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Level 5

5AACGT04 Introductory Greek Texts IV (Verse): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for Semester 1 only, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December.)

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.
Prerequisites: Normally 5AACGK3ANB Students who have taken a Level 5 text in one year should normally not take another in a following year. (Available to study abroad students with equivalent experience)

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand: there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 5 Greek text module, focusing on verse.  The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session.  Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below.  The examination will test grammatical knowledge as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

2016-17, Euripides, Cyclops, and selections from Homer, Odyssey 9

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Daniel Orrells

One of the most suspenseful and spectacular episodes of the Odyssean saga, Odysseus’ encounter with the Cyclops captured the imagination of many authors in antiquity, including Euripides.

After an introductory session on the figure of the Cyclops in the ancient Greek literary imagination and the Dionysiac genre of satyr drama, this course will study Euripides’ Cyclops and selections from Homer, Odyssey 9 (105-540) in the original.

The course will focus primarily on strengthening students’ linguistic abilities whilst helping them engage with cultural issues like otherness and representation, colonialism and literature, monsters in literature, satyr drama and myth, Homer’s reception in Greek drama, the Dionysiac and civilisation, etc. 

Suggested introductory reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

Editions and translations

  • Kovacs, D. (1994) Euripides (Loeb Classical Library), Cambridge MA and London 
  • Murray, A.T. (19952) Homer Odyssey, books 1-12, (Loeb Classical Library), Cambridge MA and London. 

Commentaries (please note the introductions to the texts): 

  • Seaford, R. (1984) Euripides’ Cyclops, Oxford 
  • Heubeck, A and Hoekstra A. (1992) A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey, vol. 2, Oxford and New York 

Recommended articles/chapters: 

  • Arnott, W. G. (1972) “Parody and Ambiguity in Euripides’ Cyclops,”` in Antidosis: Festschrift für Walter Kraus zum 70. Geburtstag, Vienna. 
  • Hall, E. (2008) The return of Ulysses: a cultural history of Homer's Odyssey, London, 89-101 
  • Hamilton, R. (1979) ‘Euripides’ Cyclopean Symposium’, Phoenix 33, 287-292 
  • Hernández, P. N. (2000) ‘ Back in the Cave of the Cyclops’ The American Journal of Philology 121, 345-66 
  • Konstan, D. (1981) “An Anthropology of Euripides’ Cyclops,” Ramus 10, 87–103.

2015-16, Euripides, Cyclops, and selections from Homer, Odyssey 9

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Daniel Orrells

One of the most suspenseful and spectacular episodes of the Odyssean saga, Odysseus’ encounter with the Cyclops captured the imagination of many authors in antiquity, including Euripides.

After an introductory session on the figure of the Cyclops in the ancient Greek literary imagination and the Dionysiac genre of satyr drama, this course will study Euripides’ Cyclops and selections from Homer, Odyssey 9 (105-540) in the original.

The course will focus primarily on strengthening students’ linguistic abilities whilst helping them engage with cultural issues like otherness and representation, colonialism and literature, monsters in literature, satyr drama and myth, Homer’s reception in Greek drama, the Dionysiac and civilisation, etc. 

Primary/introductory reading

Editions and translations
  • Kovacs, D. (1994) Euripides (Loeb Classical Library), Cambridge MA and London 
  • Murray, A.T. (19952) Homer Odyssey, books 1-12, (Loeb Classical Library), Cambridge MA and London. 
Commentaries (please note the introductions to the texts): 
  • Seaford, R. (1984) Euripides’ Cyclops, Oxford 
  • Heubeck, A and Hoekstra A. (1992) A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey, vol. 2, Oxford and New York 
Recommended articles/chapters: 
  • Arnott, W. G. (1972) “Parody and Ambiguity in Euripides’ Cyclops,”` in Antidosis: Festschrift für Walter Kraus zum 70. Geburtstag, Vienna. 
  • Hall, E. (2008) The return of Ulysses: a cultural history of Homer's Odyssey, London, 89-101 
  • Hamilton, R. (1979) ‘Euripides’ Cyclopean Symposium’, Phoenix 33, 287-292 
  • Hernández, P. N. (2000) ‘ Back in the Cave of the Cyclops’ The American Journal of Philology 121, 345-66 
  • Konstan, D. (1981) “An Anthropology of Euripides’ Cyclops,” Ramus 10, 87–103.

2013-14, selections from the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Rosie Wyles

This module will study selections from the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. This module offers the opportunity to study, in the original, some of the most powerful poetry and dramatic moments in Greek literature. The selections will be chosen to show the characteristic traits of each of these playwrights and demonstrate why they became so canonical. By the end of the course students will have an appreciation of the brilliance of these authors’ use of the Greek language and an understanding of the genre of Greek tragedy as it developed through their stage productions. The selections will also highlight 5th-century Athenian self-imaging and the relationship between drama and society.

Primary/introductory reading

  • Texts for the selections will be provided in a course booklet
  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient) which is also available as Iphone app.
For those of you who have no exposure to Greek Drama at all, whether at University or even at school, it will be a good idea to do some background reading on the genre in general before joining this course. There are many good introductory works that will set you up nicely for this module (and beyond!), but see whether you can lay your hands on a couple of the following during the summer:

  • P. Easterling (ed), The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 1997)
  • E. Hall, Greek Tragedy: Suffering under the Sun (Oxford 2010)
  • R. Scodel, An Introduction to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 2010)
  • N. Sorkin Rabinowitz, Greek Tragedy (Blackwell 2008) 

2012-13, Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Rosie Wyles

This module will study AeschylusPrometheus Bound.

Primary/introductory reading

  • Griffith, M., [Aeschylus], Prometheus Bound (Cambridge 1983). 
  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon (the small abridged version should be sufficient) which  is also available as Iphone app.
  • D. J. Mastronarde, Introduction to Attic Greek (Berkeley, Los Angeles and London 1993).

For those of you who have no exposure to Greek Drama at all, whether at University or even at school, it will be a good idea to do some background reading on the genre in general before joining this course. There are many good introductory works that will set you up nicely for this module (and beyond!), but see whether you can lay your hands on a couple of the following during the summer:

  • P. Easterling (ed), The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 1997)
  • E. Hall, Greek Tragedy: Suffering under the Sun (Oxford 2010)
  • R. Scodel, An Introduction to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge 2010)
  • N. Sorkin Rabinowitz, Greek Tragedy (Blackwell 2008)
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