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Medicine MBBS

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Overview

The MBBS programme at the GKT School of Medical Education offers an innovative and integrated curriculum that will ensure that you are not only better equipped for the transition to becoming an outstanding doctor but also to becoming one of the next generation of medical leaders.


Key benefits

  • An underlying philosophy of integration of medical science and clinical teaching.
  • Focus on learning in partnership with patients.
  • Partner hospitals include Guy’s, King’s College and St Thomas’ Hospitals – three of the most renowned and busiest teaching hospitals in London.
  • Learning from some of the world’s most eminent clinicians and scientists who are global leaders in life sciences and medical research.
  • Teaching underpinned by high quality online learning resources.
  • A multi-faculty university giving students access to a breadth of non-core subjects including humanities and social sciences.
  • Twinned with leading medical schools around the world providing opportunities for clinical exchanges and during the elective module.

Key information

UCAS code A100

Duration Five years

Study mode Full-time

Course type Single honours

Awarding institution King's College London

Faculty Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine

Department

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Entry requirements

Required grades:

AAA

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None


Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

35 points overall and three Higher Level subjects at 666

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

45 Level 3 credits: 36 must be awarded at Distinction, with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

D3 D3 D3

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

Further information below

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

Further information below

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

Further information below

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here

Required grades:

85% overall

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here
Visit our admissions webpages to view our international entry requirements and English language entry requirements.

Required subjects

Chemistry and Biology

Preferred subjects

None

Further information and other requirements

Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements

General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer

A levels: AAA (including Biology and Chemistry) and a further AS-level B. If only one of Chemistry or Biology is offered at A-level, the other must be taken at AS-level grade A. GCSE grade B in both English and Mathematics required, if not offered at A/AS level.

Access to HE Diploma: QAA Access to Medicine/Dentistry HE Diploma taken at a UK Further Education College full time over one year may be considered. Of the 45 Level 3 credits, 36 credits must be from units at Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT,  also required.

Cambridge Pre-U: Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D3 D3 D3 including Chemistry and Biology.

Grade B in both English and Mathematics, and the UKCAT, also required.
Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010): Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010) :Not acceptable for entrance to this programme.

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers: AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and Biology in addition to AAAAB in 5 Highers. 

If only one of Chemistry of Biology is offered at AH, the other must be taken at Higher grade A. 
English and Mathematics required at N5/Standard Credit grade 1 or 2/ Intermediate 2, with grade B if not offered at Higher. UKCAT required.

International Baccalaureate: Pass the IB Diploma with a total of at least 35 points, with three Higher Level subjects at 666 including Chemistry and Biology (if only one taken to HL the other must be taken at SL with 7).  Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE. GCSE Grade B in both English and Mathematics also required (if no GCSE, passes are required at SL in English and Maths if not offered at HL) 

Non academic requirements

Occupational Health clearance required? (Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Enhanced criminal conviction check(Compulsory): Required for successful applicants

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): Any scholastic activity would be considered, eg general reading, debating, theological interests etc

Community activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment. Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account eg clubs, theatrical, religious etc.

General (Very Desirable): We look for applicants who not only have interests but may have also achieved in these areas eg music, sport, first aid, etc.

Work shadowing/observation (Very Desirable): We would normally expect that applicants will have undertaken some voluntary work experience in a caring/health environment and/or observation in a medical clinical setting. It is important for applicants to have a realistic appreciation of what a career as a health professional involves.

Paid or voluntary work (Very Desirable): Any voluntary contribution to your community is taken into account, eg volunteer in a care home. We look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Interviewing

Are interviews offered? Yes. 
Are all applicants interviewed? No, interviewees are selected. 
Are all those made an offer interviewed? Yes. 
What form does it take? Interviews will normally be Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Interviewees circulate from one timed station to another and meet several interviewers who will ask structured questions and mark these independently. More information will be sent to applicants who are invited to interview.
What is considered at interview?Communication skills, interest in the subject and profession, exploring general social and ethical issues, normally health related, the interviewee’s general suitability for the programme and as a health professional, how the interviewee will contribute to the College as a whole.

Selection procedure

A maximum of four choices on the UCAS form may be made for programmes which lead to a professional qualification in medicine. You may add one of the following alternative non-health programmes to your UCAS application: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology, Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Sciences and Biomedical Science. Please be assured that you will be considered as having a full commitment to medicine whether you include a non-health programme choice or not.

If you would like to discuss your options regarding programme choice, including adding a programme which does not appear on this list, please contact the Admissions Office (contact details can be found on the 'Further information' tab).

Currently, students study the following programme structure. King's reviews its programmes on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting learning opportunities and this information is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School/department for further advice.

Application deadline: This course is now closed to applicants for 2016 entry.

The UKCAT

Please note: all applicants are required to sit the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) prior to applying to the MBBS degree. Please refer to the UKCAT website for details on registration at http://www.ukcat.ac.uk.

When considering those students which will be shortlisted for interview the selectors consider the following; GCSE (or equivalent performance), predicted or achieved A-level grades (or equivalent), the personal statement, the reference and the score in the UKCAT. All of these contribute to the shortlisting of candidates, but examination performance and the UKCAT score are perhaps the most important. These are highlighted as they provide us with the fairest and most consistent method of comparing applicants.

The university does not have a threshold UKCAT score in any particular year, and UKCAT is only one of the factors considered in selecting candidates for interview. In previous years, however, we have published guideline scores indicative of what would have been seen as competitive in previous years. Please note that students with scores above these guidelines would not necessarily have been interviewed, and indeed some applicants with scores below the guideline score may have been interviewed.

Scores for the last five years have varied between 630 and 735. Variation from year to year is partly due to variation in the average score UK-wide on the UKCAT, and partly due to variation in the number and quality of applications to King’s each year.

Please note that in the 2016 test, UKCAT will be piloting a new Decision Making section in place of the Decision Analysis subtest.  You will not receive a score for this subtest.  Further information about this new section can be found here:  http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/decision-making/

Academic achievement

You should carefully check that you will meet the School of Medical Education’s minimum academic standards before making an application. Please note that many applicants meet the minimum requirements and so all applications are considered within a competitive environment.

In line with the recommendations of the report 'Fair admissions to higher education: recommendations for good practice' produced by the Admissions to Higher Education Review in 2004, King's will endeavour to consider other factors in addition to examination results, including the educational context of an applicant's formal achievement. As well as achievement at formal examination, King's will look for other indicators of potential and capability.

Personal statement and reference

Your personal statement is one of the many factors in the overall assessment of your application. We are looking particularly for evidence of appropriate commitment to, and realistic appreciation of, the academic, physical and emotional demands of a medicine degree programme and career. We would normally expect that you will have undertaken some work experience in a caring environment and/or observation in a Medical clinical setting. If this is not possible, we look for evidence that you have worked in a setting where you can interact with the general public, eg in a pharmacy, check-out or restaurant.

Communication skills and the ability to work successfully in a team are of great importance. We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school or college life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

Your interests, achievements and contribution to your community are taken into account in addition to academic ability. We aim to ensure that all of our students can cope with the heavy academic workload of the programme and display those professional qualities, skills and attitudes that help to make competent and caring medical professionals.

We would expect your application to be strongly supported by your referee both in terms of academic achievements/potential and in terms of your character and suitability for medicine.

The interview

No offers are made without an interview. Interviews are held between January and March and you must be available for interview in order to be considered for admission. Interviews for international applicants are held in late January or early February. A large number of applications are received for Medicine. Although we recognise that this is an anxious time for you, all applications are carefully considered, and therefore you should not expect a response until the cycle has been completed in early May.

All Medicine programmes at King’s now use Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for selection. During MMIs candidates are asked to respond to questions relating to a scenario at a ‘station’ and then move onto the next station in a timed circuit. One of these station scenarios is designed to assess values and personality based attributes for example: kindness, compassion and empathy, respect for the individual, privacy and dignity, advocacy, decision-making, team working and integrity. Some scenarios are scientifically based and designed to assess information handling and evaluation skills, whilst others will assess knowledge on topical medical issues. Another station will assess the candidates’ ability to deal with an ethical dilemma. Communication skills will be assessed at EACH station.
A standardised interviewer assessment score sheet accompanies each station. Interviewers have no prior knowledge of candidates before they meet them at each station.

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for a clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical medical students at King's.

If you are made an offer for Medicine you will be invited to attend a post-offer Open Day.

Graduate applicants to Medicine A100

We encourage graduate applicants to apply to study Medicine. Suitably qualified graduate applicants for our four-year Graduate/Professional Entry Programme A102 who are invited to interview may also be considered for the five-year programme A100.

Graduate applicants who do not wish to be considered for A102 may apply directly to A100 and their application will be considered in the normal way. Graduate applicants can list both A102 and A100 on their UCAS form if they wish to maximise their chances of studying at King's.

Graduate applicants to A100 do not normally have to satisfy the usual A/AS-Level or other entry requirements (eg you are not expected to have AAA at A-level at the first attempt). The minimum entry requirement is a grade B at A-Level Chemistry and Biology plus an upper second class honours degree (a lower second class honours degree is acceptable combined with a master’s degree with at least a merit). Graduates who have a sufficient quantity of Biology or Chemistry as part of their degree may not need the A-Level in this subject.

For 2014 entry, approximately 18 per cent of our A100 medical students were graduates.

EU and international applicants

There is no quota on the number of EU students who may be admitted. EU applicants must satisfy the normal entry requirements and must be available for interview in this country. International applicants must satisfy the entry requirements as described and be available for interview in the UK. There may be English language requirements: for details of these, please check here . Competition for places is high as the UK Government restricts places for overseas applicants to 8 per cent of the total intake.

University of Oxford applicants

If you are a pre-clinical medicine University of Oxford graduate, or if you expect to obtain a relevant degree from Oxford, you may apply to join the programme. You will join King’s at the beginning of the third year and follow a special preparatory course to cover elements of the course not covered at your previous university.
Applications should be made through the Common Application Scheme. The closing date will be 4 January 2016. An Open Day specifically for University of Oxford students is held in November, to enable applicants to see the facilities and meet students and staff. Successful applicants will also be given the option of attending one of the post offer Open Days in March and April.

All University of Oxford applicants are interviewed as part of the admissions process.

For additional queries about entry requirements or more information, please contact the Admissions Office.

International Science Foundation Programme (ISFP) – Biology & Chemistry Pathway

International students studying King’s International Science Foundation Programme -Biology & Chemistry pathway can now apply to Medicine MBBS. To be eligible for the Foundation, you must meet the English language and academic entry requirements, including having followed a school curriculum abroad that would not allow you to apply for direct entry to a UK university otherwise (for example your country’s national high school diploma), and have not completed an international qualification like A-Levels or International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Before starting the ISFP, students will need to ensure that they also meet the Medicine MBBS entry requirements (including relevant work experience and UKCAT exam). Eligible ISFP students that successfully apply to Medicine are guaranteed an interview for the 5-year MBBS programme. For more information please see our FAQ sheet.

Examination 're-mark' policy

Conditional offer holders must supply to King’s all complete examination results (including final grades) by 30 August of the year of entry. For example, conditional offers holders who initially do not meet their offer may apply for an A level re-mark. If official notification of any change to the final grade is supplied to King’s no later than 30 August and this change meets the initial offer, the offer holder can begin the programme that academic year. Without exception, if the improved re-marked examination result is supplied to the Student Admissions Office after 30 August, a deferred offer of a place will be made.

Criminal conviction disclosure

All offers of a place, and continued enrolment, are made subject to a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Check. All applicants are required to declare on their UCAS application if they have any spent or unspent convictions, cautions or reprimands.

Getting a decision

There continues to be considerable pressure on the available places for students wishing to study Medicine. Applications to the GKT School of Medical Education each year for our undergraduate medical programmes are around 4500 for a total of 410 places. Around 1200 – 1400 applicants are selected for interview

Direct transfer applications

Transfers in to Medicine will be considered in to the third year only.  Candidates must be enrolled on Phase 2 at a UK registered Medical School, with a comparable curriculum, and be performing strongly in their current degree.  Alternatively, they can be about to complete an intercalated degree, having already completed Phase 2 of an MBBS.

Transfer applications into the third year of our MBBS course can be considered only from applicants who have extenuating circumstances. King’s only accepts a maximum of two transfers each year.

  • Further details regarding our policy can be found here
  • Application form for direct entry can be found here
anchor-point

Course detail

Description

Our MBBS Programme aims to inspire, prepare and nurture graduates, who are:

  • Dedicated to improving patient and population health.
  • Critical scientific thinkers.
  • Collaborative leaders and innovators.
  • Outstanding patient-centred clinicians.
  • Excellent team-players.
  • Scholarly educators and life-long learners.
  • Resilient and adaptable professionals.

The curriculum is divided into three Stages. Although there are four entry routes into Medicine at King’s, all students follow the same core MBBS curriculum.

Stage 1 Foundations of Medicine (Year 1) provides students with the building blocks of biomedical sciences, and population sciences and the skills to begin to integrate them with clinical practice.

Stage 2 Principles of Clinical Practice (Years 2 and 3) brings together science and clinical practice in blocks organised around the human life-cycle and common pathological processes. It focuses on the care of patients with common conditions in a range of clinical settings. Students will also follow patients for prolonged periods of time to better understand how to deliver whole-person care. This is underpinned by biomedical and population sciences.

Stage 3 Integrated Clinical Practice (Years 4 and 5) is vocationally oriented and includes the opportunity to study abroad for an elective period. Students also contribute to quality improvement projects and develop additional skills to transform patient and population health at home and abroad. Inter-professional training and simulation at increasing levels of fidelity are important curriculum elements.

In addition to the core curriculum, medical students have a choice of optional elements that allow them to explore topics of interest in greater depth across King’s and the university’s clinical partners.

This includes the opportunity to take an intercalated degree between Stages 2 and 3. The intercalated degree is a one-year BSc programme which gives students the opportunity to study the subjects of their choice in greater depth. As a multi-faculty institution, King’s offers an unrivalled range of intercalated degrees spanning clinical and biomedical sciences and humanities subjects.

Outcome of the programme

The arrangements for registration outlined below are those that apply at present. There is a proposal that the UK Parliament change the law to allow full registration at the point of graduation from medical school, which would allow graduates to practice without the need for a first postgraduate year of provisional registration. If Parliament changes the law, full registration is unlikely to be moved to the end of medical school before 2022. It should also be noted that the current situation where all graduates from UK medical schools find employment within the NHS in their first postgraduate year is already no longer guaranteed.

At the end of the undergraduate programme you will receive your MBBS (or equivalent) degree, which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles you to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, subject only to its acceptance that there are no Fitness to Practise concerns that need consideration. Provisional registration is time limited to a maximum of three years and 30 days (1125 days in total). After this time period your provisional registration will normally expire.

Provisionally registered doctors can only practise in approved Foundation Year 1 posts: the law does not allow provisionally registered doctors to undertake any other type of work. To obtain a Foundation Year 1 post you will need to apply during the final year of your undergraduate programme through the UK Foundation Programme Office selection scheme, which allocates these posts to graduates on a competitive basis. All suitably qualified UK graduates have found a place on the Foundation Year 1 programme, but this cannot be guaranteed, for instance if there were to be an increased number of competitive applications from non-UK graduates.

Successful completion of the Foundation Year 1 programme is normally achieved within 12 months and is marked by the award of a Certificate of Experience. You will then be eligible to apply for full registration with the General Medical Council. You need full registration with a licence to practise for unsupervised medical practice in the NHS or private practice in the UK.

Although this information is currently correct, students need to be aware that regulations in this area may change from time to time.

There is some discussion about whether to remove provisional registration for newly qualified doctors. If this happens then UK graduates will receive full registration as soon as they have successfully completed an MBBS (or equivalent) degree. It should be noted that it is very likely that UK graduates will still need to apply for a training programme similar to the current Foundation Programme and that places on this programme may not be guaranteed for every UK graduate.

The GMC is currently considering the introduction of a formal assessment that UK medical graduates would need to pass in order to be granted registration with a licence to practise. Although no final decision has been taken as to whether or when such an exam will be introduced applicants should be aware that the GMC envisages that future cohorts of medical students may need to pass parts of a medical licensing assessment before the GMC will grant them registration with a licence to practise.

Location

King’s offers students within the Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine unrivalled educational resources including the Gordon Museum which is the largest pathology museum in the UK. King’s Chantler Simulation & Interactive Learning Centre is a state-of-the-art interprofessional undergraduate and postgraduate facility providing clinical classrooms, hospital and community care settings.

Structure

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    Stage 1 (Year 1) Foundations of Medicine
    Stage 1 provides students with the building blocks of biomedical and population sciences and the skills to begin to integrate them with clinical practice. The following modules are required.

    • Foundations of Biomedical Science (1): Students learn the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology of body systems, metabolism, communication within and between cells, molecular and cell biology, immunology and pharmacology.

    • Foundations of Biomedical Science (2): The students develop a deeper knowledge of biomedical sciences by practical work in anatomy supported by appropriate material concerning the functional anatomy, biochemistry and physiology of systems.

    • Genes, Behaviour and Environment: Here the emphasis is on learning about the complex interplay of genes, behaviours and the environment and the opportunities to work with patients and the public to modify risk. Students are set on the path to a patient-centred approach to medicine.

    • Doctor and Society and Introduction to Clinical Skills: This covers the philosophical, organisational, ethical and legal principles underpinning medical practice. Students explore the social contract between doctors and society and what it means to be a member of the medical profession. It includes preparatory workshops on student health, wellbeing and resilience. Students are introduced to basic skills of communication and clinical practice using simulated clinical environments and clinical skills. Patient educators are used to help students develop their confidence in taking a history and undertaking a physical examination. Once students have demonstrated that they can be trusted to work with patients in a supervised environment, they are allowed to progress.


  • Stage 2 Principles of Clinical Practice is covered during Years 2 and 3 of the programme and brings together science and clinical practice in blocks organised around the human life-cycle and common pathological processes.

    • From Science to Clinical Practice:  These integrated blocks build on Stage 1 and bring biomedical, population and social sciences to life by blending classroom and technology-enhanced learning with authentic clinical experiences. This builds on our scenario-based approach with students assigned to clinical environments to develop their generic clinical skills while at the same time learning how to assess and work with patients to manage common clinical conditions.  Each integrated block lasts 8 weeks. There are four blocks in Year 2 and four blocks at the beginning of Year 3.

    • Longitudinal placements: These are designed to foster a whole-person approach to patient care. The longitudinal placement is based in General Practice, mental health and other settings. The one-day per week placements are designed to allow students to follow a panel of patients as they move through clinical services and learn about long-term conditions. Students learn with a panel of patients or other service users in general practice, mental health or other care settings. The placements are designed to help students develop clinical skills and patient advocacy capabilities, and to begin to learn about shared decision-making.

    • Student selected components (SCC):  SCCs are projects and short courses in medical, scientific and nonmedical subjects that each student selects according to personal interest. There is a broad choice, including subjects in Arts and Humanities. Popular SCCs typically include modern languages, medical humanities, population sciences, biomedical sciences and clinical sciences.

    • Scholarly projects: Students undertake a scholarly project in an area of interest selected from across the multi-faculty university. The opportunities include lab-based projects, population-based studies, systematic reviews and qualitative studies. Students may elect to extend their project at the end of Stage 2.

    • Doctor as teacher: This introduces students to the theories related to clinical teaching and learning and provides opportunities to develop teaching skills and reflect on their own approaches to learning clinical medicine. Students may elect to become more involved in education by opting to do the Doctor as Teacher (II) Module at the end of Stage 2.

    • Tasters: Short clinical placements to explore a clinical specialty, which provide opportunities for students to test career hypotheses and explore possible specialties or broader career areas.


  • Stage 2 Principles of Clinical Practice is covered during Years 2 and 3 of the programme and brings together science and clinical practice in blocks organised around the human life-cycle and common pathological processes.

    • From Science to Clinical Practice:  These integrated blocks build on Stage 1 and bring biomedical, population and social sciences to life by blending classroom and technology-enhanced learning with authentic clinical experiences. This builds on our scenario-based approach with students assigned to clinical environments to develop their generic clinical skills while at the same time learning how to assess and work with patients to manage common clinical conditions.  Each integrated block lasts 8 weeks. There are four blocks in Year 2 and four blocks at the beginning of Year 3.

    • Longitudinal placements: These are designed to foster a whole-person approach to patient care. The longitudinal placement is based in General Practice, mental health and other settings. The one-day per week placements are designed to allow students to follow a panel of patients as they move through clinical services and learn about long-term conditions. Students learn with a panel of patients or other service users in general practice, mental health or other care settings. The placements are designed to help students develop clinical skills and patient advocacy capabilities, and to begin to learn about shared decision-making.

    • Student selected components (SCC):  SCCs are projects and short courses in medical, scientific and nonmedical subjects that each student selects according to personal interest. There is a broad choice, including subjects in Arts and Humanities. Popular SCCs typically include modern languages, medical humanities, population sciences, biomedical sciences and clinical sciences.

    • Scholarly projects: Students undertake a scholarly project in an area of interest selected from across the multi-faculty university. The opportunities include lab-based projects, population-based studies, systematic reviews and qualitative studies. Students may elect to extend their project at the end of Stage 2.

    • Doctor as teacher: This introduces students to the theories related to clinical teaching and learning and provides opportunities to develop teaching skills and reflect on their own approaches to learning clinical medicine. Students may elect to become more involved in education by opting to do the Doctor as Teacher (II) Module at the end of Stage 2.

    • Tasters: Short clinical placements to explore a clinical specialty, which provide opportunities for students to test career hypotheses and explore possible specialties or broader career areas.

    • Intercalation: An intercalated year can be taken between Stages 2 and 3. This might include studies in anatomy, biochemistry, computing for biologists, genetics, immunology, molecular biology, neuroscience, pathology, nutrition, pharmacology, physiology, psychology, as well as languages and humanities subjects.


  • An intercalated year can be taken between Stages 2 and 3. This might include studies in anatomy, biochemistry, computing for biologists, genetics, immunology, molecular biology, neuroscience, pathology, nutrition, pharmacology, physiology, psychology, as well as languages and humanities subjects.

    Stage 3 Integrated Clinical Practice is covered during years 4 and 5 of the programme. During Stage 3 students consolidate and develop their capabilities in a range of different settings and grow in confidence as they contribute, under direct supervision, to the care of patients in a range of different settings.

    • Clinical blocks: These include placements in emergency and critical care, mental health, child health, women’s health, general practice, long-term conditions, and acute care. They are designed to enable students to develop their capabilities in a range of settings so they can manage both acutely unwell patients and patients with long-term conditions. All clinical blocks focus on managing the totality of patients’ healthcare needs, for example, mental health will be covered both as a distinct block and as a common element to the other clinical blocks. The teaching programme covers evidence-based practice, diagnostics, pathology, therapeutics, professionalism, ethics and law.

    • Quality Improvement, Global Health and preparation for electives: Students undertake a quality improvement project, global health assignments and electives.


  • Stage 3 Integrated Clinical Practice is covered during years 4 and 5 of the programme. During Stage 3 students consolidate and develop their capabilities in a range of different settings and grow in confidence as they contribute, under direct supervision, to the care of patients in a range of different settings.

    • Clinical blocks: These include placements in emergency and critical care, mental health, child health, women’s health, general practice, long-term conditions, and acute care. They are designed to enable students to develop their capabilities in a range of settings so they can manage both acutely unwell patients and patients with long-term conditions. All clinical blocks focus on managing the totality of patients’ healthcare needs, for example, mental health will be covered both as a distinct block and as a common element to the other clinical blocks. The teaching programme covers evidence-based practice, diagnostics, pathology, therapeutics, professionalism, ethics and law.

    • Quality Improvement, Global Health and preparation for electives: Students undertake a quality improvement project, global health assignments and electives.

    • Elective: A final year elective module offers students the opportunity to undertake an eight-week elective in the UK or abroad.

    • Tasters: As in Stage 2, these short clinical placements provide opportunities for students to test career hypotheses and explore possible specialties or broader career areas.

    • Transition to F1 (Foundation year 1): The aim of this module is to finish preparing students to become medical professionals who can be trusted to provide safe and effective care as a member of a multidisciplinary team, and take responsibility for clinical decisions under supervision. This programme focuses on the generic roles and responsibilities of an F1 doctor to help facilitate a smooth transitional to work as an F1 doctor. Employers or deaneries typically provide induction and additional shadowing opportunities in the week prior to taking up an F1 post.




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Fees and funding

Full time tuition fees - Home/EU

£9,000 p.a. (2016/17)*

Full time tuition fees - Overseas

Laboratory year fees (applicable to years 1-2) £21,750 p.a. (2016/17)**

Clinical year fees (applicable to years 3-5) £37,350 p.a. (2016/17)**

For further undergraduate funding information, please visit our fees and funding webpages.

*This tuition fee may be subject to annual increases.

**This tuition fee is subject to annual increases.

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