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Your questions answered – assessment

Updated: 18 June 2020

Please see the assessment principles and policies

On this page

Assessment timetables and alterations to assessment formatsTaking my assessment | Assessment arrangements for current first year undergraduate students | Assessment period 3‘Safety net’ policy | Deferral and interruption of studies | Mitigating circumstances process for COVID-19 | Academic AppealsTechnology issues and study environments | Results and transcripts


 

Assessment timetables and alterations to assessment formats 


 

When will I receive my assessment timetable? 

You will receive your assessment timetable from your faculty or department in the first week of April. Some students will already know of revised dates where their faculty may not be working within the standard assessment cycle.


 

How can I check which modules I am registered for?

Information of the modules you are enrolled on is available on student records.  


 

When will my assessments take place?

The standard assessment period two has been extended from five weeks to nine weeks and will run from 27 April 2020 (as planned) to 26 June 2020. Some faculties operate with slightly different assessment cycles, and you will receive information directly from them as to specific arrangements. 


 

Why has assessment period two been extended? 

The extended assessment period allows some greater flexibility given our current circumstances. It allows us to spread your assessments out a little bit more where that can help; accommodate extensions where they are needed; and of course, cater for your circumstances – and those of staff – in relation to illness, caring responsibilities, and other considerations.  The extended period is designed to ensure that all students have the maximum time available to undertake and complete all assessments. 

Some of you may not experience many changes to the period dedicated to your exams, but the additional flexibility is important in allowing your faculty and department some options in managing this process.


What format will my assessments be in?

Across faculties, assessment formats have been altered to allow you to complete them remotely. This has included, where appropriate, replacing some unseen, timed exams with open-book exams, or alternative forms of coursework. Departments have also worked to consolidate and reduce the overall volume of assessments where the learning outcomes for the year or programme can be demonstrated to have been met. You will receive specific details about your assessments in the first week of April.  

Find out more about alternative assessment submissions, key tools and techniques


 

I am due to take an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), how will this work?


Where possible, your department will make arrangements for an online assessment which assesses the learning outcomes of the module as well as meeting Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRB) requirements.  Your department will provide you with full details about your assessments.


 

Will I have less assessment?

We are working to consolidate and reduce the overall volume of assessments. You will receive specific details about your assessments from your faculty in the first week of April.


 

When will assessment period three take place? 

Assessment period three has been moved and will be held between 24 August – 4 September 2020.


 

Taking my assessment


 

How long should I spend on my assessment?

You should aim to complete your assessment within the specified time frame.

You should not spend more time than specified and you should use existing knowledge rather than undertaking further research. We are expecting answers produced in common invigilated examination conditions, not long essays or research papers. Where appropriate, word or page limits per question have been set as a guide to assist you in using your time appropriately. While these assessments will not be conducted under invigilated conditions, you are expected to act with integrity.  Assessments will be submitted via Turnitin and, in accordance with the Academic Regulations. 


 

How will academic integrity be maintained?

Students at King’s are part of an academic community that values trust, fairness and respect and actively encourages students to act with honesty and integrity.  It is a university policy that students take responsibility for their work and comply with the university’s standards and requirements.

Online proctoring/invigilation will not be used for our online assessments. Students will be confirming with each assessment that the work submitted is completely their own. The situation does not legitimise cheating or plagiarism, misconduct regulations remain in place during this period.


 

Assessment arrangements for current first year undergraduate students


 

Will this year’s assessment contribute towards my final degree?

Your grades from this year's assessments will not contribute towards your final degree classification, and only marks obtained from year two onwards will be used in determining your degree. We want to assure you that no student will be disadvantaged in their final degree classification by these measures (please see below in the details about ‘safety net’ policy). 


 

What will I need to progress to the second year?

 

Progression to your second year will be on a pass/fail basis which means you will normally be required to have passed 120 credits at the end of your first year. Exceptionally, you may able to progress with a minimum of 90 credits, although conditions will apply (please see below). 


I am a first year student, am I able to progress to the second year with only 90 credits of modules passed?

We strongly encourage you to  take your assessments in assessment period 2, or at the time you originally intended to, if it is at all possible for you to do so. If you should fail any of your assessments at this time, you will then have the opportunity to resit in period 3, and, assuming you have then passed, progress and graduate as planned. 

We aim to explore all possible ways to support you to take your assessments at the scheduled time, and you should make early contact with us if you have any particular needs or constraints, so that we can support you. 

Including any resits that may be necessary, where possible you should complete all of your assessments and/or reassessments in assessment period 3 (24 August – 4 September 2020). However, if you are unable to complete all of your assessments in assessment period 3, but you have passed a minimum of 90 credits – which, exceptionally, may include condoned fails – you will be able to progress to year 2. This means you will be carrying forward those outstanding credits, and as such will still be required to complete the assessment for these credits during year 2 of your studies. However, there may be restrictions on carrying forward core modules and prerequisite modules, and your programme leader will be able to advise you appropriately as to requirements for your programme. 

Please note that carrying outstanding credits forward into the second year of study will mean you could be undertaking up to 150 credits of study in that year, rather than your normal 120 credits. We therefore strongly advise you to complete as many of your assessments as possible by the end of your first year so as not to create excessive workload or pressure for yourself in year 2 of your studies.  

If you do not pass 90 credits or more by the end of this academic year, and/or you are unable to complete core modules and/or prerequisite modules, then you should seek advice from your department on your options. If you are eligible to resit assessments, or you have deferred, then you will take your outstanding assessments at the next opportunity.  This will involve an interruption of studies and resumption at a later date.


What is a prerequisite module?

A prerequisite module is one that must be taken and passed in order to progress to another specified module.


What is a core module?

A core module is one that must be taken and passed.


What is a condoned fail?

A condoned fail is where a student has failed a module but has attained a mark within a condonable range. For levels 4, 5 and 6, where permitted, a condoned fail is a mark between 33 and 39 inclusive. For level 7, where permitted, a condoned fail is a mark between 40 and 49 inclusive. For specified modules in the departments of Mathematics, Informatics or Physics, condoned fails are permitted, at the discretion of the Assessment Board, for marks in the range of 33 – 39 for level 4, 1 – 39 for levels 5 and 6, and 1 – 49 for level 7. There may be instances where condonement is not possible, including for core modules, or where there are special requirements for some programmes e.g. Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies regulations.  Further details on whether your programme allows condoned fails can be found in your student handbook.


 

Why have you taken the decision to continue with assessments?

We are very aware of all the hard work that you will already have put in, and the work that you will still put in, where you are able to do so, during the forthcoming assessment period. Your first year remains a fundamentally important part of your degree, allowing you to develop skills essential to the remainder of your programme, and to allow you to progress to your second year. We are committed to recognising your work and allowing you to demonstrate your performance and achievements. Your assessments will still be marked, and you will still receive a grade for your work, which will appear alongside your other marks for this year on your transcript. 


 

Will my transcript/Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR) still record my first year module marks? 

Your transcript/HEAR will not be impacted by the assessment changes put in place due to COVID-19.  It has always been the case that your transcript/HEAR provides all module results and there will be no change to this.  

All transcripts for current students will carry a note to indicate that some assessments were conducted under exceptional circumstances associated with the pandemic. 


Assessment period 3


Will examinations be held in an examination hall?

The Academic Standards Sub-Committee (ASSC) has agreed that Assessment Period 3 will continue to have online assessments to allow you to complete them remotely. In the interests of fairness and equity, the assessment will be in the same format as was set for assessment period 2 e.g. if the format were a 24-hour open book examination in assessment period 2, then this would be the same format for assessment period 3.

You will receive specific details on the assessments closer to the time.

We want to ensure that you are aware of the range of resources and services available to support you. This article details the support that you can access remotely before and/or after submitting a mitigating circumstances form.

We know that some of you may have found sitting your assessments difficult because your home environment is not conducive, or you do not have access to appropriate facilities. We are committed to understanding your personal circumstances and exploring all possible ways in which we might be able to support you. You can use the mitigating circumstances process to inform us of your requirements. More details on the mitigating circumstances process for Assessment Period 3 will be published soon.

Due to the uncertainty of the pandemic, we do not know what facilities will be open byassessment period 3. It is possible that libraries close to you may be open. If this is the case, and your home environment is not conducive for you to take the assessment, we would encourage you to use these facilities to complete your assessments.

We are constantly developing our plans as the situation evolves in line with UK government advice. If circumstances surrounding the lockdown change, then for those students who do not have access to an appropriate environment or the right technology, we will also look at the possibility of providing space in one of our buildings, if it is safe to do so. Further details on this will follow, depending on how the rules on lockdown and social distancing and the process of re-opening of our campuses evolve.


‘Safety net’ policy


 

What is a ‘safety net’ policy?

A ‘safety net’ policy is a means to ensure that no student will be disadvantaged academically by the impact of the current situation. We will put in place a range of ‘safety net’ arrangements to manage any negative impact on students’ outcomes. 

Please be aware that the application of the policy principles below may need to be adjusted if your programme is regulated by a Professional Statutory or Regulatory Body (PSRB), or where there are specific areas of variation between faculties in assessment systems. Your faculty or department will advise you of any variation, but you should be assured that the spirit of the ‘safety net’ policy will be observed in all instances. 

Where a programme is delivered collaboratively with an external partner, you should be assured that faculties are working closely with those partners to manage mitigation arrangements. 


When will the details of the ‘safety net’ policy be available to students?

Faculties are working hard on the outline of how the ‘safety net’ policy will work for their programmes. Once the Faculties have agreed their decision, the College’s Academic Standards Sub-Committee will approve the outline before publishing the detail to you.  We therefore aim to get these details to you shortly after Easter. Once approved by the College then each Faculty approach is deemed to be acceptable in ensuring our academic standards remain robust. The College’s decision will be final. 


 

I am a first year undergraduate student – what does this mean for me?

As stated in the message sent to students on 26 March 2020, after careful deliberation, we have decided to make a change to our arrangements for current first year students. Your grades from this year's assessments will not contribute towards your final degree classification, and only marks obtained from year two onwards will be used in the degree algorithm. Progression to your second year will be on a pass/fail basis. 

We also assured you that no student’s final outcomes will be disadvantaged by this decision. To achieve this, we will put in place a check at the point of considering your final degree outcome, at the end of your programme. Where your weighted cumulative score (c-score) places you within one percentage point of the ‘two percent’ borderline zone between classifications, we will look to see whether your first-year marks would have made a positive difference to your overall outcome. 

Where the inclusion of your first-year marks means that your c-score moves up into the borderline zone, the existing ‘two per cent’ rule for managing borderline cases will then be followed in order to determine whether the higher classification should be awarded. Where the inclusion of first year marks moves your c-score over the boundary for the higher classification, this is the outcome that will be awarded. 


 

I am an undergraduate student, but I am not in my first year – what does this mean for me?

The aim is to make sure that your overall performance for the year is not negatively affected by circumstances associated with the COVID-19 period. In determining your performance, we will calculate an average based on all completed modules and summative grades available for work completed with submission deadlines up to 15 March 2020, where these can be considered sufficient to give a reasonable indication of prior performance. Where sufficient information is not available from this year, we will seek to use other appropriate data, which may include the previous year’s performance or formative work this year.

This ‘safety net’ average will then be compared with your average for the full year, to ensure that we are picking up any instances in which your outcome for the year may have been negatively affected by poorer-than-average performance in the COVID-19 period. For those modules completed after 15 March 2020, marks may be adjusted to ensure that the average for the year is at least at the level of the ‘safety net’ average. Marks for any failed modules will not be so adjusted and resit marks will continue to be capped.

You must take all assessments set for you in order for the ‘safety net’ provisions specified above to be applied.


I started my studies in 2018/19 but had some level 4 reassessments to take during 2019/20.  I did not attend any teaching/tutorials – will the ‘safety net’ policy and pass/fail apply to me?

The pass/fail and/or ‘safety net’ will not apply for these modules as it is deemed that due to not attending any teaching activities your studies have not been impacted by COVID-19. If you feel unable to sit your reassessment due to COVID-19 you should follow the mitigating circumstances process


I am a final year undergraduate student – what does this mean for me?

At the point of calculating the final degree classification for our current finalists, we will put in place an additional check – in addition to the above measures – to make sure that your outcome has not been negatively affected by COVID-19-related circumstances. 

If your final c-score falls in a borderline zone between classifications, we will follow our existing policy of looking to see whether you have at least 60 credits at level 6 or above in the higher range, and if so award you the higher classification. However, an additional ‘safety net’ provision will be put in place where we will also look at whether we can find those 60 credits at level 5 or above, in a given year, and, again, award you the higher classification if this is the case. 


I am an undergraduate student, how will the ‘safety net average’ be calculated for me?

Our faculties have different assessment systems, and each faculty has therefore been working to define their approach to implementing the university’s safety net policy. All faculties will adopt one of the following two models to calculate the ‘safety net average’: 

  1. Using an average of summative grades from the current academic year up to and including 15 March 2020, OR  
  1. Where sufficient marks are not available from academic year 19/20 to form a reasonable assessment of performance, using an average of summative marks from the previous year of study.

Your faculty will advise you as to which of the above models they will be adopting. 


I am student on a one-year intercalating programme, how will the ‘safety net’ be applied to be me?

If you have a C-score within two per cent of a higher classification boundary (i.e. 68/58/48) you will be automatically upgraded to the higher classification where at least 45 credits at level 6/or level 7 are in the higher classification or above, in a minimum of two modules.


 

I am a student on a joint honours programme, which faculty ‘safety net’ will be applied to me?

For those programmes where you are studying two subject areas under one degree, i.e. BA French and Management, the programme will have a “lead department”.  The Faculty where this “lead department” is located will be the faculty ‘safety net’ applicable to your studies.


I am a student on a masters integrated (MSci, MEng) programme, how will the ‘safety net average’ be calculated for me?

Our faculties have different assessment systems, and each faculty has therefore been working to define their approach to implementing the university’s safety net policy. All faculties will adopt one of the following two models to calculate the ‘safety net average’: 

  1. Using an average of summative grades from the current academic year up to and including 15 March 2020, OR  
  1. Where sufficient marks are not available from academic year 19/20 to form a reasonable assessment of performance, using an average of summative marks from the previous year of study.

Your faculty will advise you as to which of the above models they will be adopting. 


 

I am a postgraduate taught student, how will the safety net’ be applied to me?

The Academic Standards Sub-Committee (ASSC) has approved the following postgraduate taught ‘safety net’: 

If you have an overall score within two per cent of a higher classification boundary (i.e. 68/58) you will be automatically upgraded to the higher classification (Pass with Distinction/ Pass with Merit) where at least 60 credits are in the higher classification or above, in a minimum of two modules. 

Whilst consideration was given to a ‘safety net’ averaging rule similar to that being used for undergraduate students, ASSC agreed that the ‘safety net’ described above would fairly and equitably ensure that overall outcomes are not negatively affected by the impact of the current situation. 

The ‘safety net’ described above will apply to all postgraduate taught students currently enrolled on a programme of study.


 

I am a postgraduate taught student, studying part-time, how will the ‘safety net’ be applied to me?

The Academic Standards Sub-Committee (ASSC) has approved the following postgraduate taught ‘safety net’: 

If you have an overall score within two per cent of a higher classification boundary (i.e. 68/58) you will be automatically upgraded to the higher classification (Pass with Distinction/ Pass with Merit) where at least 60 credits are in the higher classification or above, in a minimum of two modules. 

Whilst consideration was given to a ‘safety net’ averaging rule similar to that being used for undergraduate students, ASSC agreed that the ‘safety net’ described above would fairly and equitably ensure that overall outcomes are not negatively affected by the impact of the current situation. 

The ‘safety net’ described above will apply to all postgraduate taught students currently enrolled on a programme of study.


I am student who undertook study abroad during 2019/20, how would the ‘safety net average’ be calculated for me?

Our faculties have different assessment systems, and each faculty has therefore been working to define their approach to implementing the university’s safety net policy. For programmes that have study abroad, faculties have chosen one of the following principles for calculating the ‘safety net average’ where study abroad has been completed:

  1. If study abroad took place during term two of 2019/20, where there are sufficient module marks from assessments completed during term one of 2019/20 to calculate an appropriate safety net, they will be used.
  2. If study abroad took place during term one of 2019/20, the module marks from the previous year of study will be used.
  3. If study abroad was meant to take place during the whole of 2019/20, the module marks from the previous year of study will be used. 

Your faculty will be advising you of which of the above principles they will be following to calculate your ‘safety net average’. 


All students – what does this mean for me?

We will carry out additional checks at the point at which your final degree classification is being determined at the end of your programme, to make sure that we are satisfied that no disadvantage to your final outcome has been caused by the disruptions experienced in spring/summer 2020 as a result of COVID-19. 

More technical work is underway to specify how this will be operationalised across the faculties, given important differences in assessment systems, and to guide implementation by assessment boards in the summer/autumn. 


 

What is the C-score?

For undergraduate students the final degree algorithm is calculated using a method called “the C-score”. The specific calculation can be found in the academic regulations (T30)


 

What does summative assessment mean?

Summative assessment refers to assessment which contributes to your formal outcomes for your module/programme.


Deferral and interruption of studies


 

Under what circumstances can I defer (either a single assessment or multiple assessments)? 

We strongly encourage students wherever possible to take your assessments during exam period two but understand that there may be a range of good reasons as to why you are unable to do so. You can opt to defer from one or more assessments for the following reasons:

  • you are unwell and do not expect to be well enough to take your assessment or assessments
  • you are looking after family members who are ill from COVID-19 
  • you have childcare responsibilities due to COVID-19 
  • you do not have access to a quiet environment to complete your assessments 
  • your firewall prevents access to the King’s online system 
  • you do not have access to a computer/laptop/tablet to complete your assessments remotely 
  • you feel you are unprepared or unable to take your assessments due to COVID-19 

This is not an exhaustive list and there may be other reasons relating to COVID-19 that mean you need to defer one or more assessments.  Please include the details on your deferral request.


How do I defer a single assessment/a number of individual assessments/all assessments due to COVID-19? 

If you know in advance of assessment period 2 commencing that you have circumstances relating to COVID-19 that mean you need to defer one or more assessments, you should submit a request to defer to period 3, or the next assessment opportunity where this may vary in specific faculties, citing the reason for the request. A deferral request can be made here, no later than 26 April 2020. If you defer to period 3 you will take your assessments between 24 August – 4 September 2020.


 

Why has a deadline of 26 April been set for deferral requests?

This has been set because the standard assessment period 2 begins on 27 April. We need to hear from you before the start of the assessment period if you wish to defer some or all of your assessments.


 

Do I need evidence to accompany my deferral request? 

You should provide details on the deferral request of the specific COVID-19 circumstances that are the reason for your request, but no additional evidence is required.


 

I am considering interrupting my studies, is this an option?

We encourage you wherever possible to complete your assessments in period 2. However, we understand there may be circumstances where taking assessments in period 2 or 3 is not possible for you. In these exceptional cases you have the option to interrupt your studies and take your assessments in the next academic year. However, this would be a big decision which may carry implications for your progression and graduation, career progression, professional recognition requirements where the programme is regulated by a Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body (PSRB), or your visa status.  

Interruption of study should only be taken after seeking advice and considering the implications carefully. If you are considering doing this, please speak to your programme director or personal tutor to discuss whether ways can be found to enable you to take your assessments this academic year. If you hold a visa, you should speak to our visa compliance team. Our aim is to explore all possible ways to enable you to continue with your studies, and progress or graduate on time.


 

Mitigating circumstances process for COVID-19


 

What should I do if the deferral deadline has passed and I am unable to complete an assessment due to a change in my personal circumstances relating to COVID-19?

If your personal circumstances change after the deferral deadline and you are unable to undertake an assessment, you should submit this form, noting that the reason is related to COVID-19. 


 

What should I do if the deferral deadline has passed and I am unable to complete an assessment due to ill health from COVID-19?

If you become unwell and you are unable to complete an assessment, you should submit the mitigating circumstances form noting that the reason is COVID-19. 

If you are feeling unwell as a result of COVID-19 you should also fill in this online form. This will be shared directly with the Advice & Guidance team and will allow us to contact you to discuss advice, support and resources available to you. We also strongly encourage you to reach out to your personal tutor or department office, and anyone close to you or nearby who be able to support you.


 

Do I need evidence to accompany my mitigating circumstances form? 

You should provide details on the form of the specific COVID-19 circumstances that are the reason for your request, but no additional evidence is required.


What should I do if I am unable to submit my assessment on time due to COVID-19?

If your ability to submit your assessment or coursework on time has been impacted because of circumstances relating to COVID-19, please submit a copy of the mitigating circumstances form available here


Academic Appeals


 

What happens if I get my results and I want to challenge the decision? 

You may be able to submit an academic appeal in exceptional cases.  Please go to these webpages for more information on the grounds that the university accepts for academic appeals and for the form.


Will I be expected to submit independent third party evidence with my academic appeal?

In the current circumstances, due to the Covid 19 pandemic, if you have been unable to obtain independent third party evidence of a medical nature, you may not have to submit this, though you should briefly outline the circumstances that make it impossible to provide such evidence. However if you are able to do so, please provide independent third party evidence wherever possible, especially if your appeal relates to non-medical issues.


 

Technology issues and study environments


 

I am unable to undertake assessments due to my firewall blocking my access, what should I do?

You should take some time to check you are able to access King’s online systems before the date of your assessments. A “test” assessment is being devised and will be shortly available to you to test prior to when your assessments are due to start. 

If you find that your firewall is blocking your access you should contact the King’s IT Service Desk in the first instance.  

If IT support is unable to resolve your firewall issue and as a consequence you are unable to complete the assessment(s) then you can defer your assessments to period 3, or the next assessment opportunity where this may vary in specific faculties, by submitting this form, citing the reason for the request. 


 

What should I do if I do not have access to a computer to undertake my assessment?

If you do not have access to a computer or laptop to undertake your assessment, we suggest you: 

  • check if a laptop is available for loan from IT via submitting a request using the request form available on Student Services Online.
  • If you have access to a tablet you should check if it is possible to complete your assessment using it. A “test” assessment is being devised and will be shortly available to you to test prior to your assessments due to start. 

If neither of the above options are possible but you can access your paper via your smartphone, on the agreement of your department, you may handwrite then photograph your answers, and send to your departmentby the set deadline.  

If none of these options are possible you should request a deferral using this form


 

What should I do if I do not have access to Wi-Fi  to undertake my assessments?

If you do not have access to Wi-Fi to undertake your assessment, we suggest that you check if a dongle is available to loan from IT by submitting a request using the form available on Student Services Online

If you are an overseas student you should contact IT by emailing 8888@kcl.ac.uk to discuss options available to you. 

If you are unable to get a dongle or make other arrangements, you should request a deferral using this form.


What should I do if my Wi-Fi goes down during an assessment?

If you are unable to complete your assessment due to issues with Wi-Fi you should submit this form, citing exam irregularity due to COVID-19. Once we have received the form, your faculty will contact you to discuss next steps. 


 

What should I do if I do not have access to a suitable quiet space to undertake my assessments?

You are encouraged wherever possible to complete your assessments during period 2, and to let us know if you have particular needs that we may be able to support you with. However, if you feel that your study environment will prevent you from being able to engage with your assessments, you could defer your assessments to period 3, or the next assessment opportunity where this may vary in specific faculties. You should do this by submitting a deferral request, citing the reason for the request. A request can be made by submitting this form.


 

Results and transcripts


Will my module results for 2019/20 be recorded on my final transcript?

All module results for all years of study will be recorded on your final transcript. A statement which can be attached to your transcript will be made available explaining how marks and module results from 19/20 have been used to calculate your final degree outcome. Further information on what form this statement will take will be available shortly.


I am due to graduate this year, when will I find out my results and overall classification?

Undergraduate Assessment Sub-Boards are being held 20–24 July 2020. Students who take their assessments in period 2 will hear of their outcomes shortly after the Assessment Sub-Board has been held and Registry Services have put all the information onto the student records system. Notwithstanding the slight extension to the assessment timetable, you will receive your award on 31 July 2020.

Arrangements for postgraduate taught Assessment Sub-Boards will be announced shortly.


I am not a final year student, when will my results be published? 

Undergraduate Assessment Sub-Boards are being held 20–24 July 2020. Students who take their assessments in period 2 will hear of their outcomes shortly after the Assessment Sub-Board has been held and Registry Services have put all the information onto the student records system. Notwithstanding the slight extension to the assessment timetable, you will receive your results on 31 July as planned.

Faculties are liaising with the Registry team to schedule Postgraduate taught Assessment Sub-Boards during the summer period. Marks will be inputted onto the student record system by the 1st July 2020 to ensure that any student that has failed to meet the requirements to pass the module can be reassessed in period 3.


 

I am worried that my performance may not meet expectations over this difficult period. How will this be reflected on my transcript/ Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR)?

All transcripts for current students will carry a note to indicate that some assessments were conducted under exceptional circumstances associated with the pandemic.