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Weekly Seminar Series

The SGDP Centre holds regular weekly seminars during the academic year. These hour-long seminars cover a variety of social, genetic and developmental psychiatry research topics.

Speakers include professors and lecturers, as well as other post-doctoral researchers and students who are based at the Centre.

Below are the details of the next seminar coming up at the Centre:

Seminar Room A&B SGDP Centre.

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/core-assets/maps/detail/ioppn.pdf

 When:  4th of April 2019 (10:00 – 11:00)

Contact: Isabel.Sinha@kcl.ac.uk

The next seminar will be on the 4th of April- 

 

1) Longitudinal DNA methylation changes related to reinforcement psychopathology in adolescence

 

Nicole Xi Hui Tay

1+3 PhD student (final year), Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, IOPPN, KCL

 

There has been a wealth of evidence for epigenetic mechanisms, in particular DNA methylation, underlying environmental influences related to the development of behaviour and psychopathology. While DNA methylation has been associated with environmental influences and the development of psychiatric illnesses, longitudinal methylation changes have not been well described. Current analyses of DNA methylation variations over time have mostly been related to age-related changes. With the advantage of having access to the longitudinal adolescent IMAGEN cohort, a part of my PhD work aims to identify novel DNA methylation patterns across time and relate them to neurobehavioural features and development of psychopathologies. In this talk I will present my preliminary findings on dynamic changes in methylation patterns identified within the IMAGEN cohort and how they relate to environmental influences.

 

 

2) Polygenic scores in research: past, present and future

 

Saskia Selzam

1+3 PhD student (final year), Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, IOPPN, KCL

 

The use of polygenic scores in research has grown rapidly during the past five years, permeating the social, behavioural and biomedical sciences. Mostly due to increasing genome-wide association sample sizes, this progress has opened up novel opportunities to investigate developmental and multivariate research questions, as well as genotype-environment interplay. In this talk, I will give an overview of the advances made in genetic research since I became a student at the SGDP before outlining some of the studies I conducted as part of my PhD in the Twins Early Development Study. Firstly, I will present work on polygenic prediction of educational achievement and related traits (Selzam et. al., 2016), and the application of polygenic scores to investigate shared aetiology between traits, based on my work on a polygenic p factor for major psychiatric disorders (Selzam et. al., 2018). The second part of this talk will focus on the estimation of gene-environment correlation effects in polygenic score prediction, based on some of my current work on genotyped DZ co-twins. Finally, I will discuss some general future directions.

 

 

 

 

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