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Maggi Hambling: War Requiem & Aftermath Events

Introducing a series of unique events, led by King’s academics, in the Inigo Rooms Somerset House East Wing, and venues nearby, to accompany the Culture at King's Maggi Hambling: War Requiem & Aftermath exhibition:

 

James Cahill and Maggi Hambling in conversation

Wednesday 18 March 2015, 19.00 – 20.00, followed by private view
Moot Court, Somerset House East Wing, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

Spring 2015 will see the launch of Maggi Hambling: War Requiem & Aftermath, a major new book by James Cahill chronicling two significant bodies of work by the British artist, Maggi Hambling. 

Comprehensively illustrated and closely researched, the book bears witness to a pivotal and innovative moment in Hambling’s career. War Requiem & Aftermath is the most extensive publication on Hambling’s work since the publication of Maggi Hambling: The Works in 2006 (second edition 2014). The publication of War Requiem & Aftermath follows closely in the wake of a solo exhibition, Walls of Water, at the National Gallery.

This ‘in conversation’ event will see Maggi Hambling talking with James Cahill about the exhibition and book. Join us, over a glass of wine, and then view the exhibition afterwards (from 20.00).

James Cahill is an author and critic whose research interests embrace contemporary art and classical antiquity. He regularly contributes to art magazines and periodicals, and his writing has appeared in publications including Apollo, Art in America, The Burlington Magazine, Elephant, frieze and the Observer. He has published essays in numerous books and catalogues, and is the co-author of a monograph on British artist Angus Fairhurst (1966–2008). He leads monthly art tours of restaurants in Mayfair, London (organised by Le Caprice Holdings); he has also lectured widely on art and the classical world. He is currently researching a PhD at Cambridge University on the impact of Greco-Roman art and mythology on contemporary visual culture.  


Victimhood, Violence and Imagination: re-conceptualising vulnerability through Maggi Hambling's exhibition War Requiem & Aftermath

Tuesday 21 April 2015, 16.00 – 17.00
Room B5, Franklin Wilkins Building, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

A lecture by Ian Noonan, Lecturer in Mental Health, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery, as part of the Culture & Care Series 2014/2015.

This year the Culture & Care Series explores the concepts of personhood and compassion; using music, poetry, sculpture, art and film to inspire discussions and reflections on personhood; vulnerability; dementia; and evoking compassion. This lecture will explore sculpture and visual art which illustrate different perspectives of strength and beauty to consider whether we ought to be looking at the strengths and resilience of these vulnerable groups.

All are encouraged to visit the War Requiem & Aftermath exhibition of Maggi Hambling’s work in the Inigo Rooms in advance of the lecture.

Wounded minds: shell shock, PTSD and beyond

Wednesday 22 April 2015, 18.30 – 20.30
Greenwood Theatre, Guy's Campus, King's College London, 55 Weston Street SE1 3RA

Tickets: £5 general public, free for students, King's staff and alumni, and Northbank card holders.

To book general public tickets, click here

To book free tickets, click here. Please use your @kcl.ac.uk email address, or bring your staff/student ID with you. Alumni details will be checked internally – you do not need to bring ID.

The first world war not only shaped the lives of thousands of young men and their families but also sparked a significant transformation in the treatment and understanding of mental illness. For many the trauma of war didn’t end with the final gunshot; the phenomenon of shell shock saw soldiers return home still reeling from the horror of what they’d seen. Whilst many of their symptoms – dizziness, forgetfulness, poor concentration and nightmares – were typical of having sustained a head injury, many soldiers had no such wounds and some hadn’t even been on the front line.

Leading physicians and neurologists alike, baffled by what they were seeing, began to think differently about psychiatric disorders, producing new causal theories and treatment initiatives. By the end of the war over 240,000 cases of shell shock had passed through British Army medical facilities. With treatments researched and out-patient units emerging, psychological medicine had truly arrived.

Whilst the term ‘shell shock’ has since become redundant, with psychologists preferring ‘Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder’ (PTSD), there’s no doubt that what this phenomenon taught us about mental illness remains as invaluable as it ever was.

Join Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research, Professor Edgar Jones, Professor in the History of Medicine and Psychiatry, and Professor David Edgerton, Hans Rausing Professor of the History of Science and Technology and co-director of the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War at King's, to examine the appearance of shell shock during the first world war, the struggles faced by affected soldiers and exactly how it impacted our understanding of mental health then and now.

This talk was first given in October 2014. The event will run for approximately two hours including a Q&A session. Drinks will be available at the bar (cash only) before and after the event.

Professor Sir Simon Wessely and Maggi Hambling in conversation

Wednesday 29 April 2015, 17.00 – 18.00
Moot Court, Somerset House East Wing, King's College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

This event brings together two remarkable minds to discuss and reflect on the War Requiem & Aftermath exhibition.

Professor Sir Simon Wessely is a British psychiatrist. He is Professor of Psychological Medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s, head of its Department of Psychological Medicine, vice dean for academic psychiatry, teaching and training at the IoPPN, as well as Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research. He was knighted in the 2013 New Year Honours for services to military healthcare and to psychological medicine.

Maggi Hambling is one of Britain’s most distinguished contemporary artists, consistently irreverent and controversial. She was the first Artist in Residence at the National Gallery, London, 1980, and won the Jerwood Painting Prize (with Patrick Caulfield) in 1995. Hambling has exhibited extensively; major solo exhibitions include the National Portrait Gallery; Serpentine Gallery; Yorkshire Sculpture Park; State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg; Yale Center for British Art, Connecticut; and, most recently, her return to the National Gallery, London in 2014 for her exhibition Maggi Hambling: Walls of Water.  In 2003 Hambling’s sculpture Scallop was installed on Aldeburgh beach in celebration of Benjamin Britten; other public works include A Conversation with Oscar Wilde (1998), the Brixton Heron (2010), and The Winchester Tapestries (2013). Her work is held in many public collections including, in the UK, the British Museum, Tate, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Join us, over a glass of wine, and then view the exhibition afterwards (until 19.00).

Reconstructing Identity

Wednesday 6 May 2015, 18.30 – 20.00, followed by a drinks reception.
Tower Lecture Theatre on Floor 30, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, SE1 9RT

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

This talk will explore and illustrate the extraordinary life-changing work delivered by specialists working in the field of facial reconstruction surgery. The techniques and outcomes that can now be achieved are a result of decades of research and knowledge, going back to the ground-breaking work delivered for those severely injured in the first world war.

Experts from the Dental Institute at King’s working in maxillofacial and craniofacial rehabilitation and prosthodontics will discuss models and approaches for post head and neck cancer reconstruction. With Professor Michael Fenlon, Professor of Prosthodontics; Dr Trevor Coward, Reader in Maxillofacial & Craniofacial Rehabilitation; Professor Lucy Di-Silvio, Head of the Biomaterials, Biomimetics & Biophotonics Division at the Dental Institute; and Dr Andreas Artopoulos, Clinical Research Fellow.

There will be an opportunity to see a demonstration of facial reconstruction with 3D planning and modelling. Tours of the Maxillofacial Prosthetics Lab are available to book for small groups after the event (8 8.30pm and 8.30 9pm). Email sophie.cornell@kcl.ac.uk for details.

  

Professor Iain Hutchison and Maggi Hambling in conversation

Tuesday 12 May 2015, 18.00 – 19.00
Nash Lecture Theatre (K2.31), King's College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

The third in a series of special 'in conversation' events will see Maggi Hambling talking with Professor Iain Hutchison, a pioneering oral and facial surgeon, with reflections on the current exhibition War Requiem & Aftermath.

Iain created and funded the counter-intuitive Saving Faces Art project charting the physical and emotional journey of patients undergoing facial surgery after he had been inspired by the Henry Tonks/Harold Gillies collaboration creating artistic works of first world war soldiers undergoing facial surgery almost a century earlier. Right in Hutchison’s office, patients sat for the renowned artist Mark Gilbert before and after facial surgery, resulting in searching, honest portraits that show the humanity even of someone whose face we might be unwilling to look at. The “Saving Faces” project has had a dramatic effect on the public and proved cathartic for the patients who participated. The exhibit has been seen by more than two million gallery visitors worldwide.

Iain’s “Day Job” as a surgeon at St Bartholomew's Hospital involves Head & Neck Cancer resection and the reconstruction of patients with severe facial deficits following the removal of cancers, severe traumatic damage or birth defects. He sees patients sent from all corners of the globe. His main mission is to lead research to improve prevention and treatment strategies for patients with diseases, traumatic injuries and disfiguring conditions affecting the face. To that end he founded and leads the charity Saving Faces-Facial Surgery Research Foundation (www.savingfaces.co.uk) which funds the world’s first and only National Facial Oral and Oculoplastic Research Centre (NFORC). NFORC is now the Royal College of Surgeons of England Head and Neck Clinical Trials Unit. NFORC runs projects to prevent binge drinking and smoking; projects to improve the treatment of mouth cancer and pre cancer, facial fractures and cuts; and psychological, genetic, stem cell and tissue engineering research.

Maggi Hambling is one of Britain’s most distinguished contemporary artists, consistently irreverent and controversial. She was the first Artist in Residence at the National Gallery, London, 1980, and won the Jerwood Painting Prize (with Patrick Caulfield) in 1995. Hambling has exhibited extensively; major solo exhibitions include the National Portrait Gallery; Serpentine Gallery; Yorkshire Sculpture Park; State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg; Yale Center for British Art, Connecticut; and, most recently, her return to the National Gallery, London in 2014 for her exhibition Maggi Hambling: Walls of Water. In 2003 Hambling’s sculpture Scallop was installed on Aldeburgh beach in celebration of Benjamin Britten; other public works include A Conversation with Oscar Wilde (1998), the Brixton Heron (2010), and The Winchester Tapestries (2013). Her work is held in many public collections including, in the UK, the British Museum, Tate, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Participants are encouraged to visit Maggi Hambling’s War Requiem & Aftermath exhibition in the Inigo Rooms before the event.

 

The voice and touch of nursing: diaries and dispatches from the front

Tuesday 12 May 2015, 18.15 – 20.15 Inigo Rooms, Somerset House East Wing, King's College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

This event is a creative response to Maggi Hambling’s War Requiem and Aftermath exhibition based on the writings of nurses during the first world war and collaboration between Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and King’s College London Archives. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty and Kate O’Brien will explore the nursing contribution to the war through diaries and letters of nurses giving expression to the materiality of care, human fragility, and the psychological and physical spaces of war. Kate O’Brien will read extracts from nurses’ writings including those of Kate Luard, a nurse who served in the Boer War whose ‘energetic anger’ and stoic account of the physical and physiological trauma of the first world war powerfully evoke the human impact of war.

The event will be highly interactive including audience handling of objects as a sign and symbol of our human vulnerability and connectedness to each other. The readings will be complemented with accounts from other ‘discordant and critical voices’ of the period, contextual facts and projected images. Opportunities for the audience to respond will be interspersed throughout, aiming to provoke lively exchange.

Participants are encouraged to visit Maggi Hambling’s War Requiem & Aftermath exhibition in the adjoining rooms before the event.

 

The Art of Surgical Practice

Tuesday 19 May 2015, 17.00 – 19.00
Gordon Museum of Pathology, Hodgkin Building, Guy's Campus, King's College London SE1 1UL

Tickets: free, but must be booked in advance. Click here to book.

As the Gordon Museum is not open to the general public, access to this event is restricted to certain groups on production of an appropriate ID card, which includes Medical Public (ie the suitably qualified or those in training). Full details can be found here. If unsure, please contact sophie.cornell@kcl.ac.uk in the first instance.

A special opportunity to join experts in the fields of surgery and art in the unique setting of the Gordon Museum of Pathology at King’s, to include a guided tour of this extraordinary collection from Museum Curator Bill Edwards.

Donald Sammut is a plastic surgeon and a specialist hand surgeon. His particular interests include the reconstruction of hands following trauma or degeneration, nerve and tendon surgery, congenital hand malformations and the paralysed hand. Founder of the UK Charity Working Hands, he has established a programme of hand surgery in Nepal and regularly travels there to reconstruct and reanimate paralysed hands in patients with leprosy and to teach local surgeons. He teaches anatomy to undergraduates at King’s College London.

Jenny Wright is an artist whose work involves collaborative practice with surgeons, medical students and scientists. She is studying the haptic nature of drawing and medical practice and collaborates with Neil Shah, Senior Fellow of the Head and Neck Optical Diagnostics and Intervention Society. Dr Shah is a consultant oral & maxillofacial surgeon at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, and his research interests include the relationship between art, anatomy and surgery.

The Gordon Museum of Pathology at King’s is the largest medical museum in the UK and contains some rare and unique artefacts including Lister’s antiseptic spray and the original specimens of kidneys, adrenal glands and lymph nodes which led Richard Bright, Thomas Addison and Thomas Hodgkin to describe the medical conditions that bear their names. Housed in the museum are also a number of important historic collections, including the Joseph Towne anatomical and dermatological wax models, the Lam Qua pre-operative tumour paintings and the specimen and artefact collections of Hodgkin, Addison, Bright and Astley Cooper.

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