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Level 5

5AACGT02 Introductory Greek Texts (Verse): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list  for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for only one semester, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December.)


Prerequisites: Normally 5AACGK3AN.B. Students who have taken a Level 5 text in one year should normally not take another in a following year. (Available to study abroad students with equivalent experience)

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand: there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 5 Greek text module, focusing on verse. The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session. Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below. The examination will test grammatical knowledge as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

 

2019/20 Homer & Euripides 

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Akrivi Taousiani

We will read selections from Homer’s Odyssey Book 19 and Euripides Ion. 

Our main focus will be to get to know both texts by translating and analysing the Greek. We will revise specific grammar and syntax as it occurs in the text.

Core Reading

Students will be expected to buy a copy of:

  • Homer: Odyssey XIII-XXIV, Ed. W.B. Stanford, M.M. Willcock (Bloomsbury 1998)
  • Euripides: Ion (Paperback), Ed. A.S.Owen (Bloomsbury 2013) - text handouts will be provided

You can read both texts in the Loeb edition (electronically available via the KCL Library Databases). I would encourage you to read these texts in translation before the beginning of term from the Loeb Greek-facing-English edition, so that you become acquainted with the content and get a glimpse of the overall style of writing.

Suggested Reading:

For reference, you may like to buy (though purchase is optional):

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient).

You may also find useful:

  • J. Morwood, Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek (Oxford 2001)
  • H. W. Smyth, Greek Grammar (revised edition; Cambridge, Mass. 1984)

 

2018-19 Homer & Euripides

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Ioannis Lambrou

We will read selections from Homer’s Odyssey Book 19 and Euripides Ion. 

Our main focus will be to get to know both texts by translating and analysing the Greek. We will revise specific grammar and syntax as it occurs in the text.

Core Reading

Students will be expected to buy a copy of:

  • Homer: Odyssey XIII-XXIV, Ed. W.B. Stanford, M.M. Willcock (Bloomsbury 1998)
  • Euripides: Ion (Paperback), Ed. A.S.Owen (Bloomsbury 2013) - text handouts will be provided

You can read both texts in the Loeb edition (electronically available via the KCL Library Databases). I would encourage you to read these texts in translation before the beginning of term from the Loeb Greek-facing-English edition, so that you become acquainted with the content and get a glimpse of the overall style of writing.

Suggested Reading:

For reference, you may like to buy (though purchase is optional):

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient).

You may also find useful:

  • J. Morwood, Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek (Oxford 2001)
  • H. W. Smyth, Greek Grammar (revised edition; Cambridge, Mass. 1984)

2017-18, Menander, Dyskolos 

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Pavlos Avlamis 

In 2017-18 we will read the Dyscolus (Curmudgeon)of Menander, the only play to survive almost in full by the most celebrated Greek dramatist of New Comedy. Our main focus will be on getting to know Menander’s text by translating and analysing his Greek, but there will also be ample opportunity to place the play in its cultural, literary and performative context.

Primary/introductory reading

For reference, you may like to buy:

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient).

You may also find useful:

  • J. Morwood, Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek (Oxford 2001)
  • H. W. Smyth, Greek Grammar (revised edition; Cambridge, Mass. 1984)

For those of you who have no exposure to Greek drama and comedy, whether at University or at school, it will be a good idea to do some background reading on the genre in general and Menander in particular before joining this course:

  • R. Hunter, The New Comedy of Greece and Rome (Cambridge 1985)
  • N. J. Lowe, Comedy (Cambridge 2007)
  • M. Revermann, The Cambridge Companion to Greek Comedy (Cambridge 2014)

The prescribed edition is: E. W. Handley, The Dyskolos of Menander (Bloomsbury 1998)

You should arrange to acquire this text in good time before the first scheduled class, if nothing else because you can find good second hand deals on Amazon, provided you allow yourselves enough time.

You will also consult (purchase is not required):

  • W. Gomme & F. H. Sandbach, Menander: A Commentary (Oxford 1973)
  • D. Konstan, Menander’s Dyskolos (Bryn Mawr 1983)
  • S. Ireland, Menander: Dyskolos, Samia and Other Plays: A Companion (Bloomsbury 1998)

2014-15 Euripides, Helen

Module convenor/tutor: Professor Roland Mayer 

Euripides’ Helen arguably embodies the variety and dynamism of fifth-century Athenian tragedy more than any other surviving play. The story of an exemplary wife (adulteress? Not!), who went to Egypt (Troy? Not!) Euripides’ repurposed Helen skilfully transforms and supplants earlier versions of myth and literature. The play is sometimes marginalized as a tragicomedy or romantic tragedy, but it nonetheless exercised a powerful influence on later artists, including Richard Strauss.

Since the text is too long to be managed in one term, the choruses will not form part of the prescription; there may also have to be some further excisions. But the whole text will be covered, however cursorily, in class.

Primary/introductory reading

William Allan (ed.), Euripides Helen, Cambridge 2008

2013-14 Euripides, Iphigeneia in Tauris and Helen

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Ismene Lada-Richards

In 2013-14 we will read extracts from two plays of Euripides: the Iphigenia in Tauris and the Helen.  From the Iphigenia in Tauris we will read lines61-122, 467-569, 582-631, 657-830, 912-938, 1007-1088, 1157-1221; from the Helen we will read lines 1-163, 437-482, 550-622, 1032-1106, 1193-1300.

Our main focus will be on getting to know Euripides' text by translating and analysing his Greek, but there will also be ample opportunity to place the plays in their cultural, literary and performative context.

Primary/introductory reading

For reference, you may like to buy:

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient).

You may also find useful:

  • D. J. Mastronarde, Introduction to Attic Greek (Berkeley, Los Angeles and London 1993).

For those of you who have no exposure to Greek Drama at all, whether at University or even at school, it will be a good idea to do some background reading on the genre in general and Euripides in particular before joining this course. There are many good introductory works that will set you up nicely for this module (and beyond!), but see whether you can lay your hands on a couple of the following during the summer:

    • P. Easterling (ed), The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 1997)
  • E. HallGreek Tragedy: Suffering under the Sun (Oxford 2010)
  • R. Scodel, An Introduction to Greek Tragedy(Cambridge 2010)
  • N. Sorkin Rabinowitz, Greek Tragedy(Blackwell 2008)

On Euripides in particular, try to have a look at:

  • D. J. Mastronarde, The Art of Euripides: Dramatic Technique and Social Context (Cambridge 2010)

The prescribed editions for both texts are:

M. J. Cropp, Euripides: Iphigenia in Tauris (Aris and Phillips 2000)

P. Burian, Euripides: Helen (Aris and Phillips 2007)

You should arrange to acquire these two texts in good time before the first scheduled class, if nothing else because you can find good second hand deals on Amazon, provided you allow yourselves enough time.

 You will be also required to consult W. Allan's commentary: Euripides' Helen (Cambridge 2008)

2012-13 Euripides, Cyclops and Helen

Module convenor/tutor: Professor Michael Trapp

This year we will read substantial extracts from two plays of Euripides: the satyr-play Cyclops, which we will read entire, except for the choral (lyric) interludes (so around 590 lines in all); and the Helen, of which we will read lines 1-166, 386-624 and 1512-1692 (approximately 580 lines).

Students are expected to attend all classes. They should come well prepared, and submit homework as required. They should expect to spend 8-10 hours a week in private study.

Primary/introductory reading:

For reference, you may like to buy:

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient).

You may also find useful:

  • D. J. Mastronarde, Introduction to Attic Greek (Berkeley, Los Angeles and London 1993).

For those of you who have no exposure to Greek Drama at all, whether at University or even at school, it will be a good idea to do some background reading on the genre in general and Euripides in particular before joining this course. There are many good introductory works that will set you up nicely for this module (and beyond!), but see whether you can lay your hands on a couple of the following during the summer:

  • P. Easterling (ed), The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 1997)
  • E. Hall, Greek Tragedy: Suffering under the Sun (Oxford 2010)
  • R. Scodel, An Introduction to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 2010)
  • N. Sorkin Rabinowitz, Greek Tragedy (Blackwell 2008)

On Euripides in particular, try to have a look at:

  • D. J. Mastronarde, The Art of Euripides: Dramatic Technique and Social Context (Cambridge 2010)

Commentaries:

Basic linguistic commentaries are available for both plays:

  • Euripides Cyclops, ed. W. Long (Clarendon Press 1891) – which can be consulted online at www.archive.org (use site search for 'euripides cyclops')
  • Euripides Cyclops, ed. S.D. Olson (Bryn Mawr 1997)
  • Euripides Helen, ed. J.W. Ambrose (Bryn Mawr 1992)

For more advanced commentary, there are:

  • Euripides Cyclops, ed. R. Seaford (Oxford 1984, reprint by BCP 1998)
  • Euripides Helen, ed. A.M. Dale (Oxford 1967, reprint by BCP 1996)
  • Euripides Helen, ed. W. Allan (Cambridge 2008)
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