientists and leading neuroscientists'

How to fight the scourge of tax evasion

The Times 30th May 2013

In an article about tax evasion, Professor Jonathan Schwarz from The Dickson Poon School of Law is quoted. He said: 'All laws influence and tax laws are no different. The tax behaviour of companies is largely driven by the tax systems they engage with. Tax administrators must apply the law as it exists rather than what they, or anyone else might think it ought to be.'

Alan Michette, 1950-2013

Times Higher Education 30th May 2013

Obituary for Professor Alan Michette, a leading international expert on laser science and Head of the Department of Physics at King's. Professor Michette served as lecturer in physics from 1981 to 1989, reader in physics from 1989 to 2001 and finally as professor of physics from 2001 until his death.

New hope to treat schizophrenia with therapist-controlled avatars

Guardian 30th May 2013

Professor Thomas Craig at the Institute of Psychiatry is leading a large scale randomised study to evaluate therapy for schizophrenia. The avatar system enables people with schizophrenia to control the voice of their hallucinations. Professor Craig said: 'The beauty of the therapy is its simplicity and brevity. Most other psychological therapies for these conditions are costly and take many months to deliver. If we show that this treatment is effective, we expect it could be widely available in the UK within just a couple of years as the basic technology is well developed and many mental health professionals already have the basic therapy skills that are needed to deliver it.' Also reported by Evening Standard, Reuters and BBC News Online.

King's press release related to 'New hope to treat schizophrenia with therapist-controlled avatars'

The rise of nationalism

BBC Radio Five Live 30th May 2013

Alex Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, was interviewed about the rise of nationalism in the UK following the Woolwich attack. He said that the English Defence League is 'poisoning' the debate about religion and radical Islam. Item begins at 1.40.

Digital wars

BBC World Service 30th May 2013

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, was interviewed about China's decision to conduct its first digital technology military exercise next week.

Assessing the threat of 'killer robots'

BBC Newsnight 30th May 2013

Following a debate about 'killer robots' at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, BBC Newsnight visited King's Department of Informatics to hear more about the perceived threat of such machines. Professor Maria Fox, Informatics, said that although robots could have a military use it is not helpful to focus on that because it encourages people to envisage a 'terminator-type robot'. She added: 'This is not a future that any of us working in the field envisage.' Newsnight also interviewed Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, who discussed the difficulty in assigning responsibility for an autonomous decision made by a robot, should such machines be used at war. Item begins at 32.34.

New UN goals call for end to extreme poverty by 2030

Guardian 30th May 2013

Andy Sumner, Co-Director of King's International Development Institute, commented on new UN goals calling for an end to extreme poverty by 2030. He said: 'Nice goals, but the elephant in the post-2015 room is inequality. We find in our number-crunching that poverty can only be ended if inequality falls so one should ask: where's the inequality goal? Something resembling that elephant in the room – on data disaggregation – is in annex 1 of the report, but will anyone remember an annex note in 2030?'

Plans for more army reservists could lead to more PTSD

The Daily Telegraph 29th May 2013

Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, commented on Government proposals to increase the number of reservists in the Army. Speaking at the Telegraph Hay Festival, he said research showed reservists were at greater risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than regular servicemen.

Viewpoints: How should radicalisation be tackled?

BBC News (Online) 29th May 2013

Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, writes about how society and the authorities could combat radicalisation in the UK following the Woolwich attack. Dr Rogers said more should be done to encourage critical thinking in young people: 'If you give young people the critical thinking skills in the first place, they will be less vulnerable to extreme views.'

Why Syria's rebels need to combat Assad's air power

Channel 4 News (Online) 28th May 2013

Following the EU's move to lift the embargo on arming Syria's rebels, Dr Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, was interviewed about the weaponry that might fall into their hands. He said: 'Anything that shoots down aircraft is wanted by any rebel in Syria, but this is a controversial weapon. From a military perspective, I think that is what the UK and French governments have in mind. But it depends on a judgment call about whether anti-aircraft weapons will end up in the wrong hands.'

Britain's First Labour Government by John Shepherd and Keith Laybourn: Ghetto politics

New Statesman 28th May 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, reviewed 'Britain's First Labour Government by John Shepherd and Keith Laybourn: Ghetto politics.'

Russia - Syria arms deal

BBC News 28th May 2013

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, was interviewed about the European Union's decision to allow weapons to be sold to Syrian rebels, as well as Russia's disclosure that it will provide Syria with sophisticated anti-aircraft missiles. Dr Sagramoso said that, should Russia send these missiles to Syria, 'it would be less likely that countries in the West would get involved militarily.'

Woolwich attack: caution urged over crackdown on extremist websites

Guardian 27th May 2013

Research by Tim Stevens, War Studies, was mentioned following a move by the home secretary, Theresa May, to crackdown on extremist websites. The report warned that any strategy which relied on reducing the availability of online content alone was bound to be crude, expensive and counterproductive. Speaking to the Guardian, Tim Stevens said: 'Anyone who knows anything about the internet knows that just [even if] you take something off the internet, [it] is likely to be back on it again within an hour, or downloaded on to hard drives.'

Stem cell experiments 'make progress'

BBC Radio 4 27th May 2013

Professor Fiona Watt, Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King's, was interviewed on Today about the potential of stem cell research to treat diseases that cannot be cured with current medicines.

Desert Island Discs

BBC Radio 4 26th May 2013

Deborah Bull, Executive Director of King's Cultural Institute, appeared on Desert Island Discs. Among her choices were Ludwig van Beethoven, Bob Dylan, Orbital and Francis Poulenc.

Clare Balding's Secrets of a Suffragette

Channel 4 26th May 2013

Professor Maleiha Malik, The Dickson Poon School of Law, visited The National Archives with Clare Balding to look at files on the Suffragettes, 100 years on from the death of Suffragette Emily Davison. Professor Malik commented on the 'force and power' used by the Government at the time to suppress the Suffragette movement. Item begins at 24.00.

Jail or parole? A brain scan could decide the answer

The Times 25th May 2013

Dr Vaughan Bell, Institute of Psychiatry, commented on new research, which suggests that brain imaging should be used to guide parole decisions for murderers and violent offenders. Dr Bell said: 'This study was good science, but to suggest it could be even slightly useful in the real world is an exaggeration.'

French troops leave Mali

BBC Radio Five Live 25th May 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, commented on reports that French soldiers have left Mali. Item begins at 1.03.35.

Security experts warn of policy forged in panic

Financial Times 25th May 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said the number of Islamist extremists capable of violence has dropped from around 2,000 in 2007 to about 1,000 today. He said the tougher stance on Islamist clerics preaching violence has helped bring this about.

Child abuse increases risk of adult obesity

Times of India 23rd May 2013

New research led by Dr Andrea Danese, Institute of Psychiatry, finds that experiencing maltreatment as a child incresases the risk of obesity in later life.

King's press release related to 'Child abuse increases risk of adult obesity'

London soldier murder raises 'lone wolf' fears

AFP 23rd May 2013

'The problem with amateurs is they just do something - and that's what makes them dangerous,' said Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commenting on the Woolwich attack on Tuesday.

Job applications: a foot in the door

The Times 23rd May 2013

Law firms rate 'global mindset', 'commercial awareness' and 'intellectual rigour' as highly prized competencies in graduates, finds new research conducted by King's in partnership with The Times. Professor David Caron, Dean of The Dickson Poon School of Law, said: 'I am delighted that our research into what Law firms really want from graduates has provided such clear insight and helpful guidance for students considering a career in Law.' This was also reported by India Education Diary and India Info Online.

Britain face a new type of terror threat

Press Association 23rd May 2013

King's experts have commented on the brutal murder of a soldier in Woolwich. Professor John Gearson, Defence Studies, told Press Association that there has been a 'worrying' increase in groups 'targeting the armed services'. Professor Gearson was also interviewed by BBC News, Sky News, BBC Radio Five Live, Voice of Russia, South Korean TV, ABC (Australia) and AFP, generating coverage in ITV.com, Globo (Brazil),Correio Braziliense (Brazil), Terra (Brazil) and Yahoo!. Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, ICSR, told Metro: 'It's most likely that these two were acting alone. I think it's most likely they became radicalised through the internet and geed themselves up to act.' He was also interviewed by BBC Radio 4 and ITV's Daybreak on the influence of radical Islamist preacher, Anjem Choudhary. He also spoke to BBC Radio 5 Live and Associated Press. Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, spoke to BBC Radio 5 Live. Dr Brooke Rogers, War Studies, was interviewed on this topic on BBC News, BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC London 94.9, BBC World News, BBC World Service, Radio 4, France 24, Sydney Morning Herald, CBC (Canada), Radio New Zealand and Xinhua (China), while Shiraz Maher, ICSR, was interviewed by BBC Newsnight, CNN, BBC News and Al Jazeera. Professor Peter Neumann, Director of the ICSR, was quoted in The Times as saying that 1,000 potential extremists in the UK currently pose a threat to national security, a figure that has diminished from 2,000 in 2007. Professor Neumann was also interviewed by BBC News about measures to tackle online extremism. In the Guardian, Tim Stevens, War Studies, warned that any counter-extremism strategy which relied on reducing the availability of online content alone was bound to be crude, expensive and counterproductive.

The final flowering of a Nobel hothouse

Times Higher Education 23rd May 2013

A review of ‘Plant Science’, a King’s Cultural Institute exhibition based on the university’s abandoned Plant Sciences Department laboratories in Herne Hill. The projects is part of a series instigated by Professor Alan Read, English, and will run until 11 June 2013.

10 of popular culture's best Machiavellian characters

BBC News (Online) 23rd May 2013

Professor Gordon McMullan, English, comments on the use of ‘Machiavellian’ characters across literature, TV and film. He said: ‘Iago is Shakespeare's best-known Machiavel, yet he doesn't ever admit Machiavelli's influence.’

Investigating historical abuse

BBC Radio 4 23rd May 2013

Professor Penny Lewis, Law, commented on the recent Jimmy Saville case on The Report. The programme discussed the difficulties in investigating child abuse cases years after the crimes took place.

Today in healthcare: Thursday 23 May

Guardian 23rd May 2013

Coverage of the King’s Fund Leadership Summit mentions a presentation by Professor Jill Maben, National Nursing Research Unit, ‘What we know about the impact of culture on staff and patient experience.’

The blood test that can identify women most at risk of post-natal depression

Daily Mail 22nd May 2013

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which suggests a blood test could determine whether a woman is at risk of post-natal depression. He said the blood tests were a ‘valuable’ development.

Friedbert Pfluger: Climate change is no longer the EU's only priority

Euractiv.com 22nd May 2013

Dr Friedbert Pfluger, War Studies, was interviewed on the EU's climate policy. He said that the EU's climate policy has not vanished but the approach today is probably more balanced towards other aims like energy supply security and competitiveness.

Charles Bonnet Syndrome sufferer talks of hallucinations

BBC News 21st May 2013

Dr Dominic ffytche, Institute of Psychiatry, says there were various ways to distinguish CBS from hallucinations caused by psychiatric problems. He said: "Hallucinations caused by eye disease tend to be quite detailed, with patterns and people in elaborate dress. They're very bizarre images. People don't mistake them for reality and they don't see people they recognise."

Science teaching under the microscope

The Guardian 21st May 2013

In an article about science education there is mention of a survey by the Department of Education & Professional Studies at King's. The ASPIRES project found that although younger secondary school children enjoyed science, very few aspired to be a scientist when they were older.

Labour: make work experience compulsory and axe 'EBacc'

The Daily Telegraph 21st May 2013

In an article about work experience placements, there is mention of a review into vocational education by Professor Alison Wolf from the Department of Management. The report led the Government to drop a requirement for compulsory work experience placements last year.

China's relationship with Pakistan

Voice of America - Chinese service 21st May 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, has written an op-ed for Voice of America on China's relationship with Pakistan as a new government comes to power in Islamabad.

No short-cuts for India in Afghanistan

DNA - India 21st May 2013

Ahead of the visit of Afghan President, Hamid Karzai, to India, the Afghan ambassador to India, Shaida M Abdali, made a very important intervention in a debate that had become sterile in New Delhi, writes Dr Harsh Pant in an op-ed.

Oklahoma Tornado

Sky News 21st May 2013

Dr Ami Abou-bakr, Political Economy, was interviewed about US disaster response following the Oklahoma tornado. Dr Abou-bakr highlighted the importance of restoring critical infrastructure such as roads and electricity. She also assessed the US Government's response to the disaster.

Scans show premature-baby brain arrested development

BBC News (Online) 21st May 2013

Premature birth may interrupt vital brain development processes, according to research carried out at King's. Professor David Edwards, Director of the Centre for the Developing Brain at King’s, said: 'The number of babies born prematurely is increasing, so it has never been more important to improve our understanding of how preterm birth affects brain development and causes brain damage. We know that prematurity is extremely stressful for an infant, but by using a new technique we are able to track brain maturation in babies to pinpoint the exact processes that might be affected by premature birth.'

King's press release related to 'Scans show premature-baby brain arrested development'

Big Brain Projects

BBC Radio 4 - All in the Mind 21st May 2013

Dr Vaughan Bell, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about recent brain mapping projects and how these might help us understand brain disorders.

China's premier in India

Monocle 24 20th May 2013

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International studies commented on the visit of the Chinese premier to India -http://monocle.com/radio/shows/the-briefing/403/- and reviewed the Asian press - http://monocle.com/radio/shows/the-monocle-daily/404/

Vitamin D 'helps beat symptoms of asthma'

Daily Mail 20th May 2013

Scientists at King's have discovered vitamin D has the potential to significantly cut the symptoms of sufferers. Professor Catherine Hawrylowicz, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, said: 'The results are so positive that we are testing this in a clinical trial in steroid resistant asthma patients to further research the possibilities of Vitamin D as a potential treatment.' Also reported by Daily Express, BBC News, Times of India, Business Standard (India) and Zee News (India).

Living in London

BBC London News 20th May 2013

Dr Alex Loftus, Geography, was interviewed about the gentrification of Brixton, an area that has seen 'very dramatic changes' associated with housing prices. Professor David Green, also from the Department of Geography, was interviewed on the same programme about rising house prices in London. He said that colleagues in his own Department are forced to commute long distances from outside London, due to the cost of living in the City.

Where is genetic testing taking us?

The Sunday Telegraph 19th May 2013

Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology, was interviewed about the future of genetic testing, following Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after discovering a predisposition to breast cancer. 'The lesson from our research is that someone could have a blood test every year to look for the epigenetic changes that warn that their disease is developing.'

How to deal with the new China

Tribune (India) 19th May 2013

Army observation posts can achieve little, unless the country backs it up with credible political, diplomatic, and military instruments, all under a prudent leadership, writes Zorawar Daulet Singh, PhD student at King's India Institute, in an op-ed.

Am I ripped, Mum?

The Times 18th May 2013

Dr Andrew Kicman, Drug Control Centre, commented on the growing use of bodybuilding supplements amongst teenagers. He raised concerns over their often unintelligible ingredients, a recent investigation by King's showing that 23 of 24 commercially available supplements purchased actually contained anabolic steroids, these being a risk to  health. He added: 'There could be young men out there fuelled on anabolic steroids who are also drinking alcohol, which can lead to incidence of 'roid rage', this uncontrollable anger which can manifest itself in violence.'

Fever reducers don't slow children's recovery: study

Reuters 18th May 2013

A review of past research finds that fever-reducing drugs have no effect on the speed of children's recovery from an infection, contrary to the fears of some doctors and parents. 'Many many parents are using antipyretics with small children whenever they get a slightly raised temperature. This is madness,' said Professor Alison While, Nursing, senior author of the study. Also reported by Reuters India.

Germany fears return of European jihadists in Syria

Guardian 17th May 2013

In an article about Europeans fighting the Assad regime in Syria as militant Islamists, there is mention of a report by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King's. The report found that up to 600 individuals from 14 countries including the UK, Austria, Spain, Sweden and Germany had taken part in the conflict since it began more than two years ago.

Mess: theatre review

Independent 17th May 2013

Developed with the help of experts from the Institute of Psychiatry, Mess is a new play about anorexia, "it is informative and witty and constantly prods away at the strangeness of its subject matter."

The Dambusters

BBC Radio 2 17th May 2013

Dr David Whetham, Defence Studies, was interviewed about the legacy of the Dambuster aircrafts. Item begins at 12.29.

Nigeria military campaign

BBC News 17th May 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, was interviewed about the Islamist militants Boko Haram, following the start of a campaign by Nigeria's army against the terrorist group, in the north-east of Nigeria.

Malaysian family funds King's College research

New York Times 17th May 2013

Article mentions that a Malaysian family has donated 7 million to King's College London to set up a research center for politics, philosophy and law.

Are governments driving Muslim radicalisation?

Voice of Russia 17th May 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Theology, joined a radio panel debate on the topic of Muslim radicalisation. The panel tried to answer the following questions: is inequality fueling Islamophobia? Have world government policies served to radicalise Muslims? And is radicalism confined just to Muslims?

A stiff one can be good for you

The Sun 16th May 2013

An article about how drinking alcohol can reduce the likelihood of rheumatoid arthritis mentions research by King's, which found that regular drinkers were 48 per cent less likely to be diagnosed with the disease.

EU referendum

BBC Radio Five Live 16th May 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about the relationship between Britain and the EU following the move of 116 Conservative MPs to back an amendment to the Queen's speech. Professor Bogdanor said David Cameron is under pressure from backbenchers to make his promise of an EU referendum 'more credible.'

The art vs. science debate

Evening Standard 16th May 2013

In a letter to the Evening Standard, Professor Louise Archer, Department of Education & Professional Studies, said the assumption that one is either 'arty' or scientific contributes to reduced levels of and less diverse participation in key subjects at A-level and beyond.

Foreign policy: Change of tone starts to pay dividends in Washington

Financial Times 16th May 2013

Matias Spektor, Brazil Institute, comments on the contrast in approach to foreign policy of Dilma Rousseff, the current Brazilian President, and her predecessor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. He said: 'Dilma is less interested in and suited to foreign affairs.'

Human cloning advance raises hopes of medical treatments

The Times 15th May 2013

Professor Chris Saw, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on reports that a US team have managed for the first time to turn human skin cells into embryonic stem cells. He says: "This is an important advance because it is feasible. One embryonic stem cell line was generated from just two eggs." Also reported in the Guardian and Press Association

Father Ian Weathrall

Daily Telegraph 15th May 2013

An obituary of Father Ian Weathrall mentions that he studied Theology at King's before he was ordained at Winchester Cathedral.

Dispatches - murdered in Tenerife

Channel 4 14th May 2013

Professor Sir Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry, led the Schizophrenia Commission and says we are not doing the best in caring for people with mental health disorders. (Begins 19mins12)

Hub to study Rabindranath Tagore the scientist

Times of India 14th May 2013

Article mentions the recently opened Tagore Centre for Global Thought from the King's India Institute: '(King's).. will also invite scholars from universities in China, Japan and USA where research on Tagore's scientific philosophy is in progress.'

Military Suicides

BBC Radio 5 Live 14th May 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the MOD releasing data today on military suicides following the Falklands war.

Decoding genius: and the prodigy behind it

The Times 14th May 2013

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his collaboration with BGI China to identify genes for IQ. He says: "This is not an attempt to identify genius, but to detect the genes that have small effects across all human intelligence. The great thing about BGI is you can do things you might otherwise not have been able to."

Sorry, Syria. In U.S., humanitarian intervention is just 'politics as usual'

CNN International 14th May 2013

Dr Timothy Hildebrandt, Lau China Institute, has written an opinion piece - together with two other academics - on the war in Syria and the ongoing calls for the world to take stronger actions to stop the growing humanitarian crisis.

Ryan Fogle detained by Russia, accused of spying for C.I.A.

Associated Press 14th May 2013

Dr Samuel Greene, Russia Institute, commented on the fact that a U.S. diplomat was ordered to leave the country after the Kremlin's security services said he tried to recruit a Russian agent. 'Maybe this is what the CIA has come to, maybe the propaganda folks in the Kremlin think we are this stupid, or maybe both,' he said. Also reported by the Daily Mail and Sky News.

Chinese project probes the genetics of genius

Nature News 14th May 2013

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on his collaboration with BGI China, sequencing the genes of 2000 people with high IQs. If enough genes that affect intelligence are found, he thinks that it may be possible to predict someone’s intelligence from an early age, and to offer help to children who are at risk of learning disabilities.

Syria's savagery will thwart reconciliation

Reuters 14th May 2013

Dr Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, comments on footage of horrific violence emerging from the conflict in Syria. He said: 'It's the ultimate expression of disrespect and dehumanising your opponent.'

Uncomfortable truths of child exploitation in Britain

BBC News 14th May 2013

An article about the sexual exploitation of children in the UK mentions research by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King's which found that the English Defence League (EDL) had been attempting to link child sexual exploitation with Muslims.

Stress hormones reduce number of new brain cells: King's research

Financial Express 13th May 2013

Research from King's College London has revealed how stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells - a process linked to depression. The researchers identified a protein responsible for this, and successfully used a drug to block the effect, offering a new avenue for drug discovery & treatment.

Appeasing the Taleban would be a fatal error

The Times 13th May 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, writes about the Pakistani elections which took place at the weekend. He said: 'They have considerable potential for good and evil, with serious consequences for Britain as well.'

Low costs lure U.S. college students abroad

Reuters 13th May 2013

'Candidates will find they are expected to be more independent and adults right away than perhaps back home,' said Chris Payne, head of the North America office of King's in an article about the growing number of American students which decides to study abroad as tuition costs are much lower outside the USA.

War and Peace

Times of India (Education Times) 13th May 2013

Dr Harsh V Pant,Defence Studies, was interviewed on the importance of a strong international relations curriculum in India. He said: 'There are no good Political Science departments in India (...). As India becomes a global power, this deficiency needs to be rectified.'

Secrecy and security: Huawei is the company that has the world worried

The Independent 13th May 2013

US suspicion of the Chinese telecoms firm, Huawei, is warranted, according to Tim Stevens, War Studies. However, he also warned that it serves US interests to depict Chinese companies as a threat: 'If Huawei has been installing chips that communicate back to China, that is a major breach of national sovereignty. But we simply don’t know the extent to which it is true. It is very difficult to say where the private company ends and the government begins.'

Pakistan elections

BBC Radio Five Live 13th May 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, was interviewed about the challenges facing the new prime minister of Pakistan, Nawaz Sharif, including economic recovery and the country's electricity problems. Item begins at 1.44.10. Professor Lieven was also interviewed on BBC Radio 4's The World At One.

In Britain, a return to the idea of the liberal arts

International Herald Tribune 12th May 2013

'There are trade-offs with the traditional single-subject approach in terms of the number of courses you can take,' said Dr James E. Bjork (History), head of King's liberal arts program, in an article which discusses liberal arts programs in the UK in comparison with the USA.

The only person lying awake worrying at 3am is me

Daily Telegraph 12th May 2013

Dr Colette Hirsh, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on whether cases of anxiety are on the rise. She says 'people might see themselves as “worriers” but if it’s really interfering with their lives they might have generalised anxiety disorder.’

Effects of stress on brain cells offer clues to new anti-depressant drugs

Times of India 11th May 2013

Researchers have identified a key protein responsible for the long-term detrimental effect of stress on cells and successfully used a drug compound to block this effect, offering a potential new avenue for drug discovery. This was reported by Reuters India, India Info Online, Indian Express, Indo-Asian News Service (IANS), India Education Diary, Newstrack India, Health India, Med India, India Infoline News Service and Yahoo! India.

Study: key protein can offer fresh cure for depression

Med India 11th May 2013

Med India writes that research from King's College London has revealed how stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells - a process considered to be linked to depression.

Bomb blasts in Pakistan on election day, 10 feared dead

Reuters 11th May 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, commented on the violence surrounding the elections in Pakistan. He said: 'The problems facing the new government will be immense, and this may be the last chance that the country's existing elites have to solve them.' Professor Lieven's comments were also reported by Reuters India, Hindustan Times, Economic Times (India), Times of India, the Independent (India), NDTV (India), International Business Times (UK), CNBC (USA), NBC (USA), China Daily and the Guardian.

Plain packaging dropped from Queen's Speech

Daily Telegraph 11th May 2013

In a letter to the Telegraph, Professors Ann McNeill, John Moxham and John Strang write that they are disappointed that the Government has not acted to stop tobacco companies selling cigarettes in bright alluring packages. They says standardised tobacco packaging has been demonstrated to reduce how appealing packs are to children.

Medicine's big new battleground: does mental illness really exist?

Observer 11th May 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, responds to calls from the British Psychological Society for a new approach to diagnosing mental illness. He says that claims psychiatry is being "taken over by the biologists" are unfounded. Professor Wessely also wrote a comment piece for the Observer on DSM-5. His comments were also reported in the Daily Mail.

Digital Destruction

Financial Times 11th May 2013

A review of 'Cyberwar will not take place', by Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies. It said: 'Thomas Rid...throws a well-timed bucket of cold water over an increasingly alarmist debate.'

Why health warnings could be bad for your health

Daily Mail 11th May 2013

Researchers at King's have found that anticipation of an illness can be enough to trigger the symptoms of that illness. After participants were shown warnings about the dangers of wifi signals, many reported symptoms of electromagnetic sensitivity, despite having not been exposed to any signals. Also reported by BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 5 Live.

Why living near a busy road could be dangerous for your child's health: Traffic pollution linked to diabetes risk in children

Daily Mail 10th May 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group at King's, commented on children's vulnerability to air pollution. He said: 'They have a larger lung-to-body volume ratio, their airway epithelium is more permeable to air pollutants, and the lung defence mechanisms against particulate matter pollution and gaseous pollution are not fully evolved.' He added: 'Breathing the same pollutant concentrations, children may have a two to four-fold higher dose reaching the lung compared with adults.' Professor Kelly's comments were also reported by Press Association.

Military Suicides

BBC Radio 4 - More or Less 10th May 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses military suicides and what estimates from Vietnam and the first Gulf War tell us about the mental health of war veterans.

Diabetes: dirty air 'may raise' insulin resistance risk

BBC News 10th May 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, commented on research which found a link between polluted air and insulin resistance. He said: 'It is of interest that this new study demonstrates that both particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to increased risk of insulin resistance in children. This finding is especially relevant for cities in the UK such as London, which regularly exceeds current EU limit values for nitrogen dioxide.'

Abu Qatada Case

BBC Radio 5 Live 10th May 2013

Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, commented on Abu Qatada's decision to voluntarily return to Jordan if it ratifies a treaty guaranteeing a fair trial. Dr Foley argues that Britain has a slow deportation process: 'The government does not put people on the plane very quickly...it gives lawyers plenty of time to appeal.'

Flu in pregnancy linked to children's risk of bipolar disorder

The Times 9th May 2013

Professor Sir Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research linking flu in pregnancy to an increased risk of bipolar disorder in offspring. He says we should wait for findings to be replicated and not alarm pregnant women.

Pakistan's last shot at staying democratic

Financial Times 9th May 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, writes about this weekend's elections in Pakistan. He said: 'The problems facing the new government will be immense, and this may be the last chance that the country's existing elites have to solve them.' He added: 'If the lives of ordinary Pakistanis are not significantly improved over the next five years, a return to authoritarian solutions remains a possibility.'

New Model Army

ITV 1 Tonight 9th May 2013

Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, was interviewed about the mental health of full-time soldiers and Territorial Army soldiers when they return from war in Iraq and Afghanistan. He said that whilst there is no increase in mental health problems for full-time soldiers, there is a doubling of common mental health problems for 'reserves' - Territorial Army soldiers. Interview begins at 13.15.

Muslim riots in Bangladesh

Russia Today 9th May 2013

Dr Carool Kersten, Theology, commented on the islamist riots on Hindu communities in Bangladesh. He said: 'The thing with blasphemy is that is that is very easy to manipulate it politically because it deals with religious symbolism. That works as a very strong motivational force to get people onto the street (...).'

The State Opening of Parliament

BBC Parliament 8th May 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about the State Opening of Parliament, which marks the formal start of the parliamentary year and the Queen's Speech sets out the government's agenda for the coming session, outlining proposed policies and legislation. Professor Bogdanor was also interviewed by the BBC News Channel.

Vaccine could end risk of diabetes for thousands

Channel 4 News (Online) 8th May 2013

A new vaccine being developed by King's and Diabetes UK could reduce or eradicate the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes for thousands of people. Mark Peakman, professor of clinical immunology at King's, said: Looking at where we are now, 10 years is a realistic estimate for us to develop the vaccine; and it will be a two-pronged attacked (sic). If you already have Type 1, there is not a lot we can do for you. But a good vaccine might be able to save a bit of function for those in the early stages and reduce the risk if you have to live with it.'

Appointment shows relevance of Brazil, says a professor at King's College

O Globo (Brazil) 8th May 2013

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, was interviewed about the appointment of a Brazilian as the next head of the World Trade Organization (WTO). 'This is not an award, but recognition of Brazil's diplomatic efforts,' he said.

Stress-beating drugs 'may cure depression'

The Times 7th May 2013

Research led by Professor Carmine Pariante & Dr Christoph Anacker, Institute of Psychiatry, reveals the detailed mechanism behind how stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells - a process considered linked to depression. Professor Pariante says: 'With as much as half of all depressed patients failing to improve with currently available medications, developing new, more effective antidepressants is an important priority. In order to do this, we need to understand the abnormal mechanisms that we can target.' Also reported by Reuters

King's press release related to 'Stress-beating drugs 'may cure depression''

Crime Is Falling - But Have We Noticed?

Huffington Post 7th May 2013

Article about public understanding and trust in statistics, an issue that will be debated at King's College London on 14 May 2013, in collaboration with Ipsos MORI and the Royal Statistical Society.

Problem is in New Delhi, not in Beijing

DNA - India 7th May 2013

China is busy these days, busy in provoking its neighbours. It is squabbling with Japan over Senkaku Islands, with the Philippines over Scarborough Shoals, with Vietnam over the Paracel Islands, and even with Malaysia and Brunei, writes Dr Harsh Pant, Defense Studies.

DSM-5

BBC Radio 4 - All in the Mind 7th May 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, explains what the DSM-5 means for psychiatry in the UK, ahead of the publication of the new version in May 2013.

Valium's 50th birthday: little to celebrate

The Spectator 7th May 2013

Professor Malcolm Lader, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the use of valium, and more generally rising prescriptions of antidepressants. He says: 'This is not one problem. It's part of a general over-reliance on psychotropic medication, particularly for people who are less ill, or who may, in fact, be within normal limits. They are unhappy, haven't got help with things or haven't got social support, and they don't have access to psychological treatments, which are usually very effective for them.'

'We will soon be partnering with members of Indian National Cancer Grid”

Express Healthcare 6th May 2013

A profile interview with Professor Arnie Purushotham, King's Health Partners Integrated Cancer Centre (ICC). The Centre has signed a partnership with Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai. 'Getting new treatments to all patients is a huge challenge and can only really be achieved once the systems for delivering affordable and equitable care are in place,' he said.

John Ellis brings the universe's secrets down to earth

South China Morning Post 6th May 2013

Professor John Ellis, Physics, who was speaking at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. 'It's important to share what we know with the public, he said. 'The public has a stake in what we do, not just because they pay for us, but because what we do will affect them.'

Psychiatry divided as mental health 'bible' denounced

New Scientist 5th May 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the US National Institute for Mental Health's decision to abandon the American Psychiatric Association's diagnostic guide for psychiatry, the DSM-5. He says: "It's potentially game-changing, but needs to be based on underlying science that is reliable."

Crash man Lee Rose meets med student who helped save his life

BBC News (Online) 5th May 2013

Laura Falvey, a King's medical student, meets the man whose life she saved following a hit-and-run accident. Laura, who performed CPR on the man, said: 'The paramedics said I did the right things and that he wouldn't have lived if I hadn't been there.' Laura was also interviewed by BBC London 94.9 FM.

Common interests in Afghanistan test China-India ties

The National (United Arab Emirates) 5th May 2013

The counter-terrorism dialogue between China and India finally took a serious turn this year as the two powers discussed the issue of Afghanistan for the first time. The impending departure of Nato forces from Afghanistan and the spectre of looming chaos seem to have persuaded Beijing that it cannot ignore the 'Af-Pak' challenge forever, writes Dr Harsh Pant, Defense Studies.

Tourist town's new wave of visitors: Fighters on their way in or out of Syria

NBC News (USA) 4th May 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, was interviewed about his recent study on foreign fighters in Syria, and Western deliberations over arming the rebel forces. 'We're so afraid of funding the wrong people ... but the absence of our funding has actually made that more likely because the only money that comes through right now is this hard-core Islamist money,' he said.

British Museum to join free online teaching drive

Financial Times 3rd May 2013

In an article about the British Museum joining the online learning platform Futurelearn, there is mention of King's College London's partnership with the organisation, among 24 other universities.

Brookings energy chief kicks of India energy crisis research

Press Trust of India 3rd May 2013

A piece profiling Vikram Singh Mehta, who stepped down as Shell India chairman last October, and currently heads Brookings India in London as part of an annual fellowship programme run by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) and King's India Institute. The article ran in Business Standard (India) and The Economic Times (India).

Ofsted: training scheme failed to cut number of 'Neets'

The Daily Telegraph 3rd May 2013

Following a report by Ofsted, which said that exam results achieved by students in the 'Foundation Learning' programme were 'unacceptable', a Department for Education spokesman made reference to research at King's. The research by Professor Alison Wolf, Management, was critical of Foundation Learning 'because students end up taking numerous low-level qualifications that do not help them progress.'

Copyright law changes 'hinder free competition'

The Times 2nd May 2013

Dr Barbara Lauriat from The Dickson Poon School of Law discusses the implications of new copyright laws enforced by the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, including one that will allow individuals to 'format-shift' their own music from CD to MP3 for personal use, a common act that is technically infringing under current law.

Why HE is expanding into schools

Times Higher Education 2nd May 2013

In an article about the growth of university-sponsored academies, there is mention of King's maths school initiative. Alison Wolf, Sir Roy Griffiths professor of public sector management and leader of the initiative, says that schools such as the one being set up by King's are necessary to fill a void. Professor Wolf said: 'Nobody questions the established fact that we have an acute shortage of good maths teachers in English and London schools. My personal view is that the most useful thing universities can do is to provide really good subject-based input at a fairly advanced level.'

Bin Laden's death

BBC Radio Five Live 2nd May 2013

Two years on from the death of Osama Bin Laden, Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, said that Al-Qaeda has 'fundamentally changed'. He said this is due to the Arab Spring rather than Bin Laden's death as he was no longer considered important within the organisation. Item starts at 18.00.

The West's failure in Afghanistan

Evening Standard 2nd May 2013

In a letter to the Evening Standard Professor Theo Farrell, War Studies, writes about measures of Western success in Afghanistan. It 'hinges firstly on the transfer of power to the Afghan army and police', said Professor Farrell. He added: 'Second, and much more important, is the political transition to a post-Karzai regime following next year's presidential elections.'

MMR and the legacy of the link with autism

BBC Radio 4 - The Report 2nd May 2013

In a programme about the legacy of the MMR autism scare, Professor Declan Murphy, Institute of Psychiatry, says there is no evidence to show a link between the triple vaccine and autism. He explains that the causes of autisms remain unknown but will certainly be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. (Begins 10min 11s)

A Conversation With: Psychiatrist Dinesh Bhugra, Expert on Deviant Sexual Behavior

New York Times 1st May 2013

Following a case of rape in India, Professor Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about what research into sexual molestation of children in other countries has revealed, and his own experiences of working with people with pedophiliac tendencies.

Anti-domestic violence campaign in Saudi Arabia

BBC Radio 4 1st May 2013

Professor Madawi Al-Rasheed, Theology & Religious Studies, discussed the 'widespread' problem of domestic violence in Saudi Arabia, which, she says, has recently been acknowledged by the government and an anti-domestic violence advertising campaign. Item begins at 1.00.

Mission Accomplished? Iraq And US Security, 10 Years After George Bush Infamous Military Banner In 2003

Huffington Post 1st May 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, said he now feels 'nausea' looking at images of the 'Mission Accomplished' banner which hung as George Bush announced the end to major combat operations in Iraq in 2003. He said: 'Iraq remains a deeply troubled and divided society, at continuous risk of falling into civil war, which has appalling consequences for the whole region.'

Doomsday prophets

BBC Radio 4 1st May 2013

Dr Kris de Meyer, Department of Informatics, was interviewed about the psychology of belief and the reaction of 'doomsday prophets' when they've been proven wrong.

Briton among three foreigners shot dead by Assad’s soldiers

The Times 1st May 2013

In an article about rebel fighters in Syria, there is mention of research by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, which found that 600 European fighters have joined the conflict in Syria.

Radio Choice

Daily Express 30th April 2013

A recommendation for 'Constant Cravings: Does food addiction exist?', a radio programme by Sally Marlow, Addictions, which will discuss the dangers of excessive eating.

Food addiction: could overeating be compulsive?

BBC News 30th April 2013

Scientists are divided over whether or not addiction could be contributing to rising global obesity. Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses whether food addiction really exists and - if it does - how it can be treated.

Driven insane by your own immune system

Daily Mail 30th April 2013

Dr Tim Nicholson, Institute of Psychiatry, says that it is well known that certain infections can also have a psychological effect on the brain. He says: "Syphilis is the classic example. It is strongly linked to brain disintegration and dementia."

Tackling the Stigma Related to Mental Illnesses in South Asian Communities

Huffington Post 30th April 2013

Professor Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the taboo of mental illness in Black and South Asian communities. He says: "Within these communities, adherence to social norms - norms such as doing well academically, being married, having children - is key to achieving and maintaining respect. Mental illness tends to fall outside of these norms."

Constant Cravings

BBC Radio 4 30th April 2013

Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry (IoP), investigates whether food addictions really exist. She speaks to Caitlin O'hara and Professor Ulrike Schmidt from the IoP.

Mental tasks 'impaired in the air'

BBC News (Online) 30th April 2013

Passengers should stick to puzzles or books during a flight rather than making big decisions as mental tasks are impaired at high altitude, according to David Gradwell, the UK's first substantive Professor of Aerospace Medicine. Future research at King's Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences will assess advice given to passengers before travel and look at whether GPs are providing appropriate guidance. Professor Gradwell's comments were also reported by Press Association, The Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and The Sun.

The psychological impact of War

BBC World Service 30th April 2013

Dr Orkideh Behrouzan, Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, was interviewed about her recent article in Foreign Policy, which addressed the psychological impact of the Iraq War on children.

Drinking alcohol regularly could LOWER your risk of arthritis

Daily Mail 29th April 2013

An article about new research from King's which found that regular drinkers were 48 per cent less likely to be diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.

Jazz at the Movies

BBC Radio 2 29th April 2013

Dr Harvey Cohen, Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries, was interviewed about the life and work of jazz musician Duke Ellington. Dr Cohen discussed how, during the 1930s, Duke Ellington and his Orchestra were featured in Hollywood movies earlier and more respectably than any other African American figures during the decade. Interview begins at 14.10.

XX Factor

BBC Radio 4 29th April 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, was interviewed about her new book, 'The XX Factor', which examines how women are creating a new society. Interview begins at 13.15.

Cyber attacks

BBC Two 29th April 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, addressed the threat of cyber attacks on Newsnight. Distinguishing between acts of sabotage, espionage and subversion, Dr Rid said espionage - the stealing of information - is where the main threat lies for the UK. Interview begins at 12.40.

Britain may reverse East of Suez policy with return to military bases in Gulf

The Daily Telegraph 29th April 2013

Britain plans to restore a permanent military presence in the Gulf, basing land, air and naval forces in the region, according to a report co-authored by Dr Saul Kelly from the Defence Studies Department. The findings were also reported by BBC News, RT and the Washington Times.

Gender's new dividing line

The Sunday Times 28th April 2013

Book review of 'The XX Factor' by Professor Alison Wolf, Management, which examines how working women are creating a new society.

Scientists on brink of HIV cure

Daily Telegraph 27th April 2013

An article about Danish scientists who are fast approaching a cure for HIV mentions King's role in the Collaborative HIV Eradication of Reservoirs UK Biomedical Research Centre group, which is dedicated to finding treatments for the virus.

The XX Factor

Guardian 27th April 2013

Book review of 'The XX Factor' by Professor Alison Wolf, Management. The book examines how working women are creating a new society. The Guardian wrote: ‘Readably written, the book's a mass of facts and surveys, interviews, statistics and comparisons between countries; it could be a crucial bible for anyone wanting to check up on anything about contemporary women.’ Professor Wolf was interviewed by BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour and the book was reviewed by the Guardian, The Times, The Financial Times, Daily Telegraph and The Spectator.

How the stigma of mental health problems affect young Asians

BBC Asian Network 26th April 2013

Professor Dinesh Bhurga, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about how the stigma of mental health problems affect young Asians. Having a diagnosis may seem to bring shame on the family and affect people's chances of marriage for example. (Begins 20mins10s)

Mindscapes: The woman who was dropped into her body

New Scientist 26th April 2013

Professor Anthony David, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about depersonalisation disorder. His research is looking at why people with depersonalisation disorder report emotional "numbing" – the feeling that the world is somehow alien.

Writers in love with other art forms

Financial Times 26th April 2013

Professor Andrew O'Hagan from the Department of English and curator of 'The Joy of Influence', previews the series of events at King's where six novelists will discuss the inspiration they've drawn from other art forms. Also reported by the Guardian.

Food waste row

BBC Radio Five Live 26th April 2013

Tom Sanders, Professor of Nutrition, told 5 Live Drive that from a nutritional point of view people can live on £12 per week and stay healthy. Professor Sanders also commented on the high amount of waste contributed by the food industry where food is often thrown away for purely aesthetic reasons. Interview starts at 27.50.

Hope for lung cancer patients as new clinical trial plan launched

Daily Telegraph 26th April 2013

The new Lung Cancer Alliance is to bring fresh hope to lung cancer patients, aiming to enrol every sufferer in a clinical trial in a bid to beat the disease. King's is one of several leading institutions to join the alliance.

DNA discovery celebrates 60 year anniversary

Al Jazeera UK 25th April 2013

Professor Brian Sutton, Biomedical Sciences, commented on the significance of the discovery of DNA, which celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. BBC World News also interviewed him on the same topic.

DNA breakthrough 'spelt double trouble for Nobels'

Agence France Presse 25th April 2013

Article on the 60 year anniversary of the DNA discovery which lead to a Nobelprize mentions King's College London: '(Francis Crick and James Watson) acknowledged that their thinking had been 'stimulated' by X-ray diffraction images provided by the laboratory at King's College London.

Raising female experts' voices on radio and TV

Times Higher Education 25th April 2013

Article about the BBC Academy's female expert training day. Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, attended the training day and pitched a radio package about alcohol and addiction to the editor of BBC Radio4's Today Programme. The programme aired last month.

The Thatcher revolution that wasn't

Times Higher Education 25th April 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about the impact of Thatcherism on higher education.

House of Fraser manager sues employer

Daily Mail 25th April 2013

In an article about a legal case between a shop manager and her employer, there is mention of a study led by Professor Ragnar Lofstedt from the Department of Geography at King's, which counted the cost of health and safety rules for companies.

Get a heads-up on the future with pioneering brain technologies

Metro UK 24th April 2013

Nikolas Rose, Professor of Sociology and Head of the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, commented on a new report which investigates the latest brain treatments. Professor Rose raised concerns over a lack of testing, particularly for treatments such as Deep Brain Stimulation, which 'involves the implantation of electrodes deep into different areas of the brain and the application of small electrical currents.' Despite proving to be a very effective treatment for motor diseases, says Professor Rose, 'it's rather unproven whether these direct interventions into the brain are effective.'

New research body to look at chronic fatigue syndrome

BMJ News 24th April 2013

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, is one of the scientists involved in the new Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Research Collaborative led by the MRC. His research is investigating the association of raised inflammatory markers, such as C reactive protein, with CFS. He says: “It wasn’t my field. I would have been less likely, definitely, to enter the field of chronic fatigue syndrome if it wasn’t for the MRC highlighting the syndrome.”

Israel says Syria used chemical weapons; Russia warns of 'Iraqi scenario'

CNN International 24th April 2013

Dr Susan Martin, War Studies, is quoted in an article on the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government against rebel forces: 'In the Middle East, chemical weapons have been seen as a possible counter to Israel's nuclear weapons.'

From Belgian school to Syrian battleground

BBC News (Online) 24th April 2013

In an article about 19-year-old Brian de Mulder from Belgium, thought to have joined rebels fighting Bashar al-Assad's regime in Syria, there is mention of a report by King's International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, which found that up to 600 people from Europe have taken part in the conflict since it began two years ago.

US teenager snared in FBI 'terror' sting

Al Jazeera UK 24th April 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, War Studies, commented on the news that a young man from Chicago suburbs arraigned on terrorism charges after trying to join al-Qaeda-linked group on FBI website. He said: 'FBI operations like the one that snagged Tounisi have been controversial, because they are essentially picking people at the point where they are simply expression interest.'

Rise of the super-family

Prospect 24th April 2013

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, writes about the rise of the 'super-family': 'It is tight knit, nuclear, husband-wife-and-kids, but with a twist: two successful, two highly educated, two well-paid parents.' Professor Wolf added that the 'super-family' is the 'key reason why the top section of society is drawing away from the rest.'

New expert white paper recommends framework for action to tackle impact of ADHD on individuals, families and society

Press Association 23rd April 2013

Dr Susan Young, Institute of Psychiatry, co-authored an Expert White Paper highlighting the substantial impact Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can have on an individual from childhood into adulthood, in addition to the broader impact on families, welfare systems and national budgets. The White Paper was presented to policymakers and key stakeholders in Brussels today.

Twin study shows environment interacts with genes in autism

Reuters UK 23rd April 2013

A study led by Dr Chloe Wong and Prof Jon Mill, Institute of Psychiatry, has identified patterns of change in gene activity involved in autism in a study that shed light on how environmental factors can work to turn certain genes on or off and contribute to the development of the brain disorder. Also reported by Irish Times & Huffington Post

King's press release related to 'Twin study shows environment interacts with genes in autism'

The psychological impact of the Iraq War

Foreign Policy 23rd April 2013

Dr Orkideh Behrouzan, Assistant Professor of Medical Anthropology in the Department of Social Science, Health, and Medicine, writes about the enduring psychological impact of war.

The US' Asia-Pacific strategy begs a few questions

DNA - India 23rd April 2013

Kerry had been sceptical of the 'pivot' strategy in the past and the nomenclature in Washington has already changed to 'strategic rebalancing' since his taking over the role of America's chief diplomat, writes Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies.

Launch of new Hayfever vaccination

ITV 1 22nd April 2013

Dr Stephen Till, Department of Asthma, Allergy and Respiratory Science, was interviewed about the launch of a new vaccine for hayfever which could be more effective, less invasive for patients and less expensive than currently available vaccines. Dr Till said the new vaccine 'could be used widely throughout the NHS.' Item begins at 49.38.

Minorities stopped disproportionally in decade after Macpherson report

Guardian 22nd April 2013

Ben Bowling, professor of criminology at King's, said reports that stop and searches for black and Asian people has doubled in the past decade shows a 'racial penalty' being exacted by the police on ethnic minorities in Britain. He added: 'It remains an example of what the Lawrence inquiry referred to as institutional racism. In my view, the police use of stop and search is simply not good enough.'

Taking a Healthy Look "Beyond the Genes"

Huffington Post 22nd April 2013

Article about the TEDxKingsCollegeLondon conference 'Beyond the genes - identity, health and culture', organised by Twins UK at King's College London. Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, spoke at the event about his studies of twins, which have shown that identical genes do not mean identical lives. Speaking at the conference he said:'We now know genes are not our destiny.'

Laptop lectures, coming to an armchair near you

The Sunday Times 21st April 2013

In an article about the online learning platform Futurelearn, King's College London's interest in the service is mentioned.

Herbal medicine in low doses do not pose health risk: ADMA

The Economic Times (India) 21st April 2013

Article mentions research from King's College London which revealed that herbal medicines containing toxic aristolochic acid used for slimming and to treat asthma and arthritis, are exposing people to kidney failure risks.

What Kabul means to Beijing

Business Standard 20th April 2013

China seems more willing to co-operate with India over Afghanistan, but New Delhi should step carefully, writes Harsh V Pant, Defense Studies, in an op-ed on the counter-terrorism dialogue between China and India .

Islamist anger feeds on Chechnya history

Financial Times 20th April 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, examines the Chechen roots of the Boston terrorists and suggests that the attacks 'reflect a deep and terrible background in modern Caucasian history.'

Have you got the XX Factor?

The Times 20th April 2013

In an article about women who prefer to pursue a career to motherhood, a new book by Alison Wolf, professor of public sector management, is discussed. In 'The XX Factor: How Working Women Are Creating a New Society' Professor Wolf argues that is a new group of women – around 15-20 per cent – for whom work is a major source of their identity, self-esteem and pleasure. According to Professor Wolf, the other 85 per cent may find camaraderie and satisfaction in work but principally it is a means to pay the bills: family remains the centre of their lives.

Boston investigation

Sky News 20th April 2013

Dr Marat Shterin, Theology and Religious Studies, discussed 'a combination of different factors' that may have led the Chechen brothers to carry out the attack on Boston, including 'self-radicalisation', their Chechen background and alienation from American society. However, Dr Shterin warned: 'None of these stories are fully supported by current evidence.'

Jihad may have influenced more than separatism, analysts say

Folha de Sao Paulo (Brazil) 20th April 2013

Commenting on the recent terrorist attacks at the Boston marathon, Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, said: 'Islamists have influenced many Chechens to become radicalized. His comments also appeared in O Globo Online.

If memory serves me right

BBC1 19th April 2013

Professor Steven Williams, Institute of Psychiatry, talks to Maureen Lipman about how memories are formed and modified in cases of PTSD in this documentary about memory. (Interview begins at 33mins)

Rising tensions with Russia

New York Times 19th April 2013

'Russia's relations with the West are again plunging. This time the cause is repression in Russia and the Western reaction to it. Last time it was the invasion of Georgia in 2008, and before that NATO expansion to the east,' writes Denis Corboy, War Studies, in an op-ed.

China-Pakistan nuclear axis defies nonproliferation aims

The Japan Times 19th April 2013

'The nonproliferation regime is in crisis with North Korea's defiance and Iran's continuation of its nuclear program despite opposition from the international community. Yet while a lot of discussion is happening about what can be done about these two states, no one seems willing to take on the elephant in the room: China', writes Dr Harsh V Pant, Defense Studies. Also taken up by Real Clear World (USA).

Chechen brothers suspected of Boston bombings

Channel 4 News 19th April 2013

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, was interviewed about the possible motivations behind the Boston bombings. She said the Chechen brothers responsible for the attack may have fallen under the influence of radical islamists in Boston and suggested that their Chechen background could also have played a part. Dr Sagramoso was also interviewed by CNN, BBC World News, BBC News 24 and Sky News.

The lucrative allure of the double helix

Financial Times 19th April 2013

King's role in the discovery of DNA is mentioned, in an article describing it as 'one of the most valuable discoveries in the history of science.'

'We aim to be the Harvey Nichols of law schools'

Independent 18th April 2013

An interview with Professor David Caron, the new Dean of the Dickson Poon School of Law. The article also discusses the £20m donation from Dickson Poon, owner of Harvery Nichols. Professor Caron said: 'Dickson Poon's gift comes at the right time for a global community that seeks new and effective approaches to numerous challenges facing humanity - each of which transcends the borders of any particular state.'

Brighton considers drug-use rooms in bid to reduce deaths

BBC News 18th April 2013

Research by King's is mentioned in an article about how Brighton could become the first city in the UK to provide rooms where people would be able to use illegal drugs safely without the fear of prosecution. Academics at King's are researching administering diamorphine (medical-grade heroin) to addicts to reduce heroin use.

Being Protestant in Reformation Britain

Times Higher Education 18th April 2013

Dr Lucy Wooding, History, reviews 'Being Protestant in Reformation Britain', by Alex Ryrie.

Drug users taken advantage of sexually, new survey shows

The Guardian 18th April 2013

Dr Adam Winstock, Institute of Psychiatry and director of the Global Drugs survey 2013, talks about the findings from the survey. The survey shows that being taken advantage of whilst under the influence of substances was surprisingly common. He says "The results also highlight how drug use within intimate settings can increase your risk of both opportunistic and planned sexual assault."

A Natural History of Me!

BBC Radio 4 18th April 2013

Professor William Wade, Dental Institute, was interviewed about his work on oral microbiology. The programme examined the microscopic world of mouth bacteria.

Cameron's Conservatives cannot revive Thatcherism

Financial Times 17th April 2013

On the legacy of Margaret Thatcher and her political ideology, Professor Richard Vinen, History, writes that the 'alliance of beliefs' that formed Thatcherism no longer exist. According to Professor Vinen Thatcherism has reached a stage where it 'can no longer be reversed through politics.'

Funeral of Baroness Thatcher

BBC Radio Five Live 17th April 2013

Dr Eliza Filby, History, was interviewed ahead of Baroness Thatcher's funeral about the former Prime Minister's religious background. Dr Filby discussed the role of Baroness Thatcher's father in her religious upbringing and said her faith 'rooted her politics.' Interview begins at 1.11.10. Dr Filby was also interviewed on BBC World News.

5 Psychiatric disorders share genetic link

Times of India 17th April 2013

In an article about a new research that revealed that autism, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia all share several genetic risk factors, Dr Gerome Breen, Institute of Psychiatry, said: "It points out fairly clearly that there is a common genetic effect between these disorders.

Boston bombings

BBC Radio Five Live 17th April 2013

Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, was interviewed about the devices used in the Boston bombings. Professor Neumann said the 'pressure cooker bombs' indicate an 'amateurish operation', possibly of a lone operator. Professor Neumann was also interviewed by BBC London 94.9 FM.

Care firms that dodge paying minimum wage to be named and shamed

Guardian 17th April 2013

An article about how Norman Lamb, the care services minister, has called for an end to companies avoiding paying care workers the minimum wage. This article mentions research from King's which estimated that there are between 150,000 and 220,000 care workers in this position.

Ozone kills by hampering gas exchange in lungs

New Scientist 17th April 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on research which found that ozone impacts badly on the lungs by reducing the volume of gases that could be exchanged. Professor Kelly said: 'The real question is whether these events take place in us when we're exposed to elevated ozone concentrations.'

Key link between obesity and type 2 diabetes discovered

Times of India 17th April 2013

Article about the new research from Dr Jane Howard and Professor Graham Lord, which identified a key mechanism in the immune system involved in the development of obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

English Heritage: Clergy Lives

BBC Radio 4 17th April 2013

Dr Ruth Adams, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, appeared on Thinking Allowed to discuss her new study which argues that powerful interest groups have championed a 'country house' version of our national past in place of a more complex and diverse history.

Baroness Thatcher's funeral

BBC London 94.9 17th April 2013

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed about Margaret Thatcher's funeral, her political significance, and the controversy surrounding both.

Newtown parents back study for clues to violence

The Guardian 16th April 2013

Professor Terrie Moffitt, Institute of Psychiatry, is an advisory for the Avielle Foundation, set up following the shooting at Sandy Hook to investigate the origins of violence. She says that science on the origins of violence has been neglected by federal agencies that provide research grants. Also reported by Associated Press and Fox News.

Philanthropic giving to UK universities: a case of onwards and upwards

Guardian 16th April 2013

In an article about philanthropic donations to UK universities, the £20m gift by Dickson Poon to King's College London is mentioned.

How to have a good death

BBC Radio 4 16th April 2013

Dr Katherine Sleeman and Professor Irene Higginson, both from the Cicely Saunders Institute at King's, were interviewed about the Liverpool Care Pathway, an end of life plan for dying patients. Dr Sleeman commented on the changing landscape of palliative care, suggesting it has 'improved dramatically' in recent years (interview begins at 11.50). Professor Higginson said that the reluctance to talk about death is a problem for dying patients. Citing research into 'dignity therapy', where patients created a document to leave to their family members, Professor Higginson said that being able to talk about death provided a 'huge boost' for these patients (interview begins at 25.20).

Have the bombings in Boston changed how you think about security?

Scotland TV 16th April 2013

Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about the bombings in Boston. Whilst warning that it would be wrong to jump to conclusions about who was responsible for the attack, he said there is a 'distinct possibility' that domestic 'right-wing militia' may have been the perpetrators given recent pressures for gun legislation and the fact that the attack took place on Patriot's Day. Dr Boys was also interviewed on Sky News.

Belgian police target Islamist volunteers for Syria

Agence France Presse 16th April 2013

The report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) is mentioned in an article from AFP as Belgian police staged dozens of early morning raids Tuesday on radical Islamists suspected of recruiting volunteers to fight the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Cyber war is just a dangerous guessing game

Al Jazeera 15th April 2013

In an article discussing the possibilities of a cyber war, Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies said: 'A cyber 9/11 is not realistic, people exaggerate the threat because they can make money - security companies, contractors and yes, academics.'

Barbaric image of Syrian rebel holding pilot's decapitated head on a barbeque is posted online... but is sickening picture a piece of propaganda?

Daily Mail 15th April 2013

Dr Craig Larkin, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, commented on the use of propaganda in Syria. He said: 'With the conflict now more or less at stalemate, it is fast becoming a tit-for-tat war of propaganda over who is committing the most barbaric atrocities - both for the benefit of local and international communities.' Dr Larkin added that such propaganda is an attempt to influence international policy by 'putting questions in countries like Britain's mind over whether they should be supporting such atrocities.'

The cellphone-free town in West Virginia that offers people who are 'allergic' to radio waves escape from the modern world

Daily Mail 14th April 2013

Talking about whether 'electromagnetic sensitivity' is caused by electromagnetic fields, Dr James Rubin, Institute of Psychiatry, says 'it is definitely the case that some people experience symptoms that they attribute to electromagnetic frequencies, But is it really these frequencies causing the symptoms? At the moment, we can say that there simply isn't any robust evidence to support that.'

Trip Advisor

Sunday Times 14th April 2013

Dr Paolo Deluca, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the Psychonaut project where information about new psychoactive substances from online forums is gathered to inform doctors. He says: “I am not endorsing what they do, but there is a market and it is an unknown. Forums are the only way of knowing what is coming up in the world of psychopharmaceutical effects. You must understand that they are not doing us a favour, but it is impossible to ­ignore such an accumulation of data.”

Beware the jihad veterans coming home

The Sunday Times 14th April 2013

In an article about the conflict in Syria, research by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King's is mentioned. The researchers estimated that between 2,000 and 5,500 foreigners have joined the rebels fighting Bashar al-Assad since the start of the conflict in mid-2011.

Margaret Thatcher: her unswerving faith shaped by her father

The Sunday Telegraph 14th April 2013

Dr Eliza Filby, Department of History, writes about the religious background of Margaret Thatcher, whose faith, according to Dr Filby, was 'shaped by her father.'

Career problems

The Independent on Sunday 14th April 2013

'With six female scientists in a chemistry department of seven, King's College London is bucking the trend of discouraging women scientists', according to The Independent on Sunday. Dr Rivka Isaacson, Department of Chemistry, said: 'I have never felt discriminated against being female and King's is rightly proud of its workforce but there seems to be a big undercurrent of different attitudes around.'

Girl Talk

The Economist 13th April 2013

Review of 'The XX Factor: How Working Women are Creating a New Society' by Professor Alison Wolf from the Department of Management.

'5,500 foreigners fighting in Syria'

Times of India 13th April 2013

In an article about the number of Europeans that have gone to fight in Syria since early 2011, King's International Centre for the Study of Radicalization (ICSR) gets mentioned.

Containing India

Deccan Herald 13th April 2013

Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the China-Pakistan nuclear axis.

We may have more in common with the fruitfly than you think...

BBC Radio 4 - Today 12th April 2013

Dr Frank Hirth, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses his new research which reveals deep similarities in the brains of insects, and vertebrates. The findings shed new light on how the brain and behaviour evolved and may help us understand the mechanisms behind brain disorders. (Begins at 2:49:39)

King's press release related to 'We may have more in common with the fruitfly than you think...'

Tensions in North Korea

BBC Radio Five Live 12th April 2013

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, was interviewed about the ongoing tension between North Korea and the US. Discussing North Korea's nuclear capabilities, Dr Pant said their nuclear missiles will not be able to reach Guam and Alaska but they can reach allies to the US, such as Japan and South Korea. Interview starts at 02.37.18.

David Cameron's visit to Germany

BBC Two 12th April 2013

Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, was interviewed on Newsnight ahead of David Cameron's meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Professor Menon said David Cameron will seek to persuade his partners that Europe needs to be reformed and that treaty change is the way to do this. Interview starts at 04.24.

Donations to universities hit record high

The Independent 11th April 2013

In an article about philanthropic donations to British universities, Dickson Poon's £20 million donation to King's is mentioned.

Margaret Thatcher funeral

BBC London 94.9 11th April 2013

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed Margaret Thatcher's funeral from a constitutional perspective. He questioned plans for an official ceremony as it means Margaret Thatcher is 'getting something more than most Prime Ministers.' Item starts at 1.45.

Babies' brains to be mapped in the womb and after birth

BBC News (Online) 10th April 2013

Scientists from King's are part of a six-year project to map how nerve connections develop in babies' brains will still in the womb and after birth. Professor David Edwards, director of the Centre for the Developing Brain at King's, who is leading the research, said: 'It is very important to be able to scan babies before they are born, because we can capture a period when an awful lot is changing inside the brain, and it is a time when a great many of the things that might be going wrong do seem to be going wrong.'

Studying Adam Lanza: is evil in our genes?

The Daily Telegraph 10th April 2013

Dr Nigel Blackwood, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the decision to study Adam Lanza's DNA. He says, “Genes like MAO-A are not crime-promoting genes in themselves but they can create a vulnerability in someone who has already had a deleterious childhood,” but adds that even then, you can’t say this person will definitely commit a crime.

Test-tube baby pioneer Sir Robert Edwards dies

BBC News (Online) 10th April 2013

'Few biologists have so positively and practically impacted on humankind', said Prof Peter Braude, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at King's, following the death of IVF pioneer Prof Sir Robert Edwards. He added: 'Bob's boundless energy, his innovative ideas, and his resilience despite the relentless criticism by naysayers, changed the lives of millions of ordinary people who now rejoice in the gift of their own child.' Prof Braude's comments were also reported by The Times, Guardian, Independent, i, Daily Express, Daily Mail, The Sun, BBC Radio 4, BBC News and Channel 4 News.

Europe's toxic air: clearer but not clean

Reuters UK 10th April 2013

Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at King's, said 'the government needs to take responsibility' for air quality in Britain. According to the government most British regions will achieve the EU standards of air quality by 2020, with London taking five years longer. However, Prof Frank Kelly said: 'It's not good enough to say that we can wait to 2025.'

Weight loss surgery tied to colon cancer risk

Reuters UK 10th April 2013

Obesity is already linked to a higher risk of colon or rectal cancer, but new research suggests this risk is even greater for obese people who have undergone weight-loss surgery. However, Dr Jesper Lagergren, the study's senior author from the Division of Cancer Studies at King's, warned: 'These findings should not be used to guide decisions made by patients or doctors at all until the results are confirmed by other studies.'

North Korea wants attention, not war

Reuters US 10th April 2013

While the risk of escalation remains, North Korea's threats are likely to peter out as it realizes their effectiveness is limited, says Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies.

Scottish identity

Guardian 9th April 2013

In a letter to the Guardian, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes that an independent Scotland 'would be a sign that the Scots had repudiated their British identity.'

Legal aid reform

BBC Radio Five Live 9th April 2013

In an interview on legal aid, Andrew Neilson, Director of Campaigns for the Howard League for Penal Reform, quoted research by King's Department of Management. The research, published in January 2012, found that for every one pound the Ministry of Justice saved in removing criminal negligence claims from legal aid, the NHS could be liable for up to three pounds of additional costs. Item starts at 23.30.

Launch of Tagore Centre for Global Thought

Deccan Herald, Tribune (India), Times of India, The Telegraph, Press Trust of India, etc 8th April 2013

The Tagore Centre for Global Thought was officially inaugurated at King's India Institute, in a ceremony attended by Chandresh Kumari Katoch, Honourable Minister of Culture, Government of India, and Dr Virander K Paul, Deputy High Commissioner of India to the UK. The launch was reported by The Tribune, Times of India, Press Trust of India, Indian Express, India Education Diary, Net Indian, and Jagran Josh.

India Summer Schools 2013

Times of India 8th April 2013

King's has celebrated the launch of its 2013 international Summer Schools programme in Mumbai. The story was reported by Hindustan Times, Times of India, Business Standard, Economic Times, Press Trust of India, Careers 360 Study Abroad, India Education Diary, IBN-Live, Deccan Herald (page 2), Zee News, Hindu Business Line, The Pioneer (Avenues), Study Guide India, Indian Education News, Kalvimalar (Mumbai), Jagran Josh, The Telegraph, the Deccan Herald, Education World Magazine, Times of India (Education Times),

Maraget Thatcher dies, aged 87

O Globo, Folha de Sao Paulo 8th April 2013

Dr Eliza Filby, History, was interviewed by O Globo about Margaret Thatcher and Professor Richard Vinen, History, commented on her death in Folha de Sao Paulo.

Don't leave that tooth under the pillow - it might save your child's life

Daily Mail 6th April 2013

In an article about the future of regenerative dental medicine, King's new MSc in Regenerative Dentistry is mentioned.

Give Pakistan a break - it's in our interest

The Times 5th April 2013

In an article for The Times, Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, writes that withholding aid to Pakistan would cause chaos, leading to a flood of refugees heading to Britain.

Public back 'veterans NHS priority'

Press Association 5th April 2013

Based on a study by King's Centre for Military Health Research, Rachael Gribble says “Priority health and welfare services for ex-service personnel were supported by at least 70 per cent of respondents." Also reported by the Sun and the Scotsman

Attitudes to mental illness remain entrenched despite campaign

The Times 3rd April 2013

An evaluation of the Time to Change anti-stigma campaign led by the Institute of Psychiatry has found that whilst there has been a reduction in mental health discrimination, there still remain challenges in many areas of people's lives. Dr Claire Henderson (IoP) said: "Our findings suggest that it is easier to influence the way people behave with those they are close to, but much harder to change how people behave in more formal roles or within their professional framework." Also reported in the Guardian

King's press release related to 'Attitudes to mental illness remain entrenched despite campaign'

The Nocebo effect: how we worry ourselves sick

The New Yorker 3rd April 2013

Research from the Institute of Psychiatry into "idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fieldsarticle" is mentioned in this article about how beliefs about the negative effects of wifi can cause symtpoms.

Syria conflict drawing hundreds of jihadists from Europe, says report

Guardian 3rd April 2013

Hundreds of Europeans have travelled to Syria since the start of the civil war to fight against the country's president, Bashar al-Assad, according to a new report by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King's. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph and BBC Mundo.

BRICS: Search for new paradigm

The Tribune (India) 3rd April 2013

Zorawar Daulet Singh, India Institute, summarises the reaction to the 5th BRICS Summit this month. 'A common theme that runs through nearly all [the commentaries] paints the BRICS as a motley of parochial power seekers with little in common.'

Una ola de provacaciones previsible

El Pais (Spain) 3rd April 2013

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, writes about the current escalation of tensions with North Korea. He suggests that despite provocations, Kim Jong-un does want to reduce the county's dependency on China and South Korea and open up diplomatic reconciliation with Washington.

Tagore Centre for Global Thought opens at King's India Institute in London

India Education Diary 3rd April 2013

Report covering the inauguration of the Tagore Centre, based at King's India Institute, on Tuesday night. 'The Centre, housed in the prestigious King's India Institute, has been established to engage audiences with India's intellectual traditions whilst addressing a number of contemporary global questions and dilemmas.' The story was also covered by Press Trust of India, Indian Express and Net Indian.

The Deprofessionals

BBC Radio 4 2nd April 2013

Professor Stephen Bach, Management, was interviewed about the restructuring of the public sector and the issue of 'deprofessionalisation'. He raised concerns over the state of the public sector, claiming that professionals are suffering a crisis of identity and feel that they are not trusted by the Government. Item starts at 03.30.

Motorists warned over drug driving

Press Association 2nd April 2013

Medical information about the risks from taking drugs and driving should be strengthened, according to a panel of experts chaired by Dr Kim Wolff, a reader in addiction science at King's. Also reported by The Independent.

Between The Lines

Caravan Magazine (India) 1st April 2013

Dr Louise Tillin, India Institute, argues that proposed new states in India may not necessarily be a vehicle for better governance. 'Thus smaller states are not necessarily more homogeneous or better-governed units; the administrative dividends of state creation cannot be taken for granted.'

Under a southern sun

Indian Express 1st April 2013

Professor Christophe Jaffrelot, India Institute, questions whether it is in India's interest to be part of the BRICS coalition, 'where two of the dominant members, China and Russia, display such a shallow commitment to democratic values, while [India] gets closer to the West.' He also argues that India should resist Chinese pressures for merging the India Brazil South Africa Dialogue Forum (IBSA) with the BRICS. 'The former can offer New Delhi a platform that is more effective and more comfortable: after all, the other member countries are democracies too. In the latter, India will only be a junior partner.'

Summer break may not be so boring

Hindustan Times 1st April 2013

Coverage of the launch of the 2013 India Summer Schools programme, which has expanded in size and scope this year to include courses in Delhi as well as Mumbai, and pre-university level courses. The story was reported by Times of India, Careers 360 Study Abroad, India Education Diary, Press Trust of India, IBN-Live, Deccan Herald (page 2), Business Standard, Zee News, Hindu Business Line, Economic Times and The Pioneer (Avenues).

Sausages ARE safe after all

Daily Mail 31st March 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Head of Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on new research, which found that processed meat is a major factor in developing heart disease and cancer in Britain. Professor Sanders argues that processed meat cannot be singled out as other factors such as smoking, diet and lack of exercise could be equally to blame.

The age of digital improvability

Live Mint (India) 31st March 2013

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, writes about the new tribe of 'datasexuals', individuals with logging personal data and making it public. 'But, even as some of us strap on our wrist trackers and our body-mass watchers, we might ask more circumspectly what such data can help us with - and try to identify more clearly those problems that could have solutions, and those activities that are intrinsically unending.'

In the Google Tent

The Daily Telegraph 30th March 2013

The Rosalind Franklin Lecture on 27 May, to be delivered by Professor Fiona Watt, Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, was previewed in The Daily Telegraph. Professor Watt will address the promise of stem cells to treat human disease.

A door to a better realm, thrown open by the Resurrection

The Times 30th March 2013

Professor Alister McGrath, Department of Education & Professional Studies, wrote about what Easter came to mean for the author, C.S. Lewis.

Cross specialty training would improve outlook for academic psychiatry, says report

BMJ 29th March 2013

A report co-authored by academics from the Institute of Psychiatry makes recommendations for strengthening academic psychiatry. Professor Sir Simon Wessely said that part of the problem was that psychiatry was not “projected sufficiently well enough.”

We won't charge him

The Sun 28th March 2013

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King's, said that by failing to arrest Anjem Choudary, the police may risk encouraging extremists.

Degrees of comparability

Times Higher Education 28th March 2013

A worldwide 'Ahelo' exam, which would allow the comparison of graduate quality internationally, could be deeply 'homogenising', said Professor Alison Wolf, director of the International Centre for University Policy Research at King’s. She added that 'it would be an incredibly conservative force' and would create conformity in higher education in a manner similar to what has happened in the UK school system.

Image Warfare in the War on Terror by Nathan Roger

Times Higher Education 28th March 2013

Dr Neville Bolt, War Studies, reviews 'Image Warfare in the War on Terror', by Nathan Roger.

Smoking help urged for mentally ill

Press Association 28th March 2013

Professors Louise Howard and Ann McNeill from the Institute of Psychiatry have co-authored a major report, which states that smoking in people with mental health conditions is neglected by the NHS. Louise Howard, professor of women's mental health, said:'Support for people with mental health problems to stop smoking needs to be prioritised urgently to improve not only the health of this vulnerable group but also the next generation,as smoking is the leading preventable cause of fetal and infant morbidity and mortality - pregnant women with mental health problems are motivated to stop smoking but are more likely to be smoking through pregnancy than other women.' Also reported by the Nursing Times

King's press release related to 'Smoking help urged for mentally ill'

South Korea Cyber Attack

Al Jazeera 27th March 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, was interviewed following a recent cyber attack in South Korea. He explained the difficulty in knowing who is behind such attacks, calling it the 'attribution problem.'

Heir Hunters

BBC 1 27th March 2013

Dr Jatinder Mann, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, was interviewed about British migration to Australia in the post-Second World War period, or as it was more commonly known: 'The Ten Pound Pom Scheme'.

A one-state solution to the English question

Guardian 26th March 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, History, discusses the constitutional issues thrown up by devolution. He said: 'All of us need to decide not only who we are, but how we are, and how our identity is to be expressed.'

Pre-Big Bang Era of Banking

BBC Radio 4 26th March 2013

Professor Richard Roberts, History, comments on how there were different ways of rewarding bankers in the 'pre-Big Band era' in comparison with today.

Radicalisation of terrorists

BBC Radio Five Live 26th March 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, was interviewed about the Government's Channel project, aimed at tackling terrorism. He said the plans involve intervening earlier, before people become terrorists, by recognising 'far-right or Jihadi views' at a younger age. Item starts at 1.42.40.

Obama in Israel - At Last

Arise News 25th March 2013

Dr James D Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, talked about President Obama's trip to Israel. He said: 'Travelling in his security bubble, it is likely to be the one opportunity he gets to really see the land and appreciate its precarious position.'

Celtic heritage: Project wins funding to explore origins

BBC Wales 25th March 2013

The mystery surrounding the origins of the Celtic people could be unravelled by a new three-year project. The University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (CAWCS) in Aberystwyth has received £690,000. The CAWCS will work in collaboration King's on the 'archaeological background of the emergence of the Celtic languages in western Europe'.

Serotonin receptors offer clues to new antidepressants

Nature news 22nd March 2013

Dr Christoph Anacker, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which has revealed the crystal structure of serotonin receptors. He says: "These receptors are involved in so many conditions, especially depression, and knowing the molecular structures will help to develop more specific drugs and avoid the expression of undesired side effects."

UKBA's 'one-size-fits-all' visa service fee may squeeze small universities

Times Higher Education 21st March 2013

Ian Creagh, Head of Administration at King's, said that plans to offer institutions a 'premium' immigration service 'sticks in the craw.' From July, institutions will be able to pay for the UK Border Agency's extra service, which will include providing institutions with a dedicated account manager.

Give help to small renewables firms

Guardian 20th March 2013

In a letter to the Guardian, signed by Professor Mark Pelling from the Department of Geography, leading academics have urged the government to give equivalent terms for renewable energy development to small renewable firms as those being given to big electricity companies.

Jeremy Hunt accused of 'grossly unfair' allocation of public health funding

Guardian 20th March 2013

Following reports that Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Health, will allocate more public health funding to wealthy areas in London, Alan Maryon-Davis, professor of public health, has described the move as 'clearly unfair and counterproductive.' He added: 'It's post-code public health gone wrong - and the people will be the losers.'

Gove will bury pupils in facts and rules

The Independent 20th March 2013

The Government's new national curriculum 'demands too much too young', according to leading professors of education in letters to The Independent and The Daily Telegraph. Signatories including Professor Margaret Brown and Professor Megan Maguire from the Department of Education & Professional Studies, think the proposed curriculum 'will not develop children's ability to think.'

Language of food politics

BBC Radio 4 20th March 2013

Guy Cook, Professor of Language in Education, analysed the language of food and food politics - from baby food labels to organic marketing. Professor Cook is speaking at King's Feed Your Mind Festival on 22 March 2013.

Outdated attitudes 'could have led to child victims being ignored'

The Daily Telegraph 20th March 2013

At a lecture hosted by The Dickson Poon School of Law and the Institute of Psychiatry, Lord Judge, the Lord Chief Justice, said old attitudes that 'children should be seen and not heard' could have led to hundreds of ignored child sex abuse victims. Also reported by the Guardian, Daily Express and Daily Star.

Herbal medicines pose health risk to millions in Asia

TIME magazine 20th March 2013

Professor Graham Lord, Medicine, said: 'The reason we wrote this paper is to provide a diagnostic classification for aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) [the type of kidney failure associated with the agent]. For countries that haven’t asked the question of whether this is present, here is diagnostic criteria.'

Cyber warfare

BBC Radio 4 20th March 2013

Interviewed on The World Tonight, Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, said the threat of cyber attacks is often exaggerated 'for political reasons.' Item starts at 38.00.

Older fathers more likely to have autistic grandchildren

Reuters 20th March 2013

Research led by Dr Avi Reichenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, finds that men who have children when they are older are more likely to have grandchildren with autism. He says: "For the first time in psychiatry, we show that your father's and grandfather's lifestyle choices can affect you. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't have children if your father was old when he had you, because whilst the risk is increased, it is still small." Also reported by Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mirror, BBC News, Fox News, Times of India, The Australian, Press Association, Huffington Post, China Post, South China Morning Post, Folha de Sao Paolo, Globo (Brazil), AFP, ANI

King's press release related to 'Older fathers more likely to have autistic grandchildren'

Richard O'Brien: 'I'm 70% man'

BBC News 19th March 2013

Commenting on Rocky Horror Show writer Richard O'Brien thinking of himself as 70% male and 30% female, Professor Dinesh Bhugra, Institute of Psychiatry, says: "The distinction has to be made between gender and sex. Gender is very much a social construct, sex is biological. My guess would be that social notions of gender dictate how we behave."

BBC to hold Expert Women's Days in Salford, Glasgow and Cardiff

The Guardian 19th March 2013

An article about the recent BBC Academy's Expert Women's day mentions Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, who walked up to the editor of teh Today programme to pitch him an idea about alcohol abuse.

'Herbal medicines causing kidney failure, bladder cancer in India'

Times of India 19th March 2013

'We do know that preparations containing aristolochic acid (AA) are widely used in India and that this is associated with chronic kidney disease and kidney cancer if a sufficient dose is taken,' said Professor Graham Lord, lead author on a new study about the increased risk of kidney failure and bladder cancer caused by the intake of popular herbal medicines in Asia.

Academics attack 'endless lists of facts' in new curriculum

The Daily Telegraph 19th March 2013

A new national curriculum places an overemphasis on memorising 'endless lists of spelling, facts and rules' and could rob children of the 'ability to think', according to leading professors of education, including Professor Margaret Brown and Professor Megan Maguire from the Department of Education & Professional Studies.

Alcohol pricing

BBC Radio 4 (Inside Health) 19th March 2013

Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about sobriety orders for violent offenders which are used in the US and are to be eventually piloted in the UK. (Begins at 04.22)

Herbal medicines linked to kidney disease

Voice of America 19th March 2013

Scientists have pulled together previous studies about an ingredient in some herbal medicines that can cause severe kidney disease and cancer. Professor Graham Lord, Medicine, says: 'It causes cancer in areas where it's most concentrated, which probably explains why the cancers are mostly focused around the urinary tract and the kidney.'

Herbal meds pose kidney risk

Hindustan Times 19th March 2013

Indians may unknowingly be exposing themselves to increased risks of kidney failures and even forms of cancer by using traditionally popular herbal medicines that contain toxic acids, British researchers have warned. Professor Graham Lord, Medicine, said: 'We have found evidence that many millions of people continue to be exposed to significant health risk due to these herbal medicines, widely used in China and India.'

UK air pollution: why are we only now waking up to this public health crisis?

Guardian 19th March 2013

Dr Ian Mudway, Environmental Research Group, said air pollution, especially from diesel engines, is a 'neglected, hidden killer' and that children and old people are especially at risk. He added: 'There's strong evidence that if you live near main roads you will have smaller lungs.'

Digital avatars

Sky News 19th March 2013

Dr Thrishantha Nanayakkara, Department of Informatics, was interviewed about the development of virtual personal assistants and the ethical issues surrounding the use of robots.

Are older parents putting our future at risk?

Daily Telegraph 18th March 2013

In an article about the impact of parents having children at older ages, Dr Avi Reichenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, says "Many children born to old fathers or old mothers develop normally, but what the research shows is that the proportion of children of older fathers or mothers who have psychiatric or neurological disorders is higher than in children of parents of average age.”

How to raise happier boys

The Times 18th March 2013

Professor Stephen Scott, Institute of Psychiatry, says there lies an evolutionary explanation to why boys are more difficult as children. He says "boys are designed to be muscular and violent and aggressive. That's what they exist for, biologically."

Iraq war damaged Britain, says new poll

The Independent 17th March 2013

A survey by King's and Ipsos MORI shows that more than half of the British public believes involvement in the Iraq war damaged the country's reputation around the world. However, the findings show that most people still think the UK should intervene abroad when justified. Commenting on the findings, Professor John Gearson, War Studies, said: '[The fact that] over 75 per cent of the public state the UK should intervene when UK interests are directly threatened or human rights are at stake suggests this is still not a country that believes it should be inward-looking and leave the world to sort itself out while the UK concerns itself with home defence.' Also reported by the Sun on Sunday.

India in blacklist dilemma over AgustaWestland

Reuters India 17th March 2013

In its quest to guard against corruption, India's defence procurement system was now extremely complex, bureaucrats had become risk averse and the military was not getting the equipment it needed, said Harsh Pant, Defence Studies.

Why don't more girls study physics?

The Daily Telegraph 16th March 2013

Professor Louise Archer, Education & Professional Studies, comments on the lack of female physicists and why so few girls opt to study physics at A-level. She said: 'For girls in particular, physics is seen as being a very masculine subject so the girls who like physics have to work a lot harder to balance it with that notion of normal femininity.'

Returning soldiers 'more likely to commit violent crimes at home if they witnessed traumatic events in combat'

Independent 15th March 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely and Dr Deirdre MacManus, Institute of Psychiatry, talk about their research which finds that military personnel are at risk of committing violent offences post-deployment, especially if they were deployment in a combat role or witnessed traumatic events. Also reported on BBC Today Programme, BBC News Channel, BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC Radio 2 and by BBC News Online, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Daily Express, The Times, The Guardian, TIME magazine, Reuters, Associated Press, Press Association, Reuters, NBC News, Irish Times.

King's press release related to 'Returning soldiers 'more likely to commit violent crimes at home if they witnessed traumatic events in combat''

How to put the world to rights

The Times 14th March 2013

In an article about the growing field of global ethics, Professor Leif Wenar, programme leader for the MA in Global Ethics & Human Values at King's, is interviewed. He said: 'National leaders seem not to be able to solve some of the more challenging problems, such as climate change. As a result, people with a solid understanding of global ethics have a real opportunity to change how things are done.' Stephanie Eldridge, a student on the course at King's, was also interviewed.

Utilities 'are vulnerable to cyber attacks'

The Times 14th March 2013

Giving evidence on Britain's cyber security strategy to the Public Accounts Committee, Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, voiced fears that the Government does not know how many critical infrastructure control systems are vulnerable to attack.

As the smoke clears after Saudi Arabia's latest mass execution by firing squad... Charles and Camilla fly in

The Independent 14th March 2013

Professor Madawi al-Rasheed, Theology & Religious Studies, commented on Prince Charles' visit to Saudi Arabia with the Duchess of Cornwall. She said: 'Such visits do more damage to the human rights cause because they give recognition to a regime that continues to oppress women and men.'

Fantastic voyage, inside and out

Times Higher Education 14th March 2013

Dr David Green, senior lecturer in aerospace physiology at King's, reviews Kevin Fong's 'Extremes: Life, Death and the Limits of the Human Body.'

Experts: Pope's partial lung shouldn't affect duties but he should be careful

The Associated Press 14th March 2013

In an article that discusses the health implications of the fact that the new pope only has one lung, Professor Jeremy Ward, Biomedical Sciences, said he was only mildly concerned about the pope's health, unless he gets sick: 'If he gets any sort of infection, it could be much more serious in him than in someone else with two lungs. ... That could make him susceptible to pneumonia, which would be very dangerous for him.'

Al-Qaeda lacks expertise for cyberwar, expert tells MPs

BBC News (Online) 14th March 2013

Al-Qaeda lacks the technical expertise to sabotage Britain's national power and water systems, said Thomas Rid, War Studies, in a Public Accounts Committee briefing. Asked why a cyber-attack had never been launched on such assests, Dr Rid said: 'Al-Qaeda are too stupid and China doesn't want to do it.'

Transforming our world

The Daily Telegraph 13th March 2013

In an article about science research, King's is mentioned as a 'centre of excellence' where 'exciting research in the areas of graphene and associated technologies is taking place.'

EDL 'exploits sex gang perceptions'

Daily Express 13th March 2013

The English Defence League (EDL) is exploiting concerns surrounding sex-grooming gangs to fuel its anti-Islam agenda, according to a report by King's International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR). Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, ICSR, said: 'The EDL has successfully exploited concerns about the sex grooming gangs in the north of England, turning the issue into one of Islam versus the West.' Also reported by Press Association, Guardian, Huffington Post, Daily Star and BBC London 94.9FM.

Threat of cyber crime

BBC Radio 4 13th March 2013

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, was interviewed on Today about the threat of cyber attacks. Professor Rid said that although we hear about large numbers of attacks, 'bigger attacks that steal intellectual property and create multi-million pound damage are quite rare.' Professor Rid also explained why attacks on larger companies are rarely reported: 'Companies have very little interest in reporting cyber attacks if it damages the trust that consumers have in those companies.'

In Latin America, left vs left

The Indian Express 13th March 2013

Hugo Chavez has passed away, leaving Venezuela facing an uncertain future and potential for sharper division as both his movement and his opposition bid for ascendancy, writes Dr Peter Kingstone, International Development Institute.

Extreme Right poses a threat like al Qaeda, warns minister

Evening Standard 13th March 2013

The Security Minister, James Brokenshire, warned that Britain faces a threat from right-wing extremists, in a speech at King's College London. The speech was part of a conference organised by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), entitled 'What is the new Far Right?' Also reported by the Independent and i.

The Great Cyberspace

Foreign policy 13th March 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, writes: 'The White House likes a bit of threat. In his State of the Union address, Barack Obama wanted to nudge Congress yet again into passing meaningful legislation. The president emphasized that America's enemies are 'seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, and our air traffic control systems.' Dr Rid has recently published a new book 'Cyber War Will Not Take Place'.

Lifelong exercise can improve brain function in later life, study finds

Guardian 12th March 2013

Researchers at King's have highlighted a link between lifelong exercise and improved brain function in later life. Dr Alex Dregan, Lecturer in Translational Epidemiology and Public Health, said: 'As exercise represents a key component of lifestyle interventions to prevent cognitive decline, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, public health interventions to promote lifelong exercise have the potential to reduce the personal and social burden associated with these conditions in late adult years.' Also reported by Press Association, The Independent, The Daily Telegraph, Daily Express and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'Lifelong exercise can improve brain function in later life, study finds'

Saliva tests to prevent early labour

Daily Mail 12th March 2013

Preview of an event at King's Festival of Food and Ideas. Dr Michael Escudier, Dental Institute, will be speaking about the importance of saliva for the functioning of the mouth.

TV condemned over tobacco depiction

Evening Standard 12th March 2013

A report by researchers at King's and the University of Nottingham has called for tighter regulations on television programmes with 'gratuitous depictions of tobacco.' THe authors said smoking in films is a common cause of children's smoking experimentation and uptake. Also reported by Press Association, Daily Express and Daily Star.

Nicholas Breakspear: The only English Pope

BBC News (Online) 12th March 2013

Professor Anne Duggan, History, comments on the achievements of Adrian IV, the last and only English Pope. She said his most important achievement for Catholics generally was establishing the principle that serfs could freely and lawfully marry without the consent of their lords.

Mental health of Iraq and Afghanistan reservists causes alarm

Guardian 12th March 2013

Research from King's Centre for Military Health Research suggests reservists are at greater risk of mental health problems post-deployment.

World Diary

Financial Times 11th March 2013

In the Financial Times' World Diary, an event hosted by The International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation is mentioned. At the conference, 'What is the new far right?', experts, analysts and policy makers from across Europe will discuss the threat from the so-called 'counter-jihad' movement.

Nigerian kidnappers

BBC Radio Five Live 11th March 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, was interviewed about the killing of a British hostage in Nigeria. Dr Hill talked about the militant group Ansaru, who are thought to be responsible for the killing. Interview begins at 18.00.

Antibiotic resistance

BBC World News 11th March 2013

Dr Paul Long, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, was interviewed about the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr Long supported comments by the Government's Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies, who warned that antibiotic resistance should be treated as a major national risk. Dr Long said: 'The message just isn't getting across to the people who prescribe antibiotics.'

Rick Trainor to step down as King's principal

Times Higher Education 11th March 2013

Professor Sir Rick Trainor is to step down as principal of King's College London in October 2014 after 10 years of leading the College. The Chairman of the Council, the Marquess of Douro, paid tribute to Professor Trainor: 'Professor Trainor has been a highly distinguished leader of the College. Under his guidance the College's academic strengths have improved substantially over the past eight and half years.'

King's press release related to 'Rick Trainor to step down as King's principal'

More UK varsities tying up with Mumbai colleges

Times of India 10th March 2013

Article mentions King's College London summer schools in Mumbai: 'Take for instance King's College London, which will send its faculty for summer school programmes to deliver lectures in eight modules this year at HR and Jai Hind College.'

David Livingstone anniversary

BBC Radio 4 10th March 2013

Professor Clare Pettitt, English, was interviewed about the achievements of explorer Dr David Livingstone on the 200th anniversary of his birth. Professor Pettitt praised his 'extraordinary achievements' as 'Africa's publicist' for global trade. Interview begins at 24.30.

Researchers grow teeth from gum cells

BBC News (Online) 9th March 2013

Research led by Professor Paul Sharpe, Dental Institute, has developed a method for replacing missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth generated from human gum cells and cells from mice. Also reported by BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio Five Live, The Independent, The Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Sun, Sky News, Daily Star and Daily Express.

King's press release related to 'Researchers grow teeth from gum cells'

Teeth grown from mice cells offer hope for tooth replacement

Times of India 9th March 2013

A King's College London team took cells from adult human gum tissue and combined them with another type of cell from mice to grow a tooth. Lead researcher Professor Paul Sharpe, Dental Institute, said: 'Epithelial cells derived from adult human gum tissue are capable of responding to tooth-inducing signals from embryonic tooth mesenchyme in an appropriate way to contribute to tooth crown and root formation and give rise to relevant differentiated cell types, following in-vitro culture.'

Revealed: The 'drug-drive' limits which will lead to prosecutions of drivers under the influence of illegal substances

Daily Mail 8th March 2013

An independent panel of experts led by Dr Kim Wolff, Reader in Addiction Science at King's, has made recommendations about which drugs listed in the Misuse of Drugs Act (1971) should be included in regulations for the new drug-driving offence. The report, published by the Department for Transport, received coverage in The Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mirror, Metro and BBC London 94.9 FM.

King's press release related to 'Revealed: The 'drug-drive' limits which will lead to prosecutions of drivers under the influence of illegal substances '

Processed meat scare: a bacon sandwich won't kill you will it?

Guardian 8th March 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, head of diabetes and nutritional sciences, comments on research which suggests that eating large amounts of processed meat is linked to an increased risk of early death, heart disease and cancer. Professor Sanders believes the study's finding, that those who ate the most processed meat were also the most likely to smoke, means the meat cannot be confidently identified as the main factor. He said: 'Tobacco use is such an enormously potent factor that it contaminates the findings.'

Is this the death of feminism?

Daily Mail 8th March 2013

Dr Christina Scharff, Culture, Media and Creative Industries, comments on new research, which suggests that young women are rejecting feminism. She said: 'The term feminism provokes unease and even hostility. Young women want to be treated equally and are aware of gender inequalities. Yet, even in countries that see themselves as being progressive on gender and sexuality, the term is often met with suspicion.' The research was also reported by the Guardian.

Weight Loss Bribes: Cash Can Entice Dieters To Drop Pounds, Study Finds

Huffington Post 8th March 2013

Eleni Mantzani, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about UK schemes using cash incentives for health. She says "you have to prove these schemes work otherwise it's just money down the drain." Also reported by Associated Press, NPR, CTV News, CBS News, MSN News,

Valium: the drug that steals women's lives

Daily Mail 7th March 2013

In an article about the dangers of valium and other benzodiazepines, Professor Malcolm Lader, Institute of Psychiatry, says: 'Doctors have ignored warnings for years, but we need to stop more people going on benzodiazepines.'

'Brain pacemaker' offers hope for anorexics

The Independent 7th March 2013

Professors Janet Treasure and Ulrike Schmidt, Institute of Psychiatry, comment on a pilot study which found that deep brain stimulation could help treat anorexia nervosa. They say the improvement in mood is key and “will go some way to reassure patients that the technique is not just another treatment designed to fatten them up without making them feel better.” Also reported by BBC News, Daily Mail, Sun, CTv (Canada), Huffington Post Canada, AFP, CTV News, Reuters

Vocational courses may be shaved

The Daily Telegraph 7th March 2013

Mention of a report by Professor Alison Wolf, Department of Management, which estimated that 350,000 students between 16-19 years old are being 'poorly served' by courses aimed only at boosting college rankings.

The Audience: May I speak freely, Your Majesty?

The Daily Telegraph 7th March 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about 'The Audience', a new West End play based on weekly audiences between the Queen and her prime minister. Professor Bogdanor advised on the script for the play and wrote a note for the programme.

Why do the Italians live longer than us?

BBC News (Online) 7th March 2013

Alan Maryon-Davis, honorary Professor of Public Health, comments on research indicating that Italians have a longer life expectancy than people in the UK. He said that Italy is a more cohesive and less divided society: 'There is a flatter social gradient - less difference between the haves and have-nots in Italy, and that is likely to play a role in health outcomes.'

Analysis: Under the skin of Britain's neo-nationalists

Politics.co.uk 7th March 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, analyses support for the English Defence League (EDL) and what it stands for. He writes: EDL 'rejects racial nationalism and white supremacism, and has denounced the ideologies of traditional European far-right groups.'

The spirits: mad scientists of mixology

Evening Standard 7th March 2013

Article about Bompas & Parr's 'Whisky Tornado' event, set to feature at King's Feed Your Mind festival. The work of food artists Bompas & Parr focuses on the interrelationship between synaesthesia, performance and setting. The festival, which runs from 7-22 March, also received coverage in Time Out magazine.

Cash can bribe dieters to lose weight, study finds

The Associated Press 7th March 2013

'You have to prove these schemes work otherwise it's just money down the drain,' says Eleni Mantzari, Psychology, in an article that discusses the fact that the chance to win or lose $20 a month enticed dieters in a yearlong study to drop an average of 9 pounds - four times more weight than others who were not offered dough to pass up the doughnuts.

Are we really facing cyberwar?

BBC News 5th March 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, argues that predictions about cyber war are exaggerated. He said: 'I think the scenario of a cyber Pearl Harbor or sometimes even a cyber 9/11 is an overstatement.'

Politics through other means: Hurting government credibility, the cyber attacks aim to disrupt and reshape belief

Times of India 4th March 2013

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, writes: 'Recent revelations about widespread hacking of the internet systems of the US government, media and corporate offices - encompassing, according to the Washington Post, almost all the powerful institutions located in the US capital - should consternate us all.'

Islamist militant killed

Sky News 4th March 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, was interviewed about the conflict in Algeria and the reported killing of Islamist militant Mokhtar Belmakhtar.

Food allergy advice for kids, don't delay the peanuts

Wall Street Journal 4th March 2013

Research from Professor Gideon Lack, Health, gets mentioned in the article which discuss food allergy, in particular peanut allergy.

What David Cameron's Conservatives must do now to earn voters' trust

The Sunday Telegraph 3rd March 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about the implications of the Eastleigh byelection and the issues David Cameron might face in addressing voters' concerns over immigration.

China's "two sessions" agenda has world impact: foreign experts

Xinhua 3rd March 2013

In an article about new policies for China, Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, said China could learn from London's catastrophic 1952 smog that killed at least 4,000. Beijing can make laws to curb air pollution, as London did with the Clean Air Act of 1956 that cleared its smogs.

Skin cancer 'able to fight off body's immune system'

BBC News (Online) 2nd March 2013

Tumours in melanoma patients deliberately create conditions that knock out the body's premier immune defence and instead attract a weaker immune response unable to kill off the tumour's cancerous cells, according to research at King's. Dr Sophie Karagiannis, Division of Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: 'This work bears important implications for future therapies since not only are IgG4 antibodies ineffective in activating immune cells to kill tumours but they also work by blocking antibodies from killing tumour cells.'

King's press release related to 'Skin cancer 'able to fight off body's immune system''

Temples where tiniest details are crucial

The Times 2nd March 2013

An article about the Francis Crick Institute's architecture. Formed from a collaboration of University College, King's College London and Imperial College, London, together with Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust and the NIMR, the Crick is due to be completed in 2015.

60 years of DNA

Financial Times 2nd March 2013

An article about the 'Codebreakers: Makers of Modern Genetics' project which launched today. Materials from  the pioneers of modern genetics, including Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin from King’s, have been collected together for the first time and made freely available in a £3.9m digitisation project from the Wellcome Library.

Viewpoint: We need ground rules for geo-information

BBC News (Online) 1st March 2013

Professor Kevin Madders, Law, calls for a Geo-Information Convention. He writes: 'The essential questions are: how do we make geoinformation reliable enough for the particular applications for which it is to be used and what limits should we put on use of its power?'

The effects of alcohol

BBC Today programme 1st March 2013

Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, investigates the effects of alcohol on the brain and body. She explores the science behind why people drink. She says alcohol has a very complicated relationship between the brain, the mind and the body.

Women in the armed forces

BBC Radio Five Live 1st March 2013

Dr Andrea Ellner, Defence Studies, commented on the news that the USA is lifting its ban on women serving in combat roles in the American army.

US sequester is a 'plague on both houses'

The Daily Telegraph 1st March 2013

In an online video Dr James Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, says the Democrats, Republicans, and ultimately the country, will all lose from politicians' failure to agree a deal to avert the $1.2 trillion collection of spending cuts, known as the 'sequester.' Dr Boys also discussed the US sequester on Sky News.

S is for Samora, By Sarah LeFanu

The Independent 1st March 2013

Dr Zoe Norridge, English, reviews 'S is for Samora' by Sarah LeFanu.

The five genetic link between mental illness

BBC Mundo 1st March 2013

Dr Gerome Breen, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on an international study which revealed that autism, attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia share several genetic risk factors. Breen said: 'The study indicates quite clearly that there is a common genetic effect between these disorders.'

Companies stick to pension age

Financial Times 28th February 2013

According to a study by law firm Speechly Bircham and the Department of Management, a fifth of employers still have a fixed retirement age despite the coalition's abolition of default retirement at the age of 65, putting them at risk of being sued for age discrimination. Stuart Woollard, Management, said that while some findings echoed cautious optimism that economic recovery might be in sight, the survey highlighted a 'deeply unsettling work environment with organisations, made up of lean workforces, pushing their employees even harder.'

Appointments - Professor Karen O'Brien

Times Higher Education 28th February 2013

Announcement of Professor Karen O'Brien's appointment as new Vice Principal for Education and Professor of English Literature.

Five psychiatric disorders 'linked'

BBC News 28th February 2013

Dr Gerome Breen, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which finds that autism, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia all share several genetic risk factors. He says: 'these studies give a window into the biology of these disorders, that's really valuable.' Also reported by the Times of India and BBC Mundo.

Preterm clinic wins award

BBC 1 28th February 2013

Professor Andrew Shennan, Women's Health, was interviewed by BBC Breakfast about a new preterm birth clinic at St Thomas' Hospital, which has recently won an NHS Innovation prize for reducing the number of premature births in London. Professor Shennan was interviewed about the clinic, their recent prize and plans to roll out their model nationally. The interview also featured on BBC London News and BBC London 94.9FM. The Times and the Evening Standard also reported on the clinic.

North Korea's nuclear plunge - A calculated step

DNA - India 27th February 2013

Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, writes: 'Nuclear ambitions of North Korea have long been evident but with the latest test Pyongyang seems to have finally made a decision to build long-range rockets and miniaturise a nuclear warhead, small and light enough to be carried by a missile.'

Air pollution concerns

LBC Radio 27th February 2013

Following the Mayor of London's recommendation that schoolchildren should be kept inside once a month when air pollution is at its highest, Professor Frank Kelly from the Environmental Research Group commented on the permanent damage that air pollution such as this can cause. He said that 'exposure can be irreversible' for children and could potentially lead to 'underdeveloped lungs.' Professor Kelly was also interviewed by Heart London and Capital London.

The question isn't who will lead Russia

The Moscow Times 27th February 2013

Russia faces very real policy problems. Leaving aside short-term tasks, such as having to pull off the Olympics in only a year's time, at a total cost of $50 billion and growing, the Kremlin faces a spate of seemingly intractable mid- and long-run challenges, writes Dr Samuel Greene, Russia Institute.

Winners announced at the first Guardian University Awards

Guardian 27th February 2013

King's won the award for Outstanding research impact at the Guardian University Awards. The judges felt that the Woundcare for Epidermolysis Bullosa (WEB) project at the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery - which aims to understand the care needs of people with Epidermolysis Bullosa - was the most challenging of the entries submitted.

Chinese transport 'workhorses' extending military's reach

Reuters 26th February 2013

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, gets quoted in an article on Chinese military powers at sea. He said: 'Support ships will not change the nature of operations in the East China Sea but will have an impact on the ability of the Chinese navy to conduct operations at sea, if the support ships are used to grow its professionalism and seamanship.'

London's history of air pollution has lessons for Beijing

Xinhua 26th February 2013

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group was interviewed about the air pollution problem in London in 1952. He said: 'The 1952 smog is thought to have killed between 4 and 12.000 over just four or five days; this was a disaster.'

ADHD Oxfordshire support group criticises NHS

BBC News 26th February 2013

Professor Eric Taylor, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on whether enough support is given for adults with ADHD. He said 'adult ADHD is a relatively new discovery. It's partly an education and training issue because adult psychiatry needs to take it on board.'

Veterans face a mental health time bomb

Daily Express 26th February 2013

The article cites research from King's Centre for Military Health which found there is an increased risk of common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety "partially accounted for by the reduced levels of social integration among the service leavers".

Islamists vs The West: Mali and the New African Battleground

International Business Times 26th February 2013

Dr Funmi Olonisakin, African Leadership Centre comments on France's intervention in Mali and she notes that straightforward military intervention alone will not resolve the crisis in the region.

John Kerry visits UK

BBC Radio Five Live 25th February 2013

Dr James D Boys, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies, examines the political pedigree of John Kerry, the new US Secretary of State, on the day of his first visit to the UK. He described John Kerry as 'admirable and qualified' and 'someone to whom Barack Obama owes a great deal.' Interview starts at 1.45.50.

Even if Iran gets the Bomb, it won't be worth going to war

The Daily Telegraph 25th February 2013

Dr Christopher Hobbs and Dr Matthew Moran from the Department of War Studies were quoted by former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw in an op-ed on the Iranian nuclear crisis. Mr Straw was writing ahead of the latest round of negotiations between Iran and the P5+1. Mr Straw drew on Dr Hobbs' and Dr Moran's article, 'Looking Beyond a Nuclear-Armed Iran: Is Regional Proliferation Inevitable?', published in the latest edition of The International Spectator.

'In the Beginning was the End'

BBC World Service 25th February 2013

Interview with Tristan Sharps, artistic director of dreamthinkspeak, on 'In the Beginning was the End' at King's College London and Somerset House.

Vertical film screens offer a new reality

Times of India 24th February 2013

Article on how portrait-orientated screens could the next big development in cinema. Dr Erika Balsom, Film Studies, said the popularity of vertical cinema was linked to technical developments and the 'larger variability of frame proportions that comes with digitization.'

Why our rich don't give enough

Mint & Wall Street Journal 23rd February 2013

Giving, especially on a large scale, does not come naturally to Indians, writes Professor Sunil Khilnani, director of the India Institute.

A place at the top of the tree

Financial Times 23rd February 2013

Professor Matias Spektor, Brazil Institute, writes about the growing importance of Brazil's foreign policy on the world stage: 'After all, Brazil's trajectory from colony to economic powerhouse, from stale dictatorship to vibrant democracy, is simply spectacular.'

The cost of the conflict on the mental health of Colombians

BBC Mundo 22nd February 2013

Dr Vaughan Bell, Institute of Psychiatry, says many Colombians live in areas of conflict, and there is very little information available on the population's mental health and how they are related to the experience of violence and the challenges of being a civilian in armed conflict.

Navigating the tricky passage to India

The Hindu 22nd February 2013

In his bid to trump up business for the UK, Cameron has made all the right noises on issues critical to India, writes Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies.

How having an older father can damage a child's health

Daily Mail 21st February 2013

Dr Avi Reichenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, says "there is now quite a bit of literature showing the relationship between a father having a child at an older age and the risk of the child having negative health and behavioural consequences." He says that people should be aware there are two biological clocks ticking.

UK college to offer insight into Tagore's global ideas

Times of India 21st February 2013

Sunil Khilnani, director of King's India Institute, was interviewed in an article about the yet to be opened Tagore Centre. He said: 'We will host short-term Tagore fellows (Gopal Gandhi will be our first). We have two scholarships for young researchers from India to come here and do their PhD on aspects of modern Indian intellectual history. We also offer to host for one term annually two exchange PhD students from India working in this field.'

The impossible injustice of Talha Ahsan's extradition and detention

New Statesman 21st February 2013

Dr Ian Patel, Law, tells the story of Talha Ahsan, who was extradited to the US in 2012 after spending six years in high security prisons in the UK. Talha Ahsan has Asperger Syndrome, and is now in a supermax prison in Connecticut.

Would-be terrorists jailed

BBC Radio 4 21st February 2013

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, was interviewed about the cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, who is thought to have inspired three men in Birmingham found guilty of a suicide bomb plot. Item starts at 9.40. Alexander was also interviewed on BBC Radio 2.

Public attitudes change with the generations, and so must welfare policy

Guardian 20th February 2013

Bobby Duffy, Visiting Senior Research Fellow at King's, writes that welfare policy must change in line with shifting generational values. He said 'Politicians and policymakers increasingly need a full generational perspective to make sense of shifting public opinion.'

Childhood cancer survival improvements under threat from clinical trial red tape: experts

The Daily Telegraph 20th February 2013

A series of studies led by some of the world's most eminent cancer experts, including Richard Sullivan, professor of cancer policy and global health at King's and King's Health Partners Integrated Cancer Centre, outline some of the biggest challenges to the improvement of cancer care for children and young people. Experts from 19 countries believe further progress is being threatened by increasingly strict research regulations and insufficient development of new drugs.

King's press release related to 'Childhood cancer survival improvements under threat from clinical trial red tape: experts'

Stay indoors this week: advice to at-risk Londoners as pollution levels set to spiral

Evening Standard 20th February 2013

In an article about a health alert issued due to the high levels of air pollution in London, research by the Environmental Research Group at King's is mentioned: 'Statistics released by King's College London showed concentrations of harmful nitrogen dioxide in some boroughs were far above government-set limits.'

British PM offers to cooperate with India on graft probe

Agence France Presse 19th February 2013

Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, gets quoted in an AFP article on the visit from British MP David Cameron to India this week. He said that Britain and India were bound by their history and large British-Indian population, but that New Delhi was destined to remain aloof. "India has never been about close relationships with any country," he said, referring to its embrace of the non-aligned movement. "They will never be the sort of partners that some countries expect them to be or want them to be."

Healthy eating and exercise

BBC Radio 4 18th February 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Head of Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, discusses the food that counts as part of people's five-a-day. Item starts at 19.30.

Iraq War 10 Years On: Was It Worth It?

Huffington Post 18th February 2013

In a debate about the Iraq war, Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), argues that those who lived under Saddam Hussein's tyranny may support the Iraq war, whilst acknowledging that he initially opposed the UK's intervention.

Organ donation: Wales government 'misled' assembly, says expert

BBC News (Online) 17th February 2013

Professor John Fabre, Transplantation, Immunology & Muscosal Biology, believes the Welsh government has misled the assembly over its 'opt-out' organ donation bill. He said: 'To pass a bill with such a misleading statement is quite an undemocratic thing to do.'

The smuggled hard drives of Timbuktu

Boston Globe 17th February 2013

Simon Tanner, Digital Humanities, helped with the digitisation of ancient manuscripts from Timbuktu following the destruction of Islamist rebels across the city. He said: 'Manuscripts tend to be very robust and live very well as long as they're in a good environment.'

Harsh V Pant: When Europe's leaders come calling

Business Standard 16th February 2013

The visits of the French president and the British prime minister to New Delhi should be seen in the context of Europe's ebbing economic power, according to Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies. He writes: "A new dynamic is emerging between Europe and Asia, and India is at the heart of this recalibration."

De-clutter your desk if you want a successful career

Daily Telegraph 15th February 2013

Professor David Mataix-Cols, Institute of Psychiatry, says a key feature of Hoarding Disorder is a difficult discarding possessions.

Film, TV violence is an intensely sensitive subject for some

LA Times 15th February 2013

Professor Michael Pluess, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses why violent films may be more disturbing to some people. He says that some people are more influenced by their environment than others.

Where the drug cheats are uncovered - the front line of the doping war

Guardian 15th February 2013

Interview with Professor David Cowan, Director of the Drug Control Centre, on the work being carried out at King's in the fight against drug cheats in sport.

A genetic code for genius?

Wall Street Journal 15th February 2013

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his research with BGI China into the genetics of intelligence. He says that if you can identify kids who are going to have diffciulties learning you can intervene early on in their lvies, through special support.

Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy by Gill Bennett

Times Higher Education 14th February 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, reviews 'Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy by Gill Bennett.'

The multiple splendours of love

Times Higher Education 14th February 2013

Davina Quinlivan, Film Studies, explores the charm of offbeat 'alternative romcoms' on Valentine's Day.

Plunge into murky waters

The Telegraph (Calcutta, India) 14th February 2013

If China develops the Gwadar port into a strategic outpost, India's options will be significantly constrained, writes Harsh V. Pant, Defence Studies.

'Tougher tests' for primary pupils

Press Association 14th February 2013

Pupils will sit tougher tests in the basics of mathematics before they leave primary school in an overhaul of the national curriculum. Commenting on the plans, Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Education & Professional Studies, said: 'We need to have a focus on understanding not simply calculation.' Speaking at a Westminster Education Forum on maths, Professor Hodgen said he had a number of concerns about the new curriculum, saying that the content of what pupils should be taught has increased, which will mean less autonomy for schools. Professor Hodgen's comments were also reported by i and the Daily Telegraph.

Plans to improve London air quality

BBC London News 13th February 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group, believes Boris Johnson's plans for an Ultra Low Emission Zone in London could be too little too late.

Boris Johnson's sticky pollution solution

Guardian 13th February 2013

A study by scientists at King's has found that a pollution trial backed by Boris Johnson, which involves 'gluing' pollution from vehicles to London's roads, is ineffective at tackling PM10s, tiny particulates that are harmful to human health. Dr Benjamin Barratt, Senior Research Fellow at King's Environmental Research Group, said: 'The bottom line is [the gluing method] is not going to work in many of the sites in London where the problem is purely down to traffic, but there are other locations in London where we have severe PM10 problems relating to industrial activity and it has been shown to have a role in those locations.'

Johnson aims to boost London air quality

Financial Times 13th February 2013

Research carried out by the Environmental Research Group at King's is mentioned in an article about Boris Johnson's plans for an Ultra Low Emission Zone in London: 'Research last year from King's College London, which monitors emissions at 100 sites across the capital, found levels of harmful nitrogen dioxide breached EU limits at most locations near roads. The worst affected areas were Putney and Brixton.'

Spread the news: butter may not be a yellow peril after all

The Daily Telegraph 13th February 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Head of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, comments on new research which indicates that men who had suffered a heart attack were more likely to die from coronary heart disease when they replaced saturated fats with polyunsaturated fat in margarine. He said: 'Since 1991, UK nutrition guidelines have stated that no more than 10 per cent of our energy should come from polyunsaturates, and our current intake is around 6 per cent.'

Don't let an allergy spoil your fun

Daily Express 12th February 2013

Dr Adam Fox, Director of the King's Allergy Academy, discusses several theories behind the UK's position as one of the world's top three countries for allergies.

Nuclear North Korea

Sky News 12th February 2013

Professor Wyn Bowen, War Studies, discussed the nuclear threat posed by North Korea.

Chinese dams in Tibet raise hackles in India

The Washington Post 12th February 2013

Harsh V. Pant, Defense Studies, gets quoted in an article on Chinese dams in Tibet: "India has very little leverage over China, and this is just one more lever that China is acquiring."

BBC Inside out: Electromagnetic sensitivity

BBC Yorkshire 11th February 2013

Dr James Rubin, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about research into electromagnetic sensitivity. He says the symptoms are certainly real, severe in some cases. However research has shown that symptoms are as likely to be caused by real fields, as by sham fields which suggests there is something psychological going on. (Begins at 18.52)

Gene discovery could lead to an end to short-sightedness

The Times 11th February 2013

An international team of scientists led by King's has discovered 24 new genes that cause refractive errors and myopia (short-sightedness). Professor Chris Hammond from the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology said: 'Clearly the hope is that eventually we will be able to block the genetic pathways that cause short-sightedness.' Also reported by BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC World Service, The Independent, Daily Express and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'Gene discovery could lead to an end to short-sightedness'

Babies scanned in womb to unlock secrets of brain growth

The Sunday Times 10th February 2013

Scientists at King's will scan the brains of 500 unborn babies using a powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to map how brain cells connect and grow.

Saying no to 'gizit' is plain prejudice

The Independent 10th February 2013

Dr Julia Snell, Department of Education and Professional Studies, reacts to comments from the headteacher of a Teeside primary school, asking parents to correct certain words, phrases and pronunciations associated with Teeside, such as 'gizit ere.' Dr Snell writes: 'Ultimately, it is not the presence or absence of non-standard forms in children's speech that raise educational issues; rather, picking on non-standard voices risks marginalising some children, and may make them less confident at school.'

In The Beginning Was The End, Somerset House, London

The Independent 8th February 2013

Review of 'In the beginning Was The End', the dreamthinkspeak theatre production presented by King's Cultural Institute and Somerset House. Paul Taylor of the Independent writes: '...its mix of live performance, witty absurdist videos and haunting "happenings" has its own imaginative integrity and is sustained with terrific logistical aplomb.' The production has also been reviewed by The Times, The Daily Telegraph, Evening Standard, Financial Times and Huffington Post.

Whoever wins in Eastleigh, the coalition will lose

Guardian 8th February 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes that the Eastleigh byelection, 'the first since the 1930s in which two governing parties in a coalition will be fighting each other with a realistic chance of winning', will highlight that there is no way of knowing if the public supports the coalition government.

Love in the time of social media

Evening Standard 8th February 2013

In an article about social media and the rise of online dating among older adults, a study by researchers at King's is mentioned. The study showed that more than 80 per cent of 50 to 90 year olds are sexually active.

24 new genes for short-sightedness identified

Voice of America - French service 8th February 2013

An international team of scientists led by King’s has discovered 24 new genes that cause refractive errors and myopia (short-sightedness). Professor Frederic Geissman, Biology, was interviewed by the French service of Voice of America.

Legalising gay marriage may improve health and reduce healthcare costs

Guardian 7th February 2013

In light of yesterday's vote on gay marriage, Dr Qazi Rahman, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses research in the US which shows that legalising gay marriage improves health and reduces healthcare costs.

Saudi prince repatriated for prison sentence

BBC Radio 4 7th February 2013

Professor Madawi Al-Rasheed, Theology & Religious Studies, commented on the Today programme about Prince Saud bin Abdulaziz bin Nasir al Saud, who killed one of his servants. She said: 'It is unlikely that he will be put in prison for life or beheaded. It seems the princes in Saudi Arabia are governed by a law of their own making.'

Be a family 'fare dodger' - get more space in a cheaper part of town

Evening Standard 6th February 2013

Professor Tim Butler, Geography, comments on the recent increase of families buying homes in cheaper locations of London rather than the suburbs. He said: 'Well-designed townhouses do not have to cost a fortune - and they can help to boost regeneration in areas that have fallen out of favour.'

Beam of light that can help banish black dog

Daily Mail 5th February 2013

Professor Tony Cleare, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which reports that laser acupuncture may be an effective way to treat depression. He says: "There is little evidence that, in depression, acupuncture to specific areas of the body is any different from acupuncture in random areas. This suggests that if acupuncture is having an effect, it isn't in the way that acupuncturists think."

Start spreading the news - saturated fat 'is not so bad,' says study

Independent 5th February 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Nutritional Sciences, commented on new research which suggests that margarine may not be healthier than standard butter. He claimed that the study was 'enormously underpowered,'of 'little relevance to diets today' and its findings had been refuted by recent better studies.

World Cancer Day: Are we killing cancer?

Daily Telegraph 4th February 2013

Research by the Institute of Psychiatry is mentioned in an article to mark World Cancer Day. Research from the IoP found that cultural factors, such as the British stiff upper lip, may explain why people in the UK don't present early enough with symptoms of cancer.

Self-harm: Childline reports calls relating to five-year-olds

BBC News 4th February 2013

Research from the Institute of Psychiatry into the link between bullying and self-harm is mentioned in this article about the rise of younger children calling Childline. Also reported in the Daily Mirror

Needle-free syringe passes test on mice

Financial Times 4th February 2013

Coverage of a study at King's which demonstrates the ability to deliver a dried live vaccine to the skin without a traditional needle, and has shown for the first time that this technique is powerful enough to enable specialised immune cells in the skin to kick-start the immunising properties of the vaccine. Dr Linda Klavinskis, Peter Gorer Department of Immunobiology, said: 'This work opens up the exciting possibility of being able to deliver live vaccines in a global context, without the need for refrigeration.'

King's press release related to 'Needle-free syringe passes test on mice'

Cyber Fail: The Obama administration's lousy record on cyber security

The New Republic 4th February 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, writes: 'Barack Obama is probably America's most web-savvy president ever. But when it comes to actually crafting policy for the nation's cyber security, his administration has been consistent in only one aspect: bluster. Obama's major legacy on cyber security, it increasingly seems, will be an infrastructure for waging a non-existent 'cyber war' that's incapable of defending the country from the types of cyber attacks that are actually coming.'

Leaders give six month deadline to find peace with the Taliban

The Daily Telegraph 4th February 2013

On reports that the leaders of Afghanistan and Pakistan have set a six month deadline to reach a peace deal with the Taliban, Dr John Bew, War Studies, said: 'There are many reasons to be sceptical that this will work. But if you are going to give this one last try it may help to have a timetable and it will help to have as many of the key players on board as possible - this hasn't been the case before.'

France says 'non' to hashtags

The Sydney Morning Herald 3rd February 2013

The Academie Francaise has invented a new word for hashtags. For now on a hashtag should be called a 'mot-diese' in French. Dr Craig Moyes, French, who recently published a book on the writer of the first modern French dictionary, feels mot-diese is 'too musical'. Dr Moyes says a lot has changed since the Academie Francaise was asked in the 17th century to put the language on a noble footing alongside ancient Greek and Latin.

Tory plan for mixed-race adoptions challenged

Daily Telegraph 3rd February 2013

Professor Alan Ruston, Adoption Studies, commented on a new study that challenged government plans to make it easier for prospective parents to adopt children from different racial or cultural backgrounds. He said: 'The government needs to take notice of these findings on the significance of ethnicity, so that the wording of the proposed adoption legislation does not seem to downplay its importance.'

The end of revolutionary science?

BBC Radio 4 (Today programme) 1st February 2013

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on a piece in Nature claiming that there will be no more revolutionary breakthroughs. He argues this is wrong and talks about the research into mental health.

Charles Dance, author John Green, French cinema's forgotten man

BBC Radio 4 1st February 2013

Tristan Sharps, the artistic director of dreamthinkspeak, walks listeners through the labyrinth of tunnels at Somerset House and King's for 'In the Beginning Was the End', a theatre production presented by King's Cultural Institute and Somerset House.

Cybersecurity

BBC Two 1st February 2013

Tim Stevens, War Studies, was interviewed on Newsnight about the difficulties authorities face in catching the perpetrators of cyber attacks. Item starts at 16.00.

How Mali could make France governable again

Financial Times 31st January 2013

Professor Dominique Moisi, Political Economy, addresses France's intervention in Mali and explores the benefits for Francois Hollande's administration.

Students: how to be boss-friendly online

Guardian 31st January 2013

Bernadette John, Digital Professionalism Lead at the Centre for Technology Enhanced Learning, advises students on how to clean up their social media profiles and give their job prospects a boost in the process.

Viewpoints: Future of the British army

BBC News (Online) 31st January 2013

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, writes about the implications of Britain's declining defence budget. He said: 'The risk, and it is a considerable risk, is that Britain will no longer be capable of the sort of rapid deployments at anything like the scale seen in the past two decades given difficulties in mobilising reservists and ensuring adequate levels of training in advance of being sent overseas.' Professor Gearson was also interviewed on the subject by the BBC News Channel.

Sharon's brain scans show leaps in science of comas

Reuters UK 30th January 2013

Professor Steve Williams, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on reports that brain scans of Ariel Sharon are showing signs of consciousness. He says: "The technology is still very new and we haven't by any means optimized this kind of work yet."

Cancer fight 'hampered in UK by stiff upper lip'

BBC News 30th January 2013

Dr Lindsay Forbes, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about her latest research which finds that British people are more likely to report being embarassed and not want to waste the doctor's time which may delay them going to the doctor with a symptom of cancer that might be serious. Also reported in the Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, Press Association, Huffington Post, Independent, The Times, METRO, NPR (US), The Week, The Evening Standard. Dr Forbes was interviewed on BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 4 Today programme, SkyNews, BBC News, BBC Radio 5 Live.

King's press release related to 'Cancer fight 'hampered in UK by stiff upper lip''

New appointment

Mumbai Mirror 30th January 2013

Professor David Caron has been appointed as the new dean of The Dickson Poon School of Law at King's College London. He is due to take up his appointment in mid-2013. Caron currently serves as a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on the Rule of Law, is a member of the American Bar Association Section on international law, a member of the US Department of State Advisory Committee on Public International Law and a former Chair of the Institute for Transnational Arbitration. (Page 14, no link available)

Workers of the World, Sit Tight

New York Times 30th January 2013

Do unions have a shot in the 21st century? Workers have obviously chafed at these job-shrinking strategies, writes Adam Davidson. Matt Vidal, a labor sociologist at King's College London, is mentioned in the article, saying that Lean actually works best for everyone (executives, employees, customers) when managers work with unions to preserve jobs and foster worker support.

Shell beats court action

BBC World News 30th January 2013

A court in the Netherlands has rejected most of the allegations against the oil giant Shell relating to oil spills in Nigeria. Professor Cees van Dam, Law, commented: 'The farmers are happy that they won one, because so far Western courts have not convicted multi-national companies for environmental damage.'

London marathon runner's death probably result of taking stimulant

Guardian 30th January 2013

Dr Andrew Kicman, head of research and development at King's Drug Control Centre, was an expert witness at the case of Claire Squires, who collapsed and died during the London marathon. Dr Kicman analysed a blood sample from Squires and said that DMAA had been present, but emphasised that she was unlikely to have known of its amphetamine-like properties. Dr Kicman's comments were also reported by the Daily Mail, The Times, and the Independent.

Why are there so few top black British police officers?

Guardian 30th January 2013

Ben Bowling, professor of criminology at King's, comments on the lack of top ranking black police officers. He said: 'There needs to be a strategic view. What are the blockages? What has been successful? Why was the foot taken off the gas?'

Bukom: Why an Accra suburb produces champion boxers

BBC News 30th January 2013

Dr Claire Haworth, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about why the region of Bokum, in Ghana has produced so many world class boxers. She says there are two things happening: "One is that there is something special genetically about this population and the other possibility is that the culture and environment that these people are in just draws out the genetic potential."

Do Universities Need Internal Social Networks?

Huffington Post 30th January 2013

Bernadette John, Digital Professionalism and Social Media Lead at King's, writes about the need for internal social networks at universities and why King's has launched its own - KINSHIP.

Night sweats, hot flushes: My prostate drugs made me feel like a menopausal woman

Daily Mail 29th January 2013

Professor Myra Hunter, Institute of Psychiatry, says that CBT can help men experiencing hot flushes as a result of prostate cancer treatment. She says CBT doesn't stop the hot flushes, but it helps patients to not panic or feel frustrated by them.

Da Vinci v dreamthinkspeak at Somerset House

Guardian 29th January 2013

Interview with the maker of 'In the beginning was the end', the dreamthinkspeak theatre production presented by King's Cultural Institute and Somerset House. Also reported by Time Out magazine.

Mali intervention

BBC Two 29th January 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, was interviewed on Newsnight about military intervention in Mali by other countries in Africa. Dr Hill questioned whether Nigeria can afford to send forces to Mali given the number of troops already committed to Somali and Sudan. Interview begins at 05.05. Dr Hill was also interviewed by the BBC News Channel about the rise of extremism in Africa.

Why the left should support a referendum on Europe

Guardian 28th January 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes that Labour should support an EU referendum and 'bring it [the EU] back to the people.'

Mysteries of the Mind: Schizophrenia patients may trump others on logic

Pittsburgh Post Gazette 28th January 2013

Dr Gareth Owen, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on his study which found that people with schizophrenia may be more logical than the rest of us. He says: "I think for many people in psychology and psychiatry, the results are rather surprising, because they have gotten used to thinking of delusions as an impairment of logical thought. This study runs against that trend."

Islamabad's man in Washington?

The Wall Street Journal 28th January 2013

Senator John Kerry is likely to be confirmed as the next U.S. secretary of state this week, and American foreign-policy hawks aren't the only ones wary. The Indian establishment was listening closely to Mr. Kerry's confirmation hearings, especially when he talked about Pakistan. New Delhi fears he is too dovish toward Islamabad's military-jihad complex, writes Harsh V. Pant, Defence Studies.

Kurt Schwitters, On the Edge, Gender, The Love Charm of Bombs

BBC Radio 3 28th January 2013

Dr Lara Feigel, English, was interviewed about her new book 'The Love Charm of Bombs', a wartime biography of five writers, amongst them Graham Greene, Elizabeth Bowen and Rose Macaulay who volunteered as ambulance drivers and ARP wardens.

Europe's institutions pose counterweight to voters' wishes

The Wall Street Journal 28th January 2013

In an article that analyses the influence of the Italian elections on the eurzone, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, History, said: 'Once you take economic policy out of the hands of voters, what is left?'

Then and now: lessons from the 1975 referendum

The Sunday Times 27th January 2013

Drawing on lessons learned from the 1975 referendum on the Common Market, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes that 'Today the Establishment remains in Europe but the people are distinctly sceptical.' He adds: 'That is the case for a further referendum.'

The Why Factor

BBC World Service 27th January 2013

Dr Qazi Rahman, Psychology, takes part in a feature programme looking at sexual orientation ahead of the Sochi Winter Olympics and the controversy surrounding Russia’s anti-gay laws.

Review of Zero Dark Thirty

BBC Radio 4 26th January 2013

Deborah Bull, Executive Director of King's Cultural Institute, reviews Zero Dark Thirty, a film about the capture of Osama Bin Laden. Item begins at 2.20.

Therapy 'could cut teen drinking', researchers say

BBC News 25th January 2013

Dr Patricia Conrod, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on her study which found that targeted mental health interventions reduced teenage alcohol use. She says: "Not only does the intervention have a significant effect on the teenagers most at risk of developing problematic drinking behaviour, there was also a significant positive effect on those who did not receive the intervention, but who attended schools where interventions were delivered to high-risk students." Dr Conrod was also interviewed by BBC Radio 5 Live.

King's press release related to 'Therapy 'could cut teen drinking', researchers say'

The King's College London unit tackling eating disorders

The Lancet 25th January 2013

In a profile piece on eating disorders research at King's, Professors Ulrike Schmidt and Janet Treasure, Institute of Psychiatry, talk about the history of the unit and the future of eating disorders research.

Arab spring still a work in progress

Voice of America 25th January 2013

As Egyptians mark the second anniversary of their revolution, Voice of America asked experts to assess the actual impact of the Arab Spring. Dr Stacy Gutkowski, MEMS, said: 'The word 'revolution' is a very romantic term. It conjures up images of something dramatic like the Berlin Wall falling. That isn't what has happened in the region. These are rumblings, long-term rumblings. But not yet radical change.'

Older mothers

BBC London 94.9 25th January 2013

Professor Andrew Shennan, Division of Women's Health, comments on reports that nearly half of all babies are now born to women aged thirty or older. Professor Shennan discussed some of the issues that older mothers might face during pregnancy. Interview begins at 15.00.

What are we like? Centre plans global evaluations

Times Higher Education 24th January 2013

The International Centre for University Policy Research, launched by King's, will tackle an 'amazing' lack of empirical research into higher education. Directed by Professor Alison Wolf, Management, the Centre will compare different national university systems and write policy papers to inform debate in the UK.

King's press release related to 'What are we like? Centre plans global evaluations'

US foes of legal pot focus on risks to the brain

Reuters India 24th January 2013

Opposers to Marijuana legalisation in the USA cite evidence from a study from the Institute of Psychiatry which found that cannabis use in adolescence is linked to a decline in IQ. Also reported by Reuters UK and the Huffington Post.

King's press release related to 'US foes of legal pot focus on risks to the brain'

Drone inquiry launched

Sky News 24th January 2013

Paul Schulte, War Studies, said he is 'encouraged' by efforts to reexamine the legal frameworks of drone attacks but said that drones are 'morally no different' from bombs.

Cybersecurity - Gozi computer virus

BBC World News 24th January 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, was interviewed about the Gozi computer virus, a virtual crow-bar to break into private bank accounts. US authorities have recently foiled an international cyber-crime ring that compromised many accounts across the globe.

What can Londoners expect from new Thames tunnel? Lethal pollution

Guardian 24th January 2013

Dr Ian Mudway from the Environmental Research Group comments on plans to build a new tunnel under the Thames, linking east and south London. Pointing out that Tower Hamlets is already in noncompliance with EU air quality standards, he said, of the tunnel: 'It feels criminal to me, unjust, to consider delivering this extra burden of pollution.'

The Royal Institution doesn't represent my kind of Britishness in science

New Statesman 24th January 2013

Mention of research by the Centre for Public Policy Research at King's, showing that 18 per cent of British black children are interested in a career in science. 'That's significantly higher than the 13 per cent of British white children. However, the black children don't get to follow through on their aspirations', reports the New Statesman.

Vegetarianism versus 'flexitarianism'

The Daily Telegraph 23rd January 2013

In an article about 'flexitarianism' - vegetarians who sometimes eat meat - Tom Sanders, professor of nutrition and dietectics, comments on red meat consumption. He said: 'Eating red meat once a week is plenty. Vegetarian meals tend to be healthier and lower in calories.'

Ageing gamers

BBC World News 22nd January 2013

Dr Tim Jordan, Acting Head of Culture, Media and Creative Industries, believes the gaming industry is changing its approach by becoming more inclusive of older generations. He said: 'In the main the gaming population is ageing as games get older.'

Algerian hostage crisis

Sky News 21st January 2013

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, discussed the Algerian hostage conflict and the counter-terrorism tactics that might be used to address the crisis. He said: 'The Arab spring has injected a great deal of uncertainty across North Africa.' He added that drones could potentially be used by the US.

France Becomes Regional Gendarme in Mali

The Moscow Times 21st January 2013

Professor Dominique Moisi, Political Economy, writes about France's intervention in Mali. He said: 'The benefits have become more dubious, while the costs and risks have grown increasingly evident.' Professor Moisi's article also featured in The Australian Financial Review.

Birth of Neo-Liberalism; Music, Race and Difference

BBC Radio 4 21st January 2013

Professor Paul Gilroy, English, discussed neo-liberalism on 'Thinking Allowed.'

Want to ward off Diabetes? Eat chocolates, drink red wine

Times of India 21st January 2013

Article on how a compound found in chocolate and red wine may guard people against the risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

Recession linked to rising suicides

Sunday Express 20th January 2013

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on rising rates of depression during the recession. She says that people 'get into a vicious cycle of low self-esteem and with less money they can't afford to do the things that would improve their mental well-being.'

Des res boroughs suffer worst pollution deaths

The Sunday Times 20th January 2013

Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health, comments on 'particulate pollution' caused mainly by diesel engines, where the particles are so small that they penetrate the lungs and blood vessels, causing inflammation. According to Professor Kelly particulate pollution now kills 30,000 people a year. He said: 'The particles are tiny balls of carbon laden with toxic chemicals and reactive metals. In the body they attack your lungs and blood vessels. Over years they are lethal.'

Sine up, comrades

The Sunday Times 20th January 2013

Professor Alison Wolf from the Department of Management was interviewed about a specialist maths school planned by King's College London and set to open in September 2014. She explained that the school is seeking applications from pupils who 'may not have a string of A* at GCSE but will have done well at maths and maybe physics. We're looking for mathematical talent and everything else is secondary.'

Study Finds How Genes That Cause Illness Work

The New York Times 20th January 2013

Genes are not the sole cause of rheumatoid arthritis and other common diseases, according to Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology. For example, although identical twins have identical DNA, they do not always get the same diseases. Also reported by The Straits Times.

Chocolate, Tea, and Berries: How to fight Diabetes with Food

Time 20th January 2013

Article on how diabetics have to watch what they eat but compounds found in chocolate, tea and berries may lower the risk for their disease.

Eating berries may protect you from diabetes

NDTV 20th January 2013

Article on how having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes. Researchers from University of East Anglia (UEA) and King's College London in Britain, high levels of flavonoids including anthocyanins and other compounds in berries, tea and chocolate could guard against type 2 diabetes.

Chocolate, berries and red wine are shields against berries

Globo.com 20th January 2013

Article on research which shows that flavonoids contained in such foods and beverages to reduce insulin resistance and regulate blood glucose.

Eating berries, chocolate may guard against diabetes

Business Standard (India) 20th January 2013

Article on research by King's which has found that having a significant amount of berries, tea and chocolate daily may help protect you from diabetes.

Chocolate may help ward off diabetes risk

Economic Times 20th January 2013

Article on new research by King's which has shown how chocolate may ward off the risk of diabetes

The Why Factor - the Boxers of Bukom

BBC World Service 19th January 2013

Dr Claire Haworth, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the influence of nature and nurture, or genes and environment, on why Bokum in Accra (Ghana) has produced so many world-class boxers.

What doctors won't do

Guardian 19th January 2013

Susan Bewley, Professor of Complex Obstetrics, explains why she would never have a screening mammogram. She said: 'Down the microscope, doctors can't always tell the difference between "dangerous" and "OK to leave alone". So it is possible to find things "too early" that are not really life-threatening cancer.'

Higher tuition fees caused 'wild swings' in student numbers, figures show

Guardian 19th January 2013

Article reports that King's has increased its intake of students by 12%. Also reported by the Financial Times.

Professor's service to military healthcare

The Times 19th January 2013

Professor SIR Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, was awarded a knighhood in this year's New Years Honours.

King's press release related to 'Professor's service to military healthcare'

Leon Panetta calls for 'relentless pressure on al-Qaida'

Guardian 18th January 2013

The US Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, spoke at King's, where he said there must be a fundamental change in the transatlantic alliance, as the west faces challenging global threats. Comments from Secretary Panetta's speech at King's were also reported by Financial Times, Channel 4 News, ITV News, Daily Mail, Reuters, Press Association, MSN UK, Yahoo News UK, New York Times, Washington Post, Bloomberg, Agence France Press (AFP), Associated Press (AP), CBS News (USA), ABC News (USA), USA Today, Press Trust of India (PTI) and Zee News (India), among numerous other outlets.

King's press release related to 'Leon Panetta calls for 'relentless pressure on al-Qaida''

Hostage crisis in Algeria is ongoing

BBC Radio 4 18th January 2013

Nick Butler, King's Policy Institute, talked about the hostage situation in Algeria on the Today programme. He said: 'A lot of people in both BP, Statoil and the other companies will know one or more of the individuals affected here. There is uncertainty as to whether this situation is finished or if it is a continuing conflict.'

Shiraz Maher: The Jihadist Eruption in Africa

The Wall Street Journal 18th January 2013

Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), writes about the hostage situation in Algeria and its relation to the growing jihadist movement in Mali. He said: 'The hostage crisis that broke out in Algeria ostensibly has its roots in Mali, Algeria's neighbour to the southwest.'

The passionate European's case for leaving the union

Financial Times 17th January 2013

Ahead of David Cameron's speech on the UK's future in the European Union, Professor Simon May, Philosophy, writes that despite being 'the noblest of postwar political projects', the UK must ultimately leave the EU. He said: 'It is irresponsible to ask a country to renew vows to a marriage it cannot abide.'

Professor Tony Charman

Times Higher Education 17th January 2013

Child autism expert Professor Tony Charman has been appointed to the Institute of Psychiatry's Department of Psychology.

Traffic pollution causes lung deficits in young children

The Lancet 17th January 2013

Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group (ERG), warns that not enough is being done to tackle air pollution in view of the magnitude of the problem.

Will Big Data DNA analysis herald new era in medicine?

BBC News (Online) 17th January 2013

Dr Stuart Hogarth, Social Science, Health & Medicine, commented on government plans to collect the DNA of 100,000 people with rare diseases and cancer. He said: The 'grand bargain' that the government is offering us is that if we give them our DNA then they are going to revolutionise healthcare. Well it's not clear in fact that we need so much genomic data to understand the genetic basis of health and disease.'

Algerian forces try to re take control of gas facility where Islamist militants hold hostages

BBC Radio Scotland 17th January 2013

Dr Jonathan Hill, Defence Studies, spoke about the Algerian military strategy in their fight against the Islamist hostage-takers on the Newsdrive programme. He said: 'The Algerian armed forces have been waging a two decade long campaign against various Islamist terrorist groups. They've really taken a hard stance when launching military operations. Dr Hill also spoke to Channel 4 News and BBC World News.

David Cameron's speech on the European Union

BBC Radio 4 17th January 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, took part in a discussion on the PM show which questioned the need for politicians to make big public speeches. He said: 'There is a case when there's an issue of fundamental concern, which obviously the European Union is, for a politician to lay out his views upon it.'

How pre-positioning can make emergency relief more effective

Guardian 17th January 2013

An article about the need to pre-position emergency aid in vulnerable areas argues that the science behind pre-positioning is not been adequately transmitted. Emma Visman, Humanitarian Futures Programme, said: 'There have been limited opportunities for the direct engagement of scientists in humanitarian and development work on a regular basis. There's a lot of interest in it, but people haven't necessarily recognised that it requires sustained investment.'

High-flying "millennial" women don't live to work-book

Reuters 17th January 2013

A new book by Dr Elisabeth Kelan, Management, argues that both women and men of the millenial generation will no longer accept endless working hours and are instead choosing more flexible options such as starting their own businesses. This was also reported by Reuters India, Reuters Brasil, Globo (Brazil), Terra (Brazil), Yahoo! (Brazil), Business Times (Singapore) and Global Post (USA).

Political speeches

BBC Radio 4 17th January 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discussed historic political speeches of years gone by.

King's College looks to expand partnership with Indian institutes

The Hindu 17th January 2013

Feature interview with Principal Professor Sir Rick Trainor during his trip to India, outlining the universities partnerships, collaborations and overall strategy in the country.

Li pledges measures in fight for clean air

China Daily 16th January 2013

As air pollution has reached a new record high in Beijing, Professor Frank Kelly and Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, were interviewed by China Daily, Shanghai Morning Post, Chengdu Economic Daily and Oriental Morning Post, on comparisons with London air pollution and in particular the Great Smog of 1952. Beijing suffers from both London's old problem (coal-fired power stations) and London's new pollution problem (traffic), said Professor Kelly. 'To improve air quality, the Chinese authorities will need to tackle both of these problems.' The story was also reported by Xinhua, Sina.com (China), Sina.com (Hong Kong), QQ.com (China) and Changjiang Daily.

Economic development of Russian Far East

Monocle24 Radio 16th January 2013

Dr Natasha Kuhrt, War Studies, was interviewed on the the economic development of the Russian Far East.

New qualification to boost post-16 maths numbers urged

BBC News (Online) 15th January 2013

The solution to England's poor participation rate in post-16 mathematics education could lie in a new qualification, according to researchers at King's. Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Department of Education & Professional Studies, said: 'Our study shows the importance of a consensual approach to policy development and implementation. Higher education and employers will need to be involved in the development of a new qualification if they are to value it and to make it an entry requirement.' Also reported by Press Association, The Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Huffington Post, MSN UK and LBC Radio.

King's press release related to 'New qualification to boost post-16 maths numbers urged'

King's College London launches flagship pre-university programme at The Doon School

Times of India 15th January 2013

Article about King's announcement of a new two week intensive residential Winter School for 16-18 year olds, to be hosted at The Doon School, on Wednesday. The new programme sees two top institutions with British heritage join forces to equip students with the knowledge and skills to lead in the 21st century.

King's College London launches flagship pre-university programme at The Doon School

India Today 15th January 2013

Article on King's College London launch of a new flagship pre-university programme at The Doon School.

Khushwant Singh awarded Fellowship of King's College London

Times of India 15th January 2013

Article about how in recognition of his exceptional achievements in the fields of literature and journalism, King's has awarded esteemed alumnus Khushwant Singh a Fellowship of the College, its highest honour.

King's College London appoints US lawyer as new law school dean

The Lawyer 14th January 2013

Professor David Caron has been appointed as the new Dean of The Dickson Poon School of Law. Prof Caron will join the College from the University of California, Berkeley. Also reported by Global Legal Post, Lawyer 2B and Young Lawyer.

King's press release related to 'King's College London appoints US lawyer as new law school dean'

Britain will leave the EU if it does not change, Osborne warns as battle with Brussels escalates

Daily Mail 14th January 2013

The Dickson Poon School of Law at King's welcomed Joaquin Almunia, Vice President of the European Commission and Commissioner for Competition, and Dr Vince Cable MP, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation & Skills, for a debate on the modernisation of state aid policy. The visit was also reported by the Wall Street Journal, El Economista (Spain), Fox Business, Capital (Greece) and Beurs (Netherlands).

King's press release related to ' Britain will leave the EU if it does not change, Osborne warns as battle with Brussels escalates'

Khushwant Singh awarded King's College London Fellowship

Outlook 14th January 2013

Article on award of Fellowship of the College to Khushwant Singh.

King's at Doon

Times of India 13th January 2013

Article on the news that King’s College London will conduct a two-week residential winter school for 16-18-year-olds, to be taught by the college’s faculty and held at The Doon School in Dehradun. ‘King’s at Doon’ is a new flagship pre-university programme in India, longer and more intensive than any others currently offered by King’s in India and is open to students from all schools.

King's at Doon

Times of India 13th January 2013

Article on the news that King’s College London will conduct a two-week residential winter school for 16-18-year-olds, to be taught by the college’s faculty and held at The Doon School in Dehradun. ‘King’s at Doon’ is a new flagship pre-university programme in India, longer and more intensive than any others currently offered by King’s in India and is open to students from all schools.

Lord Heseltine piles pressure on Cameron for his 'unnecessary gamble' over in-out European referendum

Daily Mail 12th January 2013

Mention of a speech by Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, at King's. In his speech he made it clear that the Liberal Democrats would resist any attempt to renegotiate Britain's membership of the EU.

The Age of Epigenetics

The Khaleej Times 11th January 2013

Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology, writes about the study of epigenetics and why the field is gaining traction. He said: 'More than 50 years on, genes remain crucial to understanding complex diseases especially given scientists ever-improving ability to alter them. The age of the gene is far from over; it has simply progressed into the age of epigenetics.'

Costly? Manipulative? Secretive?

Financial Times 10th January 2013

Dr Helen Yallop, History, writes about the misconceptions of headhunting as being costly, manipulative and secretive. She writes: 'Headhunters are trained to make things easy and pleasant.'

Snoring, a sweet tooth and burning gums - the menopause symptoms no one warns you about

Daily Mail 10th January 2013

An article about unexpected symptoms of menopause mentions research by King's Institute of Psychiatry which found that cognitive behavioural therapy can help to reduce several of these symptoms such as hot flushes.

King's press release related to 'Snoring, a sweet tooth and burning gums - the menopause symptoms no one warns you about '

Gravity loading skin suit

BBC London News 10th January 2013

Dr David Green, Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences (CHAPS), demonstrated a gravity loading skin suit, designed to combat the absence of gravity in space.

Future scientists

BBC Radio Ulster 9th January 2013

Professor Louise Archer, Education and Professional Studies, was interviewed about children and their aspirations to work in science. Drawing on findings from the ASPIRES research project, Professor Archer pointed out that 'liking science is not enough' - research shows that even though the majority of children find science interesting and enjoyable, few continue with it beyond the age of 16 or aspire to be a scientist.

Learning drugs reawaken grown-up brain's inner child

New Scientist 9th January 2013

New research suggests a mood-stabilising drug can help achieve perfect pitch. The discovery is the first evidence that it may be possible to revert the human brain to a childlike state, enabling us to treat disorders and unlock skills that are difficult, if not impossible, to acquire beyond a certain age. Professor Allan Young, co-author of the study from the Institute of Psychiatry, says: "If you can reopen that critical period, you could potentially reawaken learning in all."

Prince's fears 'a threat to law on succession'

The Times 8th January 2013

Robert Blackburn, professor of constitutional law, believes Prince Charles' intervention over the law changing the rules of succession may cause problems in the passage of the legislation. According to Professor Blackburn, Prince Charles' intervention has made the 'inherent difficulties' and 'scope for disagreement' surrounding the reform more public.

Jihad Comes to Kenya

Foreign Affairs (US) 8th January 2013

Alexander Melegrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), wrote an article about militant activity in Kenya. He said: 'Until recently, experts assumed that al-Shabaab's recruitment in Kenya was limited to the country's Somali minority, which numbers roughly a million people. But recent attacks have forced a reassessment; as ex-members testify, now Kenyans are joining up as well.'

Liverpool Care Pathway: 'We want the very best in care for people,' says leading doctor

The Daily Telegraph 8th January 2013

Professor Irene Higginson, Health & Social Care Research, was interviewed about the challenges surrounding palliative care and the use of the Liverpool Care Pathway. She said: 'What people are trying to do with the Liverpool Care Pathway is to take the principles that have worked very well in hospice care and put them into hospitals. I think that's a very good and important and laudable goal.' Professor Higginson's comments were also reported by The Independent and i.

A glimmer of hope for dementia sufferers

The Daily Telegraph 7th January 2013

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a drink for Alzheimer's sufferers that, they claim, helps maintain synapses - the connections in the brain that are gradually lost by sufferers of the disease. However, Clive Ballard, professor of old age psychiatry, advises caution: 'People shouldn't get excited that an off-the-shelf drink is going to transform the lives of people with dementia. While it showed some memory benefits, there's no evidence it has any effect on other symptoms such as activities of daily living.'

IoS theatre preview of 2013: A cocktail of fine writing and star casts

The Independent 6th January 2013

Preview of dreamthinkspeak's immersive theatre production 'In the Beginning was the End', presented by King's Cultural Institute and Somerset House.

UK's first hand transplant: the psychological impact

Channel 4 News 4th January 2013

Dr Joe Chilcot, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the UK's first hand transplant. He says it's important for patients' mental health to be monitored before and after the procedure.

Health and diet report

BBC Radio 4 3rd January 2013

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, commented in a report which analysed of the guidance that everyone should eat 5 pieces of fruit or vegetables a day.

Professor Michael Lynskey

Times Higher Education 3rd January 2013

Professor Michael Lynskey, Institute of Psychiatry, was recently appointed to the IoP's Addictions Department. He says he sees his role "as trying to provide a fairly neutral evaluation of the effects of drug use and the potential approaches to limiting harms associated with drug use."

King's press release related to 'Professor Michael Lynskey'

A science job? You've got to be Einstein, say children

The Times 2nd January 2013

An article about research led by Professor Louise Archer, Education & Professional Studies, which found that most children are not aspiring to scientific careers and that children from poor homes are even less likely to do so.

Smoking doesn't relieve stress - quitting does

Daily Mail 2nd January 2013

Research by Oxford University and King's challenges the popular assumption that smoking relieves stress, and argues that it only relieves the anxiety caused by nicotine withdrawal. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph, BBC News online and the Times of India. Dr Mairtin McDermott, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery, lead author of the research was interviewed by BBC Radio 4's Today Programme.

King's press release related to 'Smoking doesn't relieve stress - quitting does'

US Budget and implications of the fiscal cliff

Sky News 2nd January 2013

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, discussed the political implications of the fiscal cliff vote in the US. He believes the outcome demonstrates the inability of the Democrats and Republicans to work together in addressing the US Budget. Dr Boys was also interviewed about the fiscal cliff by BBC News Channel, BBC Radio Wales, LBC Radio, Al Jazeera and Monocle Radio 24.

Hilary Mantel : British citizenship test reminds me of apartheid

The Times 2nd January 2013

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has criticised a new British citizenship test. He said: 'How many of the indigenous British population would be able to answer these questions? I don't think people coming into the country should be singled out.'

The road to ruin

Financial Times 2nd January 2013

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, reviews 'Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan by William Dalrymple.'

A brave new world of super workers is here. It's been put on a plate for us

The Times 1st January 2013

An article about the importance of diet in sustaining a productive workforce mentions research led by Professor Genevra Richardson, Law, which found that human enhancements may come into action in the near future.

History Destinations

BBC History Magazine 1st January 2013

Professor Robert Holland, Hellenic Studies, and Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, offer a guide to exploring the historical attractions of Cyprus and Venice respectively.

US politicians fail to reach economic deal

Sky News 31st December 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, commented on Hillary Clinton's recent health scare and the questions which are being raised about her age. Dr Boys was also interviewed by the BBC News Channel.

Culture and Anarchy

BBC Radio 4 31st December 2012

Tony Thorne, English Language Centre, took part in Melvyn's Bragg's 'The Value of Culture'.

Are video games really the villains in our violent age?

The Observer 30th December 2012

Dr Vaughan Bell, Institute of Psychiatry, argues that there are numerous benefits to playing action computer games as they improve how well we pay attention, how quickly we react, how sensitive we are to images and how accurately we sort information.

Don't rely on the past to predict the future of the Middle East

The Observer 30th December 2012

An article about how historical analogy should not be used to explain current events mentions the King's of War blog by the Department of War Studies.It says: 'The reality is that the Middle East is not the Balkans of the 1990s, nor is Egypt revolutionary Iran.'

Our Queen will never call it a day

Daily Express 30th December 2012

In an article which debates whether the Queen of England should abdicate in the manner of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, Professor Robert Blackburn, Law, said: 'The fact that the Netherlands now has a tradition of abdication, which they created, does raise the question of whether it's a better system than our own.'

When the Mail traded shares for its readers

Daily Mail 29th December 2012

Research by Professor Richard Roberts, History, was mentioned in an article about the time of Charles Duguid as City Editor of the Daily Mail.

I'm addicted to my chilli nibbles says Jamie Oliver

Daily Mail 29th December 2012

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has said that he feels addicted to chillis due to the chemical capsaicin. Dr Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, commented: 'There is no evidence that capsaicin regulates mood or behaviour, or induces addiction, when ingested as part of our food consumption.'

Between the lines: ancient parchments, modern puzzles

The Independent 29th December 2012

A review of new book by Professor Joan Taylor, Theology, entitled The Essenes, the Scrolls and the Dead Sea. It says: 'Her prose is fully measured and her proposition, that the Essenes were not a sect but one of the leading legal schools of Judaism, sounds plausible.'

Peter Higgs: honour for physicist who proposed particle

BBC News 29th December 2012

King's alumnus Professor Peter Higgs, after whom the Higgs boson particle is named, has been recognised in the New Year Honours.

Ones to watch in 2013

The Independent 29th December 2012

King's alumna Aiysha Hart is named as one to watch in 2013. An English Literature graduate, Aiysha is due to feature in Richard Curtis' new rom-com 'About Time' later this year.

Military health expert knighted

BBC News 29th December 2012

Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry and Director of the King's Centre for Military Health Research, has been knighted in the New Year's Honours. Professor Wessely said he was "genuinely surprised and incredibly honoured" by the award. Also reported in Times Higher Education

King's press release related to 'Military health expert knighted'

Battle of the professors

Daily Mail 28th December 2012

King's alumnus and renowned physicist Professor Peter Higgs argued that Professor Richard Dawkins has caricatured religious believers as extremists and ignored those who try to reconcile their beliefs with science.

10 Major Research Achievements of 2012

Reuters 27th December 2012

The findings of Chiara Nosarti, IoP, were celebrated by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation which has highlighted ten significant findings of 2012. Chiara Nosarti's research found that babies born prematurely were more likely to suffer from mental illness later in life.

Link between pot, psychosis goes both ways in kids

Reuters US 25th December 2012

A new Dutch study argues that psychosis in adolescents may be linked to later use of marijuana. Dr Marta Di Forti, Institute of Psychiatry, commented: 'We can say for some people that cannabis comes first and psychosis comes second, but for some people they have some (undiagnosed) psychosis (and) perhaps cannabis makes them feel better.' Also reported by Fox News, Reuters India and Reuters UK

One moment in time: Katherine Grainger looks back on the fulfilment of her Olympic dream

Daily Mirror 22nd December 2012

Olympic gold-medalist Katherine Grainer, a PhD student in the School of Law, commented on the most successful year of her career. She said: 'When the moment arrived, there was a nice symmetry to it - waking up on the morning knowing we could do it, believing it was going to happen from the first stroke and finally crossing the line with that ultimate sensation of fulfillment.'

Hundreds gather in anticipation of the end of the world

BBC News 21st December 2012

Dr Adrian Pearce, History and Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, has commented on the ancient Mayan prediction that the world will end on Friday 21 December. Dr Pearce said: 'Some speak of apocalypse, of the end of the world. But others have a more positive interpretation, and speak rather of a transition from one great cycle of human time and experience, to a new cycle which will be more positive for human kind and for the planet.' His comments were featured on BBC News at 10, BBC Breakfast, and many Chinese news sources.

Kings, queens and the political chess match

Daily Telegraph 20th December 2012

In an article about the power exercised by monarchs at Cabinet meetings through history, Dr Andrew Blick, History, said: 'All sorts of people had the right to turn up to Cabinet in the early 18th century. The trouble was that some of the aristocrats were not up to the job.'

Campus round-up

Times Higher Education 20th December 2012

A round-up of main news from across UK universities mentions the move of the The Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine from Imperial College London to King's Department of history in August 2013.

China arrests members of doomsday sect

Al Jazeera 20th December 2012

Dr Tim Hildebrandt, Lau China Institute, spoke to Al Jazeera following news that China had arrested hundreds of people from a doomsday cult. He said the crackdown might be a reflection of a larger concern by Chinese authorities because it happened in Qinghai, where there are large Muslim and Tibetan populations. The story was also reported by Yahoo News (Middle East).

Could your genes be responsible for how intensely you feel pain?

Daily Mail 20th December 2012

A team of scientists led by Dr Frances Williams, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, has identified a particular set of genes that interact with one another to regulate pain in humans, and found that differences in these genes may influence people’s sensitivity to pain.

Court to rule on child's treatment

BBC News 20th December 2012

Dr Carolyn Johnston, Medical Education Division, has commented on the case of Neon Roberts, a seven year-old boy suffering from a brain tumour, whose mother Sally Roberts wishes to prevent him undergoing radiotherapy. Dr Johnston said: 'The role of the judge is to consider the child's welfare. Although he will be listening to the parents' concerns, he will be looking at the medical evidence as well.' Dr Johnston's comments were featured on BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC News at Six and BBC News at 10.

Workers will lose more protection

Evening Standard 19th December 2012

Professor Keith Ewing, Dickson Poon School of Law, comments on new legislation that means employers must only consult for 45 days before the redundancy of over 100 workers - as opposed to the former 90 days. He said: 'This will not only make it easier to sack staff — it also makes it easier to reduce their terms and conditions by giving 45 rather than 90 days’ notice.'

Legal highs 'stunt mentally ill'

BBC News 19th December 2012

In an article about the problems faced by mentally ill patients who use drugs to achieve 'legal highs', Professor David Taylor, Psychopharmacology, said: 'It's like going into a chemistry lab and helping themselves to jars on the shelf. Anyone with severe psychotic illness should avoid legal highs like the plague.'

Why should I study at a Russell Group university?

Guardian 19th December 2012

Anne-Marie Canning, Head of Widening Participation, and Paul Teulon, Head of Admissions, are taking part in a discussion with potential students about the advantages of studying at a Russell Group university.

Would a nuclear Iran really trigger a new arms race in the Middle East?

Guardian 19th December 2012

Dr Christopher Hobbs and Matthew Moran, War Studies, wrote a guest blog for the Guardian about a new analysis which questions the assumption that if Iran gets nuclear weapons, its neighbours would follow suit. It says: 'The flawed logic of 'proliferation begets proliferation' is clearly demonstrated in North East Asia where North Korea's nuclear weapons have not provoked Japan or South Korea to follow suit despite a long history of regional conflict and volatile relations.'

Never a lender be? How sharing museums can reap the benefits

Guardian 19th December 2012

A set of wax hands displaying numerous diseases are being exhibited at the Museum of London. The hands are usually displayed at the Gordon Museum of Pathology at King's.

Queen to attend Cabinet to mark Jubilee

The Times 18th December 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the Queen's attendance at a Cabinet meeting. He believes that the last sovereign to attend Cabinet was George III in 1784.

Brain scans could uncover psychopaths, say researchers

Reuters TV 18th December 2012

Dr Nigel Blackwood, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the structural differences found in the brains of psychopaths compared to non-psychopaths.

King's press release related to 'Brain scans could uncover psychopaths, say researchers'

Surgeons' ranking system

BBC Radio 4 18th December 2012

Kevin Burnand, Emeritus Professor of Vascular Surgery, comments on plans to introduce data on the performance of surgeons. He said the plans worry him for two reasons: 'Firstly, groups of patients who look bad will be turned down for surgery and secondly, surgeons who are performing difficult procedures or who have a run of bad luck with poor outcomes will appear to be poor surgeons when that isn't necessarily the case.' Professor Burnand's interview on Today begins at 2.10.58. He was also interviewed by the Daily Mail.

Connecticut School Shooting

ITV News 17th December 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, believes the recent school shooting in Connecticut will not prompt a change in gun legislation due to the 'cultural, historical and political block' of the Second Amendment, which allows American's to bear arms. He added: 'It is very difficult to see how gun legislation will get through with a Republican-controlled Congress.' Dr Boys also discussed gun control on Sky News and Channel 5 News.

What are the health risks of space travel?

BBC News (Online) 16th December 2012

Dr David Green from the Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences (CHAPS) describes some of the health risks of space travel, including suborbital flights. He said: 'It's highly likely you will feel sick or be sick and that's a real concern. Going back to Earth, everything will feel heavier. You could knock yourself unconscious.'

Christmas Tree Syndrome Causes Festive Hazard

Sky News (Online) 16th December 2012

Prof Jonathan Brostoff, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on the health problems caused by Christmas trees for people with asthma. He said: 'The spores and moulds you find on trees can set off people's asthma. It's like them having late summer hay fever but in December because of the Christmas tree. It's a problem for people who already have respiratory conditions.'

'Parents may never recover from Sandy Hook tragedy'

Evening Standard 16th December 2012

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, says that some parents who lost children in the Sandy Hook shooting may never recover from the pain of their death. Also reported in the Daily Express and Press Association.

Ties that divide

The Economist 15th December 2012

Professor Robert Wintemute, comments on government plans to let same-sex couples get married. He said: 'There’s no way you can stop a couple going to the European Court of Human Rights and arguing that the fact British law does not oblige religious organisations to marry them is a violation of their rights.'

Britain's top 100 children's doctors

The Times 15th December 2012

King's academics feature among The Times' top 100 paediatric specialists in Britain.

US Shootings

Channel 4 News 15th December 2012

Following the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in the US, Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, believes it will not galvanise politicians into ending gun possession. Referring to President Obama, Dr Boys said: 'He has not made gun legislation of any sort a political priority.' Interview appears at 08.10 in the video entitled 'America's worst school shooting - details of gunman emerge.'

Census sense

The Times 14th December 2012

In a letter to The Times, Professor Simon Wessely, Dr Nicola Fear and Professor Christopher Dandeker, King's Centre for Military Health Research, say the national census should gather more data on veterans.

King's College to open specialist sixth form for maths prodigies

Evening Standard 14th December 2012

King's is planning a specialist sixth-form school for talented young mathematicians. In an interview with the Evening Standard, Professor Alison Wolf from the Department of Management said: 'There are some really talented young mathematicians who are not getting the inspiring teaching they need. The school will be able to attract really talented teachers who want to work with these children.' Also reported by The Independent and Times Higher Education.

King's press release related to 'King's College to open specialist sixth form for maths prodigies'

UK universities in online launch to challenge US

BBC News (Online) 14th December 2012

King's has signalled its interest in joining the Futurelearn online higher education initiative led by The Open University, with the aim of providing students from the UK and around the world with free access to some of the country's top universities. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph, Press Association, Guardian, The Independent, Financial Times, ITV News (Online) and MSN UK.

King's press release related to 'UK universities in online launch to challenge US'

Rio's shanty towns spread their wings

BBC News (Online) 14th December 2012

Professor Anthony Pereira, Director of King's Brazil Institute, believes the 'pacification' programme in Rio de Janeiro, aimed at driving out criminal gangs, has been 'largely positive.' He said: 'I would just hope the government keeps an eye on possible unintended consequences. You can see it making these communities desirable for people who haven't been living in them, young people, the more adventurous. I don't know of any studies yet, but it could lead to gentrification and rents going up.'

The war on drugs

BBC Two - Newsnight 14th December 2012

Professor John Strang, Institute of Psychiatry, joins Jeremy Paxman to discuss whether the UK needs a new approach to drugs' policy. He says that scientific evidence needs to be taken into account in any policy decision. (Begins at 06.40.00)

Susan Rice ends bid to succeed Hillary Clinton

BBC World News 14th December 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, was interviewed about the decision of US Ambassador Susan Rice to withdraw her name from consideration to succeed Hillary Clinton as US secretary of state.

I run marathons so how could I get lung cancer?

Daily Express 11th December 2012

An analysis by King's for Macmillan Cancer Support is mentioned in an article about lung cancer. It found that within 30 years the number of women living with lung cancer will treble.

A study at King's is mentioned in an article about lung cancer.

Don't let allergies drive you nuts

The Daily Telegraph 10th December 2012

A new study which suggests that chemicals in water are linked to the rise in food allergies has several flaws, including the use of a blood test that is only 50 per cent reliable, according to Prof Jonathan Brostoff, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences.

Secession petitions: Why Americans don't really want to break up

BBC News (Online) 10th December 2012

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, explains why America doesn't want to 'break up', despite moves for independence in many other Western countries. He said: 'First of all, they had a rather big secession and that cost more lives than all the other American wars put together. The 1860s sent a pretty ferocious message about what would happen if you tried to secede.'

Innovation in education: teachers talk about the future

Guardian 10th December 2012

Robert Hill, Department of Education and Professional Studies, participated in a panel session at the Guardian's 'Innovation in Education' conference. Commenting on competition and collaboration between schools, Robert Hill argued that aligning the two can drive innovation. He said: "Some teachers would say 'I collaborate so I can compete.'"

Katherine Grainger: 'Six and a bit minutes changed my life'

The Daily Telegraph 10th December 2012

Interview with King's PhD student and Olympic gold medallist, Katherine Grainger.

DNA genetic mapping unveiled

Channel 4 News 10th December 2012

Dr Stuart Hogarth, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine, was interviewed about government plans to store the genetic code of up to 100,000 patients in the UK. Despite acknowledging that there is 'a great deal to be welcomed' in the plans, Dr Hogarth pointed out that there is still much to learn about genomic medicine: 'We have been trying to unravel the genetics of common, complex diseases for many years and what we know so far isn't worth putting into clinical practice.' Interview begins at 04.20 in the video entitled 'DNA genetic mapping unveiled.'

Plans for NHS database of patients' DNA angers privacy campaigners

The Observer 9th December 2012

On plans to build a database that would be capable of storing every British citizen's DNA records, Dr Stuart Hogarth from the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, pointed out that the UK already has a DNA database, which has more than half a million records. He added: 'The reality is that much of the data won't be useful.'

Former minister: rote learning will solve our 'maths wars'

The Daily Telegraph 8th December 2012

Research carried out at King's is mentioned in an article about mathematics education in the UK. The study showed that in 1976, 54 per cent of 14 year-olds knew how to calculate how far a car could travel on 8.1 gallons of petrol if it did 41.8 miles per gallon. In 2009 just 33 per cent knew how to perform that calculation.

Personal statements a 'valuable part of the application process'

BBC Radio Five Live 7th December 2012

Responding to a report by The Sutton Trust, which claims that university personal statements 'further disadvantage' low-and-middle-income pupils, Anne-Marie Canning, Head of Widening Participation at King's, has spoken of their value in assessing applications. Whilst stressing that they are just one part of the application process, Anne-Marie Canning pointed out that students 'value the chance to put their voice across, offering an opportunity to say why they want to study a particular subject and why they're passionate about it.' Item starts at 19.32. Anne-Marie Canning's comments were also featured on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 6 Music.

The most extraordinary feat of British scholarship ever

The Daily Telegraph 7th December 2012

Professor Richard Sorabji, Philosophy, has completed the editing and translating of 100 volumes of ancient commentaries on Aristotle, a project that has been running for the past 27 years.

Plugging the leaks in the tax system

BBC News (Online) 6th December 2012

Professor Anne Redston, Law, writes about the UK's deficit problem and the need to 'stop creating new weaknesses' in the tax system. She said: 'Trying to solve the UK's deficit without tackling tax evasion and artificial tax avoidance is like trying to run a bath with the plug out.'

'Who Do You Think You Are?'

BBC One 6th December 2012

Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, discussed naval history with comedian John Bishop, who was exploring the life of his great great grandfather.

London's Great Smog

BBC World News 5th December 2012

Dr Ian Mudway, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, believes the air pollution in developing world 'mega cities' such as Dhaka 'isn't terribly dissimilar to the situation we saw in London during the 1952 smog.' He added that initiatives in London such as the Low Emission Zone only offer small benefits that are 'not large enough to tackle some of the issues we face.'

'Binge-drinking gene' discovered

BBC News 4th December 2012

New research led by Professor Gunter Schumann, Institute of Psychiatry, finds that a particular gene is associated with alcohol abuse. He says: "This appears to be one gene that regulates how rewarding alcohol is for some people. People seek out situations which fulfil their sense of reward and make them happy, so if your brain is wired to find alcohol rewarding, you will seek it out." Also reported in the METRO, Daily Express, Reuters, Evening Standard, Chicago Tribune, Independent, MSN UK, Press Association, Daily Mail, Times of India, Huffington Post, Deccan Herald (India), CBS News

King's press release related to ''Binge-drinking gene' discovered'

Blacklisting is the scandal that now demands action

Guardian 4th December 2012

Professor Keith Ewing, Law, comments on the 'blacklisting' scandal (when workers are forced into unemployment for trade union activity). He calls it the 'worst human rights abuse in relation to workers' in Britain in half a century.

Tristan und Isolde's radical spirit

Guardian 4th December 2012

John Deathridge, King Edward Professor of Music, writes about Glyndebourne's 2007 production of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde.

Unpublished manuscripts may soon enter public domain

The Times 1st December 2012

Barbara Lauriat, Law, writes about the copyright laws surrounding unpublished works by literary scholars such as Jane Austen.

Experts call for mental illness screening for children

Reuters UK 29th November 2012

Dr Felicity Callard, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about the possibility of screening young children for future mental health problems. She warns that growing up with the knowledge "that you are 'at high risk' of future mental health problems can affect the very way in which you grow up - and thereby ... embed a sense that you are mentally vulnerable, with potentially untoward consequences." Also reported by Yahoo News, Daily Mail

Living near a busy road may double the risk of autism, researchers warn

Daily Mail 27th November 2012

Professor Emily Simonoff, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which finds living near busy roads increases the risk of childhood autism. Prof Simonoff said the research does not take into account factors such as father's age and family history of autism and that 'pregnant women should continue to look after their health during pregnancy but should not be unduly concerned.' *Also reported in the METRO, Press Association, MSN UK, Channel 4 News

Alan Turing and Morphogen Theory

WAMC Radio (USA) 27th November 2012

Dr Jeremy Green from the Department of Craniofacial Development at King's Dental Institute, discusses the legacy of mathematical genius, Alan Turing.

Brazil's World Cup work overshadowed by police murders

BBC News (Online) 26th November 2012

Professor Anthony Pereira, Director of the Brazil Institute, commented on recent violence in Sao Paulo, saying that it would probably put people off visiting Brazil in general or investing in the country. He said: 'We have an organised criminal gang that is challenging the state, and doing it in a sophisticated way. It raises question marks about the capacity of the state to maintain order.'

Is this the tobacco moment for psychosis?

The Independent 26th November 2012

Professor Sir Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry (IoP), explains the link between cannabis and schizophrenia. He says: "if the risk of schizophrenia for the general population is about one per cent, the evidence is that, if you take ordinary cannabis, it is two per cent; if you smoke regularly you might push it up to four per cent; and if you smoke 'skunk' every day you push it up to eight per cent". Dr Zerrin Atakan and Dr Paul Morrisson, also from the IoP, talk about their research.

Smoking 'rots' brain, says King's College study

BBC News (Online) 26th November 2012

Researchers at King's have identified several cardiovascular risk factors, including smoking and high blood pressure, which may be associated with the accelerated decline of memory, learning, attention and reasoning in older adults. Dr Alex Dregan, Lecturer in Translational Epidemiology and Public Health, said: 'We have identified a number of risk factors which could be associated with accelerated cognitive decline, all of which, could be modifiable. The findings were reported by Press Association, BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio London, Daily Express (front page), ITV News (Online), Sky News (Online), Metro, Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mirror, Huffington Post, CNN, Voice of Russia, Times of India, BBC Mundo and CBS News (USA).

King's press release related to 'Smoking 'rots' brain, says King's College study'

PTSD may be overdiagnosed, but PTSD deniers are 'wrong,' psychologists say

NBC News 26th November 2012

Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about whether PTSD is overdiagnosed, he says "despite the formal criteria, there is a confusion sometimes about the normal emotional responses to war — my father still has nightmares about his World War II service in Royal Navy and he is 87, but he doesn't have PTSD."

Sufferers of body dismorphic disorder see only distorted and grotesque versions of themselves in the mirrror

The Daily Telegraph 24th November 2012

Professor David Mataix-Cols, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a secretive condition which affects one in 100 people and has a high rate of suicide. The Institute of Psychiatry is running the first trial to test the efficacy of BDD-tailored CBT.

Gaza conflict: the war games of the Israel Defence Force

The Daily Telegraph 24th November 2012

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, comments on Israel's use of propaganda and the role of social media in the Gaza-Israel conflict. He said: 'Rockets and bullets matter more than tweets and badges. War is when you get a leg blown off, not when you read a tweet on your iPhone.'

The pharmaceutical path to a superhuman workforce

Financial Times 23rd November 2012

In an article about human enhancements for the workforce, Professor Genevra Richardson, Law, who chaired a report on the subject, is quoted. She said: 'We are not talking science-fiction here. There are a range of technologies in development and in some cases already in use that have the potential to transform our workplaces - for better or for worse.'

Airbrushing history

BBC Radio 4 (Today programme) 23rd November 2012

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on the BBC's decision to remove the iplayer recording of Jimmy Saville on Desert Island Discs. She discusses how removing triggers might help victims to deal with the trauma, and helps them believe they are being taken seriously.

Improve schools or be stripped of powers, town hall chiefs told

The Times 22nd November 2012

In an article about standards within schools, reference is made to a report by Professor Alison Wolf, Management, which said that 400,000 teenagers took vocational qualifications that were worthless or could even damage their chances of getting a job.

Most lawyers 'elite'

The Times 22nd November 2012

On figures from the Sutton Trust, showing that around two thirds of elite lawyers were educated at independent schools, Edward Fennell describes the Dickson Poon law scholarships as 'good news'.

Ritalin could stop prisoners reoffending

The Times 22nd November 2012

Professor Philip Asherson, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which finds that treating ADHD reduces the risk of criminality. He says that 'the £300 a month cost of each treatment would be vastly outweighed by the savings from falling crime.' Also reported by Reuters, ABC News, Associated Press, Press Association, CTV News (Canada), Daily Mail, BMJ, Huffington Post

The moon and madness

BBC Radio 4 (Today programme) 22nd November 2012

Dr Niall McCrae, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on latest research into the link between the lunar cycle and madness. He says it's highly unlikely that there is a strong link, but that more research is needed to identify if some people are more susceptible to the effect of the moon.

Alzheimer's discovery paves way for new drugs

The Daily Telegraph 21st November 2012

Dr Richard Killick and Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry, comment on their recent research which offers the most detailed picture yet of the chain reaction of events that causes brain cells to die because of Alzheimer's. Also reported in the Daily Express

MDMA keeps severe stress at bay

The Week 21st November 2012

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research reporting the benefits of MDMA assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. Also reported in Nature

Soft subjects 'stripped out' of college league tables

The Daily Telegraph 21st November 2012

'Soft' subjects are to be stripped out of college league tables following a review of vocational education by Professor Alison Wolf from the Department of Management, who warned that thousands of pupils were taking courses that did little to improve their job prospects.

Vote for female Bishops

BBC Radio Wales 21st November 2012

Lord Harries of Pentregarth, Honorary Professor of Theology at King's, described the vote against women Bishops as 'deeply dispiriting' and 'highly damaging' for the Church of England. Lord Harries also paid tribute to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams (begins at 01.37.50).

C S Lewis deserves his place in Poets' Corner

The Daily Telegraph 21st November 2012

On the news that a memorial to C S Lewis will be placed in Poets' Corner at Westminster Abbey, Alister McGrath, Professor of Theology, Ministry and Education, argues that Lewis 'certainly merits inclusion among these greats of English literature.'

The curse of vlogger's block

The Evening Standard 21st November 2012

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about writer's block being a form of social anxiety. She said: 'When there is pressure to perform, people suffering from social anxiety become convinced that if what they are doing is not excellent they might as well do nothing.'

Niki wants you to see this photo of her cradling her dying baby - because a two-minute scan could have saved him

Daily Mail 20th November 2012

Kypros Nicolaides, Professor of Fetal Medicine says that while Vasa Praevia is still thought of as a rare condition, it is more common than Down's syndrome, which accounts for one in 600 pregnancies. Vasa Praevia is a condition that occurs when the blood vessels from the placenta or umbilical cord block the birth canal and rupture as the waters break.

Macular degeneration: new hope for elderly victims of disease that causes blindness

The Daily Telegraph 20th November 2012

A study carried out by 21 international centres, including King's, has found that radiation therapy for patients with macular degeneration reduces the need for regular injections.

Would you really let schoolchildren think they had failed?

The Times 20th November 2012

In an article about success at school and university, Alison Wolf's book 'Does Education Matter?' is mentioned. Professor Wolf, Management, wrote in her book: 'If you look at obituaries in the Nineties, what was so interesting was how many people hadn't gone to university.'

After Rowan, the Church is taken seriously

The Times 20th November 2012

Lord Harries of Pentregarth, honorary professor of theology at King's, writes about the contribution of Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, to Christianity. He said: 'The imagination of our culture may not yet have been recaptured for the Christian faith, but if in the future it is, historians will point to the archbishopric of Rowan Williams as the cusp on which it began to turn.'

Why lack of sleep may trigger arthritis - but treating insomnia may improve the condition

Daily Mail 20th November 2012

Research from the Institute of Psychiatry in collaboration with Arthritis UK is helping to understand the link between arthritis, pain and sleep deprivation.

All in the Mind

BBC Radio 4 20th November 2012

Professor Stephen Scott, Institute of Psychiatry, dispels the myth that long term effects of neglect and abuse early in life mean that children are unable to form bonds with carers such as foster parents (Begins at 00.10.00)

Briton stars in Somali terror videos

The Daily Telegraph 20th November 2012

Mention of a report by The International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King’s on militant group al-Shabaab’s Western media strategy, which will highlight a recent series of terrorist recruitment videos.

Gaza crisis: The legal position of Israel and Hamas

BBC News (Online) 20th November 2012

Professor Guglielmo Verdirame, War Studies, writes about the legal position of Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Crisis. He writes: 'Israel argues that its Operation Pillar of Defence is justified under the right of self-defence. This position has in principle been supported by various countries, including the US and EU member states.'

Prince William now the most popular royal as monarchy rides high in national poll

Evening Standard 19th November 2012

A poll by King's and Ipsos MORI has revealed that Prince William is the most popular royal in recent history and 9 out of 10 people think the Queen is doing a good job as Monarch. Professor Richard Mortimore, Institute of Contemporary British History and Director of Political Analysis, said:' After a rocky period in the Nineties, public support for the monarchy and the Queen now looks as strong as it has been for many years.' Also reported by Daily Express, Daily Mail, The Sun, MSN UK and Daily Star.

Gaza-Israel crisis

CNN 19th November 2012

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, examines the use of social media during the conflict between Gaza and Israel. He said the perspective of the viewer tends to 'reinforce what they already think' when looking at social media.

Governor-general mooted for breakaway Scotland

The Sunday Times (Scotland) 18th November 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, believes it is possible The Queen would appoint a governor-general as her representative for weekly meetings with Alex Salmond, in an independent Scotland.

New checks will keep babies safe

Sunday Express 18th November 2012

Kypros Nicolaides, Professor of Fetal Medicine, commented on research into a blood test for babies in the womb that will not cause miscarriages. Professor Nicolaides said: 'This is a major breakthrough which will save the lives of babies and spare women the painful decision of whether to have an invasive test or risk miscarriage.'

Minimum alcohol price can curb drink abuse

Sunday Times 18th November 2012

In a letter to the Sunday Times, Professors John Strang and Colin Drummond, Institute of Psychiatry, highlight the dangers of alcohol for young people and say that they support the introduction of a minimum unit price for alcohol.

Pollution ages the brain by three years

Daily Mail 17th November 2012

Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group at King's, commented on the finding that high pollution levels age the brains of people aged over 50 by up to three years. He said: 'The research shows that living somewhere with clean air means you will retain your brain power for a longer period of time than if you live in an urban area.'

The royal exchange

The Sunday Times 17th November 2012

On the role of the monarchy for an independent Scotland, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, said he is 'sure the Queen would agree to be head of state in Scotland as she is in Canada or Australia.'

Cannabis risk gene discovered that could make smokers prone to psychosis

Daily Mail 16th November 2012

Dr Marta Di Forti, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses her latest research which suggests that people carrying a specific gene may be more at risk of developing mental health problems from smoking cannabis. She says 'Our findings help to explain why one cannabis user develops psychosis while his friends continue smoking without problems.'

King's press release related to 'Cannabis risk gene discovered that could make smokers prone to psychosis'

Impoverished Iberians, booming Latin America eye new relations

Reuters US 15th November 2012

Ahead of the Ibero-American Summit in Cadiz, Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, Department of European & International Studies, commented on the changing relationship between Spain and Portugal, which he says is now 'much more about the economy, about necessity.'

Harvey Nicks' grant

Evening Standard 15th November 2012

Thanks to a donation of £20 million from Dickson Poon, the owner of Harvey Nichols, The Dickson Poon School of Law is offering 80 scholarships to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Dickson Poon commented: 'The scholarships will help to enable exemplary students with academic agility to develop into global leaders.' The news was reported by the Guardian, The Independent and the South China Morning Post, and Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, Vice-Principal at King's, was interviewed about the scholarships on BBC Radio London.

Professor Ann McNeill

Times Higher Education 15th November 2012

Professor Ann McNeill has joined the Institute of Psychiatry as Professor of Addictions. She said she looked forward to developing new collaborations within the institute "The relationship between smoking and mental health is another interest of mine: smoking rates remain very high across those who have mental health problems."

King's press release related to 'Professor Ann McNeill'

Man's poetry tackles mental illness

Belfast Telegraph 15th November 2012

Commenting on a new book of poems about mental illness by Bill McKnight, Professor Graham Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, says "Others have written about depression, but it is very unusual to speak about stigma in poetic terms, and, so far as I am aware, Bill's work is something quite new."

Patient care of schizophrenics at 'all-time low', claim experts

Independent 14th November 2012

The Schizophrenia Commission chaired by Professor Robin Murray, Institute of Psychiatry, claims that switching funds from secure care to early intervention would prevent illness and save money. Professor Murray said: 'The system is pervaded by pressure to avoid risk rather than by the need to provide care.' Also reported by Reuters, BBC News, Channel 4 News, BBC Radio 4 Today programme, BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 5 Live.

Would Nick Clegg's new proposals on flexible working be practical for a career in the City?

City AM 14th November 2012

An article about whether flexible working hours would work in the City mentions research by King's which found that 50 per cent of female solicitors who use flexi-time believed that they were not perceived as being serious about their careers.

From kick start to podium finish

Guardian 14th November 2012

Dr Chris Tribble, Education & Professional Studies, writes about the different words used to describe beginning and endings in different situations. He said: 'Finish is also less conflict-related, occurring most often with sporting topics such as photo, sprint, podium, thrilling, big, dramatic, closest, podium and tense.'

Bible Readers and Lay Writers in Early Modern England

Times Higher Education 14th November 2012

Dr Lucy Wooding, History, reviews Kate Narveson's new book about the impact of the King James Bible in early modern England, particularly with regards to women.

Higgs particle is a bog Standard Model boson, say scientists

Guardian 14th November 2012

Fresh data from the LHC suggests that the new particle discovered earlier this year is just the simplest variety of Higgs boson. Professor John Ellis, Physics, said: 'The Standard Model still rules OK, but the main test will come when the gamma rates are updated.'

Hooked on fish-oil pills? You're wasting your money, says a nutrition expert

Daily Mail 13th November 2012

Tom Sanders, professor of nutrition and dietetics, writes that, despite their popularity, he is sceptical about the health benefits of fish-oil supplements.

Smacking children may increase risk of them developing cancer

Daily Telegraph 13th November 2012

Dr Andrea Danese, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research linking childhood maltreatment to disease later in life. He says that the findings are based on retrospective reports of maltreatment, and warns that 'the claims may therefore be biased or overstated, because ill people may be more likely to report unhappy childhood.' * Also reported in the Daily Mirror, Press Association

Twists in the Tale of the Great DNA Discovery

New York Times 13th November 2012

An article about the original discover of DNA mentions the roles of John Randall and Maurice Wilkins, both former scientists at King's.

Communicating with brain-injured patients

BBC News Channel 13th November 2012

Professor Penney Lewis, The Dickson Poon School of Law, discussed how information from fMRI scans on patients diagnosed in vegetative or minimally conscious states might in future be used to inform decisions about their care made in their best interests, or even to allow them to refuse particular treatments.

Airport Expansion and 19th Century Ports

BBC Radio 4 13th November 2012

This week’s episode of The Long View compared the controversy over airport expansion now with the 19th century battle of the sea ports. Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, participated in a debate about the proposed third runway at Heathrow Airport.

Lung cancer in women 'to soar' by 2040

BBC News (Online) 12th November 2012

An analysis by King's for Macmillan Cancer Support has found that the number of people living with lung cancer in the UK is set to rise significantly faster for women than men over the next 30 years. Also reported by The Times, i and Daily Mail.

Do doctors make the worst patients?

Newstalk (Ireland) 12th November 2012

Dr Max Henderson, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about how doctors face feeling of shame of failure when faced with mental health problems. He says that doctors often fail to look for help as many feel that main stream health services are not confidential, and fear that their colleagues might find out (Begins 27.00 mins)

King's press release related to 'Do doctors make the worst patients?'

Could Gazprom antitrust case redraw gas industry?

Financial Times 12th November 2012

Nick Butler, Chair of King's Policy Institute, writes about the consequences of the conflict between Gazprom and the European Union for the gas industry.

Live Q&A: will a postgrad boost my job prospects?

Guardian 12th November 2012

Laura Mackenzie, Head of Careers & Employability at King's, participated in a live Q&A webchat which addressed the question - 'Will a postgrad [degree] boost my job prospects?'

Apprentice row: MPs 'miss main problem' says professor

Mail Online 11th November 2012

Professor Alison Wolf, Management, says that a report by MPs into the UK's apprenticeship scheme has failed to tackle the core problem. She said:'They don't get to the heart of the current system, which is that providers - who are only rarely employers themselves - are paid for the number of apprentices they "deliver."'

State schools + maths = rejection by Cambridge

The Sunday Times 11th November 2012

Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Mathematics, says that mathematics teaching at A-level 'tends to be very narrow and procedural and this is the case across the state and independent sectors.' He added: 'A handful of schools go well beyond the syllabus and they are the ones dominating the Oxbridge entries.' Academics at King's are being funded by the Department for Education to develop more challenging materials for use in mathematics sixth-form classes.

Remembrance Sunday - Our wounded warriors: The abandoned soldier & the casualties to come

Independent on Sunday 11th November 2012

Research from King's Centre for Military Health Research found that nearly 7 per cent of regular solders who have seen combat will fall victim to PTSD.

Remembering Afghanistan: Attitudes and Support Amongst the British Public

Huffington Post 11th November 2012

Rachael Gribble, King's Centre for Military Health Research, writes about recent research into public attitudes to the Armed Forces which found that the British public support the Armed Forces, even though many oppose the war in Afghanistan and Iraq.

King's press release related to 'Remembering Afghanistan: Attitudes and Support Amongst the British Public '

Return from Afghanistan

Europe 1 11th November 2012

Professor Neil Greenberg, King's Centre for Military Health Research, discusses research into post-traumatic stress disorder, and how PTSD is managed and treated in the UK. He discusses the normalisation process that takes place when soldiers return from combat. (Begins 31.06 mins)

More China students choose to study abroad

Al Jazeera 10th November 2012

In a report about the increasing number of Chinese students at King's, Al Jazeera interviewed Maxine Taylor, Director of External Relations at King's.

Calculators banned in primary school maths exam

Daily Telegraph 9th November 2012

In an article about the use of calculators in children's maths tests mentions research led by a team at King's, which found that the amount of 11- 14 year olds with a poor grasp of basic maths has doubled in the last 30 years. Also reported in The Sun.

Doctors angry as health committee is scrapped

Guardian 9th November 2012

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Public Health, commented on the news that a Whitehall ministerial committee set up by the coalition as it pledged to tackle major health problems has been scrapped, prompting a furious response from senior doctors. He said: ‘This looks like a major U-turn, and a real downgrading of this government's commitment to public health.’

Why I'm having my first baby at 51

Guardian 9th November 2012

Dr Susan Bewley, Women's Health, comments on pregnancy risks for older women. She said:'I'm very worried about the increasing health risks to mothers and babies, and I've been around long enough to have seen all the complications associated with advanced age, including maternal and baby death and disability.'

Britain Pushing Harder for International Resolution in Syria

Voice of America 9th November 2012

Britain is pushing for greater international involvement in the ongoing crisis in Syria. Professor Michael Kerr, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, said that forming a united political front may be the only chance to bring peace to Syria,

Understanding pain

BBC Radio 4 8th November 2012

Dr Julie Keeble, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, says there is 'much to find out' about the treatment of pain, including the quest to find a better pain-killer. Item starts at 23.55.

Big Exercise, Low Profile, In Japan-China Dispute

Time 8th November 2012

Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, says the decision to cancel an amphibious landing with Marines and Japanese ground troops was politically smart. 'With no amphibious exercise, no one in China can claim that the U.S. and Japan are showing an aggressive behavior and that prevents the more conservative voices in China from gaining points.'

Human enhancements at work pose ethical dilemmas

Reuters 7th November 2012

Professor Genevra Richardson, Law, led a report which concluded that although human enhancement technologies might aid society, their use would raise serious ethical issues. She said: 'We're not talking science fiction here, we're talking about advances that could impact significantly on the way we work...in the near future.' Also reported by the Independent, Guardian, Daily Telegraph, BBC News, Daily Mail, CNBC, Today (Singapore), Press Association and Yahoo! and Professor Richardson was interviewed on BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

Outsourcing policymaking: the benefits

Guardian 7th November 2012

An article about the outsourcing of policy makers in the current government mentions research from Dr Ruth Levitt and William Solesbury, Political Economy, which documented the large number of external policy reviewers.

US election 2012: McDonald's, Dixieland, 'dead heat' so far?

Channel 4 News (Online) 7th November 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, spoke to Channel 4 News prior to the US election results and predicted that it would be a 'long night ahead.' He added: 'I think that the Republican vote is probably being underreported and what you are seeing - that there is a tie going into this - is remarkable for Romney because he was 10 points behind in a lot of states two months ago.'

EU Leaders Press Obama on Economy, Security

Wall Street Journal 7th November 2012

In an article about the European reaction to President Obama’s re-election, Sir Nigel Sheinwald, War Studies, said that there is a recognition in Europe that ‘we're not the theater’ of American foreign policy.

New directive on orphan works

The Times 6th November 2012

A recent directive on 'orphan works' could make it easier for public museums, libraries, schools and archives to digitise their collections legally, writes Barbara Lauriat from the Dickson Poon School of Law.

Journalist and psychiatrist awarded prize for bravery

Nature 6th November 2012

Professor Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, has been awarded the John Maddox Prize, an award that recognises exceptional courage and bravery in science.He received death threats and professional smears for offering people with chronic fatigue syndrome a psychiatric treatment at a time when a mouse leukaemia virus had been implicated as the cause. The virus link has since been discredited. Also reported in New Scientist

Liam Holder, Founder of International Construction Forensics, Joins Navigant's Global Construction Practice

Press Association 6th November 2012

Liam Holder, Visiting Practioner in the School of Law, has joined Navigant's Global Construction Practice as Managing Director. He said: 'Becoming an integral part of Navigant’s highly-regarded international construction practice is a tremendous opportunity.' Also reported by CNBC and Yahoo!.

US Election 2012

Daily Telegraph 6th November 2012

Dr James D Boys, Middle Eastern & Mediterranean Studies, recorded a video report for the Telegraph which stated that despite predictions, the swing states were too close to call during the final night of the election.

Laos to begin building hotly debated Xayaburi dam this week

Los Angeles Times 6th November 2012

Nathanial Matthews, Geography, was interviewed about the building of the Xayaburi dam in Laos. He said: 'This is the opening of Pandora’s box. Unless there is real pushback in the next six months, I see Laos moving ahead quite quickly with the rest of the dams.'

The fast-track dementia test

Daily Mail 5th November 2012

King's College London is one of the university partners involved in establishing the first 'Brain Health Centre’ - a scheme designed to promote early diagnosis of dementia.

'Pessimists are wrong', says European Bank

Valor Economico 5th November 2012

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, commented on the Brazilian economy. As the economy in Brazil is moving towards a more than three per cent economic growth in 2013, Pereira noted that 'the negative forecast of the Brazilian economic growth was somewhat exaggerated.'

Universities reject Gove's new A-levels

The Sunday Times 4th November 2012

Academics at King's and Cambridge University have been funded by the Department of Education to develop more challenging material for maths A-level teaching in state schools.

Fat lot of good

The Sunday Times (Style) 4th November 2012

Professor Tom Sanders, Head of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences at King's, comments on the consumption of saturated fat. He said: 'If you like a marbled steak, fine - saturated fat from the source is not evil - but trim the fat off your meat and give it to the cat.'

The fast-track dementia test

Daily Mail 4th November 2012

New technology which could substantially reduce the time it takes to diagnose dementia has been developed by researchers at King's in partnership with the Universities of Brighton and Sussex and Imperial College London.

The doctor battling drink and depression will see you now ...

Independent on Sunday 4th November 2012

Dr Max Henderson, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his research which showed that medics who do fall ill fear being perceived as "weak" or "a failure" by colleagues. He says, "there is a feeling among doctors, that illness shouldn't happen to them – that they should somehow be invincible."

King's press release related to 'The doctor battling drink and depression will see you now ... '

New translation that brings elation

The Times (Saturday Review) 3rd November 2012

Edith Hall, Professor of Classics and judge of The Times Stephen Spender Prize for poetry translation, says this year's entries 'have been united by their striking diversity.' She said: 'More poets, more languages and more far-flung lands were represented than I can remember.'

Workers' rights on health and safety to be scaled down

The Independent 3rd November 2012

Mention of a government review on health and safety regulations, conducted by Professor Ragnar Löfstedt from the Department of Geography.

Visa bungles hamper Britain's good influence

Independent 2nd November 2012

Jasper Humphfreys, War Studies, discusses the visa problems faced by conservationists across the world and the ‘dire repercussions for conservation organisations.’

How do you tackle maternal mortality in Sierra Leone? Try asking a midwife

Guardian 2nd November 2012

Francess Fornah, who is based at King's Health Partners as part of a three-month placement, writes about the issue of maternal mortality in Sierra Leone. Francess says that future frameworks aimed at tackling maternal mortality must be shaped by midwives.

Where is the Green Party?

Al Jazeera 2nd November 2012

In an article about the absence of impact of the Green Party in US politics, Dr James D. Boys, Middle Eastern & Mediterranean Studies, said: ‘If you’re a small group like the Greens, then you’ve got a real challenge just getting into the game.’

The Anarchy

BBC Radio 4 1st November 2012

Professor David Carpenter, Medieval History, appeared on BBC Radio 4’s In our time programme discussing the civil war that took place in mid-twelfth century England.

Get smart: the mystery behind intelligence

Sydney Morning Herald 1st November 2012

Professor Robert Plomin, Institute of Psychiatry, explains that genes make only explain about 1% of differences in IQ between people.

Jimmy Savile: Erasing the memory

BBC News 1st November 2012

Dr Jennifer Wild, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on erasing Jimmy Saville's name from memorial plaques and whether this will help victims. She says it is one of the substitutes, "Another is the change in public opinion. The fact they are going to be believed."

The case of Felicia Boots highlights the risks of post-natal depression

Daily Telegraph 31st October 2012

Professor Louise Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, says women are naturally concerned about taking medication, including anti-depressants, while pregnant or breastfeeding but there are risks of not taking them.

Don't suffer from postnatal depression in silence

Daily Telegraph 31st October 2012

Professor Louise Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses what women should do if they think they are suffering from post-natal depression.

Post-natal depression is a severe illness, but can be treated

BBC Radio 4 (Today programme) 31st October 2012

Professor Louise Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, speaks about post-natal depression. She says that any woman suffering from severe post-natal depression should discuss the risks and benefits of anti-depressants and the risks of the illness (Begins at 1.55.00). Professor Howard was also interviewed on BBC1 News, BBC News 24, Radio 5 Live and BBC Radio London.

Existing drugs may tackle dementia

The Independent 31st October 2012

Medications used to treat hypertension, diabetes and skin conditions could also treat dementia, according to new research by King's. The report's lead author, Professor Clive Ballard, Wolfson Centre for Age-related Diseases at King's, said: 'Developing new drugs to treat the condition is incredibly important, but comes with a huge price tag and, for those affected by dementia, an unimaginable wait.' Also reported by Huffington Post, Press Association, Daily Express, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Yahoo!.

Can elections be blown off course by natural disasters?

CNN 31st October 2012

Professor Mark Pelling, Geography, talked about how the weather conditions in the USA may affect the US Presidential candidates’ campaigns. He said: So long as they roll up their shirt-sleeves and are seen to be personally involved in the reconstruction, it will normally be very good for [a politician's] popularity.’

The Morality of Drone Attacks

BBC Radio 4 31st October 2012

Dr Peter Lee, Defence Studies, and Paul Schulte, War Studies, participated in a debate about the morality of drone strikes. Dr Lee said there is tension between international law and the moral arguments involved in the use of drones. Referring to 'pitfalls in international law', Dr Lee said he is 'weary of the UK carrying out extra-judicial killings' in countries where it has no legal mandate to intervene. Dr Lee's contribution starts at 19.40. Paul Schulte, whose contribution begins at 26.52, said that, whether we like it or not, drone attacks are 'inevitable'.

All the world's a Greek tragedy

Guardian 30th October 2012

In an article about the popularity of Greek tragedies with modern audiences, Professor Edith Hall, Classics, commented that more Greek tragedies have been staged in the past 50 years than at any time since the ancient Greeks were watching them.

Children at risk from grandma's smoking, study finds

The Times 30th October 2012

In an article about new findings which suggest that children born now are at risk of asthma due to the smoking habits of their grandparents, Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said another possibility was that the effects on the second generation were a consequence of direct toxic influences on the first generation's reproductive organs.

Needless cancer therapy for 4,000 women

Daily Mail 30th October 2012

A new report has found that an NHS breast cancer screening programme has 'over-diagnosed' 4,000 women leading to unnecessary treatments. Dr Susan Bewley, Women's Health, wrote an open letter to the National Cancer Director asking for women to be informed of the 'genuine doubts' about the programme. Also reported in the Daily Telegraph.

Storms continue to rage over L’Aquila sentences

Guardian 30th October 2012

Professor Clive Coen, Medicine, comments on the recent trial in which six scientists have been sentenced to six years imprisonment for underestimating the risks of the L'Aquila earthquake in 2009. He said: 'On the matters in question, the variables will always be too great for certainty. There are costs and dangers associated with knowledge and ignorance.'

The Government should reinforce regional growth and not introduce policies to undermine regional economic and social development

The Times 29th October 2012

Professor Stephen Bach, Employment Relations, is one of several academics who argued that there is no convincing evidence to support the Chancellor’s recent inference that regionally or locally determined pay could boost the economic performance of regional economies.

Changes in region push Pakistan and Russia together

The National (UAE) 29th October 2012

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes about how connections between Pakistan and Russia are growing stronger and how this is a development with great significance for the South Asian region.

State schools + maths = rejection by Cambridge

Sunday Times 28th October 2012

Professor Jeremy Hodgen, Education & Professional Studies, comments on findings that there is a large gap between the success of state and independent-school applicants for maths at Cambridge. He said: 'A handful of schools go well beyond the syllabus and they are the ones dominating the Oxbridge entries.' Also reported in the Daily Telegraph.

Erotic art dating back to Roman times is discovered by amateur treasure hunters armed with metal detectors

Daily Mail 28th October 2012

Dr John Pearce, Classics, comments on the discovery of a piece of erotic art by the Portable Antiquities Scheme. He said: 'One theory is that those scenes that show sexual activity have an apotropaic power, because they make you laugh so that wards off the evil eye.'

On the other side of the wall

Guardian 27th October 2012

Professor Anatol Lieven, War Studies, reviews Anne Applebaum's new book: 'Iron Curtain: The crushing of Eastern Europe.' He said: 'Applebaum's book has a political as well as a scholarly purpose.'

Results slump anticipated when linear exams reign

Times Higher Education 26th October 2012

An article about a study by Laurie Smith, Education and Professional Studies, which predicted that the switch from modular to linear GCSE exams will lead to a steep drop in grades.

McKinnon would not have survived

Financial Times 26th October 2012

Professor Michael Singer, Law, writes about the UK's refusal to extradite hacker Gary McKinnon on the grounds of fears regarding his welfare. Professor Singer said: 'The US government might be better advised to employ Mr McKinnon than to prosecute him for his embarrassing exposure of its security flaws.'

Anti-depressants are the only option for some women

Daily Telegraph 26th October 2012

Because 50% of pregnancies are unplanned, Professor Louise Howard, Institute of Psychiatry, says that women of child-bearing age need to weigh up the benefits and risks of taking anti-depressants against the risks of the illness. Also reported in the Daily Mail

It's a jungle out there

Times Higher Education 25th October 2012

Coverage of the Study India programme, co-sponsored by King's, in which 165 undergraduates from 12 UK universities spent time at an Indian university and took part in a week-long internship. THE reports that staff from King's will take part in two further Indian summer schools later this year.

King's and JNU expand partnership

Labmate Online 25th October 2012

Report on the expansion of King's partnership with Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), which will build on existing joint projects and allow for more collaboration in science, health and medicine.

An artist's impression of London's air pollution problem

The Guardian 25th October 2012

An animation of a small boy breathing, created by artist Dryden Goodwin in collaboration with Professor Frank Kelly, Director of the Environmental Research Group (ERG) at King's, aims to highlight the fragility of children living in polluted cities and the dangers of pollution.

Website pitches solutions in search of problems

Nature 25th October 2012

An article about new website Marblar, co-founded by King's student Mehmet Fidanboylu, on which researchers can suggest commercial uses for scientific findings. Michael Hill-King, Business & Innovation, said: 'Marblar is trying to open up questions about what you do with inventions.'

Food labelling: Consistent system 'to start next year'

BBC News (Online) 24th October 2012

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, Health & Social Care Research, describes the introduction of a food labelling system next year as 'welcome news'. He added: 'The Food Standards Agency recommended this scheme years ago - but a few big retailers succeeded in blocking it until now. This is a triumph for public health and common sense - but just goes to show how the voluntary approach can be so much slower than government regulation.'

Schizophrenia family history may lead to autism

The Jerusalem Post 24th October 2012

Research from the Institute of Psychiatry in collaboration with Tel Aviv University found that autism spectrum disorders share a root cause with psychiatric illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

King's press release related to 'Schizophrenia family history may lead to autism'

Branding James Bond Lecture

BBC Online 24th October 2012

Dr Finola Kerrigan, Management, delivered a lecture at the Museum of Brands entitled 'Branding James Bond'. Dr Kerrigan and a colleague at the University of Sheffield discussed the success of the James Bond brand and demonstrated how numerous brands co-exist within individual films.

King's press release related to 'Branding James Bond Lecture'

Three-person IVF trial 'success'

BBC News (Online) 24th October 2012

Commenting on research into a controversial new IVF treatment, Peter Braude, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, said: 'It is exactly the sort of science that the HFEA expert committee recommended needed doing, and demonstrates further the feasibility of this technique. However it is still a long way off ready for human use.' Professor Braude's comments were also reported by Agence France Presse (AFP).

Mental health figures show 'extremely worrying' levels of detainment

The Huffington Post 24th October 2012

Professor Matthew Hotopf, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new figures reporting an increase in the number of detentions under the Mental Health Act.

Neuroscience: Encounters with the nonexistent

Nature 24th October 2012

Dr Dominic ffytche, Institute of Psychiatry, reviews Dr Oliver Sachs' new book 'Hallucinations'

Italy jails scientists over quake prediction

ABC Radio Australia 23rd October 2012

Dr Bruce Malamud, Geography, was interviewed about earthquake forecasting and the potential implications of the L'Aquila earthquake trial, where seven scientists have been convicted of manslaughter.

Key gene in breast cancer development identified

BBC Radio 4 23rd October 2012

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Studies & Genetic Epidemiology, speaks to Today about the science of epidemiology and new research which has identified a gene involved in the development of breast cancer. Professor Spector says this gene could be switched on or off epigenetically. Item starts at 1.42.23.

Round 3: Romney is still standing

The Commentator 23rd October 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies, writes about the third and final US presidential debate. He said: 'Early polling appeared to give Obama an edge, but Romney was still standing at the end of the night as the president's equal and clearly eager to take his argument to the country in the 13 days that remain until Election Day.' Dr Boys also previewed the third presidential debate on Monocle Radio 24 and Radio FM4 (Austria), as well as appearing on Sky News following the debate, where he analysed the performance of both candidates.

'Not-so-identical' twins may hold the key to disease

BBC News (Online) 23rd October 2012

Coverage of the Epitwin Project, led by Professor Tim Spector from the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology. Professor Spector said: 'We used to think the most interesting thing about identical twins was in the similarities... but it's the differences, the discordance, that tells you more.' The article also refers to the first in a series of research papers, co-authored by Professor Spector, which has identified one particular gene that, when stuck in the 'on' position, appears to increase an individual's risk of developing breast cancer.

Brain change link to anti-social behaviour in girls

BBC News 22nd October 2012

Dr Michael Craig, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research which finds that the brains of teenage girls with behavioural disorders are different to those of their peers. He says "to date there has been an absence of research looking at females, so this work is an important first step."

How David Cameron lost his nerve over hugging hoodies

The Guardian 22nd October 2012

Camila Batmanghelidjh talks about the prime Minister's approach to young offenders. Her collaboration with the Institute of Psychiatry, showed that children who were assessed at Kids Company presented not only with shocking life adversities but also had neurophysiological damage secondary to the maltreatment.

2015 and beyond: what's next for school reform?

The Guardian 22nd October 2012

Robert Hill, senior visiting research fellow in the Department of Education & Professional Studies, says that future school reform will increase the focus on learning. He said: 'The focus in education policy will switch away from structural reforms such as academies and free schools (though diversity in the school system will stay and grow) to what goes on in the classroom.'

Defending Romney's 'binders of women'

Al Jazeera 22nd October 2012

Dr Christine Cheng, War Studies, writes about Mitt Romney's 'binders of women' comment at the second US presidential debate. She said: 'Romney should be applauded, not lambasted, for actively seeking out qualified women to staff his cabinet.'

Vladimir Putin changes trains: energy and power in Russia

Financial Times 22nd October 2012

Nick Butler, Visiting Fellow and Chair of King's Policy Institute, writes about Vladimir Putin's role in the energy business: 'Mr Putin’s understanding of global energy issues is unmatched by most other world leaders.' He adds that, by sanctioning the expansion of Rosneft, he is 'creating a major centre of power and source of revenue for the state.'

Stigma prevents sick doctors from returning to work

PULSE 22nd October 2012

A study led by Dr Max Henderson, Institute of Psychiatry, finds that the stigma felt by doctors who are signed off sick for long periods is a major obstacle to them returning to work.

London's new housing loses the 'dirty word'

BBC News (Online) 19th October 2012

Professor Loretta Lees, Geography, comments on declining use of the word 'estate' to describe new housing. She said: 'The word 'estate' has become synonymous with the term 'ghetto'. It's become a dirty word.' Professor Lees added that in the 1920s and 1930s it 'didn't carry the same stigma.'

The threat of cyber warfare

BBC World News 19th October 2012

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, discussed the threat of cyber warfare, drawing on a number of recent incidents.

El Alamein veterans gather in Egypt for 70th anniversary of battle

The Daily Telegraph 19th October 2012

On the 70th anniversary of The Battle of El Alamein, Dr Niall Barr, Defence Studies, said the battle is seen as the 'greatest British victory since Waterloo.' He added: 'For the British people, who had experienced a run of defeats and suffering really from 1940 onwards, the final battle of El Alamein was a crucial sign that final victory was possible.'

What Would an Independent Scotland Look Like?

The Atlantic (USA) 19th October 2012

Professor Alexander Türk, from The Dickson Poon School of Law, spoke to The Atlantic about Scotland and their membership in the E.U. They reported: 'The Scottish Government believes that its membership can continue unbroken, yet both Professor Alexander Türk of King's College London and Professor Martin Trybus of the University of Birmingham indicated to me that as a new state, Scotland would have to leave the E.U. and reapply through the usual channels.'

Cyber Threat

BBC World News 19th October 2012

Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies, describes different types of cyber attacks and warns of overstating the significance of these by using 'war metaphors'.

Chief execs should take psychological tests, says Equitable Life boss Wiscarson

Daily Mail 18th October 2012

Chris Wiscarson, the Chief Executive of Equitable Life, discusses findings from a report by Professor Richard Roberts, Institute of Contemporary British History, which highlighted the problem of boardroom hubris in the collapse of Equitable Life. Chris said: Hubris is when you have a lot of power and when you misuse it in an organisation. It is a psychological condition people develop. It is dangerous because typically, in a big organisation, you cannot see the consequences for months or years.


Over three quarters of people with depression have experienced some form of discrimination

BBC Radio 4 (Today Programme) 18th October 2012

Professor Graham Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his latest research which finds that over three quarters of people with depression report discrimination (begins at 02.40.00). Prof Thornicroft was also interviewed by LBC Radio.

King's press release related to 'Over three quarters of people with depression have experienced some form of discrimination'

Stigma of mental ill health is 'worse than the illness'

The Independent 18th October 2012

New research published in the Lancet finds that over three quarters of people with depression experience some form of discrimination. Professor Thornicroft, Institute of Psychiatry, and lead author says "we have a major problem here. Non-disclosure is an extra barrier it means people don't seek treatment and don't get help." Also reported in the Asian Age.

King's press release related to 'Stigma of mental ill health is 'worse than the illness' '

US Presidential Race: Obama And Romney Clash

Sky News 17th October 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies, analysed the second US presidential debate, saying that it was a draw between the two candidates. Dr Boys commented that the 'combative nature' of the town hall setting contributed to a number of 'pointed moments' between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, including a dispute over pension plans.

Childhood adversity affects adult brain and body functions, researchers find

The Guardian 17th October 2012

Dr Andrea Danese, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research linking chidlhood adversity to brain function in later life. He says the studies address important questions in the understanding of how childhood experiences shape adult lives, but warns that due to the nature of these studies, it is challenging to confidently point to the effects of one specific experience without its active manipulation.

Social interaction can "ease pain" study suggests

The Telegraph 17th October 2012

Professor Steve McMahon, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, comments on the finding that social interaction could help patients recover more quickly from pain linked to nerve damage. He said it was 'well recognised' that pain in humans could be strongly modulated by mood, expectation and attitude. Professor McMahon added that it was more surprising that the degree of inflammatory response to nerve injury could be affected by levels of social interaction.

Viewpoint: The last great polar challenge

BBC News (Online) 17th October 2012

Professor Steve Harridge, Director of King's Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences, comments on the White Mars project, which aims to gather data from polar expeditions that could be useful for space exploration. He said: 'We are very excited to be part of this incredibly challenging expedition, which is going to push the boundaries of human physical and mental endurance.' Professor Harridge added: 'Hopefully, important information will be obtained which will increase our understanding of the limits of human performance, and in particular those which may be relevant for future trips to Mars.'

Through the doors of perception

BBC Radio 4 17th October 2012

Dr Dominic fftyche, Institute of Psychiatry, is interviewed by Geoff Watts in this programme about visual hallucinations. The presenter undergoes a stroboscopic experiment designed to induce hallucinations in subjects whilst their brains are being scanned.

Mothers touch relieves prenatal stress

Times of India 17th October 2012

A new study from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the Universities of Manchester and Liverpool found that mothers who stroke their baby's body in the first few weeks after birth may change the effects that stress during pregnancy can have on an infant's early-life development.

Breast Cancer Timebomb Fear

Daily Mail 16th October 2012

1.68 million women will be living with breast cancer by 2040, according to researchers at King's College London. Of these, 1.2 million will be aged over 65. The findings were also reported by Press Association, The Times, The Daily Mirror, The Daily Telegraph, the Guardian, the Daily Express, ITV News, BBC London News and Sky News (Online).

Should 16 and 17-year-olds be given the vote?

BBC Radio 4 16th October 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discusses the wider impact of giving the vote to 16-year olds in Scotland. He said the arrangements in Scotland would 'set a precedent' for the rest of the UK.

Childhood stimulation key to brain development, study finds

The Guardian 15th October 2012

Dr Andrea Danese, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research linking early home environment to developmental changes in the brain of adolescents. He says that this kind of research highlights the "tremendous role" that parents and carers had to play in enabling children to develop their cognitive, social, and emotional skills by providing safe, predictable, stimulating, and responsive personal interactions with children.

Children with ADHD say stimulant drugs help them

Reuters UK 15th October 2012

Medication for children with ADHD helps them control their behaviour and make decisions, according to a report published by researchers at King's. Children living with ADHD tended to feel that they benefited from medication and that it did not turn them into 'robots', said the report. The findings were also reported by the Guardian, The Telegraph, The Washington Post and The Jakarta Post (Indonesia).

Doctor heal thyself

Daily Mail 15th October 2012

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's, offers tips on healthy living.

Can universities afford to stay single any longer?

The Guardian 15th October 2012

An article about the Francis Crick Institute, due to open in 2015, which brings together King's College London, University College London and Imperial College London.

Viewpoints: Can 16- and-17-year olds be trusted with the vote?

BBC News (Online) 14th October 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, explains why he is in favour of 16 and 17-year-olds voting in the Scottish independence referendum. He said: 'Lowering the voting age could re-ignite the interest of the young in politics.'

As US seeks bigger imprint in Asia, India remains an unknown

The Washington Post 14th October 2012

Dr Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the relationship between the United States and India. He said: 'You can see frustration in Washington because people are not entirely clear what India wants'. He added that India wants friendly relations with everybody, which 'means you are not ready to make choices.'

There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra

The Independent 13th October 2012

Book review by Dr Zoe Norridge from the Department of English.

MPs face up to impact of giving vote to 16-year-olds

The Independent 12th October 2012

Commenting on the news that 16-year-olds in Scotland will be given the right to vote in the Scottish independence referendum, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, described the move as 'very significant potentially' for the constitution and said the issue should be considered by Westminster. Professor Bogdanor's comments were also reported in i, The Daily Telegraph and Daily Mail (Scotland).

Joe Biden and Paul Ryan clash in Vice-Presidential debate

Sky News 12th October 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies, analysed the performance of Joe Biden and Paul Ryan in last night's Vice-Presidential debate, on the Sunrise programme.

BAE Systems chiefs failed the hubris test

Daily Mail 12th October 2012

Drawing parallels between the Equitable Life crisis and the collapsed merger between BAE Systems and EADS, this article references a paper by Professor Richard Roberts, Institute of Contemporary British History, which highlighted the problem of boardroom hubris.

Bad news stories 'alter women's stress response'

BBC News 11th October 2012

Professor Terrie Moffitt, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on new research suggesting that women respond differently to stress than men. She says "How do women manage to neutralise the effects of stress on their cardiovascular systems? An answer to that question would improve health for all of us." Also in the Daily Mail, Evening Standard, CBS News, Globo, BBC Brazil and Press Association

Is the afterlife full of fluffy clouds and angels?

The Daily Telegraph 11th October 2012

In an article about near-death experiences, Dr Peter Fenwick, Institute of Psychiatry, says there are deep problems in interpreting first-person memories of experiences that are supposed to have happened when the brain was out of action.

In Britain, Web Forum for Mothers Makes Politicians Sit Up

International Herald Tribune 11th October 2012

Dr Christine Cheng, Lecturer in International Relations from the Department of War Studies, comments on the influence of parenting site 'Mumsnet'. Dr Cheng's comments were also reported by Star (Malaysia).

Should 16 year old Scots get the vote?

BBC Radio 4 11th October 2012

With Scotland set to introduce voting for 16 and 17 year olds in the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, Professor Vernon Bogdanor of the Institute of Contemporary British History told the Today programme that 'there has been very little considered analysis of whether the voting age should be lowered it's an unusual way of altering the constitution.' He added: 'I am strongly in favour of votes at 16 but I'm not sure that this is the way to introduce it.'

Ministers cant be so easily absolved

Financial Times 11th October 2012

In a letter to the Financial Times, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary History, writes that ministers must take some responsibility for the West Coast rail fiasco.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Radio 3 Scienza (Italy) 11th October 2012

Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses the importance of the discovery of molecular sensors called G-protein-coupled receptors for psychiatry. The scientists who made the discovery were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. (Begins at 15.05 - in Italian)

Focus on Africa - Friendship Bench

BBC World Service 10th October 2012

Dr Melanie Abas, Institute of Psychiatry, discusses a project led by King's and the University of Zimbabwe called the Friendship Bench - a low cost intervention led by community health workers in Zimbabwe shown to be effective in helping treat mental illness. (1700 GMT Edition - begins at 45.00 mins)

King's press release related to 'Focus on Africa - Friendship Bench'

How To Debate (Mitt Romney Style)

The Commentator 10th October 2012

Mitt Romney 'busted this race wide open' with his performance during the first US presidential debate, writes Dr James D. Boys, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies. He adds: 'A poor performance for Romney last week would have been enough to seal the deal for an Obama victory. Instead, the president is on the ropes and Romney is surging.'

Teaching Portugese

BBC Brasil (Online) 10th October 2012

Mention of the Modern Language Centre (MLC) at King's. In the article, Dr Joseph Marques, Brazil Institute, claims that if Brazil wants to play a bigger role on political and business forums, it needs to invest more in promoting its language and culture.

Ban under-threes from watching television, says study

The Guardian 9th October 2012

Dr Louise Arsenault, Institute of Psychiatry, comments on reports claiming television is harmful for young children. She warns it is important to keep the findings in context and highlights that screen media could be a marker of a more generally unhealthy lifestyle.

Islamic extremist group in Cardiff tried to radicalise young Muslim

BBC News (Wales) 9th October 2012

Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, analyses extremist groups in Cardiff.

Sarah Williams talks with an expert on Nobel in Medicine

Voice of America 8th October 2012

Peter Braude, Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, explains the research behind the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

Analysis: Reprogrammed cells open new medical window

Reuters 8th October 2012

Following the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, comments on the use of iPS cells in stem cell research.

Government in need of direction

BBC Radio 4 7th October 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, from the Institute of Contemporary British History, looks back on David Cameron's leadership of the Conservative Party and assesses the challenges he faces in guiding a Government that has 'lost its sense of direction'. Interview starts at 10.20.

What drives an ex-military man to violence?

Sunday Express 7th October 2012

Commenting on the recent death of Sergeant Michael Pederson, Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes reports a recent study by Dr Deirdre MacManus, Institute of Psychiatry which found that 13% of Armed Forces personel were violent on their return home.

James Griffith Edwards

The Lancet 6th October 2012

Professor Griffith Edwards, psychiatrist and expert on drug addiction who founded the National Addiction Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry died September 13, 2012. Professor John Strang, current head of the NAC says: Around the world there is a cadre of clinicians and researchers and people in the policy field who've been profoundly influenced by Griff at critical points in their careers.

In the west coast rail blame game, the principle is clear

The Guardian 6th October 2012

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, from the Institute of Contemporary British History, writes that ministers are responsible for the rail franchise fiasco. He says: 'The constitutional principle is clear. Ministers take the credit when things go right and accept the blame when things go wrong. The trouble is that most ministers are prepared to accept only the first part of this principle.'

Rise of the megacities get the data

Guardian 4th October 2012

In an article about the inconsistencies in urban population data, Dr Deborah Potts, Geography, said that UN data is frequently wrong.

The great debates

The Commentator 3rd October 2012

Dr James D. Boys, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies, previews the US presidential election debates.

Kill or cure? Why keeping pace with science and technology may be the death of the NHS

The Independent 3rd October 2012

In an article discussing advances in healthcare and whether these will help or cripple the NHS, Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry, talks about his team's research into Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. He says "We nearly have biomarkers now and they will improve steadily over the next five to ten years." A debate on this topic was held at King's College London on Wednesday 3rd October.

Professor Griffith Edwards

The Times 3rd October 2012

Professor Griffith Edwards, CBE, expert on alcohol and drug addiction and founder of the National Addiction Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, died on September 13, 2012. The obiruary in the Times payes tribute to an internationally respected psychiatrist whose pioneering research yielded a humane new understanding of drug and alcohol addiction.

How Britain got the bomb

BBC History Magazine 1st October 2012

Dr Michael Goodman, War Studies, tells the story of how, 60 years ago, Britain detonated 'the most destructive weapon known to man.'

'Digital Humanities': Time travel via the Internet

International Herald Tribune 1st October 2012

For decades, research into the digital humanities 'percolated along' said Professor Willard McCarty from the Department of Digital Humanities, in an interview with the International Herald Tribune. He added: 'Then when the Web was invented in the early 1990s, people starting putting all