Science Education

|

MA

|

Part Time, Full Time

| Admissions status: Open
STRUCTURE OVERVIEW
Core programme content
  • Recent Developments in Science Education module 
  • 20,000 word dissertation on a topic related to Science Education

Indicative non-core content
Students are encouraged to take:
  • Recent Developments in Science Education

Over 20 other modules are available for study including:

  • Assessment in Professional Practice & Society
  • Recent Developments in Education Management
  • Social Context of Schooling
  • Teacher Development
  • Social Justice & Education Policy 
  • Psychology & Learning
  • International & Comparative Education
  • Design & Evaluation of Educational Software.

FORMAT AND ASSESSMENT
In order to gain the MA Science Education, sstudents must complete and pass four modules (30 credits each) and a dissertation (60 credits). There are no examinations - all modules are assessed by written work.

The programme may be taken over one year (full time) or two to four years (part time). A serving teacher would normally complete the MA on a part time basis and complete one module in each of the autumn and spring terms.

The sessions for each module normally take place on one evening each week from 5.30 - 7.30pm at the Waterloo Campus, and are designed to fit around the working life of a teacher.



MODULES
More information on typical programme modules.
NB it cannot be guaranteed that all modules are offered in any particular academic year.

Teaching staff: Dr Christine Harrison
Module code: 7SSEM017
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

By the end of this module, participants will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of theoretical frameworks, particularly sociological and psychological, on teaching and learning in Science education; demonstrate an ability to critically consider research based evidence and its implications for practice and apply their knowledge, understanding and intellectual skills to write an informed and critical review about a topic in their chosen area of study. The module develops knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical frameworks, particularly sociological and psychological influences, on teaching and learning in science education and the seminal texts and literature in these areas.

Teaching staff: Professor Eva Jablonka
Module code: 7SSEM016
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
6,000 word assignment

In times of great challenge and flux, it is very important that mathematics teachers and mathematics consultants, policy makers and managers are able to critique their work in terms of the rich traditions of the mathematics education curriculum. By the end of the module, participants will be able to delineate the main assumptions behind a range of theoretical frameworks for conceptualising and analysing the learning and teaching of mathematics and their implications for policy and classroom practice. In particular, participants will engage with core readings in learning theories (from cognitive constructivist, socio-cultural, interactionist, to sociological perspectives), and the teaching and assessment frameworks they often imply. Through their encounter with seminal scholarly texts, participants will develop a critical perspective on contemporary schemes currently impacting on mathematics learning, teaching and assessment, and shaping alternatives for the future. Developing academic skills (reading and writing and argumentation based on scholarly sources and critique) will be an important emphasis of the module.
Teaching staff: Dr Clive Kanes
Module code: 7SSEM052
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of both technical and pragmatic issues in educational assessment. Students will be encouraged to research and reflect on assessment systems in which they are involved. The primary aim of this module is to improve and enrich assessment skills and develop the practical know-how to practise, evaluate and challenge their own assessment practices as education professionals. Classroom, school, as well as national and international schemes for educational assessment will feature throughout. Notions and techniques of learning measurement in assessment will be explored technically, conceptually and critically. Topics will include classical testing theory, psychometric techniques including an introduction to item response theory. Work will be referenced to scholarly literature. Statistical concepts, discourse analysis, and other analytic techniques will be introduced where appropriate. Opportunities for formative assessment will arise.
Teaching staff: 

Dr Christine Harrison


Module code: 7SSEM051
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module has been designed to provide students with a rigorous introduction to the ways educational assessment currently impacts teaching and learning within social and professional contexts. National and international initiatives and programmes will feature prominently. In exploring these the influence of assessment processes and policies on curriculum in the classroom, on the job, within informal and public contexts, together with their social, economic and educational consequences, including teacher professionalism will be introduced and critically discussed. Knowledge derived from rigorous empirical and theoretical research will be emphasised. Topics will include: recent thinking about the nature, aims and purposes of educational assessment; assessment for learning; influential international league tables such as PISA, PIACC, IELTS and TIMMS; and recent developments in evaluating the quality of educational assessment. Students will be expected throughout to draw heavily on professional and scholarly resources, and become knowledgeable about key concepts, debates, and points of contention. Through these, together with their own professional experience, students will be able to generate critical analyses, arguments and their personal views for educational assessment.
Teaching staff: Margaret Derrington
Module code: 7SSEX007
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring);  summer session 1; 
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

The module aims to prepare ICT teachers to teach Computing/Computer Science in secondary schools up to A level and to give them the confidence to set up Computing courses and after school clubs in their schools. It covers the knowledge and the theoretical basis including the pedagogy for teaching Computer Science including programming and introduction of the concepts of computing to pupils from year seven. It includes a critical examination of content, assessment and resources for current curricula including GCSE and A level specifications. Issues identified by research in the area of teaching and learning of programming and Computer Science are considered together with the implications for computing education at secondary level. Module teaching comprises face-to-face workshops and online activities with Skype, KEATS and Open Wonderland. This course also exists as a standalone credit bearing course which, together with credits from a PGCE, can be ‘topped up’ to a full MA later.
Teaching staff: Professor Andrew Wright
Module code: 7SSEM002
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Wedensdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module provides a critical overview of the basic issues and contours of the model of Critical Religious Education developed at King's College, which informs the pedagogy of the National Framework for Religious Education. Particular attention is given to a) the model's philosophical roots in critical realism, b) its realistic understanding of personal identity, religious traditions, and transcendent truth claims, c) its pedagogical practices grounded in phenomenography and variation theory, and d) comparison with alternative phenomenological and constructivist religious education pedagogy.
Teaching staff: Dr Mary Webb
Module code: 7SSEM003
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions.
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module will examine different approaches to the design and evaluation of educational software and activities in a range of settings including classrooms, on the web, and "stand alone". Special attention is paid to the role of learning theories including behaviourism, constructivism and socio-cultural perspectives in implementing digitally-based activities and applications. Practical design and evaluation sessions form a major element of the module, with an emphasis on learner-centred and scenario-based approaches. The assessment takes the form of the design and critical evaluation of an activity about a topic chosen by each participant. No special technical expertise is required, and there will be opportunity within the module to develop your own practical applications and activities. Module teaching comprises two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions. Online activities each week will involve:

 

A task related to the week's theme usually including the study of a specific paper or evaluation of an application or web site, with each student posting their reactions, comments and reflections to an on-line asynchronous discussion board for others to view and respond. Online synchronous (chat) seminars in small groups to discuss the week's theme. These happen on the same evening each week.

Teaching staff: Dr Chris Abbott
Module code: 7SSEM019
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: One face-to-face workshop then online participation
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This is a cross-curricular module which has been popular with students on the Languages and ICT programmes. The module will examine issues related to new and wider definitions of literacy in the light of developments in Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and will examine the implications of these for notions of literacy and its pedagogy. Also considered will be the various ways in which language has developed as a result of the devices, mechanisms and practices of online life and social networking. It is essential that all module participants are confident users of email and the Web, as all of the module will be delivered online. There are no set times for online participation but new tasks will be set for each week of the module, and it is important that participants are able to log on regularly (at least three times a week) to take part in discussions and to contribute to group and individual tasks..
Teaching staff: Dr Mary Webb
Module code: 7SSEM021
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions.
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module considers a range of issues in depth relating to the uptake and the uses of ICT in teaching and learning, known variously as "e-learning" or "technologically-enhanced learning". It will cover the reasons for the successes and failures of e-learning/ technology enhanced learning in its integration into teaching and learning, and interpret those changes in light of alternative theories and practices of innovation and change in education. Teachers' pedagogies and learners' achievements and attitudes will be examined, together with the new repertoires of skills and understandings needed by both to be effective in the context of technology-enhanced learning. Technology's role in managing learning will be examined including the use of Virtual and Managed Learning Environments. Drawing on a range of recent and relevant research the module will relate theories of learning and change to the empirical evidence of the uptake and use of e-learning in education. Module teaching comprises two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions. Online activities each week will involve: A task related to the week's theme usually including the study of a specific paper, with each student posting their reactions, comments and reflections to an on-line asynchronous discussion board for others to view and respond; Online synchronous (chat) seminars in small groups to discuss the week's theme. These happen on the same evening each week.
Teaching staff: 

Professor Becky Francis


Module code: 7SSEM005
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Wednesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

Policies are developed in order to tackle what are perceived to be social issues or problems. For example, currently we have policies which aim to include children, students and all learners in society in order to improve their life chances. However, concerns about 'problems' in society are not new. In the nineteenth century in Britain, the movement of many people from the country-side to the newly emerging cities was accompanied by social changes and concerns about poverty, poor housing, child labour and what were viewed as the threats of the growing urban working class. It became accepted that the government (the state) would have to do something about these issues. Social policies were enacted to try to ameliorate these problems. Obviously education – the focus of this module - was one form of policy intervention. In this module we want to consider the origins of state intervention (policy) into educational provision. We will examine how and why certain policies were taken up, which ideologies have dominated at certain times and we will explore the sorts of policy outcomes which have come from all this. We want to consider how policies are developed and how they are implemented. We also want to consider how they change in the different contexts in which they are interpreted, experienced, enacted and/or resisted as well as through the actions of those charged with their implementation. Our module title includes the word 'city' because it is in cities that we can most easily see the way in which educational and other policies do their work and are resisted/ appropriated/impact on the lives of those who 'people policy'.

 

"The city concentrates and makes highly visible the contrasts between the rich and the poor. This concentration and visibility means that conflicts over scarce resources, not least education, between rich and poor are more likely, more extreme, and in turn, more visible in urban areas" (Coulby, 1992, p. 221)

Teaching staff: Dr Bethan Marshall
Module code: 7SSEM007
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

By the end of this module students will be able to situate their own practice within an arts paradigm; apply to their thinking about teaching a knowledge of the relevant literature on writing, composition and rhetoric to issues in the teaching of English; reflect on their own practice as teachers and arts practitioners; apply to their thinking about teaching an understanding of what is involved in students' appreciation of the language-based arts; and apply to their thinking about teaching an understanding of the relevance to English of creative work within performing arts, moving image and other modalities. The module develops knowledge and understanding of aspects of psychological, philosophical and aesthetic and literary theory relevant to a theoretical foundation for an arts-oriented English and key issues in the debates about the place and relative importance of the arts in education.
Teaching staff: Professor Justin Dillon and David Pepper.
Module code: 7SSEM061
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

What can you learn from comparing education systems, schools or teachers? International comparisons have recently risen to prominence in the education policy discourse. At its best, comparative education can inform us about learning in different places or times and can provide us with fresh perspectives on ourselves. When we engage in international comparative education, differences are often stark. A world of alternatives opens up to us - with the capacity to challenge and reassure in equal measure. But caution is advisable. When we observe differences, what are the less visible factors we need to account for? When we find trends across countries, do they reflect national consensus or international pressures? What then is the influence of organisations such as the OECD, UNESCO, the World Bank and the EU? The question arises: are policy makers’ interpretations justified or do they merely reflect pre-set political imperatives? In this module, we will: familiarise ourselves with the field of comparative education; consider the relationship between education and aspects of national contexts; evaluate the methodology, contribution and limitations of international comparative education; and, identify international trends in curriculum, assessment and pedagogy. During the module, students will be required to identify a topic for their written assignment. One session will be devoted to short presentations on initial exploration of the topic and formative feedback for the full assignment. Students will benefit from the international perspectives of the tutors, outside speakers, and their fellow students.
Teaching staff: Dr Jane Jones
Module code: 7SSEM022
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module aims to extend students’ understanding of the key concepts of foreign/second language learning and acquisition theory including mentalism, behaviourism and social constructivist approaches. We also explore the communicative language teaching approach, motivation, the increasingly important topic of learning/learner strategies, content-based language learning, and the linguistic and cultural representations modelled through film in the classroom. The module then examines how these concepts are applied in language teaching practices. MA students examine a range of teaching and learning approaches and the underlying theoretical precepts and relate this broad understanding to their own cultural and educational contexts. The module is interactive, being based on active learning methods and very student-focused. The session formats are varied and involve both personal reflection and collaborative learning. The module draws on a variety of key texts and draws on a wide range of international research to explore the key issues in language teaching and learning. Students choose to focus on one of the topics in greater depth for their end-of-module essay which will be agreed by the module tutor.
Teaching staff: Prof Ben Rampton
Module code: 7SSEM023
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module addresses a number of perspectives on the relationship between language and power. It sets up a dialogue between theories and methods from social theory, critical discourse analysis, interactional sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. It examines the dynamics of language and power in, for example, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, education, informal, institutional & mass-mediated discourse, and global and local interaction. The module also helps students to conduct their own analyses. By the end of this module, participants will have an understanding of relations of language and power in a wide range of domains and communicative settings, and an understanding of how relevant research approaches might be practically applied.
Teaching staff: Prof Constant Leung
Module code: 7SSEM006
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module is designed for those who are involved in the education of language minority students in the primary, secondary and FE sectors in the UK and other similar societies where there is a high degree of ethnic and linguistic diversity. Students will gain an understanding of:

 

policy, theory and practice in the teaching and learning of English as a Second/Additional Language (ESL/EAL) in school/college settings principles and practice of integrating language and content teachingassessment of ESL/EAL development.

Teaching staff: Dr Bethan Marshall
Module code: 7SSEM025
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

By the end of this module participants will have an understanding of key elements of an epistemological framework for the teaching of English; a knowledge of the competing philosophies of English, the history of these positions and their current manifestations; an understanding of understanding of the cognitive activities distinctively involved in English; an ability to reflect on their own assessment practices and an awareness of the assumptions underlying their own pedagogical practices and an ability to reflect on their efficacy in relation to the teaching of English The module develops knowledge and understanding of aspects of psychological, philosophical and aesthetic and literary theory relevant to a theoretical foundation for an arts-oriented English and key issues in the debates about the place and relative importance of the arts in education.
Teaching staff: Dr Jill Hohenstein
Module code: 7SSEM030
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: 

Wednesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm


Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This is an optional module that provides an introduction to principles and applications of Psychology to Learning in formal and informal contexts. Over the last three decades, psychological theories and explanation of learning have developed far beyond simple, mechanistic models (such as reinforcement) that are applied in formal settings (especially schools). Within this module, participants will have the opportunity to explore: individual and social circumstances that may promote or hinder learning; characteristics of learning in formal and informal contexts; and individual and social theories of learning. Further, the module will explore how theories of learning have been adapted and ignored in education policies: at pre-school, primary and secondary school levels; with regard to curriculum; and with regard to assessment. In considering explanations of learning, the module will consider issues of development, multiple intelligences, interpersonal support that underlies learning and the effect of culture/activity on learning experience.
Teaching staff: Dr Mary Webb
Module code: 7SSEM032
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module will introduce a broad range of current major developments associated with ICT in education. In particular it will include a consideration of computational thinking in the curriculum and its importance for learning. Students may be from a range of subject areas including computer science and they will consider computational thinking as well as the use of computers and the Internet in their subjects for learning, teaching and the curriculum, the nature of educational software, how learners may be changing in the digital age and the impact of new technologies such as multimedia and social networking software. Other areas covered include web-based learning, the role of computer-mediated communications, pedagogy with technology, modelling, learning though gaming, mobile learning and e-assessment. Module teaching is comprised of two face-to-face workshops held at the start and middle of the module on a Saturday together with weekly tasks and readings in ten on-line sessions. Online activities each week will involve:

A task related to the week's theme usually including the study of a specific paper, with each student posting their reactions, comments and reflections to an on-line asynchronous discussion board for others to view and respond. Online synchronous (chat) seminars in small groups to discuss the week's theme. These happen on the same evening each week.

Teaching staff: Dr Gerard Lum
Module code: 7SSEM031
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

Over the last decade education management has become a major preoccupation of educational research, policy and practice. This module considers the 'problem-solving' nature of most approaches to education management but also highlights more critical perspectives which bring into the picture historical, social, economic and political influences. The module ranges widely across recent education management issues including evaluation and accountability, the nature of educational leadership and change, issues of power and authority, the micro-politics of educational organisations, school effectiveness and improvement, and the management implications of educational markets and managerialism.
Teaching staff: Professor Eva Jablonka
Module code: 7SSEM033
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Wednesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This course will provide an overview of recent developments in mathematics education. A major focus of this module will be the exploration of research being undertaken at King's in the context of recent developments more widely. The content of this course will be subject to regular review so as to ensure that the course reflects recent developments. We anticipate that the topics which will be considered will be drawn from:

International comparisons,
Progression in learning mathematics,
Processes in mathematics,
The role of IT in mathematics education,
Social theories of teaching & learning,
The impact of feminisms on mathematics education,
Social Justice and mathematics education,
Assessment practices and mathematics education.
Teaching staff: Dr Jane Jones
Module code: 7SSEM034
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Tuesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

The module explores recent theoretical and policy developments in MFL Education in a rich variety of cultural contexts and phases of language learning. Topics that are considered include:
- recent initiatives in languages teaching and learning
- early language learning
- assessment frameworks
- ICT in education
- citizenship and the languages curriculum
- gender issues as they relate to language learning
- special needs and inclusion
- cultural learning
- subject leadership in MFL

The module is research focused and includes important work that has been pioneered at King’s College. We seek to consider how these issues relate to and shape pedagogy and classroom practices. Students will be expected to read widely and to reflect critically on issues. The sessions are based on active learning methods and collaborative learning. Comparison is an important feature of the learning that is designed to enable to learn from other contexts as well as to deepen students’ understanding of their own teaching and learning contexts. Students chose an essay on a topic of interest in negotiation with the tutor.

Teaching staff: Dr Heather King
Module code: 7SSEM035
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module aims to develop students' knowledge and understanding of recent research developments in science education with a particular focus on the theoretical base. It will develop students' abilities to review critically and evaluate research findings and to consider their implications for practice. The module will examine recent bodies of research in the following areas: the role of language: the practice of argumentation; the nature of representations; teacher beliefs; learner 'identity'; technology mediated education; and learning outside the classroom. During the module, you will be required to select one topic for a fuller analysis for your written assignment which should involve in-depth consideration, analysis and critical review of one-research based recent development in science education. Time in the sessions will be devoted to a discussion on your initial thoughts in order to provide formative feedback for the full assignment.
Teaching staff: Dr Philip Barnes
Module code: 7SSEM036
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Wednesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module provides a critical overview of the basic issues and contours of contemporary practice and debate in religious education in Britain. Particular attention is given to the issues of methodology and ideology, and to effective teaching and learning in religious education. The content centres centre chiefly on the modern (post-1944) history of religious education in Britain is traced through its most prominent debates, personalities and developments. Attention is given to the diversity of methodologies (or models) employed by British religious educators (confessional, implicit, phenomenological, spiritual, conceptual, ethnographic and critical); these are discussed and evaluated in the context of the legislative arrangements, national guidelines and statutory and non-statutory advice that pertain to religious education. Students are introduced to the skills that will enable them to direct successful teaching and learning in religious education.
Teaching staff: Dr Gerard Lum
Module code: 7SSEM037
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

School effectiveness and improvement research has become very popular in recent years but has also become increasingly criticised for being a socially and politically decontextualised body of literature which provides support for inequitable educational reforms. This module is intended to provide a critical appraisal of this literature by looking at its methodological and theoretical problems, whether school effectiveness and school improvement claims are justified and the relationship between this literature and recent education policy in the UK and elsewhere. While this is emphatically not a module on 'fixing' underperforming schools, the school effectiveness and improvement literature provides a fascinating example of the way educational research is never neutral but is coloured by the political, ideological and methodological concerns of its time.
Teaching staff: 

Professor Becky Francis


Module code: 7SSEM038
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Wednesdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module is designed to provide a framework through which to examine the conflicting aims, claims, values and beliefs which have underpinned educational provision over time. The module considers several key social science concepts or fields of study with education as the major substantive focus and processes of social change providing the major context of concern. The key concepts include: gender, 'race', class, reproduction theory, globalisation, the market, the politics of knowledge and performativity. The overall aim of the module is to introduce students to a set of concepts, theories and ideas which will enable them to place their own subject interests in relation to wider social, political and economic changes taking place in modern society.
Teaching staff: Professor Becky Francis
Module code: 7SSEM039
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 1 (autumn) 
Teaching pattern: 

Block teaching


Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

This module explores what is meant by the concept of social justice and some of the difficulties involved in trying to enact socially just practices. It will consider tensions between distributive, cultural and associational forms of justice by looking at some examples of contexts in which these tensions arise. Each session will focus on a different axis of social differentiation, for example, age, disability, sexuality and identity.
Teaching staff: Dr Bob Burstow
Module code: 7SSEM040
Credit level: 7
Credit value: 30
Semester:  Semester 2 (spring) 
Teaching pattern: Thursdays 5.30 - 7.30pm
Assessment:  coursework 
One 6,000 word assignment

In recent years, the gaze of researchers and policy makers has focused increasingly on teachers and teacher change. In this module, teacher development is considered as an area of knowledge from a range of perspectives including historical, philosophical, ethical, sociological, ethical, and political. Within these various concepts of 'teacher' are introduced and tensions among them explored. These include notions of the teacher as, for example: domain knowledge specialist; curriculum worker; bureaucrat; exemplary life coach and pastoral carer, and so on. The roles and representations of teachers (for example, as 'professionals' or as 'change agents') are explored in depth. Teachers' careers touching on their social, personal and professional growth are considered e.g., the reflective practitioner, the competence facilitator, the practitioner and practice oriented researcher, the professional leader, educational manager. Participants are expected to use their knowledge and experience of their own and their colleagues' development to interpret and inform their reading and discussions.
KEY FACTS
Programme leader/s
Dr Christine Harrison
Awarding institution
King's College London
Credit value (UK/ECTS equivalent)
UK 180/ECTS 90
Duration
One year FT, two to four years PT, September - September
Location
Waterloo Campus.
Student destinations
Senior and middle management in schools, informal science education or science education research.
Year of entry 2014
Offered by
Strand Campus