Show/hide main menu

Logan Group

Professor Malcolm Logan

Professor of Regenerative Biology

Email: malcolm.logan@kcl.ac.uk

Tel: 0207 848 6886
Fax: 0207 848 6296

Biography

  • Postdoctoral Fellow Harvard Medical School (Tabin Lab) 1995-2000
  • PhD NIMR/University of London 1995
  • BSc Biochemistry University College London 1991

Past Appointments

  • Group leader MRC-NIMR, Division of Developmental Biology 2000-2013

Research Interests

The objectives of my research group are to understand the normal physiological processes of limb formation and homeostasis and how these processes have been disrupted in diseases affecting the limb. We are focussing on addressing two fundamental questions.What are the combination of factors that coordinate the recruitment of cells within regions of the embryo flank to form the emerging limb buds, from which the mature limb tissues are formed? And, secondly, what are the events that organise differentiating cell types of the limb into tissues and how these tissues become integrated into a functional musculoskeletal unit? We aim to develop regenerative strategies that can address the defects present in congenital limb abnormalities, tissue damage in trauma and to tackle the degenerative problems associated with ageing limbs.

Recent Publications

  • Nishimoto, S., Minguillon, C., Wood, S. and Logan, M.P. (2014)A combination of activation and repression by a collinear Hox code controls forelimb-restricted expression of Tbx5 and reveals Hox protein specificity.PLOSGenetics 10(3)
  • Minguillon, C., Nishimoto, S., Wood, S., Vendrell, E., Gibson-Brown, J.J., and Logan, M.P. (2012). Hox genes regulate the onset of Tbx5 expression in the forelimb.Development 139, 3180-3188.
  • Duboc, V., and Logan, M.P. (2011). Pitx1 is necessary for normal initiation of hindlimb outgrowth through regulation of Tbx4 expression and shapes hindlimb morphologies via targeted growth control.Development 138, 5301-5309.
  • Abu-Daya, A., Nishimoto, S., Fairclough, L., Mohun, T.J., Logan, M.P., and Zimmerman, L.B. (2011). The secreted integrin ligand nephronectin is necessary for forelimb formation in Xenopus tropicalis.Dev Biol 349, 204-212.
  • Hasson, P., DeLaurier, A., Bennett, M., Grigorieva, E., Naiche, L.A., Papaioannou, V.E., Mohun, T.J., and Logan, M.P. (2010). Tbx4 and tbx5 acting in connective tissue are required for limb muscle and tendon patterning.Dev Cell 18, 148-156.
  • Minguillon, C., Gibson-Brown, J.J., and Logan, M.P. (2009). Tbx4/5 gene duplication and the origin of vertebrate paired appendages.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106, 21726-21730.
  • Horton, A.C., Mahadevan, N.R., Minguillon, C., Osoegawa, K., Rokhsar, D.S., Ruvinsky, I., de Jong, P.J., Logan, M.P., and Gibson-Brown, J.J. (2008). Conservation of linkage and evolution of developmental function within the Tbx2/3/4/5 subfamily of T-box genes: implications for the origin of vertebrate limbs.Dev Genes Evol 218, 613-628.
  • Durland, J.L., Sferlazzo, M., Logan, M., and Burke, A.C. (2008). Visualizing the lateral somitic frontier in the Prx1Cre transgenic mouse.J Anat 212, 590-602.
  • Delaurier, A., Burton, N., Bennett, M., Baldock, R., Davidson, D., Mohun, T.J., and Logan, M.P. (2008). The Mouse Limb Anatomy Atlas: an interactive 3D tool for studying embryonic limb patterning.BMC Dev Biol 8, 83.
  • Hasson, P., Del Buono, J., and Logan, M.P. (2007). Tbx5 is dispensable for forelimb outgrowth.Development 134, 85-92.
  • Manning, L., Ohyama, K., Saeger, B., Hatano, O., Wilson, S.A., Logan, M., and Placzek, M. (2006). Regional morphogenesis in the hypothalamus: a BMP-Tbx2 pathway coordinates fate and proliferation through Shh downregulation. Dev Cell 11, 873-885.
  • Harvey, S.A., and Logan, M.P. (2006). sall4 acts downstream of tbx5 and is required for pectoral fin outgrowth.Development 133, 1165-1173.
  • DeLaurier, A., Schweitzer, R., and Logan, M. (2006). Pitx1 determines the morphology of muscle, tendon, and bones of the hindlimb.Dev Biol 299, 22-34.
  • Rallis, C., Del Buono, J., and Logan, M.P. (2005). Tbx3 can alter limb position along the rostrocaudal axis of the developing embryo.Development 132, 1961-1970.
  • Minguillon, C., Del Buono, J., and Logan, M.P. (2005). Tbx5 and Tbx4 are not sufficient to determine limb-specific morphologies but have common roles in initiating limb outgrowth.Dev Cell 8, 75-84.

Review Articles

  • Duboc, V., and Logan, M.P. (2011). Regulation of limb bud initiation and limb-type morphology.Dev Dyn 240, 1017-1027.
  • Carkett, M.D., and Logan, M.P. (2011). 1, 2, 3: Counting the fingers on a chicken wing.Genome Biol 12, 130.
  • Duboc, V., and Logan, M.P. (2009). Building limb morphology through integration of signalling modules.Curr Opin Genet Dev 19, 497-503.
  • Horton, A.C., Mahadevan, N.R., Minguillon, C., Osoegawa, K., Rokhsar, D.S., Ruvinsky, I., de Jong, P.J., Logan, M.P., and Gibson-Brown, J.J. (2008). Conservation of linkage and evolution of developmental function within the Tbx2/3/4/5 subfamily of T-box genes: implications for the origin of vertebrate limbs.Dev Genes Evol 218, 613-628.
  • Minguillon, C., and Logan, M. (2004). Developmental biology reaches new lineages.Genome Biol 5, 333.
  • Minguillon, C., and Logan, M. (2003). The comparative genomics of T-box genes.Brief Funct Genomic Proteomic 2, 224-233.Logan, M. (2003). Finger or toe: the molecular basis of limb identity.Development 130, 6401-6410.
Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions  Privacy policy  Accessibility  Modern slavery statement  Contact us

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454