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Deborah Bull appointed to Arts and Humanities Research Council

Posted on 16/07/2013
Deborah Bull (Credit: William Burlington)

Deborah Bull (Credit: William Burlington)

David Willetts, Minister for Universities and Science, has appointed Deborah Bull, Director of Cultural Partnerships at King’s College London to the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) governing body, the Council, with effect from 1 September 2013 for three years. She will be joined by two other new members Jan Dalley, arts editor of the Financial Times, and Anthony Lilley, Chief Creative Officer and CEO of Magic Lantern Productions Ltd. Council members are appointed by the Minister for Universities and Science and are responsible for the overall strategic direction of the AHRC including its key objectives and targets, and key decisions about the research direction of the AHRC.  

The AHRC funds world-class, independent researchers in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and much more. This financial year the AHRC will spend approximately £98m to fund research and postgraduate training in collaboration with a number of partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK.

Chairman of the AHRC Professor Sir Alan Wilson welcomed the appointments: 'It is with great pleasure to welcome three influential figures from the creative and cultural industries to the AHRC Council. Each new member brings with them a wealth of experience to complement our current membership and will support the AHRC in driving forward the aims and ambitions of our new strategy.'

As Director of Cultural Partnerships, King’s College London, Deborah has established King’s Cultural Institute and is leading on the development of Science Gallery at King’s on the Guy’s Campus. She danced with The Royal Ballet between 1981 and 2001, when she joined the Royal Opera House Executive to establish ROH2. From 2008-2012, she was Creative Director of the Royal Opera House. In 1999 she was awarded a CBE for her contribution to the arts. She has served on Arts Council England, as a Governor of the South Bank and the BBC and as a judge for the 2010 Man Booker Prize.

Commenting on her appointment, Deborah Bull said: 'I am delighted to be joining the Arts and Humanities Research Council and look forward to working with colleagues on the Council to ensure that it connects effectively with the broad communities of artists and arts organisations of which I have been a part for so many years. I very much hope that my past experience and my current role, at the interface between culture and Higher Education, will allow me to offer valuable perspectives and to champion the value of the research the Council supports to culture, policy making, the economy and across society more broadly.'

Notes to Editors

For further information, please contact pr@kcl.ac.uk or 020 7848 3202.

For further information about King’s visit our 'King’s in Brief' page.

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