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IoPPN researchers & academics among most cited in the world

Posted on 27/11/2018

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Clarivate Analytics today published its annual Highly Cited Researchers list. Now in its fifth year, the citation analysis identifies the most influential researchers as determined by their peers around the globe - those who have consistently won recognition in the form of high citation counts over a decade. This year’s list continues to recognize researchers whose citation records position them in the very highest strata of influence and impact as it includes 17 Nobel laureates. 

King’s College London has 27 entries in this year’s list, with 21 of those working at the IoPPN. These are:

Of the list, Executive Dean of the IoPPN, Professor Ian Everall said, ‘I am truly delighted that we have so many of our world acclaimed researchers listed on the highly-cited researchers list. This is yet another marker of the world leading quality of the work carried out by our esteemed academics and again is validation that we are one of the most prestigious institutions for research in neuroscience and mental health.’

Of King’s researchers on the list, Professor Reza Razavi, Vice President & Vice-Principal (Research & Innovation) said:

‘It is fantastic to see so many King's academics featured on this prestigious list and shows how prolific the university is in producing highly cited research. Crucially it highlights that this work is having the greatest impact on the scientific community and on advancing their respective fields.’


Annette Thomas, CEO of the Scientific & Academic Research group at Clarivate Analytics, said:

‘The Highly Cited Researchers 2018 list helps to identify the researchers who are having the greatest impact on the research community as measured by the rate at which their work is being cited by others and that contributes so greatly to extending the frontier and gaining knowledge and innovations for society - contributions that make the world healthier, safer, richer, and more sustainable.’ 


The methodology that determines the who’s who of high-impact researchers draws on the data and analysis performed by bibliometric experts from the Institute of Scientific Information at Clarivate Analytics. It uses Essential Science Indicators, a unique compilation of science performance metrics and trend data based on scholarly paper publication counts and citation data from the Web of Science, the premier web-based environment of scientific and scholarly research literature totalling over 33,000 journals. More about the methodology can be read here

The full Highly Cited Researchers 2018 list and executive summary can be found online at https://clarivate.com/hcr/.

Contact

For further media information please contact: Robin Maginn, Communications Officer, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, robin.maginn@kcl.ac.uk / +44 20 7848 0063 / +44 074 6835 3067.

 

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