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More young people to benefit from King's College London's extended medical degree

Posted on 31/08/2017
2017 MBBS graduation

More students will benefit from King's College London's extended medical degree programme

King’s College London’s extended medical degree is to broaden its eligibility to include schools across the UK, meaning even more talented young people will be able to take advantage of its flagship broadening-access-to-medicine programme.

The Extended Medical Degree Programme (EMDP), introduced some 16 years ago, was the first of its kind in the UK and offers a more graduated introduction to medical study than the traditional degree course.

It was designed for young people who may otherwise not have the opportunity to study for a degree in medicine, following the same medical curriculum and involving the same rigorous assessments as the traditional course, but providing greater academic and pastoral support.

Back in 2001 when the programme began, only 10 additional students attending one of the 100 or so state schools or colleges in the 15 most educationally-deprived boroughs of inner London, were offered places.

Access later increased to include 50 students studying A-levels or Access to Medicine at any non-selective state school in Greater London, and up to 5 participants of the Realising Opportunities programme across England.

From this year though, King’s will open up applications to young people from non-selective schools right across the UK and the number of available places has increased to 77. With entry requirements ABB, this means that King’s College London can help more young people with the capability - but not necessarily the usual background - become doctors and medical leaders of the future.

King’s College London’s Executive Dean for Life Sciences & Medicine, Professor Richard Trembath, said:

“As our society evolves and the expectations of our health service increase, widening participation into medicine programmes are required to help ensure that those young people with the potential to become doctors are given the opportunity to, and that the health services we deliver reflect the needs of patients."

So far, the programme has seen more than 270 students qualify as doctors.

Click here for more information.

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