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Level 5

5AACLT02 Introductory Latin Texts II (Verse): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for Semester 1 only, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December.)


Prerequisites: Normally 5AACLA3AN.B. Students who have taken a Level 5 text in one year should normally not take another in a following year. (Available to study abroad students with equivalent experience)

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand: there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 5 Latin text module, focusing on verse. The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session. Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below. The examination will test grammatical knowledge as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

2019-20, Ovid, Metamorphoses, selections

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Lucy Nicholas

This is a Level 5 Latin text module, focusing on verse. The examination will test grammatical knowledge as well as translation ability.

We will read a selection of stories from Ovid's Metamorphoses, the world’s most famous and influential collection of Greek and Roman myths which includes well-known stories like those of Daedalus and Icarus, Pygmalion, Narcissus and King Midas.

Our main focus in this course will be on getting to know Ovid’s poetry by translating and analysing his Latin.

Core reading:

Students will be expected to buy a copy of: Reading Ovid: Stories from the Metamorphoses, Intermediate Latin Readers, Ed. Peter Jones, Cambridge University Press: 2007 ISBN (pb): 9780521613323

 

2018-19, Ovid, Metamorphoses, selections

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Eoin O'Donoghue

We will read a selection of stories from Ovid's Metamorphoses, the world’s most famous and influential collection of Greek and Roman myths which includes well-known stories like those of Daedalus and Icarus, Pygmalion, Narcissus and King Midas.

Our main focus in this course will be on getting to know Ovid’s poetry by translating and analysing his Latin. 

Core reading:

Students will be expected to buy a copy of:

Reading Ovid: Stories from the Metamorphoses, Intermediate Latin Readers, Ed. Peter Jones, Cambirdge University Press: 2007 ISBN (pb): 9780521613323

2017-18, Ovid, Heroides 

Module convenor / tutor: Dr Lucy Jackson

The text for this course will comprise a selection of Ovid’s Heroides (for the prescribed edition see Primary Reading below). We will be reading some of the so-called ‘double’ Heroides. Whereas the single Heroides (1-15) describe a one-way communication by heroines to their lovers, the double Heroides (16-21) match a female voice with a male voice, and thus stage a relationship (or confrontation) between two lovers.  

Our main focus in this course will be on getting to know Ovid’s poetry by translating and analysing his Latin, concentrating on the four letters purportedly written by Hero and Leander, and by Acontius and Cydippe. We will revise and practise specific grammar constructions as they occur in the text. We will also think about some of the literary aspects of the poems: the function of the letter form, the effectiveness of the characterisation, the rhetorical flavour of the poetry, and the gendering of the voices behind the poetry.

Students are expected to attend all classes, and to participate fully in them. In addition to the classes, students should expect to spend several hours each week preparing the text, revising grammar, and doing a small amount of background reading.

Core reading: 

 

Be sure to have found a copy of both these books in good time for the beginning of term.

Set textOvid: Heroides XVI- XXI, edited by E. J. Kenney, Cambridge 1996.

Grammar revisionVia Plana: Graduated Readings in Advanced Latin, P. Ruth Taylor-Briggs, BCP 2000.

 

Study aids: It is important to own or have access to a good Latin dictionary. If you’re in the library use the Oxford Latin Dictionary or Lewis and Short (the latter can also be found online at the Perseus website). For everyday use you may like to buy a smaller dictionary such as the Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary.

 

You will also need a guide to Latin grammar and syntax. Most Latin textbooks will have good sections on grammar and syntax, but you may find it useful to own a more systematic reference work. For grammar look out for Kennedy’s Revised Latin Primer, Allen and Greenough’s New Latin Grammar, or the Oxford Latin Grammar. For more on syntax specifically try Colebourn’s Latin Sentence and Idiom, or Woodcock’s New Latin Syntax.

2016-17, Ovid, Metamorphoses, selections

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Danielle Frisby

We will read a selection of stories from Ovid's Metamorphoses, the world’s most famous and influential collection of Greek and Roman myths which includes well-known stories like those of Daedalus and Icarus, Pygmalion, Narcissus and King Midas.

Our main focus in this course will be on getting to know Ovid’s poetry by translating and analysing his Latin. 

Core reading:

Students will be expected to buy a copy of:

Reading Ovid: Stories from the Metamorphoses, Intermediate Latin Readers, Ed. Peter Jones, Cambirdge University Press: 2007 ISBN (pb): 9780521613323

2015-16, Ovid, Fasti IV: spring in Rome

Module convenor/tutor: Ms Jennifer Hilder

Fasti IV (April) begins with the appearance of Venus, who chides Ovid for his abandonment of erotic elegy; Ovid goes on to trace the genealogy of the Roman kings and Augustus from Venus and ends with a celebration of Venus as the goddess of creation (1–132). The first long episode of the book is the festival of the Magna Mater, the Ludi Megalenses. For this festival Ovid recounts the birth of Rhea's children, the castration of Attis, the goddess' transfer to Rome, and the story of Claudia Quinta (179–375).

The next narrative, which is the longest and most elaborate in the Fasti describes the Cerialia and the rape of Persephone, the wandering of Ceres, and the return of Persephone to Olympus (393–620). The next extended section is regarding the festival of the Parilia which includes agricultural prayers, aetiologies of customs, and the story of the founding augury and death of Remus (721–862).

The final sections tell the story of Mezentius in connection to the Vinalia (863–900) and include an agricultural prayer on the Robigalia (901–942).


Primary/introductory reading:
  • All students will need a copy of Elaine Fantham (ed.), Ovid: Fasti Book IV. Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 1998.
  • You will need a Latin dictionary and a guide to Latin grammar and syntax, such as Kennedy’s Revised Latin Primer, Allen and Greenough’s New Latin Grammar. or the Oxford Latin Grammar. 

 For a general overview:

  • Newlands, C. "mandati memores: political and poetic authority in the Fasti " in Hardie, Ph. (ed.) Cambridge Companion to Ovid (Cambridge 2002), 200-216
  • Fantham, E. 'Recent Readings of Ovid's Fasti' in Classical Philology 90 (1995): 367-78

For the pivotal role of Fasti in Roman culture see the excellent account of Feeney, D. Caesar's Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History. Sather Classical Lectures, 65. Berkeley:  University of California Press, 2007. Chapters 5 and 6.

For literary studies of the Fasti and Fasti IV in particular:

  • Fantham, E. "Sexual Comedy in Ovid's Fasti: Sources and Motivation" in Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 87 (1983): 185-216
  • Green's and Knox' chapters in Herbert-Brown, G. (ed) Ovid's Fasti (Oxford 2002)
  • Hejduk, J.D. "Epic Rapes in the Fasti" in Classical Philology 106 (2011): 20-31
  • Littlewood, R.J. "Poetic Artistry and Dynastic Politics: Ovid at the Ludi Megalenses (Fasti 4. 179-372)" in The Classical Quarterly 31 (1981): 381-395
  • Wiseman, T.P. The Myths of Rome.   Exeter:  University of Exeter Press, 2004. Chapter 7

2013-14, Virgil, Georgics, selections

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Victoria Moul

In this module we will read extracts from Virgil’s Georgics, covering in the course of the term substantial portions of all four books, and reading some of the most influential passages of classical Latin poetry (including the dedication to Octavian, the ‘praise of Italy’ from Book 2, and the ‘Orpheus and Eurydice’ section from Book 4).

Set text: R. D. Williams (ed.), Virgil: The Eclogues and Georgics (Bristol Classical Press). Students should obtain a copy of this edition in advance, as we will be using the commentary from the beginning of term.

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