Show/hide main menu

Level 6

6AACGT08 Greek Texts VIII (Poetry): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for Semester 1 only, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December. Students should check the Study Abroad module catalogue for the relevant year for availability.)

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.

Prerequisites: A pass in 4AACGK03 Greek Language 3 or a level 5 Greek text module, 5AACGT01-GT04.

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand, there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 6 Greek text module, focusing on poetry. The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session. Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below. The examination will test knowledge of the context, content and themes of the set text(s), as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

2019-20, Trachiniae, Sophocles

Module convenor/tutor: Prof. Mike Trapp

The play for this module will be Sophocles’s Trachiniae (Women of Trachis), which focuses on the homecoming of Heracles to his wife Deianeira after the latest in his long series of heroic adventures.  What should be a time of celebration and relief turns to horror and torment for both, as Deianeira’s innocently misguided attempt to win back her husband’s wandering affections goes agonizingly wrong, and victims of Heracles’s monster-fighting heroism from the distant past find a way to take their ghastly revenge. 

The action of the play also raises issues to do with misunderstood prophecy, divine sanction for suffering, and the intransigence of heroism.We will read the play in its entirety, concentrating as much on interpretation of its action and themes as on issues of grammar and translation.   Others of Sophocles’s tragedies will be used as points of reference, but will be consulted in English translation.

Set text

  • Sophocles: Trachiniae, ed. P.E. Easterling (CUP 1982)

Suggested Introductory Reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

Other useful commentaries

  • Sophocles: Trachiniae, ed. M. Davies (OUP 1991) – advanced
  • Sophoclis Trachiniae, ed. A. Pretor (Deighton, Bell 1877) – basic
  • Sophocles: Trachiniae, ed. L. Campbella nd E. Abbott (OUP 1893) – basic

Sample background reading

  • Easterling, P., ‘Sophocles’ Trachiniae’, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 15 (1968), 58-6
  • Fuqua, C., ‘Heroism, Heracles and the Trachiniae’, Traditio 36 (1980), 1-81
  • Levett, B. Sophocles: Women of Trachis  (Duckworth 2004)
  • Segal, C., ‘The Hydra’s nurseling: image and action in the Trachiniae’, Antiquité classique 44 (1975), 612-17

 

2017-18, Iliad, Homer 

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Pavlos Avlamis 

In this Level 6 Greek text module, we will explore Homer’s Iliad in the original by focusing on two books that are pivotal for the poem and its central character, Achilles. The set text prescription is Iliad 1 and 9. In the seminars, you will be encouraged to voice your own responses to the poem and your own interpretation of its meanings. The examination will test your ability to translate the set text, as well as your knowledge of its context, content, language, and themes. It is expected that by the beginning of the module you will have read through the Iliad in English (recommended translation: R. Lattimore). 

Set text

Prescribed text: 

  • Iliad 1 and 9: M. M. Willcock, Homer: Iliad I-XII (Bristol Classical Press, 1996) [Text and commentary. There are multiple editions, all of which are usable: Macmillan 1968, Bristol Classical Press 1996, Bloomsbury 2013. Please acquire your own copy in time for our first meeting.]

While working on the set text, you will also consult the following (available in the library; purchase is not necessary):

  • S. Pulleyn, Homer: Iliad I (Oxford, 2000)
  • J. Griffin, Homer: Iliad IX (Oxford, 1995)
  • G. S. Kirk, The Iliad: A Commentary: Books 1-4 (Cambridge, 1985)
  • B. Hainsworth, The Iliad: A Commentary: Books 5-9 (Cambridge, 1993)
  • C. Wilson, Homer: Iliad VIII and IX (Aris & Phillips, 1996)

Suggested introductory reading

This is suggested introductory reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • Michael Silk, HomerThe Iliad (2nd edn; Cambridge, 2004)
  • Seth Schein, The Mortal Hero: An Introduction to Homer’s Iliad (Berkeley, 1984)

 

2015-16, Homeric Hymn to Demeter and selections from Hesiod

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Ismene Lada-Richards

The 
Homeric Hymn to Demeter and Hesiod’s epics Theogony and Works and Days reflect extensively on the patriarchal organisation of the cosmos, the challenge and perceived threat of the feminine, its exploitation, domination (and, in turn, its reaction), as well as on the humans’ role in this cosmos. They are therefore ideal texts for an exploration based on ecological criticism and eco-feminism.

The module will look at the different constructions of the environment and the cosmos more generally in these narratives, by focusing especially on space, gender, economics, myth and cult. The Homeric Hymn to Demeter will be studied in its entirety and will be followed by passages from Hesiod’s epics Theogony (453-894) and Works and Days (42-617).

Set Text

Recommended texts, translations and commentaries:

  • Foley, H.P. (ed.) (1993) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Princeton
  • Most, G. W. (2006) Hesiod. Theogony, Works and Days, Testimonia, Cambridge MA and London
  • West, M. L. (1978) Hesiod, Works and Days, Oxford
  • West, M. L. (1966) Hesiod, Theogony, Oxford

Suggested introductory reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • Foley, H.P. (ed.) (1993) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Princeton
  • Bowden, H. (2011) Mystery Cults in the Ancient World, London (pp. 1-48)
  • Nelson, S. (1998) God and the Land: The Metaphysics of Farming in Hesiod and Virgil, New York and Oxford
  • Clay, J. S. (2003) Hesiod’s Cosmos, Oxford

2013-14, Homeric Hymn to Demeter and extracts from Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Emmanuela Bakola

The Homeric Hymn to Demeter and Hesiod’s epics Theogony and Works and Days reflect extensively on the patriarchal organisation of the cosmos, the challenge and perceived threat of the feminine, its exploitation, domination (and, in turn, its reaction), as well as on the humans’ role in this cosmos. They are therefore ideal texts for an exploration based on ecological criticism and eco-feminism. The module will look at the different constructions of the environment and the cosmos more generally in these narratives, by focusing especially on space, gender, economics, myth and cult. The Homeric Hymn to Demeter will be studied in its entirety and will be followed by passages from Hesiod’s epics Theogony (453-894) and Works and Days (42-617).

Set Text

Recommended texts, translations and commentaries:

  • Foley, H.P. (ed.) (1993) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Princeton
  • Most, G. W. (2006) Hesiod. Theogony, Works and Days, Testimonia, Cambridge MA and London
  • West, M. L. (1978) Hesiod, Works and Days, Oxford
  • West, M. L. (1966) Hesiod, Theogony, Oxford

Suggested Introductory Reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • Foley, H.P. (ed.) (1993) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Princeton
  • Bowden, H. (2011) Mystery Cults in the Ancient World, London (pp. 1-48)
  • Nelson, S. (1998) God and the Land: The Metaphysics of Farming in Hesiod and Virgil, New York and Oxford
  • Clay, J. S. (2003) Hesiod’s Cosmos, Oxford
Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions  Privacy policy  Accessibility  Modern slavery statement  Contact us

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454