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Level 6

6AACLT05 Latin Texts V (Poetry): Various Texts

Module convenor and assigned text change from year-to-year, please see below for annual information

Credit value: 15
Module convenor/tutor: Various, changes from year-to-year, see below
Teaching pattern: 10 x 2-hour seminars (weekly)
Availability: Please see module list for relevant year
Assessment: 1 x 2-hour examination (100%) (For Study Abroad students attending for Semester 1 only, 1 x 2-hour test paper in December.)
Prerequisites: A pass in 4AACLA03 Latin Language 3 or a level 5 Latin text module, 5AACLT01-L04.

The modules offered in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand, there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary between years.

This is a Level 6 Latin text module, focusing on poetry. The text prescription will vary from time to time, and will be announced before module choices have to be made for the next academic session. Specimen prescriptions, from previous years, can be found below. The examination will test knowledge of the context, content and themes of the set text(s), as well as translation ability.

For the specific text assigned for a particular year, please see below:

 

2018-19 Seneca's Medea

Module convenor/tutor: Professor William Fitzgerald & Dr Lucy Jackson

Seneca remains one of the most influential of ancient tragedians. His works were admired and imitated for centuries until they suffered a loss of status in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Recently, their sensational rhetoric, violence, and sublimity have restored them to critical attention. 

We will be reading the majority of this play, together with a few excerpts from two other authors and their treatments of the Medea myth in Latin; the poet Ovid who returned to the character of Medea a number of times in his works, and (from a much later period) the sixteenth-century humanist and dramatist George Buchanan. We will also look at a piece of secondary literature each week. 

Set Text

Students are required to purchase the following set text:

  • Medea, Seneca, with an introduction, text, translation, and commentary by H. M. Hine (Warminster: Aris & Phillips 2000).
Additional Commentaries:

Students may also wish to refer to (but need not purchase):

  • Medea, Seneca, ed. A. J. Boyle (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2014). 

Suggested introductory reading:

  • Boyle, Anthony James, ed. Seneca tragicus: Ramus essays on Senecan drama. 1983. Esp. pp.77-93
  • Buckley, Emma, and Martin Dinter, eds. A companion to the Neronian age. 2013.
  • Kohn, Thomas. The dramaturgy of Senecan tragedy. 2013.

2016-17, Horace, Odes Book I

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Victoria Moul & Dr Danielle Frisby

The text for this course is the first book of Horace’s lyric poems (carmina). Horace was the first Latin poet to exploit the full range of lyric poetry as developed by earlier Greek singers: he wrote sympotic songs, love lyrics, panegyrics, hymns or prayers, and odes celebrating important events in Roman history such as the death of Cleopatra. But many of the songs are written to friends about matters that concern them: advice and sympathy are appropriate to these more intimate poems. To bring Greek song to Italian tunes he had both to evolve unusual metrical schemes and fashion an appropriate level of poetic diction. The first book of odes fully exemplifies all these achievements.

We shall read about two-thirds of the thirty-eight odes of Book 1, arranged by addressee, theme and sub-genre. One or two articles or chapters of secondary reading will also be set as suggested further reading each week. The set poems and topics are:

  1. Opening odes: Maecenas and Octavian in 1.1 and 1.2
  2. Friendship, morality and Virgil in odes 1.3 and 1.24
  3. Love, wine, song, time I: odes 1.4, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11
  4. Love, wine, song, time II: odes 1.23, 1.33, 1.38
  5. Politics and the poet: 1.2, 1.6, 1.12, 1.37
  6. Priamel odes: 1.1, 1.7 and 1.31
  7. Lydia odes: 1.8, 1.13, 1.25
  8. Hymns I: 1.10, 1.21, 1.30
  9. Hymns II: 1.32, 1.35
  10. Endings: 1.36, 1.37 and 1.38

Set Text

This will need to be purchased:

  • Horace, Odes Book I, (ed.) R. Mayer (Cambridge 2012)

The purchase of the following books is not mandatory however, students may also wish to obtain an English translation of the Odes (for instance, the Penguin Classics translation or the recent Loeb (2004), though they should not bring translations or parallel texts to class.

Additional commentaries:

Students are expected to make thorough use of the prescribed commentary (Mayer, 2012) in preparing for every session. They will be also be expected to demonstrate knowledge of that commentary in the final exam. In addition, students may at certain points wish to refer to additional commentaries, including:

  • Nisbet and Hubbard, A Commentary on Horace Odes, Book I (OUP, 1970)
  • West, D., Horace Odes I: carpe diem (OUP, 1995)

Suggested introductory reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • Harrison, S., ed., Cambridge Companion to Horace (CUP, 2007)
  • Davis, G., ed., A Companion to Horace (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)
  • Lowrie, M., ed., Oxford Readings in Horace Odes and Epodes (OUP, 2009)
  • Lowrie, M., Horace’s Narrative Odes (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997) – use index to find sections on particular odes
  • Feeney, D., ‘Horace and the Greek Lyric Poets’ in Oxford Readings
  • Santirocco, M. S., Unity and Design in Horace’s Odes (Chapel Hill, 1986)
  • Nisbet, R. G. M., ‘The Word Order of Horace’s Odes’, in Oxford Readings
  • R.O.A.M. Lyne, Horace: Behind the Public Poetry (Yale, 1995)

2014-15, Horace, Odes Book I

Module convenor/tutorProfessor Roland Mayer and Dr Henry Stead

The text for this course is the first book of Horace’s lyric poems (carmina). Horace was the first Latin poet to exploit the full range of lyric poetry as developed by earlier Greek singers: he wrote sympotic songs, love lyrics, panegyrics, hymns or prayers, and odes celebrating important events in Roman history such as the death of Cleopatra. But many of the songs are written to friends about matters that concern them: advice and sympathy are appropriate to these more intimate poems. To bring Greek song to Italian tunes he had both to evolve unusual metrical schemes and fashion an appropriate level of poetic diction. The first book of odes fully exemplifies all these achievements.

We shall read about two-thirds of the thirty-eight odes of Book 1, arranged by addressee, theme and sub-genre. One or two articles or chapters of secondary reading will also be set as suggested further reading each week. The set poems and topics are:

  1. Opening odes: Maecenas and Octavian in 1.1 and 1.2
  2. Friendship, morality and Virgil in odes 1.3 and 1.24
  3. Love, wine, song, time I: odes 1.4, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11
  4. Love, wine, song, time II: odes 1.23, 1.33, 1.38
  5. Politics and the poet: 1.2, 1.6, 1.12, 1.37
  6. Priamel odes: 1.1, 1.7 and 1.31
  7. Lydia odes: 1.8, 1.13, 1.25
  8. Hymns I: 1.10, 1.21, 1.30
  9. Hymns II: 1.32, 1.35
  10. Endings: 1.36, 1.37 and 1.38

Set text

  • Horace, Odes Book I, (ed.) R. Mayer (Cambridge 2012)

Students may also wish to obtain an English translation of the Odes (for instance, the Penguin Classics translation or the recent Loeb (2004), though they should not bring translations or parallel texts to class.

Additional commentaries:

Students are expected to make thorough use of the prescribed commentary (Mayer, 2012) in preparing for every session. They will be also be expected to demonstrate knowledge of that commentary in the final exam. In addition, students may at certain points wish to refer to additional commentaries, including:

  • Nisbet and Hubbard, A Commentary on Horace Odes, Book I (OUP, 1970)
  • West, D., Horace Odes I: carpe diem (OUP, 1995)

Suggested introductory reading

This is suggested reading and purchase of these books is not mandatory.

  • Harrison, S., ed., Cambridge Companion to Horace (CUP, 2007)
  • Davis, G., ed., A Companion to Horace (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)
  • Lowrie, M., ed., Oxford Readings in Horace Odes and Epodes (OUP, 2009)
  • Lowrie, M., Horace’s Narrative Odes (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997) – use index to find sections on particular odes
  • Feeney, D., ‘Horace and the Greek Lyric Poets’ in Oxford Readings
  • Santirocco, M. S., Unity and Design in Horace’s Odes (Chapel Hill, 1986)
  • Nisbet, R. G. M., ‘The Word Order of Horace’s Odes’, in Oxford Readings
  • R.O.A.M. Lyne, Horace: Behind the Public Poetry (Yale, 1995) 

2012-13, Horace, Odes Book I

Module convenor/tutor: Dr Victoria Moul

The text for this course is the first book of Horace’s lyric poems (carmina). Horace was the first Latin poet to exploit the full range of lyric poetry as developed by earlier Greek singers: he wrote sympotic songs, love lyrics, panegyrics, hymns or prayers, and odes celebrating important events in Roman history such as the death of Cleopatra. But many of the songs are written to friends about matters that concern them: advice and sympathy are appropriate to these more intimate poems. To bring Greek song to Italian tunes he had both to evolve unusual metrical schemes and fashion an appropriate level of poetic diction. The first book of odes fully exemplifies all these achievements.

Set Text

Horace, Odes Book I, (ed.) R. Mayer (Cambridge 2012)

The new Loeb edition by Niall Rudd (Cambridge & London, 2004) is strongly recommended.

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