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Level 6

6AABC013 Dissertation

Credit value: 30
Module convenor/tutor: 
As allocated by the Head of Department depending on the dissertation topic.
Teaching pattern: 
Meetings as agreed with the supervisor
Availability: 
Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 
1 x dissertation of no more than 8,000 words (100%)

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand, there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.

NB Your dissertation, if it is on a topic related to any field of Hellenic Studies, will be acceptable as an entry for the Katie Lentakis Memorial Fund Award.

Information for 2016-17 Graduate Diploma students

Credit value: 30
Module convenor/tutor: 
As allocated by the Head of Department depending on the dissertation topic.
Teaching pattern: 
Meetings as agreed with the supervisor
Availability: 
Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 
1 x dissertation of no more than 8,000 words (100%)

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand, there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

NB Your dissertation, if it is on a topic related to any field of Hellenic Studies, will be acceptable as an entry for the Katie Lentakis Memorial Fund Award.

You may choose either a topic arising out of one of your taught modules, or one which supplies an element otherwise missing from your Diploma studies.  This module offers you the chance to strengthen your skills in both information gathering and analysis, and formal academic presentation, on all of which you will receive advice and guidance from your supervisor.  A strong result in the dissertation is a good indication of your suitability to continue to further academic study, for instance in an MA.

Further guidance

For information on supervision and content and presentation see the Graduate Diploma Dissertation guidance in the Classics Student Handbook.

The following information is for 2015/6 students only:

Final year students may opt to write a dissertation of approximately 8000 words on a topic of their choice, subject to the requirements and arrangements listed below.

Choice of topic

The topic must be chosen in consultation with the student’s tutor in the last semester before the final year, and a supervisor must be nominated by agreement. The tutor must forward the proposed topic and name of the supervisor to the Director of the Centre for approval.

Nature of dissertation

Candidates will be expected to show familiarity with the subject matter and skills of exposition and analysis. There is no requirement to produce an original theory, but dissertations should present the candidate’s own conclusions in their own words. Dissertations should be documented with footnotes and a bibliography of the main works used. Failure to acknowledge quotations or substantial use of the work of other persons will be penalized by the examiners. Read the College Statement on Plagiarism. The word limit includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography and captions to illustrations.

Supervision

Candidates should see their supervisor once before the end of the last semester before the final year to discuss reading and other research during the summer vacation, and then at least twice in each of the two semesters of the final year. Candidates must submit a draft version of their entire dissertation to their supervisor for comment before the end of the second semester.

Content and presentation

Before starting your dissertation ensure that you read the Department Style Guide.

A dissertation is similar to an essay but its scale and academic purpose require you to plan and structure your material and ideas more carefully, to discuss problems in more detail and to note fully the sources of your information and ideas -- that is to write a scholarly piece of research.

A dissertation should begin with a brief explanation of the topic chosen and the problem(s) that the dissertation addresses. The main body of the dissertation should consist of a structured argument or survey in which you discuss the relevant primary material and main scholarly views and advance the interpretation(s) that you prefer (or explain why no one view is adequate).

There should be a conclusion summarising your own response to the problem(s) raised.

If a dissertation involves extensive detailed discussion of particular passages of text or manuscript, or sites, monuments or objects, or sets of data, these should be presented in the dissertation as quotations, illustrations or tables. Illustrations should be relevant to the discussion, not merely decorative. They should be numbered consecutively for clarity of reference in the text, have a brief identifying caption, and should be reproduced clearly.

When composing your dissertation, keep a back-up on a USB or cloud storage separate from your computer, so that all is not lost if some glitch occurs.

Submission and deadline

The deadline date can be found on 6AABC013 Dissertation KEATS area.

Candidates are required to submit a copy of their dissertation online through KEATS and two hard copies of their dissertation to the Department Office, Room B3, North Wing.

Both hard copies should have a completed coversheet attached (see right-hand link and also available to download from the KEATS submission area). One hard copy will be returned to the student at the end of the examination process. 

Submissions must be made on KEATS and the two hard copies handed in by 16.00. Dissertations submitted late will be failed with a mark of zero. In exceptional circumstances, usually only cases of certified medical problems, the Chair of the Board of Examiners may allow postponement of the deadline to a specified date.

The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of written work on an individually researched topic of your own choice – subject only to the Department’s ability to supply a suitable supervisor. It must be no more than 8,000 words long, and will normally be no less than 6,500 words long.

You may choose either a topic arising out of one of your taught modules, or one which supplies an element otherwise missing from your Diploma studies.  This module offers you the chance to strengthen your skills in both information gathering and analysis, and formal academic presentation, on all of which you will receive advice and guidance from your supervisor.  A strong result in the dissertation is a good indication of your suitability to continue to further academic study, for instance in an MA.

Further guidance

For information on supervision and content and presentation see the Graduate Diploma Dissertation guidance in the Classics Student Handbook.

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