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Professors

Professor Andrew Lambert

 

Laughton Professor of Naval History

Prof Andrew LambertDepartment of War Studies
Room K6.44
King's College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS
Email: andrew.lambert@kcl.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7848 2179
Fax: +44 (0)20 7848 2026

 
Office hours: Mondays at 12.00.

Follow the Laughton Naval History group on Twitter @NavalHistWar

Biography

I am Laughton Professor of Naval History in the Department of War Studies at King's College. After completing my research in the Department I taught at Bristol Polytechnic,(now the University of West of England), the Royal Naval Staff College, Greenwich, and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. I am a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and also Director of the Laughton Naval History Unit housed in the Department.

Research Interests

My areas of interest include:

  • Naval history
  • Strategic history
  • History of technology
  • Historiography
Publications

For a list of publications visit the Research Portal or download  this document

PhD Supervision

I am happy to offer supervision in the following areas

  • Naval history
  • Strategic history
  • History of technology
  • Historiography
Expertise and Public Engagement

My work focuses on the naval and strategic history of the British Empire between the Napoleonic Wars and the First World War, and the early development of naval historical writing. My work has addressed a range of issues, including technology, policy-making, regional security, deterrence, historiography, crisis-management and conflict. I received the 2014 Anderson Medal for The Challenge: Britain against America in the Naval War of 1812.

I have lectured on aspects of my work around the world, from Australia and Canada to Finland, Denmark and Russia.

Recovering Robinson Crusoe

In December 2010 I joined a German documentary/academic expedition to Robinson Crusoe Island, one of the Juan Fernandez Islands, 400 miles west of the coast of Chile. The expedition focused on the relationship between the fictional character of Crusoe, one of the best known of all literary inventions, the story of Scots sailor Alexander Selkirk, who was marooned on the island for four years in the early eighteenth century, and the development of British global strategy that culminated in the arrival of Commodore George Anson’s naval expedition in 1741. Read the full story here:  Recovering Robinson Crusoe

 

 
 
 
 
 
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