Show/hide main menu

Visiting staff

Visiting Staff

Dr Natasha Awais-Dean

Visiting Research Fellow

Email natasha.awais-dean@kcl.ac.uk

Biography

Natasha studied Modern & Medieval Languages as an undergraduate at the University of Cambridge, followed by an MA in History of Design at the Royal College of Art, where she specialised in Renaissance decorative arts. She received her doctorate from Queen Mary, University of London in 2012. Her project (‘Bejewelled: the male body and adornment in early modern England’) was an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award with the British Museum as the partner institution. Natasha has curatorial experience from working at three national museums: the British Museum (Curator of Post-Medieval Collections), the Victoria & Albert Museum (Assistant Curator of the Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Collection), and the National Portrait Gallery (Associate Curator, Research Coordinator). She is Features Editor of Jewellery History Today, published by the Society of Jewellery Historians.

Research interests

  • Early modern European material culture and decorative arts
  • Jewellery history
  • Early modern masculinity

Natasha’s research interests focus mainly on the material culture of early modern Europe, with particular specialism in jewellery and metalwork.

Selected publications

  • Bejewelled: Men and Jewellery in Tudor and Jacobean England (London: The British Museum, 2017)
  • ‘Redressing the Balance: dress accessories of the non-elites in early modern England’ in Dress and Society: Contributions from Archaeology, ed. By R. Weetch and T. Martin (Oxford & Philadelphia: Oxbow Books, 2017)
  • ‘A Rothschild Renaissance: Treasures from the Waddesdon Bequest. A Review’, Jewellery History Today, no. 24 (Autumn 2015), p.9
  • Five catalogue entries in T. Cooper, Elizabeth I and Her People, (London: National Portrait Gallery, 2013)
  • ‘Gold and Silver’, with Ann Eatwell in The Gilbert Collection, ed. By T. Schroder (London: V&A Publishing, 2009) 

 Expertise and public engagement

Natasha presents regularly at conferences and gave the keynote paper at The Costume Society’s annual conference in 2015 on the theme of ‘Gold’. More recently, in February 2018, she was invited to deliver a lecture to the Antiquarian Society of the Art Institute of Chicago. Natasha has given guest lectures at BA and MA level at universities around the country. She has experience in giving gallery talks on museum collections in the British Museum and the V&A, and she has presented at courses designed for adult learners. In 2011-2012, she collaborated with silversmiths from the postgraduate training workshop Bishopsland commissioning works from them for a display she curated, which was designed as a gallery intervention at the British Museum (see Inspired: Contemporary Views of Renaissance Jewellery).

Professor Peter Barber

Visiting Professor

Biography

Peter Barber, OBE, FSA, FRHistS, graduated in international relations at Sussex University and did postgraduate research in international history at the London School of Economics (MA, 1971). In 1975 he became a curator in the Department of Manuscripts at the British Library where, between 2001 and 2015 he was Head of Map Collections. He has written extensively on a wide range of aspects of the history of pre-modern maps, particularly on medieval mappae mundi, the map collections of the British Library, English maps in the sixteenth century, and maps at European courts between 1500 and 1800, especially at the courts of King Henry VIII, Queen Elizabeth I, and King George III. He has curated or acted as consultant to numerous exhibitions both in the UK and abroad and has acted as consultant to and appeared in several radio and television documentaries.  Since 2015 he has been a visiting professor in the Department of History, King’s College London.  In 2012 he was appointed an OBE for services to cartography and topography.

Research interests

The history of cartography with particular reference to medieval European mapping; English mapping 1110-ca. 1780; maps and government; the history of the British Library’s map collection with particular reference to the Cotton Collection and King George III’s Topographical Collection; 20th century political and satirical mapping.  the iconic use of maps.

History of Italian-Swiss immigration to Great Britain 1847-1980.

History of Austrian Jewry.

History of Highgate and Hornsey. 

Select list of publications

  • Tales from the Map Room (BBC Books,1993)
  • The Lie of the Land (British Library, 2001)
  • The Queen Mary Atlas (Folio Society, 2005)
  • The Map Book ( Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2005)
  • ‘Mapmaking in England ca. 1470-1650’ in The History of Cartography.iii.  Cartography in the European Renaissance  ed. David Woodward, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007)  pp. 1589-1669
  • King Henry’s Map of the British Isles.  BL Cotton MS Augustus I.i.9 : Commentary  ( Folio Society, 2009)
  • Magnificent Maps (British Library, 2010)
  • London: A History in Maps (LTS & British Library, 2012)
  • Continental Taste. Ticinese Emigrants and their Café-Restaurants in Great Britain, 1847-1987  (London: Camden History Society, 1997).
  • Edited with introduction and afterword: Gin and Hell-Fire: Henry Batchelor’s memoirs of a working class childhood in Crouch End 1823-1837  (London: Hornsey Historical Society, 2004)

Expertise and public engagement

Committee member, Reviewing Committee for the Export of Works of Art and Objects of National Interest; Trustee, Hereford Mappamundi Trust; Trustee, Imago Mundi Ltd; member, academic steering committee, Georgian Papers; vice-president, Hakluyt Society; council member, London Topographical Society; member,   library and museum committee, Society of Antiquaries and management committee of the Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical Research.  President, Hornsey Historical Society; President, Unione Ticinese di Londra.

Professor Paul Bew

Visiting Professor

Dr Michael Carter-Sinclair

Visiting Research Fellow

Email michael.carter-sinclair@kcl.ac.uk
Address Department of History
King's College London
Strand
London WCR 2LS

Biography

Michael studied for a BA in European Studies at the University of Hull, after which he followed a career in business and IT, where he worked mainly as a consultant to a variety of public and private sector organisations. He has an MSc with distinction in Business Administration & Information Technology, as well as an MBA.  He obtained his PhD – Viennese Culture And Politics, 1861 To 1938: Everyday Expressions Of ‘German’ Identity – from King’s College, London, in 2012, under the supervision of Dr Michael Rowe.  Michael is a regular contributor of book reviews to the European Review of History. Apart from English mother tongue, Michael speaks French, German and Spanish.

Research Interests

Michael’s research interests sit within the broad history of Europe in the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century.  He has specialised in studying the development of extreme nationalist and antisemitic expressions of German identity in Vienna, from the beginnings of constitutional government in the 1860s through to Austria’s absorption into the German Reich in the Anschluss of 1938.  He is particularly interested in the interaction of culture and politics beyond formal political activity – from so-called ‘high’ culture to everyday activities – and how these interactions affect and influence opinion and behaviour.  This includes opinion on identity formation, extremist practices of  arbitrary divisions of people into “us” and “them” and questions, of otherness, assimilation and tolerance of diversity, which continue to have a relevance across a wide range of current political and social issues.  He is currently preparing the results of his PhD for submission to publishers for consideration as a monograph.

 

For more information, please see my full research profile.

Expertise and public engagement

  Michael has presented papers at a number of conferences and seminars, including Queen Mary, University of London, the University of Swansea, Oriel College, Oxford, the Institute of Historical Research and, most recently, the Austrian Cultural Forum    He believes strongly that academic research should be communicated both within and outside the academic community.   To this end, he has presented at the King’s College public lecture series, So What?, to members of the public who are interested in understanding the goals of academic research. He has also contributed to a King's College video on the impact of the First World War, designed to reach beyond the academic community to the wider public.

Dr Ralph Desmarais

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Eliza Filby

Visiting Research Fellow

FilbyEmail: eliza.filby@kcl.ac.uk 

Mobile
: 07590121474  

Address: 
Department of History
King's College London
Strand, London
WC2R 2LS

Biography 

Eliza read history  at Durham University before completing her masters at UCL and her PhD at Warwick. Between 2011-2014 she was a lecturer in Modern History at King’s and was a fellow at Renmin University Beijing in 2013 before leaving full-time academic life to run her own business 'Grad Train' helping graduates and postgraduates prepare for the job market. www.gradtrain.co.uk

Her first book, God and Mrs Thatcher (Biteback, 2015) explores Margaret Thatcher’s religious faith showing how it was central to her political outlook. It also examines the conflict between the Tory party and the former ’Tory party at prayer’, the Church of England in the 1980s. Eliza regularly acts as a historical commentator on the TV and radio, speaking on contemporary religion and politics. She has written for The Church Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator and has reviewed for The Tablet.

Her website is www.elizafilby.com

Twitter: @ElizaFilby

Research interests 

Eliza is currently researching her new book which is a history of Generation Y/millennials. 

Books 

God and Mrs Thatcher: The Battle for Britain’s Soul (Biteback, 2015) 

Dr Zhaorui Geng

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Viola Gheller

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Mark Hay

Visiting Research Associate

Dr Mark Edward Hay

Email: markedwardhay@gmail.com

Address: Department of History
King’s College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS

 

 

 

 

Biography

Dr Mark Edward Hay read history in Amsterdam, Leiden, Paris and Oxford. Most recently he held Arts and Humanities Research Council award for a doctorate in history at King’s College London. His doctoral research, Calculated Risk. Collaboration and Resistance in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic era, 1780-1806, studied Dutch power projection and strategies of international conflict in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic era. Current research focuses on the financial and fiscal integration of the Napoleonic Empire, Napoleonic war financing and the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleonic on the European financial economies.


Research interests

  • Revolutionary and Napoleonic History
  • Dutch History
  • Power Projection and Diplomacy
  • Financial & Fiscal History

Selected publications

  • Mark Edward Hay, ‘The House of Nassau between France and Independence, 1795-1814. Lesser Powers, Strategies of Conflict Resolution, Dynastic Networks’, The International History Review 38/3 (June, 2016), 482-504.
  • --, ‘The Légion Hollandaise d’Orange. Dynastic Networks, Coalition Warfare and the Formation of the Modern Netherlands, 1813-14’, Dutch Crossing 39/1 (March, 2015), 26-53.
  • --, ‘The Dutch Experience and Memory of the Campaign of 1812: a Final Feat of Arms of the Dutch Imperial Contingent, or: the Resurrection of an Independent Dutch Armed Forces?’, Napoleonic Scholarship Journal 1/5 (December, 2013), [8p]. Notable mention in the Press Review of the Fondation Napoléon Bulletin n° 704, 7-13 March, 2014. Forthcoming
  • --, ‘The Historiographical Legacy of Pieter Geyl for Revolutionary and Napoleonic Studies’, in the proceedings of the symposium ‘Pieter Geyl in Britain: 1914-1935’ of 17 November 2016 at University College London.
  • --, ‘French Strategies of Resource Extraction in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era’.
Dr Tom Hulme

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Michael Humphries

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr William Jacob

Visiting Research Fellow

Email Wmjacob15@gmail.com

Research interests 

  • Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century English and Welsh Social History of Religion
  • Development of the Anglican Communion
  • Locality and Region with reference to Norfolk

Selected publications

  • Laypeople and religion in the early-eighteenth century, CUP, 1996
  • The Making of the Anglican Church World-Wide  SPCK, 1997
  • The Clerical Profession in the Long-Eighteenth Century, OUP, 2007
  • With Glanmor Williams, Frances Knight and Nigel Yates, The Church in Wales from the Reformation to Disestablishment, University of Wales Press, 2006
Dr Jane Levi

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Chris Lewis

Visiting Research Fellow

Dr Giogio Lizzul

Visiting Research Associate

Professor Ichiro Maekawa

Visiting Professor

Dr Lisbet Rausing

Visiting Senior Research Fellow

Dr Paul Tonks

photo TONKSVisiting Research Fellow

Email paultonks@yonsei.ac.kr

Biography

Dr. Paul Tonks is an Associate Professor of History at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea. He read History as an undergraduate at the University of Oxford (Keble College). He completed his MA and PhD in History at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore under the primary supervision of Prof. Jack P. Greene. He was then a Visiting Assistant Professor at Gettysburg College, Pennsylvania before moving to Korea in 2006 to participate in the establishment of an English medium Liberal Arts College (Underwood International College) within Yonsei University. He has previously held a Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh in 2014, followed by a Visiting Research Fellow appointment at the History Department of King's College London (2014-2015) to work on a project entitled ‘Conceptualizations of East Asia and the Making of the Scottish Enlightenment: Histories of Global Power, 1688-1815.’

Research interests

His primary research interests deal with Anglo-American, especially Scottish, political, economic and religious thought in the early modern and modern eras. His central focus is on the intellectual and cultural history of empire and Western views of East Asia. 

Selected publications

  • Scottish Political Economy, Education and the Management of Poverty in Industrializing Britain: Patrick Colquhoun and the Westminster Free School Model,’ History, Volume 101, No. 347 (October 2016), pp. 495-512.
  • http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/hist.2016.101.issue-347/issuetoc

  • ‘Reflections on the Referendum in Scotland: Independence and Identities in Historical Perspective,’ The Korean Journal of British Studies, Volume 33 (June 2015), pp. 169-196.
  • ‘A Scottish Vision of Korea and East Asia before the “Great Divergence”: John Campbell and Early Modern European Comparative Historical Discourse,’ The Journal of Eurasian Studies (for the Korean Asia-Europe Perspective Association), Volume 11/ 1, Serial No. 32 (March 2014), pp. 113-127.
  • ‘Leviathan’s Defenders: Scottish Historical Discourse and the Political Economy of Progress,’ in Daniel Carey & Christopher J. Finlay, eds, The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution in the British Atlantic World, 1688-1815 (Dublin and Portland, OR: Irish Academic Press, 2011), pp. 73-94.
  • ‘Empire and Authority in Colonial New York: The Political Thought of Archibald Kennedy and Cadwallader Colden,’ New York History, Volume 91/1 (Winter 2010), pp. 25-44.

Expertise and public engagement

Dr. Paul Tonks serves on the Editorial Board of the Scottish Historical Review as an International Advisor to the SHR Trust. He is on the Executive Committee of the Korean Society for British History as a Director of External Affairs and is also a member of the Organizing Committee for the inaugural British-East Asian Conference of Historians, which will be held in 2018 in South Korea in conjunction with the Institute of Historical Research and the Japanese Society of British History.

http://www.ukhistory.or.kr/eng/html/sub01_02.asp

Dr Brian Wallace

Visiting Research Fellow

Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions  Privacy policy  Accessibility  Modern slavery statement  Contact us

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454