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The FD Maurice lectures

The FD Maurice lectures

The FD Maurice Lectures were established in 1933 in honour of Frederick Denison Maurice. Maurice, who was Professor of English Literature and History (1840-1846) and then Professor of Theology (1846-1853) at King's, was forced to leave the College in 1853 on the grounds that his theological ideas would be detrimental to students, although a more fundamental reason was probably his social radicalism.

The FD Maurice lectures take place over three consecutive evenings in the Spring, with a common theme. The establishment of the lectures testified to a later generation's recognition of Maurice's enormous contribution to education and to society. Maurice's own range of interests is reflected in the range of topics addressed in FD Maurice Lectures, within the fields of Biblical Studies, History of the Christian Church, the Study of Religion, Systematic and Moral Theology, and the intersection between religion and society. The lectures have been given by some of the most eminent specialists in their field and are designed both for students and staff and for the informed public.

FD Maurice lectures 2018Blank space

Update: We regret to inform you that the F.D. Maurice Lecture has been cancelled until futher notice due to the ongoing industrial action by the UCU University staff union. 

 

Previous lectures

The FD Maurice lectures 2017

Missionaries, Converts and Maskilim: 
An Entangled History of Christians, Jews, and Those In Between in 19th-Century Europe

Speaker: David B. Ruderman
(Joseph Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History, University of Pennsylvania)

Tuesday 28 February
The Many Faces of Alexander McCaul, the Missionary to the Jews
18.00 Lecture
19.30 Reception
Old Committee Room (Strand Campus)

Wednesday 1 March
The Intellectual and Spiritual Journey of Stanislaus Hoga: From Judaism to Evangelical Christianity to Hebrew Christianity  
18.00 Lecture
Old Committee Room (Strand Campus)

Thursday 2 March: 
The Jewish Response to McCaul: Isaac Baer Levinsohn and His Defense of the Rabbis
18.00 Lecture
K2.31 Nash Lecture Theatre (Strand Campus)

Alexander McCaul (1799–1863), for many years Professor of Hebrew at King’s College London, was one of the most prominent figures in ‘The London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst Jews'. In 1837, he published a formidable attack against the Talmud entitled The Old Paths. Having spent ten years as a missionary in Warsaw, McCaul knew Jewish texts and Jewish life intimately. He succeeded in converting several fascinating figures, especially Stanislaus Hoga, a Polish Jew, who would eventually forge a new understanding of Christianity based on a fusion with Judaism. The most significant Jewish response to The Old Paths was by the 'father of the Eastern European Haskalah' (the Jewish Enlightenment) Isaac Baer Levinsohn, an outspoken critic of the rabbis and Talmudic law, who now set out to defend them, and in doing so, offered invaluable reflections on the meanings of newly constructed modern Jewish identity.

For further details and to register, please visit here:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fd-maurice-lectures-2017-tickets-31874402195

The FD Maurice Lectures were established in 1933 in honour of Frederick Denison Maurice. Maurice, who was Professor of English Literature and History (1840-1846) and then Professor of Theology (1846-1853) at King's, was forced to leave the College in 1853 on the grounds that his theological ideas would be detrimental to students, although a more fundamental reason was probably his social radicalism.
The FD Maurice lectures take place over consecutive evenings in the Spring, with a common theme. The establishment of the lectures testified to a later generation's recognition of Maurice's enormous contribution to education and to society. Maurice's own range of interests is reflected in the range of topics addressed in FD Maurice Lectures, within the fields of Biblical Studies, History of the Christian Church, the Study of Religion, Systematic and Moral Theology, and the intersection between religion and society. The lectures have been given by some of the most eminent specialists in their field and are designed both for students and staff and for the informed public.

The FD Maurice lectures 2016

kovenChristianity and Conscience in Early Twentieth Century Britain

Speaker: Professor Seth Koven (Rutgers University)

14th June Lecture: Love, Friendship, and Christian Revolution in the London Slums

This lecture explores how and why the convergence of a modernist theology of love with the radical practice of friendships across divides of class, race and nation produced a revolutionary Christianity in the first decades of the twentieth century. 

This lecture will be followed immediately by a drinks reception. 

15th June Lecture: Christianity, Conscience, and the Warfare State in First World War Britain

This lecture analyses how gender and sexuality informed the wartime state’s response to the challenges posed by radical Christian critiques of the violence of everyday life in imperial industrial capitalist Britain and on Europe’s battlefields.

About the speaker: Professor Koven has published widely on the history of disability and the body; childhood; gender, maternalism, and comparative welfare states. He is notably the author of two highly regarded works, Slumming: Social and Sexual Politics in Victorian London (Princeton, 2004), which analyses the relationship between eros and altruism in shaping social welfare and The Match Girl and the Heiress (Princeton, 2014), which explores the love, friendship, and global lives of a half-orphaned Cockney match factory worker and the daughter of a well-to-do shipbuilder and pacifist feminist humanitarian, showing how they sought to remake the world according to their own utopian vision of Christ’s teachings. He is the founding director of the co-director of the Rutgers British Studies Center (RBSC). His F.D. Maurice lectures will offer compelling insights into the relationship between Christianity and conscience in early twentieth century Britain.

The FD Maurice lectures 2015

 

beckford_profileReligion and Sociology: a marriage made in heaven or hell?

By Professor James A. Beckford FBA (University of Warwick)

Dates: 18th, 19th and 20th March 2014 
Venue: S-2.08 on nights 1 and 2, K2.31 on night 3, reception on first night.

Religions have lost none of their power to fascinate, to motivate and to infuriate in the early twenty-first century.  The aim of these lectures is to discuss how far sociological perspectives are capable of raising important questions about religions and our understanding of them.  The starting point is the emergence of sociological concerns with religion in the 19th and early 20th centuries and of the continuing doubts about the value of studying the social dimensions of religion.  I shall then set out my own approach to understanding religion in its social contexts, using examples from recent research on, for example, religion in prisons, religious diversity and new religious movements.  Finally, I shall discuss the contributions that sociological perspectives have brought to bear on a selection of current debates, disputes and controversies about religion in Britain today.

 

Tuesday 18 March
‘The religious and the social'

The first lecture explores the evolving relationship between sociology and other approaches to the study of religion.  After reviewing a variety of sociological perspectives on religion I shall begin to make a case for adopting a moderate form of social constructionism as a distinctively sociological – but not sociologistic – way of raising and tackling good questions about religions. 

Listen to the lecture (night one)

 

Wednesday 19 March
‘Religions, rights and regulation’

The second lecture amplifies my social constructionist perspective by showing how far it can throw light on some of the intriguing and challenging issues that arise when prisons provide inmates with opportunities to practise their faith.  Comparisons between the provisions made in England & Wales, France and Canada will help to sharpen the focus on what counts not only as religion but also as acceptable religion.

Listen to the lecture (night two)

 

Thursday 20 March
‘Religious diversity, the state and contention’

The focus of the third lecture is on a variety of controversies in which religious actors, organisations and communities are currently embroiled in Britain. Theological and moral aspects of the controversies about, for example, equalities legislation, multiculturalism, secularism and faith schools are often in the headlines, but I shall argue that sociological analysis can also throw light on broader questions about the contested management of religious diversity and the role of the state in ‘interpellating’ faith communities as its ‘partners’.

 

Listen to the lecture (night three)

The FD Maurice lectures 2013

Professor Philip Davies

The Good Book: The Bible in a Secular Society

by Professor Philip Davies (University of Sheffield)

26-28 February 2013 

Our major Western religions (I include Islam, which has a long history in Europe) have argued for centuries about the meaning of the Bible, between themselves and among themselves. I see no reason not to extend this conversation beyond religions. Why should, for example, debates about contraception, abortion, capital punishment, suicide, homosexuality, our responsibility to the earth, gender, ethics generally, which are conducted across all of our population, assume that biblical interpretation is just for the pious?

Tuesday 26 February, 18.30
'A Secular Canon'
K6.29, King's Building, Strand Campus 
The first lecture will define the relationship between secularism, religion and the Bible, and argues that while the Bible is de facto canonical in our modern society, it is the secular state that bears the responsibility for maintaining its influence through education and by encouraging its use in public debate.

Wednesday 27 February, 18.30
'Democracy, Identity, Ethics'
K6.29, King's Building, Strand Campus
The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception in the Somerset Rooms, King's Building. 
The second lecture describes how the Bible addresses secular principles and issues such as 'worldly wisdom' versus religious 'insight'; the mistrust of the 'word of God'; democracy; the rule of law; and society-building.

Thursday 28 February, 18.30 
'Secular Biblical Exegesis'
K-1.56, King's Building, Strand Campus
The third lecture in the series discusses the principles of secular exegesis - already the norm in much biblical scholarship -  and illustrates with examples how it can contribute positively to contemporary secular society.

The FD Maurice lectures 2011

Photograph of Robert SchreiterTruth, Reconciliation & Leadership

by Professor Robert Schreiter C.PP.S. (Professor of Theology, Catholic Theological Union, Chicago)

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 22 March 2011
Christian and secular narratives of reconciliation

Wednesday 23 March 2011
Truth-telling in social reconciliation  

Thursday 24 March 2011
Leadership after conflict: justice, forgiveness and reconciliation

 

For more information please contact the Department of Theology & Religious Studies, please email trs@kcl.ac.uk.

 

 

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