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£13m investment in stem cell research

Posted on 06/11/2012
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The Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council (MRC) today announced a £12.75 million initiative to create a catalogue of high-quality adult stem cells, so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). The initiative, led by King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, will provide a knowledge-base to underpin the use of such cells in studying the effects of our genes on health and disease. It will lay the foundations to create a new iPS cell bank, providing a world-class resource for UK researchers.

As part of the Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HIPSCI), King’s will launch its ‘Stem Cell Hotel’ based at Guy’s Hospital, which will offer clinician scientists and cell biologists the opportunity to work collaboratively to turn scientific discoveries into treatments more quickly – a key aim of King’s Health Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre.

The investment will enable researchers to exploit the technology made possible by the discoveries of Professor Sir John Gurdon and Professor Shinya Yamanaka, who this year received a Nobel prize for their pioneering research into changing adult cells into stem cells.

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are derived from ordinary cells of the adult body, by winding the clock back and reprogramming them to become stem cells. They have the potential to develop into a wide range of specialised cell types and so are particularly useful for studying the biological mechanisms of disease and exploring the impact of genetic variation on cell behaviour.

The HIPSCI project will generate iPS cells from healthy volunteers and patient groups. Using state of the art techniques, researchers will conduct extensive genetic analysis on the cells, and will characterise how the cells respond to specific external stimuli and develop into specialised cell types.

The resulting cell collection and data set will be the UK’s most comprehensive resource for investigating how genetic variation impacts on cell behaviour and how diseases linked to a specific genetic defect can result in a broad spectrum of clinical abnormalities.

Professor Fiona Watt, Director of the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King’s, said: ‘The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative brings together world-leading expertise in clinical genetics, stem cell biology and genomic technologies. We believe that this research will drive forward the translation of basic research into improved diagnosis and treatment of disease. At King’s we also hope this will enable us to open a ‘Stem Cell Hotel’, providing a platform for collaborative experiments between clinician scientists with in-depth knowledge of specific diseases and cell biologists who have the tools to obtain quantitative readouts of cell behaviour.’

‘Since the Human Genome Project, we have been working to uncover the role of variation in our genome for our wellbeing,” explains Dr Richard Durbin, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. ‘The 1000 Genomes Project published its first comprehensive suite of findings last Wednesday: today’s announcement will harness biological research on a similarly powerful scale to give that variation biological meaning. By tying genetic variation to changes in the behaviour of human cells, we will build paths to understanding human disease.’

‘The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative will be an important resource that will help researchers around the world understand the links between genetic variation, cell behaviour and disease and speed up the translation of this research into improved diagnosis and treatment of disease,’ said Sir Mark Walport, Director of the Wellcome Trust. ‘The field of induced pluripotent stem cell research was made possible thanks to the seminal discoveries of Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka, who were last month awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology for their work. This is a field in which the UK remains at the cutting edge. Our investment in this new initiative should further strengthen the UK’s position and lead to patient benefit.’

Professor Sir John Savill, Chief Executive of the MRC, said: ‘Induced pluripotent stem cells hold enormous potential to help us understand and treat human disease, but currently the application of iPS cell technology is limited by gaps in our knowledge regarding their biological properties and how we can best manipulate them to accurately model human disease. By investing in a UK-wide initiative in iPS cell technology, we hope to propel UK researchers to the forefront of this rapidly evolving field and provide an invaluable stock of high-quality cell lines for use by academia and industry alike.’

Sanger Institute investigators aim to make more than 1000 induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy people and those with disease, and will use genomic approaches to study variation in their cellular function.

The multi-institution project will include collaborations with the University of Cambridge, University of Dundee, European Bioinformatics Institute and UCL (University College London).

Notes to editors

For further information please contact Emma Reynolds, PR Manager (Health) at King’s College London, on 0207 848 4334 or email emma.reynolds@kcl.ac.uk

For further information about King's visit our 'King's in Brief' page.

About the Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci)
HipSci brings  together diverse constituents in genomics, proteomics, cell biology and clinical genetics to create a UK national iPS cell resource and use it to carry out cellular genetic studies. Between 2013 and 2016 we aim to generate iPS cells from over 500  healthy individuals 500 individuals with genetic disease. We will then use these cells to discover how genomic variation impacts on cellular phenotype and identify new disease mechanisms. Strong links with NHS investigators will ensure that studies on the disease-associated cell lines will be linked to extensive clinical information. Further key features of the project are an open access model of data sharing; engagement of the wider clinical genetics community in selecting patient samples; and provision of dedicated laboratory space for collaborative cell phenotyping and differentiation.

About the Wellcome Trust
The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. It supports the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. The Trust’s breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. It is independent of both political and commercial interests.

About the Medical Research Council
For almost 100 years the Medical Research Council has improved the health of people in the UK and around the world by supporting the highest quality science. The MRC invests in world-class scientists. It has produced 29 Nobel Prize winners and sustains a flourishing environment for internationally recognised research. The MRC focuses on making an impact and provides the financial muscle and scientific expertise behind medical breakthroughs, including one of the first antibiotics penicillin, the structure of DNA and the lethal link between smoking and cancer. Today MRC funded scientists tackle research into the major health challenges of the 21st century.

About the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world's leading genome centres. Through its ability to conduct research at scale, it is able to engage in bold and long-term exploratory projects that are designed to influence and empower medical science globally. Institute research findings, generated through its own research programmes and through its leading role in international consortia, are being used to develop new diagnostics and treatments for human disease.

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