Show/hide main menu

Level 6

6AACGT09 Greek Texts IX (Prose): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for Semester 1 only, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December. Students should check the Study Abroad module catalogue for the relevant year for availability.)

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.
Prerequisites: A pass in 4AACGK03 Greek Language 3 or a level 5 Greek text module, 5AACGT01-GT04.

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand, there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 6 Greek text module, focusing on prose. The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session. Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below. The examination will test knowledge of the context, content and themes of the set text(s), as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

2018/19 Herodotus: Book 1.1-94

Module convenor/tutor: Professor Michael Trapp

For this module we will read the first 94 chapters of Book I of Herodotus’s Histories, containing Herodotus’s prologue and exploration of the early mythological pre-history of the conflict between Greeks and eastern foreigners, and the story of Croesus of Lydia. 

Besides the sheer enjoyment of Herodotus’s storytelling talents, this selection will allow us to explore his aims as a historian, his methods of gathering, criticizing and organizing his materials, and the extent to which in his work he is both continuing long-established ways of celebrating and honouring the past and breaking free from them into other forms of discourse.  We will also be able consider how he deals with other peoples and their cultures, as well as their past history.

Set Text

Students should purchase:

  • Herodoti Historiae, ed. C. Hude (Oxford 1927), vol. I

Suggested Introductory Reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

Commentaries (advanced)

  • W. Howe and J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus (Oxford 1912), Vol. I
  • D. Asheri et al., A Commentary on Herodotus Books I-IV (Oxford 2007)

Commentaries (linguistic help)

Selected preparatory reading

2016-17, Herodotus: Book 1.1-94

Module convenor/tutor: To be confirmed

For this module we will read the first 94 chapters of Book I of Herodotus’s Histories, containing Herodotus’s prologue and exploration of the early mythological pre-history of the conflict between Greeks and eastern foreigners, and the story of Croesus of Lydia. 

Besides the sheer enjoyment of Herodotus’s storytelling talents, this selection will allow us to explore his aims as a historian, his methods of gathering, criticizing and organizing his materials, and the extent to which in his work he is both continuing long-established ways of celebrating and honouring the past and breaking free from them into other forms of discourse.  We will also be able consider how he deals with other peoples and their cultures, as well as their past history.

Set Text

Students should purchase:

  • Herodoti Historiae, ed. C. Hude (Oxford 1927), vol. I

Suggested Introductory Reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

Commentaries (advanced)

  • W. Howe and J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus (Oxford 1912), Vol. I
  • D. Asheri et al., A Commentary on Herodotus Books I-IV (Oxford 2007)

Commentaries (linguistic help)

Selected preparatory reading

2014-15, Plato, Apology of Socrates

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Shaul Tor

In this module, we will read Plato’s Apology of Socrates in the original Greek. Socrates is one of the most unique, iconic and fascinating figures of the ancient world and Plato’s Apology of Socrates is one of its most unique, iconic and fascinating texts. In his Apology, Plato dramatises and creates his own version of the speech which Socrates gave in his defence when facing charges of impiety in court – charges which ultimately resulted in his execution. In this text, more than in any other, Plato articulates and explores the principles and values which frame Socrates’ life of uncompromising and subversive philosophical inquiry. 

What was the nature of Socrates’ distinctive and novel approach to living the philosophical life and why did it have such a momentous impact on later thought and culture? How and why does Socrates develop his radical challenge to the moral and intellectual authorities of the city? Why, far from trying to ingratiate the jurors who are about to decide his fate, does he choose instead to question their values, norms and priorities? Why, finally, did those jurors decide to put Socrates to death?

Throughout the module, we will combine, in a mutually illuminating way, a close reading and analysis of the Greek with discussion of these and such questions of philosophical, literary and historical interpretation.

Set Text

Plato’s Apology :

Recommended edition: P.A. Miller and C. Platter, Plato’s Apology of Socrates: a Commentary (Oklahoma, 2010) (A clearly set-out text with helpful, linguistic and historical comments at the bottom of each page, and a section-by-section commentary and full vocabulary at the back of the volume.)

Other editions and translations:

  • M.C. Stokes, Plato: Apology. With an Introduction, Translation and Commentary (Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1997) 
  • Translation: G.M.A. Grube, in J.M. Cooper (ed.), Plato: Complete Works (Indianapolis/Cambridge, 1997), 17-36 [available as electronic resource]

Suggested introductory readings

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • T. Brickhouse and N. Smith (eds.), The Trial and Execution of Socrates: Sources and Controversies (Oxford, 2002)
  • S. Ahbel-Rappe and R. Kamtekar (eds.), A Companion to Socrates (Blackwell 2008) [available as electronic resource]
  • D.R. Morrison, The Cambridge Companion to Socrates (Cambridge, 2010) [available as electronic resource] 
  • W.K.C. Guthrie, A History of Greek Philosophy, vol. 3: Socrates (Cambridge, 1969)
  • G. Rudebusch, Socrates (Oxford, 2009)

2012-13, Plato, Phaedrus

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Shaul Tor

In this module, we will read Plato’s Phaedrus. One of Plato’s richest, strangest and most fascinating dialogues, the Phaedrus raises and explores a striking array of questions concerning the nature of erotic love, inspiration, madness, rhetoric, dialectic, sophistry, philosophy, writing, mythology, the human soul, the gods, knowledge and reality. We will pay close attention to the linguistic comprehension of the set text, but, throughout, we will also raise and engage with questions of philosophical and literary interpretation.

Preparatory reading

By the time of the first class, you must have read, and be ready to translate from, Phaedrus 227a-230e.

Set texts

Prescribed texts

  • passages for assessment will be set from the old Oxford Classical Text (J. Burnet, 1905 and repr.)
Recommended editions and commentaries
  • H. Yunis, Plato. Phaedrus, Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics, 2011

Suggested introductory readings

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • G.R.F. Ferrari, Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato’s Phaedrus, Cambridge 1987
  • A. Ford, The Origins of criticism: literary culture and poetic theory in Classical Greece, Princeton 2002
  • W. Guthrie, A History of Greek Philosophy, vol. IV: Plato, the man and his dialogues, earlier period, Cambridge UP 1975
  • C. Kahn, Plato and the Socratic Dialogue, Cambridge UP 1997
  • R. Kraut, The Cambridge Companion to Plato, Cambridge UP 1992
  • R. Rutherford, The Art of Plato, Duckworth 1995

Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions  Privacy policy  Accessibility  Modern slavery statement  Contact us

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454