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James Scott

Lecturer in International Politics

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Contact Details:

Department of Political Economy
Room S2.47
Strand Building
Strand Campus
London WC2R 2LS


Email:
james.m.scott@kcl.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7848 7478


Office Hours: 

Wednesday: 10:00 - 11:00
Thursday: 15:00 - 16:00

Biography

Dr James Scott is Lecturer in International Politics in the Department of Political Economy. He is also the Research Group Leader for International Ploitics, Philosophy and Economics.  He works primarily on trade governance, particularly with regard to  developing countries in the World Trade Organisation. James did his Bachelor’s degree in Physics and Philosophy at New College, Oxford before moving to the University of Manchester to undertake a MA in Development Studies and subsequently a PhD in International Political Economy. Following completion of his PhD he worked as a research assistant and then a post-doctoral research fellow at the Brooks World Poverty Institute, University of Manchester. James has also taught at the University of Liverpool.

Research

Dr Scott’s research focuses on global governance, with a particular focus within that on the world trade system. He has worked on a number of aspects of the governance of trade, principally exploring the links between trade and development. This has included exploring the participation and role of developing countries in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and World Trade Organisation (WTO), and the extent to which the WTO’s negotiations deliver the promises made concerning development. Most recently Dr Scott has been working on examining the range of institutions that provide expert knowledge in global trade and the extent to which they provide resistance to dominant trade narratives and open up the possibility of more development-oriented trade governance. This work has been funded by research grants from the British Academy and the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Teaching

  • Issues in International Politics (2nd year undergraduate)
  • International Institutions and Global Governance (3rd year undergraduate)
  • Advanced Issues in International Politics (3rd year undergraduate)

Publications

Edited Books:

Erin Hannah, James Scott and Silke Trommer (eds.) (2015), Expert Knowledge in Global Trade. (Abingdon and New York: Routledge).

Rorden Wilkinson and James Scott (eds.) (2013), Trade, Poverty, Development: Getting beyond the WTO’s Doha deadlock, (London: Routledge).
  

Journal Articles:

Erin Hannah, Holly Ryan and James Scott, ‘Power, Knowledge and Resistance: The Revolutionary Potential of Intergovernmental Organisations in Global Trade?’, (2017), Review of International Political Economy, online first, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09692290.2017.1324807.

Erin Hannah, James Scott, Rorden Wilkinson, (2017). ‘Reforming WTO-civil society engagement’, World Trade Review, online first, https://doi.org/10.1017/S1474745616000446

James Scott, ‘The International Politics of South-South Trade’, (2016) Global Governance, 22(3), pp. 427-445.

Rorden Wilkinson, Erin Hannah and James Scott, (2016) ‘The WTO in Nairobi: The demise of the Doha Development Agenda and the future of the multilateral trading system’, Global Policy,7(2), pp. 247-255.

James Scott, (2015) ‘The Role of Southern Intellectuals in Contemporary Trade Governance’, New Political Economy, 20(5), pp. 633-652.

Wilkinson, Rorden, Erin Hannah and James Scott. (2014). ‘The WTO in Bali: What MC9 means for the Doha Development Agenda and Why it Matters’, Third World Quarterly, 35(6), pp. 1032-1050. 

Mark Langan and James Scott, (2014), ‘The Aid for Trade Charade’, Cooperation and Conflict, 49(2), pp. 143-161.

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2013) ‘China Threat? Evidence from the WTO’, Journal of World Trade, 47(4), pp. 761–782. 

James Scott and Sophie Harman, (2013) ‘Beyond TRIPs: Why the WTO’s Doha Round is Unhealthy’, Third World Quarterly, 34(8), pp. 1409-1426.

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2012), ‘The Politics and Perils of Plurilaterals’, Economic and Political Weekly, 47(43), pp. 16-19.

Matthias vom Hau, James Scott and David Hulme, (2012), ‘Beyond the BRICs: Alternative strategies of influence in the global politics of development’, European Journal of Development Research, 24(2), pp. 187-204.

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2011), ‘The Poverty of the Doha Round and the Least Developed Countries’, Third World Quarterly, 32(4), pp. 611-627.

James Scott, (2010), ‘Developing Countries in the ITO and GATT Negotiations’, The Journal of Trade Law and Policy, 9(1), pp. 5-24.

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2010) ‘What happened to Doha in Geneva? Re-Engineering the WTO’s Image while Missing Key Opportunities’, European Journal of Development Research, 22(2), pp. 141-153.

David Hulme and James Scott, (2010), ‘The Political Economy of the MDGs: Retrospect and Prospect for the World’s Biggest Promise’, New Political Economy, 15(2), pp. 293-306.

Rorden Wilkinson and James Scott, (2008), ‘Developing Country Participation in the GATT: A Reassessment’, World Trade Review, 7(3), pp. 473-510. This was subsequently condensed and republished by CUTS Centre for International Trade, Economics & Environment as Briefing Paper BP09-WTO-05.

James Scott, (2008), ‘The Use and Misuse of Trade Negotiation Simulations’, The Journal of World Trade, 42(1), pp. 87-103.

Book Chapters:

David Hulme and James Scott, (2013), ‘Governing Development: Power, Poverty and Policy’, in Sophie Harman and David Williams (eds.) Governing the World? The Practice of Global Governance, (London: Routledge).

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2012), ‘The Poverty of the Doha Round and the Least Developed Countries’, in Rorden Wilkinson and James Scott (eds.), Trade, Poverty, Development: Getting beyond the WTO’s Doha deadlock, (London: Routledge).

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson. (2012), ‘The promise of ‘Development’ and the Doha Development Agenda’, in Rorden Wilkinson and James Scott (eds.), Trade, Poverty, Development, (Abingdon and New York: Routledge).

James Scott and Rorden Wilkinson, (2012), ‘China in the WTO’, in Scott Kennedy and Shuaihua Cheng (eds.) From Rule Takers to Rule Makers: The Growing Role of Chinese in Global Governance, (Geneva: ICTSD and RCCPB).

James Scott, (2007), ‘How the Poor Pay for the US Trade Deficit and Why it Matters for the Doha Development Agenda’, in Donna Lee and Rorden Wilkinson (eds) The WTO After Hong Kong, (London: Routledge).

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