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level7

7AAICC54 Future Memory: Creating Connected Worlds

Module convenor: Dr Ricarda Vidal
Credits:
20
Teaching pattern: Ten two-hour workshop-lecture-seminars

Module description:

The module introduces different concepts of the cultural imaginary, including the sociological and mnemonic imagination, feminist and utopian imaginaries. It explains different theorisations of media and creative memory, including media witnessing, connective memory, digital memory and globital memory. The module aims to draw on a range of international case studies that would normally include one or more of the following: cultural memories of nonviolent struggles, the ways in which gendered memories and imaginaries are changing through digital and mobile memories, the uses of digital media for live witnessing, future memories of the planet and the earth’s environment.

The module explores how future memories are trans-medial and may work across and between different media, that might include images and words, museums and memorials, games and phones, gardens and homes. Students will be asked to illustrate and evidence their ideas through researching and sharing their own examples from anywhere in the world across different mnemonic media. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own agency and creativity to design and make public future memories. The module is designed to complement and extend other optional modules offered by the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries that examine cultural memory and heritage but it can also be taken as a standalone memory option with other options in other areas of the curriculum.

Module aims

In a 21st century that seems increasingly conflicted and precarious this module aims to examine how the heritage and memory industries continue to provide possibilities for human transformation and human connection through future memories.

The module aims to introduce students to different ideas and approaches to the cultural imaginary and cultural memory to enable them to evaluate different claims made about the future and past and how these impact on contemporary cultural struggles, actions and outcomes.

The module aims to consider the political-economy, history and philosophy of future memories and how these are shaped by different mnemonic technologies from heritage rune stones to museums to mobile and social media.

The module aims to enable those studying the creative and cultural industries to understand their own role as well as wider questions of agency and ethics for cultural leaders, journalists, curators, and makers in shaping future worlds through different pasts.

Learning outcomes

  • Students will build a strong repertoire of analytical and methodological skills for understanding cultural memory and cultural imaginaries in contemporary society, including how imaginaries and memories may be created,  mobilised and secured in a global context.
  • Students will be expected to be able to evaluate different claims made about the future and past and how these impact on contemporary cultural struggles, actions and outcomes.
  • Students will be able to understand and evaluate the political-economy, history and philosophy of future memories and how these are shaped by different mnemonic technologies.
  • Students will be able to critically reflect on their own future roles within the cultural and creative industries with tools to analyse questions of agency and ethics that confront cultural leaders, journalists, curators, and makers in shaping future worlds through different pasts.

Core reading

Indicative Core Reading List

  • Crownshaw, Richard; Kilby, Jane and Anthony Rowland. (2010) The Future of Memory Berghaus Books.
  • Garde-Hansen, Hoskins, Andrew and Reading, A. (Eds) Save As…Digital Memories  Palgrave
  • Gready, Paul and Robins, Simon. (2014) From Transitional to Transformative Justice. International Journal of Transitional Justice.  (2014) 8 (3): 339-361.
  • Gutman, Yifat, Brown, Adam, Sodaro, Amy Memory and the Future of Transnational Politics, Ethics and Society Palgrave.
  • Gutman, Yifat. (2016)Memory Activism: Reimagining the Past for the Future in Israel-Palestine Vanderbilt University Press 

  • Harvey, C (2015) Fantastic Transmedia: Narrative, Play and Memory Across Science Fiction and Fantasy Story Worlds Palgrave

  • Hoskins, Andrew (2017) Digital Memories. Routledge

  • Keightley, Emily and Pickering, Mike. (2015) The Mnemonic Imagination: Remembering as Creative Practice. Palgrave

  • Levitas, Ruth. (2013) Utopia as Method: The Imaginary Reconstitution of Society Springer

  • Levy, Daniel and Snaider, Natan. (2010) Human Rights and Memory Penn State University Press.

  • McDaniel, M. A., & Einstein, G. O. (2007). Prospective memory: An overview and synthesis of an emerging field . Sage Publications Ltd.

  • Mills, C. Wright (1959). The sociological imagination. New York: Oxford University Press

  • Reading, A. (2016) Gender and Memory in the Globital Age Palgrave

  • Reading, A and Katriel, T (2015) Cultural Memories of Nonviolent Struggles Palgrave

Assessment

1 x 4,000 word essay (100%) or a creative work on future memory accompanied by a 2000-word commentary

Students are reassessed in the failed elements of assessment and by the same methods as the first attempt.

 The modules run in each academic year are subject to change in line with staff availability and student demand so there is no guarantee every module will run. Module descriptions and information may vary depending between years.

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