Skip to main content
KBS_Icon_questionmark link-ico

Understanding the 2017 General Election

Bush House South East Wing, London

21 Feb pollingstationthumbnail Part of Events by the Centre for British Politics and Government

Understanding the 2017 General Election

The 2017 British general election result confounded the expectations of political commentators and the fall-out from it continues to shape British politics.

Academic studies of the election have started to amass highlighting key debating points which will be considered during this session. What were the main drivers of the result? In what ways did the campaign affect the result? Was this a brexit election? Did the 2017 general election expose new long term electoral cleavages in Britain such as the age divide? Does 2017 herald a permanent return to two-party politics? How does the 2017 election result fit with wider international political trends?

Chair: Professor Sarah Birch

Contributors:

Professor Roger Mortimore
Dr Rupa Huq MP

This research seminar will bring together two leading academics with Labour MP Dr Rupa Huq to consider the 2017 general election.

Professor Sarah Birch (KCL) is a Professor of Political Science. She studies comparative politics and public ethics. She is a fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Public Policy Research. She recently contributed a chapter to None past the post: Britain at the polls 2017.

Professor Roger Mortimore (KCL) is a Professor of Public Opinion and Political Analysis. He is also Director of Political Analysis at Ipsos MORI. He is also co-author of Political Communication in Britain - the definitive book on the campaigning, media and polling in the 2017 election.

Dr Rupa Huq is MP for Ealing Central and Acton and a former lecturer in sociology. Having first been elected in 2015, she entered the 2017 general election campaign with a majority of just 274 votes (making it the Conservatives' second top target seat) but increased this to 13,807.

This event has been organised by the Centre for British Politics and Government at King's College London. It is for academic researchers and postgraduate students with an interest in the area.


Search for another event