Press cuttings

A summary of the latest media coverage for King's College London and Higher Education including headlines from national and international newspapers, specialist journals, television and radio programmes, with a link to the article where possible.

There is also a searchable Archive going back to 2004.

Please submit any media mentions to the Public Relations Department pr@kcl.ac.uk, 020 7848 3202.

King's stories

In Poor Health

Independent 24th March 2017

Critics say the World Health Organisation needs radical reform. Martin Prince from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said: "I know there are arguments about individual responsibility and behaviour change but they are important factors."

A radical new therapy could treat the 'untreatable' victims of trauma

Newsweek 23rd March 2017

Professor Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) backs innovation but warns that clinicians should not place undue faith in a new PTSD treatment before it is validated by rigorous research. He said: “I’m not saying we don’t need to treat [PTSD], but the impetus is to do it right, because doing it wrong can harm people and also dissuades people from going to get other treatments.”

It's good to talk: pupils gather for world's largest mental health lesson

Guardian 22nd March 2017

Poet, astronaut-in-training and mental health campaigner Hussain Manawer and Professor Dame Til Wykes from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) set a new GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS title for the World’s Largest Mental Health Lesson.

King's press release related to 'It's good to talk: pupils gather for world's largest mental health lesson'

Interview with Hussain Manawer

BBC London 19th March 2017

Interview with Hussain Manawer, who will later this week be hosting the world's largest mental health lesson with Professor Dame Til Wykes from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Prince Harry carries out a second day of royal duties

Daily Mail 16th March 2017

Prince Harry attended the Veterans’ Mental Health Conference at King’s College London today (Thursday 16 March), where he led a panel discussion with three veterans on the benefits of having open conversations about mental health and getting the right support. Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "We set up this annual conference three years ago in order to provide high quality evidence and informed debate at a reasonable cost for those interested in this important topic. We were delighted to welcome Prince Harry to the conference this year as well as a range of other excellent speakers." Also reported by Daily Star, Daily Express and ABC News.

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Colourful, creative and close up: Wellcome Images 2017

BBC 15th March 2017

Wellcome Image Awards 2017 includes Language pathways of the brain by Stephanie Forkel and Ahmad Beyh, Natbrainlab, and Alfonso de Lara Rubio from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Also reported in by Time Out.

Town cursed by suicide struggles to find reason

The Times 14th March 2017

Surrounded by green rice paddies, the southern Guyana farming community of Mibicuri hides its sad truth well. At the Georgetown public hospital, 85 miles up the coast, Caitlin Vieira, 26, who trained at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) before returning to her native Guyana, is one of only five psychologists and three psychiatrists in the entire country.

Depression, anxiety, PTSD: The mental impact of climate change

CNN 14th March 2017

It's a dream many city-dwellers long for: moving to a spacious house surrounded by greenery in the countryside, where they plan to raise their family. James Rubin from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "One of the major health effects of flooding seems to be the mental health aspects. There are a whole host of stressors around it."

Susceptibility to unscientific truths in a post-truth era

BBC World 13th March 2017

Dr Sarah Gormer and Dr Kris De Meyer of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who has written about the science of how we become more entrenched in our views, debate so-called "post-truth" era and why people are susceptible to unscientific beliefs. Dr Kris De Meyer said: "So through the process of feeling a surge of negative emotions when we are challenged, justifying them, finding additional reasons for a point of view, which turns into an ever stronger opinion."

Schizophrenia risk for babies of pregnant mums on diets

Mail on Sunday 12th March 2017

Women who diet during pregnancy are 30 per cent more likely to have babies who develop schizophrenia later in life, say researchers. Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: "This does not mean pregnant women should overeat, and the advice remains the same: eat a balanced diet and keep healthy during pregnancy, take folic acid, and don't smoke tobacco or use illicit drugs."

Mental Health and Stigma

BBC Radio 4 11th March 2017

Professor Grahama Thornicroft of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses mental health and stigma. He said: "Most people who havent had direct experience of mental illness themselves actually know very little about mental health and the problem is a lot of what they do know is actually wrong and where people get these ideas, mostly from the media. The problem with that, is that if they have these stereotypes, they may actively avoid going to seek help."

Sixty seconds on... skunk

British Medical Journal 11th March 2017

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and University College London are warning of the harms associated with 'skunk' a form of high potency cannabis.

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Prince Harry to heap pressure on Theresa May by speaking out publicly about the mental health crisis of veterans’

The Sun 9th March 2017

Prince Harry will be attending a Veteran's Mental Health Conference next Thursday to speak out publicly about the Veterans mental health crisis. A recent study by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and forces charity Help For Heroes found a massive 75,000 vets from the wars of the last 25 years are afflicted by their war nightmares.

Parents refuse to give children flu jab over safety fears

The Times 9th March 2017

A study led by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), investigating parental attitudes towards the UK’s child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced. Dr James Rubin said: ‘Our study is the first to look at what parents in England think about the child flu vaccine, which has important implications for how we communicate public health messages.’ Also reported by i News.

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Middle-class, female and smokes skunk

The Times 9th March 2017

A piece which discusses one woman's problem with drugs, with comment from Professor Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). He said: "Men are more enthusiastic about smoking cannabis, but women are catching up. It's become normalised. The use of skunk has increased over recent years and therefore one would expect that its use would increase among women. We see more psychotic behaviour among young men, but I'm not at all surprised that more women are running into difficulties."

Impact Asia With Mishal Husain

BBC World 9th March 2017

New research has found that stimulating the brain with electricity can help sufferers of bulimia to deal with the symptoms. Dr Maria Kekic, bulimia researcher from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), joins to detail the research. She said: "A weak current is being sent from this battery and through your brain."

Why mobile phones should be banned from the bedroom: They keep you awake at night, even when they're switched off

Daily Mail 7th March 2017

Article on the impact that technology is having on sleeping patterns. The article cites a study of 125,000 children by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), published in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics last November on the subject.

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Eating disorders are rarely all about food

i news 6th March 2017

Professor Janet Treasure of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: “Eating disorders are serious, biologically and socially influenced mental illnesses that are fundamentally characterised by dysregulated eating and body weight. Adverse life events, abuse, bullying, and social pressures to be thin have all been associated with anorexia nervosa.”

Victoria Derbyshire: Police in Durham are planning to give free heroin to addicts.

BBC News 6th March 2017

Police in Durham are planning to give free heroin to addicts. Ron Hogg, the Police, Crime and Victims Commissioner for Durham, joins the show and says this kind of scheme has been evaluated by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and found to be a very effective way forward.

Police set to supervise use of 'free heroin' in bid to tackle drug problems

ITV News 6th March 2017

A radical plan which will see police give heroin addicts free supplies of the drug to inject at specially designated "shooting galleries" is being launched in a bid to help users "back into recovery". Ron Hogg, Durham's police and crime commissioner, said it was about "being proactive and getting on the front foot" as evidence had showed the method was "very effective" at dealing with addiction. He said: "There have been trials run in the UK, six year trials founded by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which shows that this method is actually very effective at getting people back into recovery, reducing crime and indeed reducing their health conditions such as aids. "It is really very positive that we're taking this step forward." Also reported by BBC Radio 5 Live and Vistoria Derbyshire.

King's press release related to 'Police set to supervise use of 'free heroin' in bid to tackle drug problems'

Make cannabis safer to use, urge experts

The Times 2nd March 2017

As cannabis laws become liberalised in many countries, experts from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) argue that there is an urgent need to explore how cannabis use can be made safer. Dr Amir Englund said: "Although most users will not develop problems from their cannabis use, it is vital, especially now that cannabis is becoming increasingly liberalised, that we explore alternative and innovative ways by which we can reduce and mitigate cannabis related harms." Also reported by Huffington Post, Guardian, Daily Mail, Reuters, i, and BBC World Service.

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Don't let useful data go to waste

Nature 2nd March 2017

Researchers must seek out others' deposited biological sequences in community databases, urges Franziska Denk. Franziska is about to open a neuroscience research laboratory at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Young people 'fear stigma' if they ask for mental-health help

BBC News 1st March 2017

Over three-quarters of young people say there is a stigma to mental illness and a quarter would not ask for help if they were suffering, a survey suggests. Professor Louise Arsenault of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "Increasing the understanding and awareness of mental health problems among young people should be a key priority. We also need to explore ways of ensuring young people with mental health problems do not fall out of education or employment at an early age." Also reported in the Huffington Post.

Adopted Romanian orphans 'still suffering in adulthood'

BBC News Online 23rd February 2017

Despite living in strong and supportive families for over 20 years, many children exposed to severe early deprivation in Romanian institutions aged 0-3 experience a range of mental health problems in early adulthood, according to new King’s College London research. Professor Edmund Sonuga-Barke from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: 'Being exposed to very severe conditions in childhood can be associated with lasting and deep-seated social, emotional and cognitive problems, which are complex and vary over time.' Also reported by BBC World Service, Associated Press, Washington Post, ABC News and others.

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Dementia could be triggered by eating too much sugar, landmark study reveals

Daily Mirror 23rd February 2017

For the first time a ‘tipping point’ molecular link between the blood sugar glucose and Alzheimer’s disease has been established by scientists, who have shown that excess glucose damages a vital enzyme involved with inflammation response to the early stages of Alzheimer’s. The research was carried out by scientists from the University of Bath and the Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Also reported by Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Daily Express, Times of India and The Economic Times.

Do YOU feel anxious when you have to do math or read a map?

Daily Mail 22nd February 2017

Our genes play a significant role in how anxious we feel when faced with spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, according to a new study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Margherita Malanchini said: "Our results have important implications for finding specific genes which contribute to differences in anxiety between people, as they suggest that some of the same genes contribute to anxiety in several areas, but that most of them are specific to each domain of anxiety". Also reported by the Sun, The Hindu, Daccan Herald, India Today, NDTV, and the Indian Express.

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Antidepressants may not be perfect, but they DO save lives

Daily Mail 21st February 2017

Comment article discussing antidepressants, written by Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Checking troops for mental illness ‘doesn’t reduce incidence of problems’, top docs’ report

The Sun 17th February 2017

A study testing a potential post-deployment screening programme for UK Armed Forces personnel, found it was not effective in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders or encouraging personnel to seek help, compared to the general mental health advice which is the standard of care in the UK military. Co-Author Professor Neil Greenberg of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "More research is needed to improve the mental health of UK Armed Forces personnel and other approaches could include good leadership training, peer and family support programmes and further improving the quality and accessibility of military mental health services."
Also reported on BBC 2 with Victoria Derbyshire, Press Association, BBC World Service and New Scientist.

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Professor Sir Simon Wessely on Victoria Derbyshire

BBC 2 17th February 2017

Discussion on post-traumatic stress disorder among military veterans, which includes contribution by Professor Sir Simon Wessely from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. He said: "People are reluctant to come forward, they are worried they might become stigmatised, if it will have an effect on their career and what other people will think of them. They are also not convinced that the services themselves, the mental health services, will help them."

BBC Radio 5 Live in discussion about psychosis and skunk

BBC Radio 5 Live 16th February 2017

Discussion of the risks of psychosis to users of the strain of cannabis known as skunk, which makes reference to research by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Autism in girls - Channel 4 news

Channel 4 16th February 2017

Feature on increasing awareness and diagnosis of autism in girls and young women. Includes comment from Professor Francesca Happe of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

BBC Radio 4 in discussion with Sir Simon Wessley

BBC Radio 4 14th February 2017

Sir Simon Wessely from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) joins to discuss the resilience of people's mental health in relation to traumatic events and the need to maintain boundaries with regards to classifying personality disorders. He said: "We do have good services but it that doesn't men they are remotely good enough... Now the policy is, we wait a bit, and then if people are still distressed 10 - 12 weeks later, then yes we will offer help. That has been quite a big change in the way in which we appreciate trauma. Most people will cope, through normal social network, the minority will not and will develop actual disorders for which we can help."

'We didn't even have room for a table': meet the 30-somethings fleeing London

Guardian 13th February 2017

Article discussion why people in their 30s are leaving London despite it being voted "the best city in the world" for quality of life last year. Gráinne McLoughlin from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is quoted. She said: “I’m never going to earn enough to buy a place in London. If I didn’t have a permanent academic job in London, I would definitely leave.”

Dr Jennifer Lau discusses Mental Health Week

BBC London 10th February 2017

Dr Jennifer Lau of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) taking part in a panel discussion on issues surrounding mental health. She said: "It's difficult to know whats going on in his head. I imagine a lot of anxiety, a lot of mood problems. Those problems are associated with being bullied. It's a time where mental health problems, anxiety and depression, increase."

Marine A 'at breaking point' when he killed Afghan insurgent, appeal court hears

Telegraph 8th February 2017

A British Royal Marine who killed an injured Afghan prisoner is a "John Wayne" type character who did not realise he had a mental illness at the time of the incident, a court has heard. The first expert witness for Blackman, Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said that up to 25 per cent of British troops would at some point suffer with a mental health difficulty and combat troops were more vulnerable.
Also reported by The Times, The Guardian and Daily Mail.

Smoking cessation services can also help improve mental health

Nursing Standard 8th February 2017

People with depression who successfully quit smoking using smoking cessation services may also improve their mental health. Leonie Brose of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is one of the researchers. Also reported by the Daily Mirror.

Food: Truth or Scare

BBC1 London 7th February 2017

There is a plethora of conflicting information on which foods might be linked to migraines. Neurologist professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) explains what research actually shows. He said: "It's not that food doesn't trigger migraines, but it usually only does so when its combined with other factors, like stress or lack of sleep."

KCL Lecturer Adam Perkins Slammed As ' Racist'

Huffington Post 6th February 2017

Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has apologised for comments made about Donald Trump's travel ban.

Diabetes danger: this complication could cause nerve damage and amputation

Express 2nd February 2017

Article about the complications of diabetes and the implications of diabulimia. Professor Janet Treasure of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: “People with diabetes are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. As 15 to 20 per cent of all young women have an eating disorder and the risk is twice as high in people with Type 1 diabetes this means that up to a third of young women with diabetes develop eating disorders." Also reported by Hindustan Times and Economic Times, India Times.

Scientists to Trump: Torture doesn't work

Science 30th January 2017

Article on torture following remarks by Donald Trump. Metin Basoglu of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: “Our work shows that waterboarding is one of the most traumatic forms of torture. Scientifically, there is no question about this issue … so one cannot administer these techniques and remain within the bounds of the law at the same time.”

From An Enlightenment King To Enlightened Princes: Mental illness And The Royal Family

Huffington Post 30th January 2017

Article written by Professor Sir Simon Wessley of the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry & Neuroscience (IoPPN) about the forthcoming BBC documentary showcasing the Georgian Papers which uncovers the life of King George.

Novel Psychoactive Substances: acute and chronic use

British Medical Journal 28th January 2017

Identifying and managing acute drug related harms and problematic substance misuse cuts across medical specialties. Data suggest that clinicians are seeking readily accessible information on novel psychoactive substances (NPS), incorrectly known as "legal highs." King's College London referenced in the notes.

Novel Psychoactive: types, mechanisms of action, effects

British Medical Journal 28th January 2017

In 2016 the Psychoactive Substances Bill banned trading but not possession of all current and future novel psychoactive substances (NPS), sometimes incorrectly called "legal highs," in an attempt to overcome rapid proliferation of these compounds. King's College London referenced in the notes.

Heads campaigning to raise awareness of hidden autism in girls

Tes 27th January 2017

Experts warn that 'thousands' of girls on autism spectrum might be undiagnosed School leaders, health experts and parents have called for action to address the underdiagnosis of girls with autism. Professor Francesca Happé from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: “Until recently, it was thought that boys outnumbered girls on the spectrum by five or even 10 to one. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest we are missing autism in females, and there are in fact only two or three times as many boys as girls affected.”

Lack of diagnosis of autism in girls - comment from Prof Francesca Happe

BBC Radio 5 Live 26th January 2017

Discussion of lack of diagnosis and false diagnosis of autism in girls, which includes contribution by Professor Francesca Happe from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). She said: "Increasingly we are realising that autism might look somewhat different in girls."

Cardiff University accepts race report after play row

BBC News 25th January 2017

An inquiry was launched at in June last year following reports that face paint was used to impersonate a staff member in a student-led performance at Cardiff University. It caused offence to eight students of African heritage, prompting the review by Prof Dinesh Bhugra from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Prof Bhugra said: "Whilst the university and School of Medicine did their best to deal with this incident in accordance with its established procedures, our report does highlight a number of specific and overarching issues that the university needs to consider and address." Also reported by Daily Mail.

Binge eating and bulimia can be treated by electrically stimulating parts of brain, study finds

Independent 25th January 2017

Key symptoms of bulimia nervosa, including the urge to binge eat and restrict food intake, are reduced by delivering electricity to parts of the brain using non-invasive brain stimulation, according to new research by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Maria Kekic said: ‘Our study suggests that a non-invasive brain stimulation technique suppresses the urge to binge eat and reduces the severity of other common symptoms in people with bulimia nervosa, at least temporarily. We think it does this by improving cognitive control over compulsive features of the disorder." Also reported by Daily Mail, i, the Sun, Daily Mirror.

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Interview with Helen Fisher - immersive art exhibition

BBC World Service 25th January 2017

An immersive art exhibition at Copeland gallery in south London aims to challenge people's perceptions of mental health and normality. Includes interview with Dr Helen Fisher from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). She said "So hearing voices and seeing visons and other unusual sensory perceptions is actually very common in the general population."

Brain anatomy impacts personality - Interview with Prof Marco Catani

BBC World News 25th January 2017

Interview with Professor Marco Catani from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). He said: "It started with a man... and a bar went through his brain, and his personality changed as a result of brain injury."

Genes determine more than one-third of differences between individuals' online behaviour

Financial Times 24th January 2017

Online media use such as social networking and gaming could be strongly influenced by our genes, according to a new study by researchers from King’s College London. Ziada Ayorech from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: ‘Finding that DNA differences substantially influence how individuals interact with the media puts the consumer in the driver’s seat, selecting and modifying their media exposure according to their needs.' Also reported in The Times, Daily Mail, The Times, The Sun, and Xinhuanet English.

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The five lessons I learned from breaking my smartphone

Guardian 24th January 2017

Article about smartphone use which mentions a study by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and Cardiff University, which looked at children and screen usage, found that sleep can even be significantly disturbed by merely having access to the devices.

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Can you hear flashes of light?

Daily Mail 18th January 2017

Some people have the ability to 'hear what they see,' assigning subliminal sounds to silent visual cues. A new study published to the journal Consciousness and Cognition by researchers from City University and King's College in London, has found that roughly one in five people experience auditory sensations when viewing silent stimuli, suggesting it's far more common than previously thought.

Study reveals for first time that talking therapy changes the brain's wiring

BBC Radio 4 Today 17th January 2017

A new study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown for the first time that talking therapy strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later. Dr Liam Mason from the IoPPN said: 'This research challenges the notion that the existence of physical brain differences in mental health disorders somehow makes psychological factors or treatments less important.' Also reported by Huffington Post and Voice of America.

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Mental Health: A Political Vote Loser Or Vote Winner?

Huffington post 17th January 2017

By Graham Thornicroft, Professor at the Centre for Global Mental Health (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London). Until recently it was received political wisdom that mental health issues should remain silent at election time - because there were no votes to be had there. Graham discusses his argument made in his book about stigma ‘Shunned’, research studies all across the world have shown that the most common reaction of people with mental illness is concealment.

Natural selection making 'education genes' rarer, says Icelandic study

Guardian 17th January 2017

Tempting as it may be, it would be wrong to claim that with each generation humans are becoming more stupid. As scientists are often so keen to point out, it is a bit more complicated than that. A study from Iceland is the latest to raise the prospect of a downwards spiral into imbecility. The research from deCODE, a genetics firm in Reykjavik, finds that groups of genes that predispose people to spend more years in education became a little rarer in the country from 1910 to 1975. Robert Plomin, a behavioural geneticist at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, said: “They have already changed science and will soon affect the clinic and society. Although the effect of the polygenic score for educational attainment on fertility is weak and needs replication in populations other than Iceland, this study is a harbinger for the new directions in research that will be possible as bigger and better polygenic scores come online."

With more and more veterans suffering from PTSD, help us to heal the troops with wounds you can’t see

The Sun 17th January 2017

Help For Heroes exec Melanie Waters reveals why it's high time we started talking positively about mental health and our Armed Forces. The article cites recent research by the institute of psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kings College London that shows that of the 757,000 regulars from 1991 to 2014, at least 66,000 will need some kind of support with mental or physical health needs in the years to come.

Netflix: is it every student’s worst addiction?

Guardian 17th January 2017

Article on the addictiveness of TV subscription services. Sally Marlow, public engagement fellow in the addictions department of King's College London, is quoted in the article. She said: “Everyone is familiar with these self-indulgent behaviours. We have friends that eat too much, or have an extra pint at the pub, but these are not necessarily addictions. It is easy to say: ‘I am addicted to chocolate’ or: ‘I am addicted to Netflix,’ but that most certainly does not mean it is true.”

Schizophrenia could be linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes

Hindustan Times 16th January 2017

People with schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are adjusted for, a new study has found. Researchers from King's College London examined whether diabetes risk is already present in people at the onset of schizophrenia, before antipsychotics have been prescribed and before a prolonged period of illness that may be associated with poor lifestyle habits - such as poor diet and sedentary behaviour. Toby Pillinger from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, said: “Our study highlights the importance of considering physical health at the onset of schizophrenia, and calls for a more holistic approach to its management, combining physical and mental healthcare.” Also reported by The Conversation, India Today, NDTV, the Economic Times, and Science Daily.

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Interview with Neil Greenberg

BBC Radio 4 16th January 2017

Interview with Neil Greenberg is a Professor of defence mental health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London

My cure for depression is cheap and tasty with chips

Sunday Times 15th January 2017

Could there be a deliciously simple solution to the epidemic of mental illness that even the prime minister acknowledged last week? The answer may be on our plates. The article notes the research of Carmine Pariante, professor of biological psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Mental health is suffering more than ever in the deepening NHS crisis

Independent 15th January 2017

Collection of letters discussing a variety of topics, including a letter discussing mental health by Dr Philip Timms FRCPsych, honorary senior lecturer, at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, KCL.

Multiplex Disorder

Guardian 13th January 2017

M Night Shyamalan's new movie, Split, stars James McAvoy as a man with 23 personalities. Cinema still hasn't moved on from the stigma of Psycho, says Steve Rose. Movies such as Split can be extremely damaging, argues Dr Simone Reinders, a neuroscientist studying DID at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London in collaboration with universities in the Netherlands.

Mental illness is at last getting the attention, if not the money, it needs

The Economist 13th January 2017

In 2012 the Health and Social Care Act created a legal responsibility for the government to give the same priority to mental health as it gives to physical health. Now the prime minister, Theresa May, has added her voice. The fact that the prime minister herself has chosen to highlight the issue marks an important step, says Graham Thornicroft of King's College London.

Parkinson’s ‘game changer’ – New research says it starts in the gut and NOT the brain

Daily Express 12th January 2017

Scientists have performed a complete about turn on the thinking on the causes of Parkinson's disease, saying the condition may be caused by damage to the gut rather than the brain. Sébastien Paillusson of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London said:"It could be that having the wrong bacteria in your gut triggers inflammation. We know that inflammation makes synuclein more likely to aggregate.”

Young people live in fear of the future

Daily Mirror 9th January 2017

Political upheaval and fears about job prospects have left young people at their least confident in almost a decade, a report shows today. Prof Louise ­Arseneault, mental health leadership fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, believes the report shows a "big shift" in attitudes. Also reported by the Sunday Times, Daily Mail and the Daily Telegraph.

Your choice of life patner is no accident

Science 9th January 2017

Chances are, you're going to marry someone a lot like you. Similar intelligence, similar height, similar body weight. A new study of tens of thousands of married couples suggests that this isn't an accident. Robert Plomin, a behavioral geneticist at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, adds that new research suggests humans with autism, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder tend to marry each other, and that the new method can explore whether those choices, too, are rooted in DNA.

WHO Director-General candidates: where does mental health feature?

Lancet 7th January 2017

Letter regarding the election of a new Director-General of WHO, from Petra C Gronholm, Crick Lund, and Graham Thornicroft, of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Royal Mail postmen are delivering vast amounts of drugs bought on the dark web every day

Daily Mail 6th January 2017

Huge amounts of drugs are being delivered by Royal Mail every day in the UK, an investigation revealed today. Dr Adam Winstock, from the National Addictions Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (King's College London), said millions of pounds of drugs are bought online every day.

Autism diagnosis may raise eyebrows

Metro 5th January 2017

Computer analysis of facial expressions and head movements may help diagnose autism. However, Eric Taylor of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London said the best approach is still observing children in everyday surroundings.

Computer uses facial cues to spot if people have autism

New Scientist 5th January 2017

An algorithm that analyses facial expressions and head movements could help doctors diagnose autism-like conditions and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Eric Taylor at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London welcomes the potential of this as a diagnostic tool for these conditions. But he says the best approach is still observing children in everyday surroundings.

Slavery trafficking victims crippled by fear in UK

Al Jazeera 3rd January 2017

Saved from grips of being trafficked into modern-day slavery, victims suffer severe trauma and struggle to move on. A report published this year by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London found some 40 percent of male victims reported high levels of depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder.

King's press release related to 'Slavery trafficking victims crippled by fear in UK'

Could you benefit from boredom?

US News 3rd January 2017

Article discussing proneness to bordeom, including comment from Wijnand van Tilburg, a lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. Wijnand van Tilburg said: “People who get easily bored are more likely to be depressed, anxious and violent. They eat less healthy, are more likely to drop out of school and may engage in dangerous behavior, such as joy riding or pathological gambling,”

Friendship Bench may help fight mental illness

India Today 2nd January 2017

Friendship Benches - simple wooden seats with trained community "grandmothers" who listen to and support people living with anxiety, depression and other common mental disorders can improve the lives of millions of patients in developing countries, a new study has found. Patients with depression or anxiety who received problem-solving therapy through the Friendship Bench were more than three times less likely to have symptoms of depression after six months, compared to patients who received standard care, according to the researchers from University of Zimbabwe, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kings College London. Also reported by Voice of America.

King's press release related to 'Friendship Bench may help fight mental illness'

Rethinking disorders of empathy

Psychologist 1st January 2017

Article on empathy, mentioning a 2011 study on 'gaze avoidance' from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, led by Geoffrey Bird.

Fierce and hopeful

Psychologist 1st January 2017

Theatre review of play 'Tomorrow I Was Always a Lion', by Helen Fisher of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Seven broken hearts, seven racing minds

Psychologist 1st January 2017

Album review of 'Let Them Eat Chaos', by Lindsey Hines, a post-doctoral researcher and teaching fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

A workout that's all in the mind

Daily Telegraph 27th December 2016

Feature discussing ageing quotes research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), Kings College London. An online brain-training package conducted by researchers at the IoPPN involving almost 7000 people over 50 found that online games that challenged reasoning and memory skills could have significant benefits for older people. After six months, significant improvements were noted on daily living tests, such as managing budgets, navigating public transport and doing the shopping, as well as grammatical reasoning and memory.

Must-read military books of the year

The Times 24th December 2016

Leading figures from the world of military affairs nominate the most compelling book on their subject in 2016, including Professor Sir Simon Wessley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Mind wandering and ADHD

BBC Radio 4 22nd December 2016

Interview with Professor Philip Asherson of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, about the relationship between mind wandering and ADHD.

Toxic pollution in three London areas breaches EU limits

Evening Standard 22nd December 2016

Research from the Environmental Research Group is referenced in an article about London pollution levels.

Uncovering the language of the first Christmas

Conversation 22nd December 2016

Tony Thorne, Visiting Consultant, writes about the language used in traditional accounts of the nativity, and the languages that might have been used by the participants themselves.

Christmas binge drinking increases risk of alcohol dependence

Independent 21st December 2016

Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience explains why people are more likely to drink alcohol over the Christmas period and increased risk of alcoholism.

Dina Asher-Smith: ‘You have to make sacrifices — but I wouldn’t trade this job for the world’

Evening Standard 21st December 2016

Student, Dina Asher-Smith, is interviewed about the sacrifices she has had to make for her athletics career. Dina also spoke to the i.

Putney High Street breached air pollution limits 1,000 times this year

Evening Standard 21st December 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, says 'understanding air pollution hotspots is the first step in addressing the problem,' in an article about London air pollution.

China seen readying for trade war during Trump presidency

Voice of America 21st December 2016

Donald Trump has promised to restrict the role of Chinese goods and currency movements in the American economy. Commenting, Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: 'I am sure that the U.S. under Trump will focus unrelentingly on the exchange rate.'

Swedish start-up tackles air pollution head on

CNN 21st December 2016

A group of Swedish entrepreneurs have created a new air pollution mask which they say is both functional and fashionable. Commenting, Dr Ben Barrett, ERG, said: 'Generally speaking, there are two reasons why mask can or can't work: one is the size of the particles they are able to filter out and the other is the fit on the face. If it's leaking in from the side it's not going to work.'

A study that tracked 1000 people for 35 years reveals the case for giving kids a basic income

Yahoo 20th December 2016

A new study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London makes a strong case that giving families a set amount of money each month to use toward childcare - essentially a basic income for kids - could have profound implications for how disadvantaged children turn out as adults.

Millions face health risk from 'toxic' GM crop

Daily Mail 20th December 2016

A genetically modified crop eaten by millions of people and animals around the world may be unsafe because of previously undetected toxic effects, a study led by researchers at King's has claimed. Dr Michael Antoniou, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, lead author said: 'Our results call for a more thorough evaluation of the safety of NK 603 (maize) consumption on a long term basis'. This was also reported in The Times.

Give a child a book for Christmas and it keeps on giving back

Guardian 20th December 2016

Book recommendations from teachers and authors, including Surely you're joking, Mr Feynman!, which has been recommended by Dan Abramson, the head teacher of King's College London Mathematics School.

2016's parallels with the revolutions of 1848

BBC Radio 4 Today 20th December 2016

Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, give his perspective on how 2016 compares to momentous years of the past, saying that nearest equivalent was 1848, when a series of revolutions broke out one after the other. Also reported on BBC News Online.

Universities must act now and provide refugee scholarships

Huffington Post UK 20th December 2016

Article on refugee scholarships at UK universities. Goldsmiths, University of Sheffield, Manchester Metropolitan, Kings College London and Exeter University are all mentioned to have schemes.

Halving number of foreign students is 'economic self-harm' say universities

Evening Standard 20th December 2016

King's is included as one of the top leading London universities warning the Government that dramatically reducing the number of international students allowed into Britain would be 'economic self-harm.'

The unnoticed trend that worries Europe’s counter-terrorism agencies

Independent 20th December 2016

Research from the ICSR at King's is featured in an article about criminals turning into terrorists and obtaining firearms.

Look before you leap: Don't panic-apply to graduate schemes - think carefully about what you want

Telegraph 20th December 2016

Third year international politics student, Amy Fallon, writes about applying to graduate schemes.

Amid smoggy days in London, growing calls to clean up Europe's toxic air

Washington Post 20th December 2016

Article on pollution in London includes comments from Dr Gary Fuller, ERG. 'It's a complete policy failure. No one could defend this,' he said. Dr Fuller's comments were also reported by South China Morning Post

Why fretting about what to wear could be ruining your life

Daily Mail 19th December 2016

We need to make some big decisions - and yet most of us are hopeless at them. Dr Benjamin Gardner is an expert in behaviour change at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, said: "When we exhaust our willpower, we need to let it rest again, like a muscle."

Ground-breaking digital biblical image project launched

King's press release 19th December 2016

A ground-breaking project of the largest ever online commentary on the Bible through visual images is to be launched by King’s. The Visual Commentary on Scripture (VCS) aims to cover the entire Christian Bible – the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha – with vivid clusters of images, curated by an expert team of scholars providing accompanying commentary.

King's press release related to 'Ground-breaking digital biblical image project launched'

Hitachi building nuclear power in the UK

BBC Radio 4 Today 19th December 2016

Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Greg Clark will visit Japan later this week, with discussions on nuclear power in the UK likely to be on the agenda. Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, comments: ‘What we see with this visit this week is the attempt by the government to create a plan B. There is a lot of doubt still in Whitehall whether Hinkley will be built on time because of the technology and the finances of the company.’

Russian envoy shooting

AFP 19th December 2016

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, discusses the assassination of Russia's envoy to Turkey, and its impact on relations between the two countries. 'It will not substantially disrupt the relationship because the Turks have immediately said they will reinforce the security of the Russian embassy,' she said. Dr Sagramoso's comments appeared in Yahoo, and she was also interviewed for Sky News.

If peace is to be sustainable, it must be inclusive

Huffington World Post 19th December 2016

King's alumna Karlijn Jans, European & International Studies, writes a piece on the role of women in prevention and resolution of conflicts.

Is democracy itself threatened by tech disruption?

Observer 18th December 2016

An article on technology, privacy and democracy refers to a report by Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, which found a way of 'transgressing 150 years of legislation that we’ve developed to make elections fair and open.'

Why pictures trigger memories better than words

Observer 18th December 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director of Science Gallery, explains in his regular column why pictures can trigger a buried memory and recall a precise moment in time much more rapidly than words.

Jihadi John II: British hate preacher’s giant bodyguard appears in ISIS beheading video

Mail on Sunday 18th December 2016

Mohammed Reza Haque, a British extremist who guarded hate cleric Anjem Choudary, has appeared on camera carrying out an execution. Commenting, Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: 'Some people dismissed the radical network that surrounded Anjem Choudary as clownish. Yet scores of individuals, like Haque, from that cluster have travelled to Syria from Britain and now pose a very significant security risk. They're not there to take a back seat.' Also reported in Telegraph, Daily Mirror and the Daily Star.

Cold cases: The detectives on the trail of undiscovered killers

BBC Online 18th December 2016

Article looking at the use of forensics in cold cases. Dr David Ballard, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘At the moment, that nuclear DNA that we normally find in the hair root is so degraded and so poor quality on a hair shaft that there is no way that we can normally get a result.' Dr Ballard's comments were also reported on Sky News.

The Brexit effect

BBC News 17th December 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, participates in a panel to discuss the future of UK in a post-Brexit Europe. Discussing the single market, he says: ‘It isn’t about tariffs, it’s about regulatory equivalence, it’s about saying we accept your laws.'

Fears new definition of anti-semitism will stifle criticism of Israel

Guardian 17th December 2016

A letter to editor, co-signed by actors, holocaust survivors and academics, including King’s researchers, discusses new definitions of anti-Semitism.

Who are Russia's cyber-warriors and what should the West do about them?

Telegraph 17th December 2016

Western intelligence services and cyber security firms say they have identified two particular groups involved in the hacking of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) during the US elections. 'Thinking of them as glorified bank scammers would be a big mistake', says Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies.

Study backs sugar tax and targets sweets

Guardian 16th December 2016

A tax on sugar in soft drinks will prevent tens of thousands of people from becoming dangerously overweight, but the obesity crisis will only be solved if ministers take action against the sales of sweets and chocolate, experts said. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘This is a very small reduction in energy intake – equivalent to the amount of energy expended by one minute of brisk walking.’ He added that some of the predictions about improvements in health ‘hard to swallow’. Also reported by the Independent and BBC News

Berlin terror attack

Various media outlets 16th December 2016

King's academics have commented following the truck attack on a Christmas market in Berlin. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), was quoted in New York Times, and interviewed for CNN and PBS. Research from the ICSR was mentioned in a separate article for the New York Times. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, discussed the attacks on Sky News and ITV News.

Diabulimia: The hidden eating disorder that's killing diabetic women

Independent 15th December 2016

Article on people with diabetes and eating disorders. The article reports that at King's College London, a new unit aims to unite psychiatrists and diabetes experts in a bit to treat both conditions. Professor Khalida Ismail, who leads the clinic said: "They never meet patients together and it's an inefficient use of current resources. I would argue we'd actually be saving money by joining up services."

Children who spend hours glued to their smartphones are more likely to be sleep deprived and obese

Daily Mail 15th December 2016

A major study led by experts at Harvard School of Public Health in the US found children who used their tablet or smartphone for more than five hours a day had a 43 per cent increased chance of becoming obese. The article includes research by Dr Ben Carter of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, which found that children and teenagers who use an electronic device within 90 minutes of going to bed are twice as likely to get insufficient sleep - and are nearly three times as likely to feel sleepy during the day.

King's press release related to 'Children who spend hours glued to their smartphones are more likely to be sleep deprived and obese'

Obesity in adolescents increases risk of heart disease

King's press release 15th December 2016

A new study published in BMJ Open has found a link between obesity in adolescents and their risk of developing heart disease in early adulthood, regardless of ethnicity. People of South Asian or Black African descent are known to have a four and three-fold higher risk of diabetes compared with White Europeans. Black African and Black Caribbean girls are more likely to be overweight and Indian girls are also known to have larger waists in childhood compared to their white, British counterparts.

King's press release related to 'Obesity in adolescents increases risk of heart disease'

Do humans need dairy? Here's the science

Conversation 15th December 2016

Sophie Medlin, Diabetes and Nutrition Sciences, discusses the latest research on dairy in the diet. ‘Continuing to produce lactase into adulthood is actually an inherited genetic variation which has become so common because being able to tolerate milk has a selective advantage,’ she said. This was also published by Independent.

Three-parent babies could be funded by the NHS from next year: UK regulator will decide on controversial fertility treatment today

Daily Mail 15th December 2016

Coverage of the decision on fertility treatment that will help couples with genetic diseases to conceive. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, is quoted describing the recent birth of a baby with three parents as ‘revolutionary’. This was also reported by Metro.

Review of 2016: a year of challenges and triumphs for nurses

Nursing Standard 15th December 2016

A review of the year in the nursing profession. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing and Midwifery, is quoted in the article.

Revenge of the experts

Prospect 15th December 2016

Prospect's 16th Think Tank Awards are discussed. The winner of the 'One-to-Watch' award was 'The UK in a Changing Europe', a new network of specialists, which is based at King's.

Special investigation of mental health in students

BBC Radio 5 live 15th December 2016

Chris Shelley, Director of Student Services, is part of a panel discussing student mental health. The programme also looks at a new pilot scheme at King’s in which second and third year students make calls to first year students to offer support and services where needed.

After 50 years, it's time to close the gap between different human rights

Conversation 15th December 2016

A piece by Koldo Casla, European and International Studies, who writes about different human rights treaties. ‘There are three degrees of separation between the two sets of rights: different treaties that states could pick and choose from, different legal wording, and different accountability mechanisms,’ he said.

Aleppo and the Syrian conflict

Various media outlets 14th December 2016

Academics across King’s have been commenting on the ongoing conflict in Syria: Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, spoke to Independent; Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, was interviewed by BBC News and Al Jazeera; Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, spoke to Al Jazeera; Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), commented on BBC Radio 4, and an article written by Dr Maher on the humanitarian crisis was republished by New Statesman.

Londoners 'take more cocaine on weekdays than other Europeans'

Guardian 14th December 2016

Research looking at the drugs consumed by major European cities has suggested that Londoners take more drugs during the weekdays than other cities. Dr Leon Barron, Forensics, who provided the London data said this was because of the time it took for users to excrete the metabolites of their drugs: ‘If you think about cocaine, the maximum concentration that you will excrete in your urine will take about two hours or so for that to come out.’ This was also reported by the Telegraph.

Soon robots could be taking your job interview

Guardian 14th December 2016

In a piece about robots conducting job interviews, Dr Mathew Howard, Informatics, is quoted: ‘We find that people often prefer to interact with something that’s not real; it’s all about reducing the cognitive load.’

The future of news

BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking 14th December 2016

Discussion of the changes in media, the rise in distrust of mainstream sources and increase in fake news. Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, is interviewed.

The Raj delusion

Prospect 14th December 2016

Review of a book on British rule in India authored by Dr Jon Wilson, History.

Brain tests predict children's futures

BBC News 13th December 2016

Brain tests at the age of three appear to predict a child's future chance of success in life, say researchers. Researchers from Kings College London and Duke University in North Carolina followed more than 1,000 children from pre-school to the age of 38 to see if it was possible to forecast who would lead troubled lives. Also reported by Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Sun, Yahoo, The Week, Sky News, and Channel 4 News.

King's press release related to 'Brain tests predict children's futures'

Charles Bonnet Syndrome

BBC Radio 4 13th December 2016

Dr Dominic Ffytche of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London is interviewed in feature about Charles Bonnet syndrome.

Brexit

BBC News 13th December 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, comments as part of a special panel discussing Brexit.

Kidnapping for ransom works like a market. How it is organised is surprising

Washington Post 13th December 2016

Dr Anja Shortland, Political Economy, writes a piece on the business of kidnapping. ‘There are three important factors that make transactions between kidnappers and ransomers difficult — problems of trust, problems of bargaining and problems of execution,’ she said.

When the price is right: Drug costing and NICE approval

British Medical Journal 12th December 2016

Professor Richard Sullivan, King’s Centre for Global Health, comments in an article looking at pricing in the pharmaceutical industry. ‘For many pharmaceutical companies trying to get access to the UK market, the view now is we’ve got the process—we’ve just got to go through it. Now that the old CDF has come to an end—and thank goodness it has, because it was a dreadful waste of time and taxpayers’ money—they know what these drugs are worth, and they are putting them through at a price they know will meet NICE’s threshold.’

Scandal and geopolitics Gangnam style: The impeachment of Park Geun-hye

Spectator 12th December 2016

Professor David Martin Jones, War Studies, writes on the impeachment of Park Geun-hye. He comments: ‘The current government’s loss of face, however, comes at a particularly bad time coinciding, as it does, with increased tensions on the Korean peninsula.’

‘One China’ policy

BBC World Service 12th December 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, comments on the ‘One China’ policy. ‘The… policy has been the policy of the United States really since 1972…Trump is the first American President who has really questioned this,’ he said. Professor Brown also commented for Newsweek and Independent.

Are Christians being targeted in Egypt?

Al Jazeera 12th December 2016

Following attacks in Egypt, Dr Carool Kersten, Theology & Religious Studies, comments. ‘The exact timing is obviously to coincide with Sunday Mass and with the maximum amount of damage,’ he said.

Mongolia has record growth followed by economic crisis

Globo 12th December 2016

Article discussing the Mongolian economy includes comments by Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute.

About 4.6mn in India suffer from dementia, says expert

Times of India 11th December 2016

Nearly 4.6 million people in the country suffer from dementia, a condition where the patients suffer from memory loss and difficulties in problem-solving, said Dr Martin Prince. Dr Martin Prince is a Professor of Epidemiological Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College, United Kingdom and Co-director of Centre for Global Mental Health.

‘Goodness’ in fiction

BBC Radio 4 11th December 2016

A discussion about the way ‘goodness’ is represented in novels includes an interview with Dr Jon Day, English, who is a judge for this year’s Man Booker Prize.

‘Dopplegangers’

BBC World Service 11th December 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, comments on the nature of ‘dopplegangers’ after he appeared in a Channel 4 programme. ‘The idea that we all have someone else out there who looks…just like us…I think is quite fascinating,’ he said.

Obituary of Costas Nikolaos Stefanis

Lancet 10th December 2016

Obituary of Costas Nikolaos Stefanis, former Greek Health Minister and leader in Greek psychiatry. Nick Bouras, who trained under Stefanis and is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London, is quoted in the article.

A neuroscientist explains: The mental benefits of art history

Observer 10th December 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery London, writes about why we should keep the art history A Level. ‘Studying art can have a dramatic effect on our brain activity, too. What we know changes how we look at things and this is easy to prove in the art world,’ he said.

Labour has been written off before, but could it really be finished this time?

Independent 10th December 2016

Article looking at the Labour party mentions a seminar at King’s given by George Osborne on the history of the Treasury since 1945, in which he was asked by the students for his views on the state of politics.

Women in Greek and Roman myths

BBC Radio 4 10th December 2016

Dr Edith Hall, Classics, comments on the portrayal of angry and vengeful women in Greek and Roman myths.

US election and Russian hacking

BBC World News 10th December 2016

Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, comments on accusations that Russian hacking took place during the US election. ‘The CIA and its sister agencies have been developing a strong evidence base, so they can say in public with some certainty that somehow Russia is involved,’ he said.

Russian and US foreign policy

BBC World Service 10th December 2016

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, comments on Russian-US relations. ‘The Russian government under Putin has a history of interfering in elections beyond its borders,’ she said. Dr Sagramoso also spoked to Sky News and BBC News.

New test to identify risk of diabetes in pregnancy

King's press release 9th December 2016

In a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, a team of researchers led by King’s have successfully developed a method that more accurately identifies those obese women at high risk of gestational diabetes, than what is currently being used. Dr Sara White, Women’s Health, said: ‘Clinical use of these tests would enable prompt intervention and correctly target those at highest risk and therefore most likely to benefit.’

King's press release related to 'New test to identify risk of diabetes in pregnancy'

Hong Kong leader Leung Chun-ying: Cunning wolf or loyal government servant?

South China Morning Post 9th December 2016

Hong Kong's leader Leung Chun-ying announced that he is not running for a second term. It is mentioned that Leung is an alumnus of King's.

After the referendum, the people, not parliament, are sovereign

Financial Times 9th December 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, writes about sovereignty, and suggests that the most dangerous threat to democracy comes from a passive electorate. ‘There is an irony at the heart of the case. The ‘Brexiteers’ hoped to restore sovereignty. Yet that is now undermined not by Europe, but by the people through the referendum.’

Corbyn considering radical plan to ban petrol car sales

Independent 9th December 2016

Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party is considering radical plans to ban the sale of new petrol cars in the UK. Article mentions a King’s study that suggested up to 10,000 people die prematurely in London every year due to toxic air, caused largely by traffic on the city’s streets. This was also reported by BBC London and London Evening Standard.

How Pakistan's Gwadar port is an attractive business option for China

Daily Mail 9th December 2016

Professor Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, writes about Chinese involvement in Pakistan. ‘China has always been keen on gaining a strategic toehold in the Arabian Sea and Gwadar has been an attractive option,’ he said.

BBC World News:

BBC World News 8th December 2016

A new study has found that patients suffering from conditions like Psychosis and Bipolar disorder could in fact be the result of an immune disorder. Tom Pollack, psychiatrist at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London and one of the authors of the study, is interviewed. Also reported on BBC 2.

Londoners' immune systems 'weakened by capital's toxic air'

Evening Standard 8th December 2016

Hundreds of thousands of Londoners may be having their immune system slowly aggravated by toxic diesel fumes, Dr Ian Mudway, Environmental Research Group, has warned. He said: ‘In individuals with pre-existing lung disease the contaminants within the air we breathe can have immediate tangible effects, such as symptomatic ‘flare-ups’ during pollution episodes.’

Modernist dream, dystopian nighmare: The ups and downs of tower blocks

Independent 8th December 2016

Article on tower blocks mentions that Alice Coleman’s report into the state of council housing directly informed Thatcher’s overhaul of social housing policy. Coleman was head of the Land Use Research Unit at King’s in the 1980s.

Speak to immigrant students like me before you ‘deprioritise’ them

Guardian 8th December 2016

An opinion piece on immigration written by first-year student Sharon Akaka. ‘If Mrs. May revises her ‘deprioritisation’ idea, now she is prime minister, I would urge her first to speak to some of the hardworking and aspirational young people whose futures and careers she would be blighting,’ she said. Sharon is the recipient of a sanctuary scholarship at King’s.

How much of the Obama doctrine will survive Trump?

The New Yorker 8th December 2016

Article on Obama's military policies quotes Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies. 'Obama seems to prefer waging war in the shadows with a light footprint and if possible limited public scrutiny,' he said.

Rosalind Franklin

BBC World Service Witness 8th December 2016

As part of the 100 Women Week campaign, Rosalind Franklin, is profiled on her work in DNA. Commenting, Dr Christine Kenyon Jones, English, said: 'She worked for years on this problem...and she didn't feel ready to jump to conclusions.'

Why the death of an Indian politician is sparking fears of mass suicide

Vice 8th December 2016

The former Tamil Nadu chief minister in India, Jayalalithaa, has died. Commenting, Dr Kriti Kapila, India Institute, said: ‘Her popularity was based to a very large extent on her policy measures—a near universal healthcare coverage scheme in the state, food security, and other more explicitly populist measures...aimed at the disadvantaged sections of the population.’

Smoking while pregnant makes your child more likely to use cannabis as a teenager

Daily Mail 7th December 2016

Scientists also discovered they would be more prone to substance abuse in general - one of the leading preventable causes of death worldwide. Researchers from King's College London and the University of Bristol assessed the risk of smoking on the developing foetus. Lead researcher Dr Charlotte Cecil, from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, said: "Together, our findings add to existing knowledge about the adverse effects of prenatal smoking on child health. The study also lends new insights into the biological mechanisms through which tobacco smoking during pregnancy may increase risk for future substance use."
Also reported by The Conversation.

King's press release related to 'Smoking while pregnant makes your child more likely to use cannabis as a teenager'

ADHD

BBC Radio 4 7th December 2016

ADHD tends to be characterised by difficulties in concentrating, impulsivity and hyper activity but could excessive mind wandering be at its core? Philip Ascherson, Professor of Clinical and Molecular Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London comments.

Wellcome invests £12M in Imaging research at King's

King's press release 7th December 2016

Wellcome has announced that King’s has been awarded £12.1 million for a Wellcome Trust/EPSRC Centre for Imaging, which will focus on the science and translation of medical imaging and related computational modelling. Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Provost (Health), said: 'This award is hugely encouraging and emphasises the importance of multi-and inter-disciplinary working, which is a key aspect of the university's new research strategy.’

King's press release related to 'Wellcome invests £12M in Imaging research at King's'

George Osborne on the power of politics for good

Independent 7th December 2016

Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, has written a piece on George Osborne’s recent visit to King’s. Osborne spoke at the ‘Treasury and Economic History since 1945’ course, taught by Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, and Visiting Professor Nick Macpherson, Policy Institute.

Twin research

Channel 4 Finding My Twin Stranger 7th December 2016

The Department of Twin Research, led by Professor Tim Spector, features in a programme whereby ordinary members of the public try to find their ‘twin stranger.’

Paris pollution 'worst for 10 years' as smog causes travel chaos

Sky News 7th December 2016

Paris is said to be suffering its worst winter pollution for at least a decade, with the French capital clouded by thick smog and gripped by travel chaos. Experts at King's said air flowing into London was forecast to have travelled up through France and close to Paris. This was also reported by Evening Standard.

UK’s ‘juggernaut’ HE bill may crush university autonomy, warn peers

Times Higher Education Supplement 7th December 2016

The UK government’s higher education bill has been criticised by peers, with Conservative, Labour, Lib Dem and crossbench figures all joining the attack. Crossbench peer Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, carried out a review of vocational education for the government in 2011. She said the bill ‘proposes a dramatic change in how government relates to our universities…for the worse.’ This was also reported by BBC Radio 4 (23:43).

University Awards 2017: The judges

Guardian 7th December 2016

Visiting Professor Kalwant Bhopal, School of Education, Communication & Society, will be a judge at the University Awards 2017.

Sadiq Khan just doubled funding to tackle London’s filthy air

Wired 7th December 2016

Sadiq Khan has announced that £875 million will be invested in cleaning up the capital’s fetid air through to 2021/22, doubling the £425 million previously committed. Nearly 9,500 premature deaths a year have been linked to air pollution in the city, according to a study carried out by researchers at King’s.

Trump picks Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad-a ‘friend’ of China’s leader-as Beijing ambassador

Washington Post 7th December 2016

President-elect Donald Trump has selected Terry Branstad, the long-serving Republican governor of Iowa, as ambassador to China. Commenting, Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: 'You definitely need someone who's going to get direct access to the president and get the president's attention.'

Aleppo

BBC World Service 7th December 2016

Bill Park, Defence Studies, comments on the conflict in Syria, following news that the Syrian Government has advanced into Aleppo. 'The more restricted and small the area gets, the more fierce the fighting can be,' he said.

Donald Trump's tough guys in defence

Newsweek 7th December 2016

Dr Heather Williams, War Studies, comments on Newsweek's podcast, discussing Michael Flynn and James Mattis, who were recently announced by Donald Trump as national security adviser and defense secretary, respectively. 'The only certainty that this President-elect is showing is uncertainty,' she said.

Brexit vote comes with risks for English city home to Nissan plant

NPR 7th December 2016

Following a vote to leave the EU, Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, commented on the impact on businesses in the UK. 'Some companies...have already started to either close all operations, move jobs to other countries in the European Union,' he said.

Brexit vote comes with risks for English city home to Nissan plant

NPR 7th December 2016

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, comments on the impact of Brexit on industries in the UK. 'Some companies...have already started to either close all operations, move jobs to other countries in the European Union,' he said.

How I cured my decision fatigue

Daily Telegraph 6th December 2016

Helen Russell looks at the ways that science suggests we can streamline our thinking. Features comment from Dr Benjamin Gardner, an expert in behaviour change at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Your vote does not matter! Lawyers for anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller claim it's 'legally impossible' that the EU referendum gave the decision to the people

Daily Mail 6th December 2016

Theresa May could force a new 'one-line' bill through Parliament to trigger Brexit if judges write off the result of the EU referendum as 'legally irrelevant'. The article quotes a tweet by Professor Andrea Biondi, Law, and mentions Dame Mary Arden who sits on the Advisory Board for the Centre.

Theresa May's policy will cost Britain its single market membership, economists warn

Independent 6th December 2016

Theresa May’s insistence that Britain should impose controls on freedom of movement means the UK will by definition leave the single market, a panel of economists have told MPs. Professor Martin Weale, School of Management & Business, said: ‘I share the view that Britain’s economic interest would be served by remaining in the single market.’

Extremism

BBC1 BBC News 6th December 2016

The Metropolitan Police has welcomed a promise by some of the world's biggest technology companies to work together to stop the spread of extremist content online. Speaking of ISIS, Charlie Winter, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘They’ll be looking very closely at how this policy gets implemented.’ He also spoke to BBC Radio 4 (07:15) and BBC Radio 5 live (09:05).

Article 50

Sky News 6th December 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discusses the Supreme Court appeal on the triggering of Article 50. He said: ‘There are complex legal arguments on both sides.’ Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, also spoke to BBC Radio 5 live (11:08).

Xi Jinping to visit Davos for World Economic Forum

Financial Times 6th December 2016

The World Economic Forum is preparing to welcome Xi Jinping to its annual meeting in January, in what would be the first such appearance by a Chinese president. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘It demonstrates just how much ambition China has to the outside world now, and how Xi is the carrier of that.’

What Theresa May's Christmas plans tell us about her faith

Guardian 5th December 2016

Article on Theresa May’s Christian faith. Dr Eliza Filby, History, said: ‘Margaret Thatcher set out a biblical justification for neoliberal economics. There’s no way May would do that.’

Price of sugary soft drinks could rise by 8p a can when tax introduced

Guardian 5th December 2016

The cost of a can of cola, lemonade or Red Bull is likely to rise by about 8p, while a two-litre bottle of any high-sugar soft drink will go up by 48p, once the government’s sugar levy comes into force. Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Because the increase in cost is so small [6p to 8p per 330 ml], it is highly unlikely to deter consumption among children and young adults.’

Homer's Iliad

BBC World Service Forum 5th December 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, is one of the expert guests on BBC's Forum, discussing why Homer's Iliad is still so important. 'I think it is the dawn of the branch of Greek philosophy that we call ethics. I think that it is 24 amazing books of moral philosophy,' she said.

China fury over Trump’s Taiwan call

Various media outlets 4th December 2016

China has lodged a diplomatic protest with the US State Department after Donald Trump broke with almost four decades of American foreign policy to talk to the president of Taiwan. Speaking to the Times, Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘It’s the first real thing that Trump has done and it’s the most incendiary.’ He also commented for BBC News, BBC Radio 5 live (21:02), BBC Radio 4 (17:02) and CNN.

Sturgeon's SNP in race storm as English politician is told to 'go home' by party member

Daily Express 4th December 2016

Nicola Sturgeon's Scottish National Party has been called upon to stamp out increasing hostility after Professor Adam Tomkins, an English member of the Scottish parliament claims he was told to ‘go home’ by a member of the party. It is mentioned that Professor Tomkins used to teach at King’s.

Google, democracy and the truth about internet search

Guardian 4th December 2016

Article about 'fake news'. Dr Martin Moore, Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, said: ‘There’s large-scale, statistically significant research into the impact of search results on political views.’

‘Tis the season of dancing animals - but why do humans love them?

Guardian 4th December 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery Director, explains why humans are captivated by dancing animals. ‘We identify with animal movement because the wiring that connects our limbs to our spines is so similar,’ he said.

Depression genes 'trap generations in poverty cycle'

The Times 3rd December 2016

Poverty is biologically entrenched because people with a tendency to depression have children together and then fail to look after them properly, an academic has claimed. The study comes a year after another lecturer, at King's College London, faced criticism for arguing that the welfare state had created a social class that was genetically and psychologically "employment-resistant". Depression genes 'trap generations in poverty cycle'

Parkinson's: we're looking in the wrong place

New Scientist 3rd December 2016

The disease could start in the gut not the brain, finds Clare Wilson. Sebastien Paillusson at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, Neuroscience, King's College London is quoted. He said: "It could be that having the wrong bacteria in your gut triggers inflammation. We know that inflammation makes synuclein more likely to aggregate."

Books

Financial Times 3rd December 2016

A review of a book by Dr Srinath Raghavan, King’s India Institute.

Turn off that TV and go outside: Getting enough sunshine as a teenager can reduce chance of needing glasses as an adult by a fifth

Daily Mail 2nd December 2016

A study has confirmed that UV light from being outdoors in the sun could notably cut the risk of being short-sighted, by around 20 per cent as a teenager and up to 30 per cent over a lifetime. Study co-author Dr Katie Williams, Diabetes, said: ‘Our study shows that spending more time outside, particularly in younger life, reduces your chance of developing short-sightedness.’

MPs’ mental health

BBC Radio 4 Today 2nd December 2016

MPs are going to be questioned by researchers to assess their mental health. Chief amongst them is said to be Visiting Professor Dan Poulter, Policy Institute, former health minister. He said: ‘I have seen in my time in Parliament colleagues who clearly are struggling.’ Professor Graham Thornicroft, IoPPN, said: ‘There are a number of factors which suggest that people working in these high-pressure jobs may actually face mental health problems more often than the whole population.’ (06:38)

Ten to watch

i 2nd December 2016

TV guide features ‘Finding My Twin Stranger’, a programme on Channel 4 next Wednesday featuring Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology.

King's Health Partners awarded Cancer Research UK Centre status

King's press release 2nd December 2016

King's Health Partners, of which King's is a major partner, has been awarded Cancer Research UK Centre status following a national competition.

King's press release related to 'King's Health Partners awarded Cancer Research UK Centre status'

TransCampus Network receives €5million grant

King's press release 2nd December 2016

The TransCampus network between King’s and Technische Universität Dresden (TUD) has been awarded a five million euro grant from the German National Research Foundation for diabetes research. Professor Stefan Bornstein, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, who is the TransCampus Dean, said: ‘We have to seek new avenues in order to sufficiently address this prevalent disease of modern society.’

King's press release related to 'TransCampus Network receives €5million grant'

Temperatures plunge to -10C as health officials warn sub-zero weather and toxic smog cloud could be deadly over the coldest weekend of the season

Daily Mail 2nd December 2016

Article on the weather mentions that the Environmental Research Group (ERG) described air pollution as 'high' on 30 November due to an area of high pressure over the UK, resulting in calm, settled and cold conditions and poor dispersal of local pollutants. Huffington Post reported that Londoners were warned not to drive on Monday, as air pollution levels in the city soared. According to London Air, an air pollution monitoring site run ERG, the forecast for Monday and Tuesday included moderate air pollution. This was also reported by Independent.

Ed Balls should capitalise on his newfound fame – the country would vote Labour if he were the next leader

Independent 2nd December 2016

Article on Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute. He was also featured in Daily Mail, Independent, Guardian and i.

Who is Sarah Olney, how did she win the Richmond Park by-election and how did Zac Goldsmith lose?

Daily Mirror 2nd December 2016

Article on Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Olney, Alumna, who won the Richmond by-election. This was also reported by Financial Times and a separate print piece.

Is it time to ban sales of new diesel cars in London?

Evening Standard 2nd December 2016

Article mentions that according to a recent report by the Institute for Public Policy Research, Greenpeace and King’s, diesel cars are emitting 40 per cent of London’s NO2 and particulate PM10 emissions.

Tiny minority of people with depression get treatment, study finds

Guardian 1st December 2016

Only a small minority of people with depression across the world, just one in 27 in the poorest countries, receive even minimally adequate treatment for their condition, a major study has found. Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (King's College London), Harvard Medical School and the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that even in wealthy countries only one in five people with depression received adequate treatment. Prof Graham Thornicroft from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, who led the study, said: “We call on national and international organisations to make adequate resources available for scaling up the provision of mental health services so that no one with depression is left behind. Our results indicate that much treatment currently offered to people with depression falls far short of the criteria for evidence-based and effective treatment. Providing treatment at the scale required to treat all people with depression is crucial, not only for decreasing disability and death by suicide, but also from a moral and human rights perspective, and to help people to be fully productive members of society.”
Also reported by Voice of America, NDTV, and National Public Radio (NPR).

King's press release related to 'Tiny minority of people with depression get treatment, study finds'

A fitting tribute for World AIDS Day

The Psychologist 1st December 2016

Dr Sally Marlow reports from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience LGBT film night.

Parents warned over taking babies outside in London as air pollution levels soar

Evening Standard 1st December 2016

Parents in London have been advised to ‘take care’ when taking their baby outside because of toxic air pollution levels. Yesterday, experts at King’s, using the EU limits, put air pollution at ‘high’ in Brent mid-morning and ‘moderate’ in Sutton, Westminster, the City, Lambeth, Croydon and Ealing. Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, said: ‘If we really want to do more to improve public health we would follow the WHO guidelines.’

Julia Gillard on tackling sexism against female leaders

Times Higher Education Supplement 1st December 2016

Visiting Professor Julia Gillard, Policy Institute, discusses making the internet safe for women and helping universities prepare for change. She said: ‘The original conception of a university meant it had a monopoly that came with place: you went to a university you physically could get to.’

How an 'open relationship' with Israel would serve India well

Daily Mail 1st December 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on India's relationship with Israel. ‘Israel has been a good friend of India but Delhi continues to be shy of demonstrating its friendship,’ he said.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan issues air quality alerts across capital

BBC News Online 1st December 2016

Air quality alerts have been issued across the capital by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan for the first time. King's air quality network describes air pollution in London as ‘high’ due to an area of high pressure over the UK resulting in calm, settled and cold conditions and poor dispersal of local pollutants. Dr David Green, ERG, said: ‘Letting people know about the problem is very important.’ This was reported by BBC News Online, Daily Mail, Telegraph, New York Times, Washington Post and ABC News.

Rauschenberg - Performance, Identity and the Writings of Erving Goffman

BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking 1st December 2016

Feature on the concept of self with contribution from Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director. He said: ‘I think that the thing that reminds us that we are ourselves is our bodies.’ (22:00).

The Investigatory Powers Act

BBC Radio 4 The Briefing Room 1st December 2016

Members of the UK's upper house of Parliament have given final approval to the Investigatory Powers Act, giving Government agencies unprecedented powers to collect user information in bulk and access data about visited websites. Visiting Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, said: ‘I hope listeners won’t underestimate how seismic a shift this is.’ (20:00). Speaking to Al Jazeera, Dr Mark Coté, Digital Humanities, said: 'No one should be forced to live in full transparency, or be compelled to share our data without control.'

Opec

BBC Radio 4 Today 1st December 2016

Opec has agreed to its first cut in production in eight years. Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, said: ‘I think we’ll see the US shale industry reacting to this by keeping production up.’ (17:00)

'Paucity of evidence' behind advice to drink lots of water when ill

Telegraph 1st December 2016

Telling people to drink lots of water when they are poorly is nothing more than an old wives’ tale, according to a case report in the British Medical Journal. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Patients should be provided with an adequate supply of water by their beds which they should be encouraged to drink or helped to drink.’

As Assad Pushes into Aleppo, Rebellion's Future Unclear

Voice of America 1st December 2016

The Syrian army's push into rebel-held areas of Aleppo continues, and entire districts of Syria's largest city have been returning to government control for the first time in years. Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, said: ‘The loss of eastern Aleppo in its entirety would signal the beginning of the end of the rebellion, definitely.’

Breadth of study

Times Higher Educational Supplement 1st December 2016

Letter regarding the concerns of academics from King's and the University of Cambridge that the return to linear A levels would have a negative impact on the number of girls taking up science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects.

Medical experts' warning over Asperger's 'hacker' Lauri Love

Daily Mail 30th November 2016

The Asperger's suffered by an alleged computer hacker is so acute he is 'not aware of the consequences' of his actions, the country's leading autism expert warns. Another expert, Dr Michael Kopelman, emeritus professor of neuropsychiatry at King's College London, found that Mr Love was clinically depressed, suffering from bouts of 'severe [depression] with some psychotic symptoms'.

Should universities take control of schools? The government thinks so

Guardian 30th November 2016

Article on universities sponsoring schools in exchange for raising fees cites the King’s Maths School as a successful example.

Forest Fringe to take over Somerset House for a weekend of performance and conversation

Evening Standard 30th November 2016

Experimental performance company Forest Fringe will hold a weekend of participatory events at Somerset House next weekend. On the Saturday morning, artists, performers and writers will talk about how we remember performance, with contributions including from Professor Alan Read, English.

Heritage homes to boast about

Evening Standard 30th November 2016

An article on property mentions a mansion in Hampstead that was part of a wider estate later bought by King’s.

Britain’s first ‘three-parent babies’ could be born in 2018

Financial Times 30th November 2016

A final scientific review has given a green light for British doctors to carry out mitochondrial replacement, which creates babies with DNA from three people in order to avoid genetic disease. Member of the review panel Professor Frances Flinter, Medical Genetics, said: ‘We expect the first applications to come from Newcastle University, where they have huge experience looking after patients with mitochondrial disease.’ This was also reported by New Scientist.

Defining feminism

BBC World Service 30th November 2016

Dr Christina Scharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries (CMCI), discusses the difficulties in defining feminism and what others perceive it to mean. 'I find it really difficult to define feminism, and that's not because I don’t identify as a feminist...but I think there is something to leave the term open,' she said.

Apprenticeships seen as a backwards step

Nursing Standard 30th November 2016

The announcement of nursing degree apprenticeships has been criticised as an 'act of amnesia' by a leading academic. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Adult Nursing, said: ‘Who is coordinating this policy and assuring quality and safety for the public in developing new routes to registration?’ She was also quoted in Nursing Standard about the impact of Brexit on nursing.

'Hormonal link' between brain and liver may offer new treatment for dealing with problem drinkers

Independent 29th November 2016

A hormonal link between the liver and brain that regulates alcohol consumption may help scientists develop new treatments for problem drinkers, according to new research. Professor Gunter Schumann from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London is quoted. Also reported by the Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Sun, Times, Express, Telegraph, Evening Standard and BBC Radio 4.

King's press release related to ''Hormonal link' between brain and liver may offer new treatment for dealing with problem drinkers'

What a legal recreational drug market would look like in the UK

Vice 29th November 2016

It's been an eventful month for British drug policy. A couple of weeks ago, the British Medical Journal came out in support of the legalization of all narcotics, saying that "the war on drugs had failed and that there is an imperative to investigate more effective alternatives to criminalization of drug use and supply." Robin Murray, professor of psychiatric research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, once suggested that "we could prevent almost one quarter of cases of psychosis if no one smoked high potency cannabis."

Dina Asher-Smith believes extra muscle can power her into sprinting elite

Guardian 29th November 2016

Article on third-year student and athlete Dina Asher-Smith, History. Speaking about whether she is aiming for a first in her degree, she said: ‘I’m going for it and it’s not unattainable but there’s a lot of juggling and stress so I have to be realistic.’ She also spoke to BBC News and BBC Radio 4 (10:49).

Healthcare clean up of urban environment means tackling pollution at source

Financial Times 29th November 2016

Article discussing air pollution. Speaking about personal pollution monitors, Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, said: ‘Provision of accurate, personal air quality information to the individual is within our grasp in some major cities such as London, where there is knowledge of air pollution at a relatively fine scale.’

Older carers 'risk their own health'

Daily Express 29th November 2016

Looking after sick loved ones is taking its toll on the health of elderly carers, a charity has warned. Jo Moriarty, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, said: ‘Support for carers is predicated on carers not having health problems of their own.’

The 11 UK universities which produce the most employable graduates

Independent 29th November 2016

Article on the Times Higher Education's newly-released ‘Global Employability Index’, a global ranking of universities which produce the most employable graduates. King’s is ranked 4th.

Nicole Kidman interview: 'My new movie is a love letter to my adopted children'

Daily Telegraph 29th November 2016

Interview with actress Nicole Kidman mentions her role in the play ‘Photograph 51’ where she played Rosalind Franklin, Alumna, whose work at King’s led to the discovery of the DNA double helix.

Bus stops designed to fight killer pollution in London

Evening Standard 29th November 2016

Pollution-fighting bus stops have been designed to zap exhaust fume particles and pump out fresh air for pedestrians. Independent tests on the Airlabs system were conducted in Marylebone Road by the Environmental Research Group at King’s.

DNA editing accelerates along controversial healthcare path

Financial Times 29th November 2016

Genome editing vastly increases the speed and efficiency with which scientists can cut and paste DNA in living cells, making it possible to add or remove genes in ways that were impractical with the previous hit-or-miss ‘recombinant DNA’ methods. Professor Karen Yeung, Law, said: ‘Genome engineering may offer the possibility of avoiding the transmission of such diseases by making genetic changes in the early stage embryo.’

Could too much vitamin D be doing you more harm than good? Experts reveal how excessive supplements can make your bones weak

Daily Mail 28th November 2016

The debate over Vitamin D has split the medical and scientific communities into those who believe that one in three of the population is deficient in vitamin D, and sceptics who say supplementation is a 'cure' for an invented disease that doesn't actually exist. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘We are seeing an over-obsession with something that isn't a real disease.’

Ed Balls tipped for House of Commons return by Labour MPs after Strictly Come Dancing exit

Evening Standard 28th November 2016

Article on Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute, who has been voted off of ‘Strictly Come Dancing’. He also spoke to Times and Daily Telegraph.

Western leaders' cowardly refusal to condemn Fidel Castro brings shame upon our democracies

Telegraph 28th November 2016

Visiting Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, has written a piece on the death of Fidel Castro. ‘It is an unmistakeable sign of decadent, disastrous cultural self-hatred when prominent leaders of democratic countries cannot state openly that evil dictators such as the late President Fidel Castro of Cuba were what they undoubtedly were: serial human rights abusers, torturers and tyrants,’ he said.

Claims of IVF rip off

Channel 5 News 28th November 2016

Couples undergoing IVF sometimes spend tens of thousands of pounds on add-on treatments which are a waste of money, according to a research team at Oxford University. Dr Yacoub Khalaf, Women’s Health, said: ‘These interventions are not founded, they are expensive, they don’t add value...’

BBC Radio 4 World at One

Syria conflict 28th November 2016

Over 100 MPs have written to the Prime Minister to ask for immediate air drops of food and medicine to the worst affected civilians in Syria. Dr Shiraz Mayer, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘I think we’ve seen over the last four or five years just how difficult it has been for anybody, not just humanitarian agencies, but journalists, any independent third parties, to work in Syria unimpeded.’ (13:22)

The centralising instinct

Hindu 28th November 2016

Dr Louise Tillin, India Institute, writes a piece on Centre-State relations in India. 'The time is right to engage in a deeper debate about Centre-State relations and the operation of federalism,' she said.

Syria

BBC World News 28th November 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, spoke on the latest developments in Syria. 'We've already seen the Syrian conflict in general present one of the greatest displacements of people and one of the greatest humanitarian crises since the Second World War,' he said.

A day in the life of a King's student

BBC World Service (Russian) 28th November 2016

BBC World Service (Russian language) profiled a King's student for a day, filming her at King's, at a Russian Society event, and included her mobile footage of halls and breakfast. They also did a Facebook live with the student, which can be viewed again.

To support veterans, we must stop pitying them

Sunday Telegraph 27th November 2016

Professor Sir Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, grew up well aware of what combat could do to a person. He is co-director of the King's Centre for Military Health Research.

Eating Disorder Beds

BBC Radio 5 Live 27th November 2016

Professor Ulrike Schmidt is a consultant psychiatrist at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Professor of Eating Disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London joins to discuss what exactly an eating disorder is.

The psychology behind a nice cup of tea

Guardian 27th November 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains the psychology behind tea. ‘In an experiment, people were asked to rate strangers on how welcoming and trustworthy they thought they were. Holding a warm cup of coffee made them rate the strangers higher on these attributes,’ he said.

Inconvenient truth about your wood-burning stove: They can be bad for the environment AND your health

Daily Mail 26th November 2016

Article on the environmental and health impacts of wood-burning stoves. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘There is evidence that good wood-burning stoves produce less air pollution than open fires, because they burn wood more efficiently, but any home burning wood will be creating more air pollution than heating by gas, oil or electricity.’

Dance: Deborah Bull

BBC Radio 3 Saturday Classics 26th November 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal, presents a selection of classical music. (13:00)

Sixty seconds on…Cryonics

British Medical Journal 26th November 2016

Article on cryonics. Professor Clive Coen, Women’s Health, said cryopreservation of the whole body is ‘just ridiculous and the whole brain is only slightly less ridiculous.’

My London…Kele Okereke

Metro 25th November 2016

An interview with Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke, Alumna. He said: ‘I went to university at King’s College London on the Strand and I walked across Waterloo Bridge every day and marvelled at the view from both sides of the bridge - I never got bored of it.’

New target receptor discovered in the fight against obesity

King's press release 25th November 2016

New research by King’s and Imperial College London has discovered the essential role that the receptor FFAR2 plays in the success of fermentable carbohydrates – found in foods such as vegetables, fruit, breads, cereals and pasta - in suppressing appetite and preventing obesity. Dr Gavin Bewick, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Obesity is currently one of the most serious global threats to human health, determined by genetic background, diet, and lifestyle.’ This was also reported by Metro, India Today and Times of India.

King's press release related to 'New target receptor discovered in the fight against obesity'

London’s Waterloo in the limelight as Asian buyers eye new-builds

Financial Times 25th November 2016

Article about building developments in Waterloo mentions the Strand campus.

Backstage power struggles in a long-running Whitehall drama

Financial Times 25th November 2016

Visiting Professor Sir Nicholas Macpherson, Policy Institute, has written a piece on the power dynamic between the Chancellor and the Prime Minister. ‘The authority of the office has been enhanced by the de¬cline of cabinet government and a move to a more presidential system,’ he said.

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus

BBC Radio 4 25th November 2016

Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, presents audio portraits of figures that have shaped the arc of Indian history over two thousand years. (21:00)

Ditch vitamin D pills . . . just get some sun: Healthy lifestyle and diet 'is all most of us need'

Daily Mail 24th November 2016

People should get out into the sunshine rather than rely on supplements to get enough vitamin D, University of Aberdeen experts say. Commenting, Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Highly convincing evidence of a clear role of vitamin D does not exist for any outcome.’ This was also reported by Daily Express and Sun.

School for teenage codebreakers to open in Bletchley Park

Guardian 24th November 2016

Bletchley Park is planning a new school for the next generation of codebreakers. Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, said: ‘There’s already the promise of a new government-sponsored ‘virtual’ initiative mentioned in the new UK National Cyber Security Strategy, and this in addition to many degree courses, research groups and, of course, the sovereign capabilities of UK armed forces, intelligence, police and others.’ This was also reported by International Business Times.

Butter is still bad for heart, say scientists

Times 24th November 2016

Swapping butter and meat for olive oil and fish does cut the risk of heart disease, a study has found. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘It is important to focus on replacing saturated fatty acids with healthier unsaturated fats or unrefined carbohydrates, which is in line with current dietary guidelines.’ This was also reported by Sun.

Experts highlight opportunities in 3rd party markets for British, Chinese companies

Xinhua 24th November 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, commented on UK-China relations. ‘I think the UK would bring analysis and local knowledge to the table, and…it has got very internationalised companies,’ he said. This was also reported by China Daily.

Clinton’s loss is one more nail in the coffin of center-left politics in the West

Washington Post 24th November 2016

Article on the decline of the center-left in politics included comments by Professor Alex Callinicos, European & International Studies. ‘If the left and the center-left don’t get their act together, then we’re looking at a period of very unstable right-wing hegemony,’ he said.

Why frequent dieting makes you put on weight – and what to do about it

Conversation 24th November 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, has written a piece on dieting in light of new research which has shown why some people are more prone to ‘yo-yo’ dieting and how it can be reversed. He said: ‘The best approach if you really want to lose weight long term is to avoid crash diets and calorie counting altogether, which are doomed to fail.’ This was also reported by i.

Stop England's universities 'dominating' tertiary sector

Times Higher Education Supplement 24th November 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, has called for a change of approach to tertiary education in a report published by the Education Policy Institute this week. She said: ‘I don’t know anywhere in the world that is as 'one-size-fits-all' as we are.’

Around the World

Nursing Times 23rd November 2016

Professor Ulrike Schmidt comments on the upcoming Eating Disorders Summit in January 2017. She said: 'Making early intervention for eating disorders a reality needs good leadership and a team approach.'

Three free exhibitions for history of science enthusiasts

Guardian 23rd November 2016

Article on three upcoming exhibitions including ‘Victorians Decoded: Art and Telegraphy’ which draws chiefly on the Victorian art collections of the Guildhall and the historic scientific instrument collection of King’s.

Mosul battle: How the fight against Isis is being reported through victory selfies and Facebook statuses

Independent 23rd November 2016

New trends in frontline ‘victory selfies’ and videos make war more immediate than ever before, providing Iraqi civilians with live updates on frontline action. Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘In war zones, people often use social media as a primary source of information.’

In India, citizens rush to exchange defunct rupee notes

NPR 23rd November 2016

The Indian government has made a sudden move to make 500 and 1,000 rupees ‘worthless’, meaning notes must be traded in at banks for other bills. Commenting, Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, said: ‘It's a massive shock, and it's a very big gamble.’

Virtual Reality video simulates drink driving car crash

BBC News 22nd November 2016

A virtual reality video simulating a drink driving car crash has been released by alcohol maker Diageo. Dr Lucia Valmaggia, head of the Virtual Reality Lab at the Institute of Psychiatry, psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, said: "VR has been shown to trigger a response which is similar to a real life experience."

Coordinated approach essential to care after ICU and hospital discharge, new research finds

King's press release 22nd November 2016

New research by King’s has found inconsistencies in the experiences of patients once they were discharged from hospital, following admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), impacting detrimentally on the continuity of care they received. Suzanne Bench, Adult Nursing, said: ‘Health professionals need an improved understanding of critical illness, and patients and families must be included in all aspects of the information-sharing process.’

King's press release related to 'Coordinated approach essential to care after ICU and hospital discharge, new research finds'

Brexit and the EEA

Times 22nd November 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History, has written a letter on Brexit. ‘If, therefore, Britain were to become, after Brexit, a member of the EEA she would be required to accept rules which she has hardly any ability to shape,’ he said.

Global University Employability Ranking

i 22nd November 2016

The Global University Employability Ranking by Times Higher Education is listed, with King’s coming sixth in the UK.

I know all about Oxford's class problem. It starts in schools

Guardian 22nd November 2016

Article about the University of Oxford and social class mentions a King’s study which found that schools in the south-east and London sent nearly 50% more students to Oxford and Cambridge colleges than the national average.

Eat your fibre or face the flesh-eating microbe cannibals

Conversation 22nd November 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, has written a piece on the importance of eating fibre. He said: ‘Our own TwinsUK study has recently shown that low fibre eaters gain weight more quickly and have less microbial diversity.’ This was also published by Independent. Professor Spector also spoke to Independent about transforming how we approach eating.

Is this America's best-read general? Viral email from Trump's potential Defense Secretary 'Mad Dog' Mattis shows how he fights using the lessons of history

Daily Mail 22nd November 2016

Article on a viral email by the Marine general who is in the running to become Donald Trump’s Defence Secretary. The exchange of emails by Gen. James ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis is mentioned to have been posted on the King’s War Studies ‘Strife’ Blog in 2013.

Fossil fuel divestment soars in UK universities

Guardian 22nd November 2016

The number of British universities divesting from fossil fuels has risen to 43. It is mentioned that King’s has agreed to drop its most polluting investments in September.

In the Mideast, weighing the risks of tough talk

International New York Times 22nd November 2016

Some analysts fear that the appointment of Donald Trump, his views and reliance on cabinet appointees who have expressed anti-Islamic views will be exploited as a recruiting tool by Islamic State. Commenting, Charlie Winter, ICSR, said the views ‘reinforces and ratifies the jihadist worldview.’

Trump's foreign policies

Reuters 22nd November 2016

Trump-branded property could present a target for bombings or other kinds of attacks, according to Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR. ‘From a terrorist’s perspective, it’s a very attractive target,’ he said. This was also reported by Yahoo and Daily Mail.

Clinical research advancements

BBC World Service 22nd November 2016

Discussion on clinical research advancements using model design and craft embroidery. A collaboration between Dr Matthew Howard, Informatics, and a textiles artist is mentioned. They were looking to see if they could make embroidered sensors that could fit inside garments and pick up electrical impulses.

Britain’s top GP: Five-a-day goal is too costly for poorer families

Daily Mail 21st November 2016

Doctors should no longer insist that patients follow official advice to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day, says a top GP. Potatoes have been previously debated over whether they should be included as a ‘five-a-day’. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, has said that their exclusion is due to ‘middle-class morality’ and concerns it would encourage people to eat chips.

'I can never forgive the GP who gave my daughter the anxiety pills that she used to take her own life': The anguish of a mum who was kept in the dark about her 16-year-old's prescription

Daily Mail 21st November 2016

Article on GPs giving medication to teenagers mentions a study by King’s which found that 75,000 girls under 16 are being prescribed the contraceptive pill every year — in many cases without their parents' knowledge.

Why shouldn’t your local school be a museum?

Guardian 21st November 2016

Assistant Principal Deborah Bull, has written a piece on the ‘My school is a museum’ project which King’s took part in. ‘Imaginative partnerships could help stretched funds go further,’ she said.

30 fabulous things to do in London this week

Time Out London 21st November 2016

Article on things to do in London this weekend includes the Longplayer Conversation 2016, which will be held at King's.

Facial encounters

BBC Radio 4 Beyond Belief 21st November 2016

A piece that discusses the advantages and dangers of ‘giving religious figures a face’. Professor Ben Quash, Theology & Religious Studies, said: ‘There’s been attempts all through Christian history to try and fix what Jesus might have looked like.’ (16:30)

Meet the new favourite to become the next President of France

Buzzfeed 21st November 2016

François Fillon is favourite to become the next President of France. Dr Alex Clarkson, European & International Studies, discussed Fillon’s foreign policy. ‘Within the French right, going back to de Gaulle, there has always been a sentimental attachment to the notion that the Russians can be ‘civilised’ and turned into a European partner,’ he said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 Sunday 20th November 2016

The German Islamic organisation that calls itself 'True Religion' has been banned after the authorities accused it of recruiting jihadists. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘What it is being accused of is to facilitate travel to Syria.’ (07:23)

What about the workers? Oxford students pick ‘classism officer’

Times 20th November 2016

Students at an Oxford college are to appoint a ‘class liberation officer’ to protect working-class undergraduates from insults and hardship. King's is mentioned to have also appointed an officer to support working-class students. This was also reported by Daily Mail in print and online, India Today and Indian Express.

A formula for equality

Times 20th November 2016

Feature about gender equality in the science industries, including an interview with Dr Victoria Sanz-Moreno, Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics. ‘At the research level there are more women, but at the point where a scientist becomes independent, they decide it’s too much,’ she said.

Nostalgia for things that never happened

Guardian 20th November 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains why we sometimes feel nostalgic for things that have never happened. ‘Indeed those who wanted Trump to make America great again were harking back to a version of the country that never really existed,’ he said.

Will Brexit block EU students from UK law schools?

Financial Times 20th November 2016

Article detailing the effect of the Brexit decision on EU students coming to the UK. Professor Ben Bowling, Law, said that there are no indications yet of a Brexit effect depressing student recruitment at King’s. ‘If you want to practise in the international realm then you need to have some legal knowledge of the common-law systems such as the UK, Hong Kong and Singapore,’ he said.

Emissions

BBC World Service 20th November 2016

The London Mayor Sadiq Khan has called for Volkswagen to provide compensation following its recent emissions scandal. The interview mentions research by King’s Environmental Research Group (ERG), which found up to 9,500 people die each year due to long term exposure to air pollution.

A great British asset: Judges who won’t be bribed or told what to do

Times 19th November 2016

An interview with Visiting Professor Rt Hon Lord Igor Judge, Law.

The rise and rise of the referendum

BBC News Online 19th November 2016

Article on the increasing occurrence of referendums around the world. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute for Contemporary British History, said: ‘People feel that indirect democracy keeps them too far away from any influence.’

How exercise can thrwart depression

New York Times 18th November 2016

Exercise may be an effective treatment for depression and might even help prevent us from becoming depressed in the first place, according to three timely new studies. Dr Brendon Stubbs of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London was a primary author on all the reviews.

Beachcomber: 99 years old and STILL admires civilisation

Daily Express 18th November 2016

Article mentions a King’s collaboration with the Helios Collective opera company in which they will put on three short original operas at the end of next week.

The cryonics dilemma: Will deep-frozen bodies be fit for new life?

Various media outlets 18th November 2016

There has been a large amount of public discussion this week, around being cryogenically frozen after death. Professor Clive Coen, Women’s Health, said to the Guardian: ‘The main problem is that [the brain] is a massively dense piece of tissue.’ Professor Coen also called for restrictions on marketing cryonics in a separate Guardian article. He was quoted in another online Guardian article, and a comment piece for the Guardian, as well as in two pieces for i, Times, BBC News Online, Telegraph, Daily Mail, Independent, Evening Standard, Metro and Financial Times. Meanwhile, a Daily Telegraph piece reporting on the preservation process quotes David Farlow, Alumna, who came across the concept as a Computer Science student at King’s.

How can Facebook and its users burst the ‘filter bubble’?

New Scientist 18th November 2016

In the wake of the US election, concerns are surfacing over the filter bubbles that mediate the information people see in their social media feeds. Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, said: ‘If this window is filled with highly partisan and, in some cases, false news, then many people will be assessing political candidates and information on the basis of distorted and misleading information.’

I used to live my life in fear of cancer – now it's dementia that worries me most

Independent 18th November 2016

Article about dementia mentions that researchers at King’s believe that there is a ‘genetic signature’ they can identify in people who are ageing well. This was also reported by i.

Do you feel that money is put before safety in your organisation?

Nursing Times 18th November 2016

Article discussing the new ‘nursing associate role’ mentions research undertaken by a variety of academics including Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing Policy, which found that hospitals that employ more nurse assistants relative to the number of professionally qualified nurses have higher mortality rates, lower patient satisfaction, and poorer quality and safety of care. This was also reported in two further online pieces; Nursing Times (1), Nursing Times (2) and a print piece for the same publication.

Patients' role in making care safer

British Medical Journal 18th November 2016

Article looking at the role of patients in improving standards of care. Evidence to support the view that patients and carers raise valid concerns and alerts which health professions rebuff or sideline, has been cited by Nicola Mackintosh, Women’s Health.

Children need our help in the war on weight

Times 17th November 2016

Article on obesity mentions research by King’s which followed more than a quarter of a million obese patients over five years and found that only one in 210 men and one in 124 women reached a normal body weight after dieting.

Race is on to measure your biological age to treat people at risk from growing old prematurely

i 17th November 2016

A study led by a team from Kings claims to have determined a genetic signature of ageing present in individuals that are ageing well.

Broadband speeds

Sky News Sunrise With Sarah-Jane Mee 17th November 2016

New evidence suggests that misleading adverts are making it difficult for customers to understand what speeds they can expect to get from their broadband. Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, said: ‘Speed is something really complicated.’ (07:14)

Chinese literature in Africa: meaningful or simply ceremonial?

Conversation 17th November 2016

Dr Catherine Gilbert, English, has written a piece on the distribution of Chinese literature in Africa. ‘If China aims to counter the cultural hegemony of the West, the translation and exporting of its literature plays a vital role,’ she said.

Google Think Tank launches new weapon in fight against ISIS

NBC News 17th November 2016

Developers at a think-tank have developed a pilot project that aims to push web users searching for jihadist information toward content designed to counter tools of terrorist recruitment. Commenting, Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘For recruiters who are based in conflict zones, they have a unique ability now to reach anybody, anywhere, at any time.’

Ten of the world’s hottest start-ups in 2016

CNBC 17th November 2016

Article discussing 10 of the world’s hottest start-ups in 2016, mentions one that King’s students have been involved in – a biotech start-up which has developed a novel method of tracking the response of cancer to therapy.

‘Fewer women will study engineering’ owing to school exam changes

Times Higher Education Supplement 17th November 2016

Sustained efforts to bring more women into engineering in the UK will be severely damaged by upcoming changes to school qualifications, experts have warned. Speaking at a meeting of the Engineering Professors' Council on 9 November, Professor Peter Main, Physics, said: ‘It is almost inevitable that changes to A Levels will make the gender balance worse.’

Replacing professional nurses with nursing assistants linked to heightened death risk

King's press release 16th November 2016

Replacing professionally qualified nurses with lower skilled nursing assistants is linked to a heightened risk of patient death, as well as other indicators of poor quality care, reveals a study conducted by academics at the University of Pennsylvania, King’s and the University of Southampton. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing Policy, said: ‘Our study finds that high professional nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction in hospital nursing practice is not alleviated by adding lower skilled workers.’ This was reported by Daily Telegraph and Nursing Times.

King's press release related to 'Replacing professional nurses with nursing assistants linked to heightened death risk'

Whitehall’s institutional memory gap

Prospect 16th November 2016

Article on Brexit mentions that the Treasury has gone into partnership with King’s, to create a group whose aim is to strengthen Whitehall's institutional memory.

Scottish ‘passports’ and joining Norway among Brexit plans

Times 16th November 2016

Scottish ministers are considering plans to give Scotland a more Euro-friendly Brexit deal than the rest of the UK, including Scottish ‘passports’. The passport plan would be based on Scotland issuing its own national insurance numbers. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, commented.

Palliative care

BBC 1 Breakfast 16th November 2016

Professor Irene Higginson, Cicely Saunders Institute, is interviewed about palliative care for people with cancer. ‘Palliative care is the total active care of somebody who’s got a serious or progressive illness,’ she said. (09:08)

Top 100 universities for employability: Which British universities make the world rankings?

Daily Telegraph 16th November 2016

Article on the top 100 universities for employability notes that King’s is ranked highly at 23.

Cannabis should be legal as a medicine, says Clegg

Daily Mail 15th November 2016

Cannabis should be legalised because of its 'medicinal value', Nick Clegg said last night. A major review led by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, in 2014 concluded smoking cannabis is highly addictive, can cause mental health problems and opens the door to hard drugs.

King's academic comment on US election

Various media outlets 15th November 2016

Professor Jennifer Rubin, Policy Institute, has written a piece for Independent on Donald Trump winning the US presidential election. ‘The new President-elect and his voters are feeling emboldened by victory, and they will be feeling validated and encouraged by a prevailing message of “welcome to the fold”,’ she said. Visiting Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, spoke to BBC Radio 4 and has also written a piece for Telegraph. ‘If Trump shows a new-found capacity to listen and learn, he might do much better than we think,’ he said. Meanwhile, Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was quoted by BBC News Online. He said: ‘The election of Donald Trump is the most troubling political event in my lifetime.’

Boom in demand for a master’s degree fuels campus expansion

Times 15th November 2016

Article discussing campus expansion for several universities mentions the Strand campus.

Fake news

BBC Radio 5 live 5 live Drive 15th November 2016

The controversy over fake news on Facebook is intensifying after reports that employees at the social media company have formed an anonymous task force to tackle the problem. Dr Martin Moore, Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, director, said: ‘Facebook has an audience of 1.7 billion people worldwide and over half of Americans now rely on it regularly for their news.’ (16:57)

Silver lining

Daily Mail 15th November 2016

Researchers at King's recently found that people who had acne were more likely to live longer than those with perfect skin.

Brexit bulletin: Who will build Britain’s future?

Bloomberg 15th November 2016

Analysts have argued that the stronger the U.K. economy is, the harder the Brexit deal could be. The article includes comment by Professor Anand Menon, European& International Studies.

Narendra Modi set to get tougher on China and Pakistan

Economic Times of India 15th November 2016

Comment on Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi’s foreign policy. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘There’s been a very overt attempt to use foreign policy as a tool for domestic economic growth.’ These comments were also reported by NDTV. Professor Pant also wrote a piece for The Hindu, on Indian foreign policy, specifically Modi’s recent visit to Japan.

Russian politics

BBC World 15th November 2016

Dr Sam Greene, Russian Institute, comments on the arrest of Russian Minister Alexei Ulyukayev. ‘We haven’t seen anything like this in a lifetime of looking at Russian politics.’

Looking ahead

China Daily 15th November 2016

Article mentions an upcoming law event, where Stephanie Balme will present a talk on Reforming the Judiciary in China (1978-2016).

Link between depression and body inflammation

BBC World Service 14th November 2016

Interview with Professor Carmine Pariante from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London discussing the link between depression and body inflammation.

Are we thinking about depression all wrong?

Telegraph 14th November 2016

Article on research into depression. Dr Valeria Mondelli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London is quoted.

NUT and King's College London research into Key Stage 4

King's press release 14th November 2016

A new King’s report, commissioned by the NUT, uncovers serious problems with the EBacc, the Government's attempt to steer all schools towards a narrow range of subjects. This was also reported by Guardian.

King's press release related to 'NUT and King's College London research into Key Stage 4'

How will tonight's moon affect human behaviour?

Telegraph 14th November 2016

Article looking at the supermoon and how it might affect human behaviour. As part of research for his book on the history of mental health nursing, Dr Niall McCrae, Mental Health Nursing, spoke to former nurses who worked at old mental asylums. He said: ‘Anyone who worked in those institutions, old nurses and guards, they will tell you with utter conviction that there was a lunar effect on wards at night.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail and a separate article for Daily Telegraph. He also spoke to BBC Radio 5 live (22:55).

Brexit: What Europe wants

BBC Radio 4 Analysis 14th November 2016

Feature presented by Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, analysing how politics in other EU member states might impact Britain's future with the rest of the EU. (20:30)

England's higher education system 'in tatters'

Financial Times 14th November 2016

England's higher education system is ‘in tatters’, according to a think tank and Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business. A report by Professor Wolf for the Education Policy Institute has found that an increase in university graduates has resulted in ‘an unsustainable’ funding system, while technical qualifications below degree level have suffered a ‘steep decline’ in student numbers. This was also reported by Times.

Anglophone political populism and the cultural rejection of climate change

Conversation 14th November 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, has written a piece on the cultural politics of climate change in light of Donald Trump winning the US presidential election and Brexit. ‘How climate change is believed in or denied, how it is acted upon or resisted, can only be understood at the level of much deeper beliefs people hold about themselves and about how the world is and should be,’ he said.

Lack of sleep is making our children obese - but help is at hand

Guardian 14th November 2016

Article mentions that researchers at King's have shown that irregular bedtimes and insufficient sleep in childhood may result in increased calorie consumption and obesity.

Brexit Briefing: Too close to Trump, Theresa May?

Financial Times 14th November 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, argues that we are heading for a hard Brexit thanks both to the relatively good performance of the economy, the intransigence of public opinion about migration and the fact that EU leaders want to deter populist movements.

Niesr Think Tank to run new U.K. statistics office facility

Bloomberg 14th November 2016

The National Institute of Economic and Social Research will run a new branch of the U.K. statistics office. Academics from King’s will be involved in the new centre.

Turkish jets hit al-Bab in push to take ISIL's Raqqa

Al Jazeera 14th November 2016

The Turkish military announced recent gains in the fight against ISIL in northern Syria. Commenting, Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘Turkey did not want the YPG or the SDF to take more control of land [in Syria], which is why their military got involved in the first place.’

Climate Change

BBC World 14th November 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, commented in response to research that suggested an increase in the global temperature. ‘I would say the far more important thing is looking at what particular industries are doing, looking at what cities are doing and individuals are doing. The risks of climate change are risks and are serious,’ he said.

How to use your brain power to fight off a cold

Guardian 13th November 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery Director, explains how we can use our brain power to fight off a cold. ‘Because the nervous system runs from the brain into every organ of the body, what we believe can have a powerful effect on how we respond to illness,’ he said.

Bullied children twice as likely to be obese in later life - regardless of genetic factors

Mail Online 12th November 2016

Children who were bullied at school are twice as likely to be overweight than their popular peers, a new study claims. Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London analysed interviews with 2,000 adults who have been part of a study since they were children in the 1960s. Dr Andrea Danese is quoted: "Bullying is commonly associated with mental health problems, but there is little research examining the physical health of bullied children. Our study shows that bullied children are more likely to be overweight as young adults, and that they become overweight independent of their genetic liability and after experiencing victimisation."
Also reported in the Indian Express, Economic Times, and Deccan Chronicle.

King's press release related to 'Bullied children twice as likely to be obese in later life - regardless of genetic factors'

Article 50 could be reversed, Government may argue in Brexit case

Guardian 12th November 2016

Government lawyers are exploring possibilities of reversing the Article 50 process. Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, said: ‘I know that the issue of revocation is a live issue in terms of the Supreme Court hearing.’

Link between DNA and chronic widespread joint pain

King's press release 11th November 2016

Scientists at King’s, funded by the charity Arthritis Research UK, have found a link between changes in marks on the outside of DNA (epigenetics) and chronic widespread joint pain, one of the main symptoms of fibromyalgia. Dr Frances Williams, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Fibromyalgia is influenced by genetic factors but there are many complicated steps between gene and disease. Identifying measurable epigenetic links is a major step forward.’

King's press release related to 'Link between DNA and chronic widespread joint pain'

Opportunities in 3rd party markets for Chinese, British companies: experts

Xinhua 11th November 2016

Analysts give their views on China-Britain relations. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘I think the UK would bring analysis and local knowledge to the table, and the fact that it has got very internationalised companies that have been overseas for a long time.’

The $88m student digs: Homebuying for children of the super-rich

Financial Times 11th November 2016

Article on homebuying mentions the Strand campus.

MOUTHY

ITV London 10th November 2016

Students at King's are exploring methods to control computer games using one’s mouth. (18:21)

‘The job of a historian is to be diagnostic’

The Hindu 10th November 2016

A review of Dr Jon Wilson’s, History, book India Conquered. ‘What motivated me was that we still live in some degree of myth that the British rule propagated about itself,’ Dr Wilson recently said.

Defending Norway

BBC World Service 10th November 2016

Professor Mats Berdal, War Studies, presents the second part of ‘Defending Norway’. ‘In this programme, I’ll be investigating whether the recent cooling in relations between Washington and Moscow does in fact signal a new cold war, where Norway’s high north could be a potential flashpoint for conflict,’ he said.

World War One at Home

BBC Radio 4 9th November 2016

Professor Edgar Jones of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is interviewed about the treatment of shell-shock during World War One.

Crick Institute receives royal seal of approval

King's press release 9th November 2016

Europe’s largest biomedical research centre under one roof- the Francis Crick Institute was officially opened by HM The Queen on Wednesday. Professor Ed Byrne AC, President and Principal, said: ‘As a founding academic partner King’s is delighted to play a key role in this world-leading institute.’

King's press release related to 'Crick Institute receives royal seal of approval '

Preparation for a crucial role

Nursing Standard 9th November 2016

Dr Corina Naughton, Adult Nursing, has co-written a piece arguing that education must be matched with dynamic career pathways that attract professionals to older people's care. ‘Nurses have expressed frustration at the lack of available opportunities to develop their capabilities to provide age-attuned care,’ they said.

After Trump’s victory, the world is left to wonder: What happened to America?

Washington Post 9th November 2016

Dr Thomas Roulet, School of Management & Business, comments following the announcement that Donald Trump will be President of the United States. ‘Trump said himself that his election would be ‘Brexit plus plus.’ And he was right,’ he said.

China denies complicity in Pakistan’s nuclear missile programme

Various media outlets 9th November 2016

The Chinese Foreign Ministry have responded to a report released by King’s Project Alpha, which investigated Pakistan’s strategic nuclear and missile industries, denying any illicit involvement by China. This was reported by Deccan Herald, China Daily and NDTV.

Trump’s Challenge: The Powerful Women of NATO

Voice of America 9th November 2016

Dr Christine Cheng, War Studies, commented on Donald Trump and NATO. ‘Donald Trump and what he represents to NATO in particular is dangerous. He is going straight at the heart of the alliance.’

Trump’s win signals open season for Russia’s political hackers

Wired 9th November 2016

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, comments on the relationship between hacking and propaganda. ‘The ground is becoming more fertile for Russia’s influence operations,’ he said.

Why are 250000 lives still being ruined by mothers little helpers

Daily Mail 8th November 2016

Article on benzodiazepine addiction. Professor Malcolm Lader, a psycho-pharmacologist from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, identified so-called benzo dependency syndrome - where patients develop dependence even at lower doses and when taking the drug as prescribed.

Suicide bombers slow Iraqi advance

Times 8th November 2016

Article discussing suicide attackers slowing down an advance by the Iraqi army. Charlie Winter, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘I think we are going to see massive instability in Mosul for years to come.’

Staying alive

Daily Mail 8th November 2016

Article on how to minimise the health risks linked to a hospital stay. Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘It’s not a time to worry about eating healthily or watching our fat intake.’

Think of the universe as a skateboard park: Supernovas and sphalerons

Guardian 8th November 2016

Article on research at the Large Hadron Collider, mentioning Professor John Ellis, Physics, and Professor Nick Mavromatos, Physics.

Trump vs Clinton is America’s dirtiest election ever - and the poison could infect the whole world

Mirror 8th November 2016

Visiting Professor Dr Andrew Roberts, War Studies, has written an article in the run-up to the US presidential election. ‘Whoever wins tonight will doubtless quickly persuade themselves that they were elected because they were popular, but in this election it simply won’t be true. They will have won because the American people despised their opponent slightly more,’ he said. He also wrote about this in a separate piece for Mirror.

The Make:Shift conference on Craft and Innovation

BBC Radio 4 8th November 2016

Discussion of a new ‘trend’, in which creative craft skills aid scientific research. Dr Kate Dunton, Cultural Institute, is interviewed alongside Shelley James, a glass artist, who has been working with physicists at King's. She said: ‘There didn’t used to be a barrier between art and science.’

UK risks losing global influence if it quits single market, says former civil servant

Guardian 8th November 2016

The UK's global diplomatic and security influence is at risk if it cuts itself off from the single market and continues to denigrate foreigners, a former civil servant has warned. Speaking on Monday at King's, Sir Simon Fraser, said it was inevitable that Brexit would diminish UK influence overseas. This was also reported by Financial Times.

Fight The Fads want to legally protect the term ‘Nutritionist’ to stop unqualified wellness bloggers from using it

Metro 8th November 2016

‘Fight The Fads’, a company headed by three student dietitians at Kings, have launched a Government petition to legally protect use of the title 'Nutritionist'. They said: ‘There has been a recent rise in the popularity of wellness bloggers and nutrition ‘gurus’, and unfortunately this has led to much confusion among the public.’

Looking ahead

China Daily 8th November 2016

Article mentions an event at the Lau China Institute, where Andrew Tylecote spoke about China’s Challenge in High Technology.

Narendra Modi bans India’s largest currency bills in a bit to cut corruption

New York Times 8th November 2016

Narendra Modi has moved to ban India’s largest currency bills; effectively removing 80 per cent of the currency in circulation. Commenting, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘There’s a perception that whatever he has done on the corruption front is not enough.’

Children gain confidence and social skills when schooled in local museum

King's press release 7th November 2016

A new report, published by King’s, shows the findings of four projects that for the first time in the UK placed Nursery, Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 children in their local museum for extended residencies. Katherine Bond, Director, Cultural Institute, said: ‘The project findings will inspire schools and museums across the UK and contribute to the debate around creative and cultural learning.’ This was also reported by BBC News Online.

King's press release related to 'Children gain confidence and social skills when schooled in local museum'

Processed food 'can cause bowel cancer' by changing your body

Daily Mail 7th November 2016

Common additives used in every day foods including bread and sweets may be behind the huge rise in bowel cancer, scientists claim. Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend their shelf life, alter gut bacteria. Commenting on the study, Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘In my opinion, this study has little relevance to human nutrition because the authors induced cancer with a known carcinogen and then exposed the animals to extreme amounts of additives in drinking water.’

New nursing associate role developed too quickly, warn profession's leaders

Nursing Times 7th November 2016

Plans to develop the forthcoming nursing associate role have been drawn up at a ‘helter skelter’ pace and have been ‘rushed’, leaving insufficient time for the profession to scrutinise what the new role will be able to do and how it will be trained, it has been claimed. Professor Jill Maben, Adult Nursing, said: ‘I am concerned. I don’t feel there has been enough engagement with the profession. It feels like quite a quick fix with potentially very big unintended consequences.’

Theresa May in India

BBC World HARDtalk 7th November 2016

Theresa May has visited India in her first trip abroad as Prime Minister. India’s Commerce and Industry Minister Nirmala Sitharaman mentioned King’s as a destination for Indian students studying in London. The Delhi summer school opened by King’s is also mentioned in Telegraph regarding Indian students in the UK, and Theresa May’s visit.

After the earthquake: Why the brain gives phantom quakes

Guardian 6th November 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains why some of the people caught up in the recent earthquakes in Italy will experience aftershocks that are all in the mind. ‘This happens for the same reason as ‘sea legs’ - the swaying feeling you sometimes get when you walk on dry land after time on a boat,’ he said.

Mosul

Al Jazeera 6th November 2016

Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, comments on the military advances made into Mosul. ‘Now you have an enemy who will not just disappear and run away, even if there is just one man standing,’ he said.

May plans to ease ability of Indian businesspeople to travel to U.K.

Wall Street Journal 6th November 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, comments on Britain’s trade talks with India after Brexit. ‘It would be naïve to think anyone would finalise a deal with us until they know what it means for their ability to use us as a base to reach the European market,’ he said. Professor Menon also commented on this for NDTV.

Making things up

New Scientist 5th November 2016

Article on the nature of hallucinations, mentioning a 1998 King's College London study.

Missile tracking

Economist 5th November 2016

Article on cancer treatment mentions a new technique developed by Dr Rafael de Rosales, Imaging Chemistry & Biology, and Alberto Gabizon of the Shaare Zedek Medical Centre in Jerusalem.

Netflix cuts no corners with £30,000 dress

Times 5th November 2016

Article on Netflix series ‘The Crown’ in which Research Fellow Pankaj Chandak, Transplantation Immunology & Mucosal Biology Research Division, was one of the surgical team ‘operating’ on a King George. ‘We used surgical gowns, gloves and instruments from the period and had to adapt our surgery to the time,’ he said. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Weather Eye

Times 5th November 2016

Weather report cites research from King's, which found that smoke from bonfires contains poisonous carbon monoxide and other pollutants.

BBC Radio 3 Record Review

Mozart 5th November 2016

Professor Cliff Eisen, Music, discusses the most recent box collection of 200 CDs of Mozart. He said: ‘In London, in 1791, there was a widely held view that Mozart was the greatest composer who had ever lived.’ (10:43)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives – Omnibus

BBC Radio 4 5th November 2016

A continuation of Radio Four's exploration of Indian history, with Professor Sunil Khilnani, King's India Institute.

Bellini's Norma

BBC Radio 3 Opera on 3 5th November 2016

Professor Roger Parker, Music, discusses a new production of Bellini's Norma as well as the historical background of the Viennese opera. ‘There’s this idea of fear and oppression which is built into the very set,’ he said (18:32).

Brexit is jeopardising Britain’s intellectual legacy

The Atlantic 5th November 2016

A group of academics at King’s met to discuss a post-Brexit future for universities. The article mentions Dr Lucia Pradella, European & International Studies, and thoughts of how universities should shape how Brexit happens.

It’s as healthy to eat bugs as it is to eat steak, study says

Fox news 5th November 2016

A recent research paper from King’s looked at nutritional contents of insects versus steak. This was also reported by Huffington Post.

King's College London preofessor explains what Batten disease is

Mail Online 4th November 2016

Jon Cooper, PhD, of King's College London explains in a quick video what Batten disease is - a fatal brain disorder that strikes children.

EU referendum

Various media outlets 4th November 2016

King’s academics continue to comment on the EU referendum. A report from UK in a Changing Europe, an independent group of academics led by Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, was reported by Guardian, Evening Standard, Independent, a separate piece for Evening Standard, Daily Mail and Bloomberg. Professor Menon also spoke to Sky News and was quoted in a separate piece for Bloomberg and CNN online. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed for CNN and BBC Radio 4 (13:12), and his comments were reported by Washington Post. King’s Alumn Dominic Chambers, Law, was mentioned in Washington Post to have been on the team of lawyers involved in the High Court case.

Letters to the editor: Treating autism

Daily Telegraph 3rd November 2016

A study by the universities of Manchester, Newcastle and King's College London has shown that early intervention for young children with autism reduces core "symptoms" of the condition (report, October 26).

First UK ‘fixing room’ could be turning point in approach to treating addicts

The Conversation 3rd November 2016

Article on providing safe places for addicts to take drugs. The Glasgow proposal would be the first facility to open in the UK, although as part of a King's College London research study, limited trials in 2007 involved giving heroin to addicts in special clinics in London, Darlington and Brighton.

Rabbi Lord Sacks' Templeton Prize celebrated at King's

King's press release 3rd November 2016

On 2 November the Principal and the Dean hosted a small dinner at King’s to celebrate the award of the 2016 Templeton Prize to Rabbi Lord Sacks FKC, one of our most distinguished alumni. Professor Edward Byrne AC, President & Principal, said: ‘It was a particular delight to host Rabbi Lord Sacks back at King’s. The 2016 Templeton Prize is a wonderful recognition of the respect and esteem in which he is held in contemporary British society and around the world.’

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Smoking a pack a day for a year causes 150 mutations in lung cells

King's press release 3rd November 2016

Scientists have measured the catastrophic genetic damage caused by smoking in different organs of the body and identified several different mechanisms by which tobacco smoking causes mutations in DNA. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘The results are a mixture of the expected and unexpected, and reveal a picture of direct and indirect effects.’ This was reported by Guardian and South China Morning Post.

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Back from the dead

Daily Mail 3rd November 2016

Q&A mentioning the artist John Houlston, Alumni. Some of his work is still on display at the university, including Legillium (lectern) in the Strand Chapel which he carved from the base of a 500-year old oak tree that had been blown down in the 1987 storms.

Pious progressives have created a spiral of silence which could yet conceal a Donald Trump victory

Telegraph 3rd November 2016

Article on the US presidential race, by Dr Thomas Roulet, School of Management & Business. ‘Because the partisans of Trump, Brexit, and other seemingly unpopular options, are vilified, and persistently presented as being a minority, they end up believing they are indeed one. This makes them less likely to express their view, and thus less likely to reveal it to pollsters,’ he said.

Columbia University global centres aim to prove university’s ‘relevance’

Times Higher Education Supplement 3rd November 2016

Article discussing how universities can ensure that they stay relevant in an increasingly globalised world. It is mentioned that King's, Arizona State University and the University of New South Wales launched an alliance earlier this year with the goal to collaborate on research to help solve ‘global grand challenges.’

Norway and Russia

BBC World Service 3rd November 2016

Professor Mats Berdal, War Studies, hosts a feature on the historic cross-border relationship between Norway and Russia.

Reaction to court ruling on Brexit vote

BBC News Online 3rd November 2016

Summary of reactions to the High Court Brexit ruling, including that of Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, who spoke to BBC Radio Four. ‘I think the important point is it's not quite as earth-shattering as some people are saying because Article 50 doesn't trigger a trade negotiation with the European Union,’ he said. He also wrote a piece for Times.

Sleep deprivation may cause people to eat more calories

King's press release 2nd November 2016

Sleep deprivation may result in people consuming more calories during the following day, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis led by researchers at King’s. Dr Gerda Pot, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘The main cause of obesity is an imbalance between calorie intake and expenditure and this study adds to accumulating evidence that sleep deprivation could contribute to this imbalance.’ This was reported by Daily Telegraph, Times, Daily Mail, i, Daily Express, Sun, International Business Times UK, Deccan Herald, NDTV, New York Times, Forbes, Hindustan Times, Yahoo and Time.

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The global burden of cancer

King's press release 2nd November 2016

A new research series published in The Lancet has called for international intervention to help reduce preventable deaths from cancer in low- and middle- income countries. Professor Richard Sullivan, Institute of Cancer Policy, was a co-author on the series. This was reported by Reuters, Daily Mail, Deccan Chronicle, Fox Health and Yahoo. Professor Sullivan also co-wrote a piece for Conversation and spoke to Al Jazeera during his attendance at the World Cancer Congress, where the series was announced. ‘We’re really facing a global epidemic here of cancer and a lot of countries don’t appreciate how big a tsunami this is going to be,’ he said.

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Make central London diesel-free to solve air pollution crisis – report

Guardian 2nd November 2016

Ridding inner London of virtually all diesel vehicles would solve the capital's air pollution crisis, says a report by the Institute for Public Policy Research. King’s is mentioned to have been involved in the research.

What is the dark web? Here’s what you need to know

Metro 2nd November 2016

Article on the 'dark web', which has many sites visible via a special browser similar to Firefox and free PC software which takes minutes to install. Up to 57 per cent of the hidden sites accessible via the browser Tor are used for crime, such as drugs, stolen cards and child porn, according to King's researchers.

Mosul

BBC Radio 4 Today 2nd November 2016

Charlie Winter, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), reflects on comments made by Donald Trump on the conflict in Mosul. ‘Donald Trump is a fantastic recruiting sergeant for IS. He repeats many of their narratives,’ he said (06:52). His comments were also reported by Independent and BBC World Service.

These soldiers on Ukraine’s front lines are starting to doubt the war’s value

Huffington Post 2nd November 2016

Article looking at nationalist fighters in the conflict between Ukraine and Russia. Dr Alex Clarkson, European & International Studies, is quoted.

Syria

Al Jazeera 2nd November 2016

Russia has said it will extend a pause in airstrikes. Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, comments on the conflict in Syria. ‘What the Russians have done is engage a unilateral pause. This is not a ceasefire, this is the next step in Russia’s approach to bolstering Assad’s position,’ he said. Dr Puri also spoke on BBC 4 World News Today.

Foreign policy

O Globo 2nd November 2016

Article looking at foreign policy following the US elections. Commenting on UK-US relations, Professor John Bew, War Studies, suggested that positive relations would continue under Hillary Clinton, but on different terms.

Finding our voice

The Psychologist 1st November 2016

Research assistants (RAs) work in a wide range of different fields in the sciences and social sciences. At the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (loPPN), King's College London (KCL) there are around 228 RAs working across 14 departments.

From Babylab to baby theatre

The Psychologist 1st November 2016

Feature on the behaviour of babies that mentions the Animating the Brain play which was developed by neuroscientists at King's College London, puppeteers and filmmakers.

Streaming instead of dreaming

Mail Online 1st November 2016

A new study suggests that bedtime phone use is causing children to sleep less and be excessively tired the next day, which could have serious repercussions to their health. The researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London reviewed medical literature in the hopes of understanding the effects of smartphone use at bedtime. Also reported in the Telegraph, The Times, The Sun, CNN, Fox News, Washington Post, Daily Telegraph, Reuters, New York Times, Scientific American, Yahoo, Time Magazine, and the Spectator.

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Putin's humiliation: Russia braced for huge cuts to defence as financial crisis looms

Daily Express 1st November 2016

According to a draft budget seen by the Financial Times, President Putin's spending programme on defence is likely to be cut from £50bn to £37bn in 2017. Dr Natasha Kuhrt, War Studies, said: ‘It's not definite yet but clearly with the economic situation being as it is, something has to give.’

Catholic church updates medieval 'guide to dying well' for 21st century

Guardian 1st November 2016

The Catholic church in England and Wales has brought the medieval manuscript Ars Moriendi - The Art of Dying - into the digital age, with a website aimed at helping terminally ill people and their loved ones deal with death. Dr Katherine Sleeman, Cicely Saunders Institute, said: ‘I would like everyone to have a good death but we can’t achieve that unless we as a society stop whispering and start talking about it.’

Sir David Attenborough branded 'elite snob' for saying British people were not wise enough for Brexit vote

Evening Standard 1st November 2016

Article about Sir David Attenborough includes a picture of him attending an event at King's.

Mosul

Al Jazeera 1st November 2016

Professor Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, comments on the military offensive in Mosul. ‘The battle has now entered ground zero, which is the outskirts of Mosul. They’re now actually facing real resistance; prior to that they’ve been fighting in the villages, and now they’re entering into a city that is much more densely populated,’ he said.

Go-ahead given for two King's overseas projects

King's press release 31st October 2016

King's is to lead two innovative new projects supporting overseas higher education, including a programme for Syrian refugees, following confirmation of major government grants. Dr Joanna Newman, Vice Principal (International), said: ‘The SPHEIR project is an excellent initiative and we are delighted that King’s has been selected to lead on the first two of these ambitious projects.’

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King's joins first ever Russell Group delegation to China

King's press release 31st October 2016

King’s has joined the first Russell Group delegation to visit China on a mission to strengthen innovation and collaboration between the UK and China. Professor Kerry Brown, Director of the Lau China Institute who was representing King's said: 'This is the largest ever visit by the Russell Group university consortium to China.’ This was reported by China Daily.

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The costly gridlock: How can we keep our cities moving?

Guardian 31st October 2016

Coverage of a roundtable discussion on urban transport hosted by the Guardian. Commenting as a participant on the roundtable, Professor Frank Kelly, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘In London, we have a world class transport system, but it’s still not good enough.’ Professor Kelly was also quoted in a piece for New Scientist and wrote a piece for British Medical Journal.

Fears as apprentice nurses allowed to dispense drugs

Various media outlets 31st October 2016

Apprentice nurses will be allowed to administer controlled drugs to NHS patients, under new plans. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, King's Learning Institute and Nursing and Midwifery, said: ‘It does not appear to be well thought through and is a recipe for confusion within the nursing profession, the public and other professions such as doctors about who is doing what in clinical practice.’ This was reported by Daily Telegraph, Sun, Daily Mirror and Daily Mail.

Oxford and Cambridge still struggle with an elitist image - will this ever change?

Telegraph 31st October 2016

In a survey by the Sutton Trust released this month, 13 per cent of state school teachers said they would not advise students to apply to Oxbridge because they were concerned they wouldn't be happy, or felt they were unlikely to be accepted. A study from King's found that across both state and private schools, the South East predominates Oxbridge admissions.

Defeating ISIS in Mosul will open door to many challenges

NBC 31st October 2016

Dr Jill Russell, Defence Studies, commented on the conflict in Mosul. ‘If they can liberate Mosul, if they can take care of the civilians who will be affected by the operation, if sectarian violence can be kept at an absolute minimum in the aftermath, then it gives a united Iraq a better chance,’ she said.

Spanish elections

CNBC 31st October 2016

Spain’s parliament has voted for a new Conservative government, avoiding a third general election. Commenting, Dr Emmy Eklundh, European & International Studies, said: ‘The socialist party in Spain has made this very controversial decision to abstain in the vote for a new prime minister.’

Prosecution 'hid' report on extent of Janner's dementia

Sunday Times 30th October 2016

One of the lawyers involved in the prosecution of the late Lord Janner over historic sex allegations is under investigation for allegedly failing to reveal to a court the full extent of the peer's deteriorating mental health. Michael Kopelman, an expert in memory loss and a professor of neuropsychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, told Leicestershire police the previous November that Janner would not be able to understand the proceedings.

Heartburn drugs can TRIPLE young men's infertility risk: Those prescribed the medicine are more likely to have a low sperm count

Daily Mail 30th October 2016

Heartburn drugs prescribed to millions of people on the NHS may be leaving some young men infertile, according to research. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, said: 'Our research shows PPIs mess up the gut microbiome, which produce Vitamin B.’

Teething problems: Why brain scans are as inaccurate as dental records for checking age

Guardian 30th October 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains why brain scans are not accurate for checking age. ‘Recent research has shown the brain continues developing right up until the mid-20s and beyond,’ he said.

Chinese investment and the fight for Australia's largest cattle empire

Telegraph 30th October 2016

Article exploring Chinese investment in Australia. Dr Sam Beatson, Lau China Institute, said: ‘Australia’s political concerns are the same as any other developed country receiving investments from China.’

Obiturary: Gerald Roy Patterson

Lancet 29th October 2016

Obituary of psychologist Gerald Roy Patterson. Sir Michael Rutter, professor at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is mentioned.

Thank goodness Theresa May has restored cabinet government – or has she?

Independent 29th October 2016

Article by Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, on Theresa May’s decision to revive traditional collegiate government mentions an event hosted by the Strand group. The article also mentions that Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, recently invited Lord Butler, the former cabinet secretary, and Lord Hennessy, constitutional historian, to talk to his class on Prime Ministers and No 10. The event hosted by the Strand group was also mentioned by Financial Times, i and Evening Standard.

‘I've never needed anyone else’: Life as an identical twin

Guardian 29th October 2016

Article about twins mentions the twins research programme at King's.

Climate change is invisible, insidious and urgent. Can the arts help us see it?

Guardian 28th October 2016

Article about climate change mentions a recent study by King's, which revealed that up to 9,500 Londoners die each year due to long-term exposure to air pollution.

1776: Would you like to reconsider?

Wall Street Journal 28th October 2016

Visiting Professor Andrew Roberts, War Studies, writes about the upcoming US election and political system. ‘In 2016, it is no longer sustainable for Americans to say they have the best democratic system in the world,’ he said.

Russia/US relations

Globo 28th October 2016

Dr Ruth Deyermond, War Studies, discusses US relations with Russia, and how this has changed with accusations of hacking during the US elections. ‘I think it is clear Putin would not like Clinton to be President,’ she said.

Research study expects EU gas supply mix to change fundamentally

King's press release 27th October 2016

Research by ewi Energy Research & Scenarios, Cologne and the European Centre for Energy and Resource Security (EUCERS), at King’s, provides a comprehensive assessment of EU options to diversify gas supplies in the coming 20 years and outlines several potential scenarios of future markets. Co-author Dr Adnan Vatansever, EUCERS and King’s Russia Institute, said: ‘The future of the EU’s gas diversification depends on political factors that may be partly exogenous to Europe’s policy-makers.’

Honorary doctorates of King’s

King's press release 27th October 2016

Honorary doctorates of King’s have been presented to four highly distinguished recipients at a special ceremony in the Chapel at King’s. The new King’s honorary doctors are Professor Thomas Jessell FRS, Professor Mona Siddiqui OBE FRSE, the 9th Duke of Wellington OBE DL and Professor Ke Yang.

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Top ten universities conduct a third of all UK animal research

King's press release 27th October 2016

The ten UK universities who do the most world-leading biomedical research have announced their animal research statistics, revealing that they collectively conducted a third of all UK animal research in 2015.

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Advantage Britain: Ruling the education world post-Brexit

Times Higher Education Supplement 27th October 2016

With the right strategies, becoming the leading country for scholarship and science is within the UK's grasp, says educational consultant Jamie Martin. New freedoms around academic selection may make it easier to set up schools focused on priority subjects, a move already taken by King’s with the King’s Maths School.

2016 Woman's Hour Power List

BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour 27th October 2016

Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, takes part in a discussion about the 2016 Woman’s Hour Power List. She said: ‘The women pioneers who championed the services for contraception and safe abortion are really critical people.’ (10:19)

Sustainable energy

CNBC Storyboard 27th October 2016

Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, discusses developments in technology. ‘We are trying to teleport our human skills from one place to another.’

A mammoth Mozart box set aims at more than ‘complete’

NPR 27th October 2016

A box set of Mozart’s work commemorating the 225th anniversary of his death has been released. The article quotes Professor Cliff Eisen, Music, author of the set’s biography. ‘When we started planning it, I did think of it already as being this kind of universal resource that someone who's really interested in late 18th-century music, or Mozart in particular, or music education, would find worthwhile,’ he said.

Iron deficient? These edible insects pack more minerals than sirloin steak

PBS 27th October 2016

Certain types of edible insects can provide more iron than sirloin steak, new research claims. Lead author Dr Yemisi Latunde-Dada, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Iron deficiency is relatively more frequent and pronounced worldwide in populations relying predominantly on plants for their nutrition.’ This was also reported by Wall Street Journal.

How parents can help their children with autism

Time Magazine 26th October 2016

In the new report published in the journal The Lancet, UK researchers looked at the results of a study called the Preschool Autism Communication Trial. Tony Charman, chair in clinical child psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted. He said: “Sometimes it might be natural for a parent at the beginning of the therapy to not notice that attempt at communication. The therapist can help the parent see that as an opportunity: how can they respond or locate those cues?”. Also reported by Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail, Maily Mirror, BBC Radio, BBC 1 News, NBC News, CNN, ITV News, the Independent, and India Today.

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Who are you again

BBC World Service 26th October 2016

Interview with Punit Shah, of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, about facial recognition disorders.

Were you bullied as a child?

Mail Online 26th October 2016

It has long been considered a cruel and unnecessary blight on too many youngster's childhoods. The study, by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and King's College London, tracked more than 9000 people over 40 years.

Promising drug target for aggressive 'triple-negative' breast cancers identified

King's press release 26th October 2016

Scientists from Breast Cancer Now’s Research Unit at King’s have identified a molecule crucial to the growth of ‘triple-negative’ breast cancers that they believe could now be targeted by drugs to help treat patients resistant to chemotherapy. Professor Andrew Tutt, Director of the Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Breast Cancer Now Research Unit at King’s, said: 'It is early days but as PIM1-inhibitor drugs have already been discovered they may give us a new way to hit these cancer genes.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail, Sun, Daily Telegraph and Spectator.

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UK dominates list of top 10 European universities, but US takes top five global positions

City A.M. 25th October 2016

In a new ranking of top European universities by US News & World, King’s features at number eight.

Can an electric blast zap away your gut pain? Tiny implant could treat Crohn's disease by sending small electrical pulses

Daily Mail 24th October 2016

Article mentions that scientists at King's are researching ways to treat and possibly cure Crohn's.

India sets jet suppliers scrambling

Financial Times 24th October 2016

India has kick-started a race for what is likely to be among the world’s most lucrative military aerospace contracts, with international defence companies lining up to pitch for as much as $10 billion’s worth of business supplying fighter jets for its air force. Dr Walter Ladwig, War Studies, said: ‘This is a globally significant deal, whichever way India goes.’

Breaking the ethnic breast cancer taboo

i 24th October 2016

A paper published last month in the BMC Health Services Research journal, written by researchers from the Breast Cancer Care charity (BCC), King's and the University of Surrey was the first study of its kind to consider the patient needs and experiences within BME communities during the early stages of cancer.

BAME Composers

BBC Radio 3 Music Matters 24th October 2016

Programme about BAME composers makes reference to research by Dr Christina Scharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries. (22:21)

Diabetes type 2: Offer gastric surgery regardless of weight, says surgeon

BBC News Online 24th October 2016

Thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes are being denied the chance of life-saving surgery because they do not fit strict NHS guidelines on weight. Professor Francesco Rubino, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘In patients who have done everything possible - what is the point of not offering it, just because their BMI does not fit the criteria that we have arbitrarily introduced for the treatment of obesity?’ This was also reported by BBC News.

Brexit and the energy sector - the risks of Little Britain

Financial Times 24th October 2016

Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece on the implications of Brexit. ‘Universities – which face wider proposals from the government to make it harder to attract foreign students – thrive because knowledge doesn’t recognise geographical boundaries. Why should Shell or BP – or the FT or Kings College London – be ashamed of employing someone born in Paris, Tehran or Trinidad?’ he said.

German terrorism case highlights Europe’s security challenges

New York Times 24th October 2016

European security agencies are facing increased scrutiny over their abilities to counter terrorism. Commenting, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘American agencies are Europe’s best counterterrorists…That is the big secret that no one wants to talk about.’

Newspaper review

BBC1 Breakfast 23rd October 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, discusses the day’s newspapers.

Why your brain makes you hate certain foods

Guardian 23rd October 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains why our brains makes us hate particular foods. ‘Over time, taste buds are ‘pruned’ to tolerate many new flavours. But a single bad experience can be enough to put someone off a food for life,’ he said.

What I wish I'd known as a junior doctor

British Medical Journal 22nd October 2016

Doctors comment on what they wish that had known when they were junior doctors. Robin Murray and Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience are contributors.

Men of war

Economist 22nd October 2016

Book review of 'Salafi-Jihadism: The History of an idea' by Dr Shiraz Maher ICSR War Studies.

Brothers in blood: How Putin has helped Assad tear Syria apart

New Statesman 22nd October 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), has written a piece about the humanitarian crisis in Syria. ‘The conflict has become the worst humanitarian crisis since the Second World War,’ he said.

The Francis Crick Institute

BBC World Service Our Genetic Future 22nd October 2016

King’s is mentioned in a programme regarding research being carried out at the Francis Crick Biomedical Research Institute.

Book review - The god complex

i 21st October 2016

Professor Ivor Mason reviews the book "Homo deus: A brief history of tomorrow" by Yuval Noah Harari.

Are You Singletasking Yet?

Fox news 21st October 2016

A 2005 study by Dr Glenn Wilson, then at the Institute of Psychiatry, found that workers who are distracted by phone calls, emails and text messages suffer a greater loss of IQ than a person smoking marijuana.

Corporate advisers are the real villains

Financial Times 21st October 2016

Dr Simon Teague, Chemistry, has written a letter about corporate advisors. ‘The Philip Green debate this week saw parliament at its self-indulgent worst. The desire for a pantomime villain is obscuring the role of his corporate financial advisers who provided the financial instruments for such dealings,’ he said.

Act of terror in Sweden? Desperate ISIS claim credit for arsonist attack amid Mosul defeat

Daily Express 21st October 2016

ISIS has claimed that it was one of their jihadi fighters who set a prayer house used by Shia Muslims alight. Hans Brun, War Studies, said: ‘What’s interesting is that the incident has not gained much attention in Sweden or internationally. So the questions remain, how did they gain access to this information.’

Artists are showing how we interact with war and conflict daily with new exhibition at King's College London

Evening Standard 21st October 2016

Article on a new exhibition, Traces of War, currently held at King’s.

ISIS attack in Kirkuk is reality check amid Mosul offensive

NBC News 21st October 2016

Article discussing the ongoing conflict in Mosul. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, commented: ‘As Mosul is being encircled and attacked, ISIS is going to do things like this to pull focus away from their defeats in the heartland and effect huge damage.’

Whowonit? ‘Seismic’ Man Book Prize due next week

New York Times 21st October 2016

Judges of the Man Booker Prize are set to unveil this year’s winner. Dr Jon Day, English, a judge on the panel, said: ‘It is going to be a very long and difficult decision.’ This was also reported by Reuters and Hindu.

Vladimir Putin and Volodymyr Groysman

Sky News Sky News with Colin Brazier 19th October 2016

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, spoke ahead of Vladimir Putin and Volodymyr Groysman meeting in Berlin. She said: ‘I think that we are facing a very serious crisis with Russia on many fronts’ (11:30).

Education loses lustre for Indians on Brexit, tough laws

Economic Times of India 19th October 2016

Article discussing the UK as a destination for Indian students following Brexit. King’s is briefly mentioned to not be expecting a drop in numbers. This was also reported by Times of India.

Bollywood becomes India and Pakistan’s latest battleground

International New York Times 19th October 2016

Pakistan has imposed a blanket ban on Indian shows on its television networks and radio stations, a day after one of India’s top film directors vowed not to hire actors from Pakistan. Commenting, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘We have a government that is taking a very, very hard line on Pakistan.’

'Electric shocks stopped my seizures': Pioneering new treatment reduces epileptic fits

Daily Express 18th October 2016

Article about an epileptic girl who has been seizure-free for just over a year, after undergoing a new electrical brain stimulation technique developed at King’s. Dr Antonio Valentin, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘If a child’s epilepsy cannot be controlled, it can seriously disrupt their lives.’

Fear gets the cold shoulder

Sun 18th October 2016

Opinion article on cold water swimming, mentioning the King's College Twin Research Centre.

EU faces influx of Isis fighters as they flee Mosul offensive, top official warns

Independent 18th October 2016

Violent extremists who left Europe to join Isis now fleeing the US-backed offensive on Mosul who try to come home pose a "serious threat" to European security, the EU's security commissioner has warned. Around one fifth of Isis's total fighters are residents or nationals of Western Europe, a King's study estimated last year.

Can devolution help bridge the skills gap?

Prospect 18th October 2016

Report on the Prospect roundtable discussion "Making devolution work: how can an industrial strategy address the UK's skills and employability gap?" mentions that King’s faced an oversupply of well-educated, middle-class students with four A-levels which meant that medicine was becoming one of the least socially represented degree courses. To tackle this, they recruited a second tier of students with lower grades and provide an extra year of education to bring them up to scratch. This degree programme was also mentioned in an article in British Medical Journal.

Cigarette sales no longer key profit source for UK corner shops

Financial Times 18th October 2016

Cigarettes are no longer a core product for Britain's corner shops and small retailers, according to research from the antismoking group ASH. The report, a joint project with the National Centre for Addiction at King's, argues that selling tobacco requires retailers to tie up their capital in bulky excess stock, which is often placed in prime positions behind the counter despite behind hidden by boardings.

Reimagining BRICS

The Hindu 18th October 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the eighth BRICS summit that ended in Goa on Sunday. ‘It was clear from the way India shaped the agenda of the Goa summit that Mr. Modi was working towards a different end game this time, looking beyond the immediate BRICS mandate,’ he said.

Healthy mice born from first lab-grown eggs spark calls for debate on future use

Various media outlets 17th October 2016

Scientists have created working mammalian eggs from stem cells and used them to produce healthy offspring. Though the research was conducted in mice, ‘developing similar culture systems in other species should be only a matter of technicality,’ said Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, who was not involved in the research. This was reported by Guardian, Independent, Times, i and Times of India.

Mosul

Various media outlets 17th October 2016

King’s academics have been commenting on the conflict in Mosul. Charlie Winter, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), was interviewed for BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight and Al Jazeera. He also spoke to Daily Telegraph. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, was interviewed for Al Jazeera and Research by International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) was mentioned in a piece for NBC news. Dr Jill Russell, Defence Studies, was interviewed for BBC News.

REVEALED: King George VI's World War II plot to save Elizabeth in case of Nazi invasion

Daily Express 17th October 2016

Details of a Royal escape plan which would have seen Princess Elizabeth whisked away to another country in the event of Hitler invading have emerged. The hidden archives were uncovered in Windsor Castle by historian Dr Andrew Stewart, Defence Studies, who has detailed them in his new book, ‘The King’s Private Army’. He said: ‘In the worst case and with it looking like the secret location was jeopardised, the two princesses were to be taken out of the country to ensure their safety.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Dogs made me give up hygiene

Times 17th October 2016

Opinion article on the issue of hygiene and immunology, with reference to Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology.

Blocked banking deal hangs over May’s India trip

Times 17th October 2016

Theresa May is to make her first big trade trip to India despite Britain blocking a free-trade deal between the sub-continent and the European Union because of a disagreement over access for UK-based banks and insurers. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘The Indians did not want us taking over their market.’

Why is it so hard to find an effective drug treatment for autism?

Yahoo! News 17th October 2016

Article on treatment for autism. Dr Eva Loth, IoPPN, said: ‘Geneticists have recently identified monogenic forms of autism. Although they only affect a very small number of patients, it has conceptually provided us with a new entry point to understand causes of the disorder and to find treatments that target these causes.’ A piece about autism written by Punit Shah, IoPPN, originally for The Conversation was featured in Independent.

Bankers’ order

Times 17th October 2016

Diary piece with mention of an event on Friday during which Richard Wilson, Tony Blair's former cabinet secretary, addressed students at King's.

Viewpoint: Brics sees rekindling of India-Russia romance

BBC News Online 17th October 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the Brics summit in Goa. ‘Sino-Indian ties have been going downhill for the last few years and the future of Brics remains tentative at best because of this growing divergence. But it was the other bilateral relationship- the one between India and Russia - that was the focus of the Goa summit,’ he said.

Among Trump’s fans: Hindu nationalists

International New York Times 17th October 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, comments on the small faction of Hindu nationalists in India and the United States who support Donald Trump. ‘What Donald Trump articulates has given them some food for thought,’ he said.

Use-by dates

Al Jazeera 17th October 2016

Dr Sophie Medlin, Nutrition, commented on the use-by and best-before dates on food packaging. ‘Best-before simply refers to quality. So you may not enjoy the product so much…but it is certainly still safe to eat,’ she said.

The Communist party is above all pragmatic

Financial Times 16th October 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, has written a letter on the Chinese Communist party. ‘Everything we know about Mr Xi shows that he is a political tactician,’ he said.

What makes us think a wine tastes good?

Guardian 16th October 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery, Director, explains what makes us think a wine tastes good. ‘If you think a wine will be good or bad, or red or white, the brain primes itself to taste it in that way, regardless of what the tongue’s sensors tell it,’ he said.

Swiss immigration fig leaf won’t sate hard Brexit believers

Bloomberg 16th October 2016

Commenting on the ongoing discussions around the UK exiting the EU, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘There won’t be a deal to have your cake and eat it.’

Universities challenged

Spectator 15th October 2016

Article on how to improve British universities, mentioning that King's is one of eight British universities ranked in the world's top 100.

Fat mums-to-be are exposing their unborn children to risk of high blood pressure

Sun 15th October 2016

Overweight mums-to-be are exposing their kids to the risk of high blood pressure, kidney disease and early death. Professor Lucilla Poston, Women’s Health, said: ‘We are increasingly aware of the important role played by maternal metabolic and nutritional status in the risk of adulthood disease.’

Stress and anxiety

Huffington Post 15th October 2016

Article on charity venture ‘Music for Mental Wealth’ (MMW) which aims to help people who have struggled with the negative impact of stress and anxiety. MMW infuses music with a scientific formula to improve general wellbeing and are working with King’s on proprietary technology and proving it works.

Broadwater Farm: What’s the future for Britain’s most notorious housing estate?

Daily Telegraph 15th October 2016

Article on Broadwater Farm housing estate mentions ‘Utopia on Trial’, a book written by Emeritus Professor Alice Coleman, Geography.

Crossrail Discovery: London's Lost Graveyard

Channel 4 15th October 2016

A repeat programme that reveals new information about the people who built London by examining the 300-year-old graveyard that was uncovered by engineers from the Crossrail construction project. Dr Ian Mudway, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, discusses the deaths of the children and sets out to try and show that bad chimney design contributed to their deaths. (19:40)

DNA's discovery has twists in its tale

New Scientist 15th October 2016

Letter on the discovery of DNA, mentioning the first clear X-ray diffraction image was obtained at King's in 1950.

Realising the health benefits of sharing data

British Medical Journal 15th October 2016

Article on researchers sharing patient data with each other, by Visiting Senior Research Fellow Elizabeth Pisani, Policy Institute, and colleagues. ‘Data sharing is often asserted to be good for health,’ they said.

Banks and shops have happier customers if they let staff go 'off script'

Daily Express 15th October 2016

Businesses that let sales assistants or customer service personnel chat away under their own initiative leaves customers with higher levels of satisfaction according to researchers from the University of East Anglia, Aston University and King's.

Brain drain has begun . . . and it’s costing millions, academics warn

Times 15th October 2016

A "brain drain" of leading academics has begun already, four months after the Brexit vote, universities have told The Times. Professor Russell Goulbourne, Dean of the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, said: ‘The college is providing legal advice to people who want to change their citizenship status and also provides interest-free loans to help them through that process.’

Radicalisation

BBC World Service 15th October 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, comments on his book about radicalisation. ‘It’s not a book about an organisation…I always wanted to write a book about people,’ he said.

Grandmother’s little helper – a new drug problem emerges

The Conversation 14th October 2016

Article on the increase in gabapentinoid addiction, by Tony Rao of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience.

Exiled prime minister is waiting in the wings

Daily Telegraph 14th October 2016

Opinion piece on the death of Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej, by Visiting Professor David Martin Jones, War Studies. ‘The succession and its constitutional fallout are likely to provide for both interesting and unstable times,’ he said.

Modi and Putin to meet as longstanding alliance drifts

Financial Times 14th October 2016

Last month about 70 Russian troops arrived in Pakistan for their first joint combat exercise with their south Asian counterparts. Dr Walter Ladwig, War Studies, said: ‘Unlike India’s relationships with other countries such as the US, its close ties with Russia are completely uncontroversial. Even opposition parties accept that Russia has a special place politically for India.’

Clarke laps up the Blues

Evening Standard 14th October 2016

Visiting professor Sir Nicholas Macpherson, Policy Institute, is mentioned in this diary article on a book event by former Chancellor, Ken Clarke.

Is your child a fussy eater? The reason could be in their genes

Guardian 14th October 2016

Research suggests that picky eating and a refusal to try new foods are heavily influenced by a child's genetic makeup. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Every kid is different. There is a genetic tendency to be more or less fussy.’

Winnie the Pooh celebrates 90th anniversary with philosophical talking benches around UK

Daily Express 14th October 2016

A new study has revealed that a quarter of the population think Winnie-the-Pooh is the greatest philosopher in the world. To celebrate 90 years of learning from the bear, Disney has created a 'Thotful Spot' bench featuring a talking statue of Winnie-the-Pooh that will tour the UK and Europe, stopping off at places including the gardens of King's.

Educating publisher Pearson bets on online degrees

Reuters 14th October 2016

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, is looking to online higher education course following a downturn in its traditional textbooks and marking business. The article mentions a student who is taking a fully online course at King’s. This was also reported by CNBC.

How to save the US economy

CNN 14th October 2016

Visiting Professor Yanis Varoufakis, Political Economy, writes on the US economy. ‘What explains this decline? The answer is simple: investment in the real US economy has been woefully low,’ he said.

People with autism make more logical decisions

The Conversation 13th October 2016

Article written by Punit Shah, a researcher from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, about a recent investigation into autism and decision making. Also reported in Scientific American, The Indian Express, India Today, Deccan Chronicle and the Independent.

King's press release related to 'People with autism make more logical decisions'

Brain receptor identified as key link between obese mothers and high blood pressure in children

King's press release 13th October 2016

Exposure of babies to high levels of the ‘fullness’ hormone, leptin, in the womb irreversibly activates receptors in the brain that regulate blood pressure, according to a new study by researchers from King’s, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. Professor Lucilla Poston, Women’s Health, said: ‘This study identifies an exquisite vulnerability of certain cells in the developing brain to metabolic disturbance associated with maternal obesity, and shows how this may contribute to development of high blood pressure in later life.’ Dr Anne-Maj Samuelsson, Women’s Health, said: ‘Our findings need to be verified in human studies to determine if Mc4r is a therapeutic target for hypertension.’ This was reported by Hindustan Times.

King's press release related to 'Brain receptor identified as key link between obese mothers and high blood pressure in children'

Preventing child obesity in the next generation must start before conception

King's press release 13th October 2016

The key to preventing obesity in future generations is to make (their) parents healthier before they conceive, leading health researchers suggest. They argue that a new approach is needed to motivate future parents to live a healthier lifestyle. Professor Lucilla Poston, Women’s Health, said: ‘A pragmatic solution is required on a global scale, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries where we see a rapidly rising problem.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'Preventing child obesity in the next generation must start before conception'

Women drive rising demand for law

Times 13th October 2016

Article notes that King's is the eleventh most popular university to read law.

Why DO our mouths water? Expert reveals how just smelling food can make you produce more saliva

Daily Mail 13th October 2016

Article (originally written for Hippocratic Post) by Professor Gordon Proctor, Mucosal & Salivary Biology, on why our mouths salivate when we smell food. ‘Simply looking at food in a magazine won’t make you salivate. This can be demonstrated in all animals except human beings. We don’t appear to salivate when we see a picture of food, but we do salivate when we see and smell food,’ he said.

Julia Gillard warns Theresa May about sexist criticism

BBC News Online 13th October 2016

Visiting Professor Julia Gillard, Policy Institute, has warned Theresa May that she may face sexist criticism as Prime Minister. Speaking of her own time in government, she said: ‘The harder it got, it became more likely that gendered insult would become the political weapon.’

Blood clots are more common (and deadly) than you may think

Huffington Post 13th October 2016

Professor Beverley Hunt, Cancer Studies, has written a piece about thrombosis. ‘While you might know all about blood clots in coronary arteries (heart attack) and blood clots in brain arteries (stroke), much less recognised are blood clots in veins (deep vein thromboses), which can break off and travel through the body to block the blood supply to part, or all of the lungs (pulmonary embolism),’ she said.

World Thrombosis Day: Woman Claims Contraceptive Pill Caused Blood Clot That Nearly Killed Her

Huffington Post 13th October 2016

Article about the link between the contraceptive pill and thrombosis. Professor Beverley Hunt, Cancer Studies, said: ‘The use of any combined contraceptive pill (combined means a combination of oestrogen with progesterone) almost triples the risk of blood clots, though the baseline risk is small.’

World leaders in the arts offered university programme

Times Higher Education Supplement 13th October 2016

King’s has launched an executive programme for international cultural leaders. Aimed at those with at least three years' senior experience in the arts, heritage, culture, cultural education or creative industries sectors, the intensive and immersive seven-day course will be offered for the first time in April 2017.

How to stop city life from stressing you out

CNN 12th October 2016

A meta study found that city dwellers may have a 21% greater likelihood of developing anxiety disorders, and a 39% increased risk of mood disorders. Spending time in, or ideally living close to, green spaces is one way to combat stress, according to Dr. Andrea Mechelli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. He said: "There is a really strong effect from green spaces, and in general access to nature. We know that people who live near a park, for example, they have less risk of developing depression. Overcrowding, noise and possibly even pollution may have a negative impact," particularly on those who have mental illnesses.

Antidepressants: Drugs make people 'twice as likely to think about suicide' study claims

Express 12th October 2016

TAKING anti-depressants could double the risk of having feelings which could lead to suicide - a controversial new study has suggested. However, Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Professor of Psychological Medicine at King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, said the study 'changes nothing'.

'The New Crime-Terror Nexus'- link between crime and terror growing closer, says ICSR report

King's press release 12th October 2016

Criminals and terrorists are becoming ever more closely linked due to role of extremist groups such as Islamic State, new research by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), based at King’s, claims. Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘The lines between crime and terrorism are becoming increasingly blurred and we need to adapt accordingly.’ This was reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Newsweek, a separate piece for Daily Mail, Washington Post, New York Times, Times of India, Hindu, Associated Press, Hindustan Times, Fox News, Economic Times, Deccan Chronicle, ABC News, CBS, and BBC World Service.

King's press release related to ''The New Crime-Terror Nexus'- link between crime and terror growing closer, says ICSR report '

A sparkling waterfront town in Zone 2

Evening Standard 12th October 2016

Article mentions the new King’s campus which will be at Canada Water. This was also reported by Independent.

Screen use can affect your eye health in digital age

Financial Times 12th October 2016

Article on eye health in the digital age. Professor Chris Hammond, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said that despite the increasing use of smartphones and tablets, ‘we are not seeing any epidemics of eye problems related.’

Has big business lost its influence on Westminster?

VICE 12th October 2016

Article on the relationship between business and the Conservative Party, in light of Brexit. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘Big businesses like to think they will have direct access to politicians without necessarily having to lobby in public. In the case of Brexit, they will have tried, ever since the leave vote happened and even before then, to make sure it's done in a way that isn't detrimental to them.’

Scheme failed to boost care time

Nursing Times 12th October 2016

The main legacy of a national productivity programme aimed at nurses has been to improve the ward environment rather than increase time spent with patients, suggests a study by King’s and Southampton University. Professor Glenn Robert, Adult Nursing, said: ‘Although just over half the trusts that ever took up productive ward have now stopped using it in its original modular form, the same proportion told us that the programme had informed their organisation’s quality improvement strategy.’

Radicalisation

BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight 12th October 2016

Interview with Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, on radicalisation. Speaking of the prospect of fighters in Syria coming back to Britain, he said: ‘I don’t think that suddenly 400 people will knock at Britain’s door, some of them will go to other conflicts, some of them will over time try to return to Britain.’(22:18)

Three-person baby 'race' dangerous

BBC News Online 12th October 2016

The race to make babies from three people is a major worry, duping couples and a dangerous experiment on mums and babies, warn scientists and ethicists. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘The major worry is how technically skilful these clinics are, what quality control measures are in place and what information they provide to desperate patients seeking help.’

UK lawsuit challenges British PM Theresa May on Brexit

Various media outlets 12th October 2016

A financial entrepreneur is bringing a lawsuit against the Theresa May’s government, who may start negotiating Britain’s exit from the European Union without an act of Parliament. The case involves an argument that dates back almost 400 years as to whether power rests in the executive or Parliament. Commenting, Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, said: ‘It goes back to the clash between the king and the representatives of the subjects.’ His comments were reported by Washington Post, Associated Press, ABC News and Fox News.

THE ‘Table of Tables’ 2017: Loughborough catching up with elite

Times Higher Education Supplement 12th October 2016

King’s is named as a ‘big riser’ having climbed up four places to joint 25th.

Research Guild aims to strengthens EU ties amid Brexit uncertainty

King's press release 11th October 2016

King’s has joined a pioneering new network of top European research universities. Ed Byrne, President and Principal, said: ‘As a university which has always had a strong international core since its inception and is highly collaborative in its research, I am honoured that King’s is joining this excellent initiative.’

King's press release related to 'Research Guild aims to strengthens EU ties amid Brexit uncertainty'

Non-binary pronouns and what you need to know about the gender politics of ‘they’

Evening Standard 11th October 2016

Article on the use of non-binary pronouns. Tony Thorne, English Language Centre, said: ‘Using 'they' as a neutral pronoun is very old in the English language, Chaucer did it a lot. There are a lot of grammar pedants out there saying it's wrong, but this is nonsense, we've always done this.’ This was also reported by Yahoo! News.

Food for London: Transparency and education are hot topics for our food forum

Evening Standard 11th October 2016

Supermarkets must publish detailed data on the food they throw away to help solve London's food waste and hunger crisis, experts told the Evening Standard food forum. The event held at King's, which drew a 400-strong audience, was organised by the Evening Standard as part of their Food for London campaign which aims to tackle food waste and hunger. This was also reported in a separate piece for Evening Standard and in a piece for Times.

Podcast: Thomas Rid on the ‘Rise of the Machines’

Yahoo US 11th October 2016

Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, spoke on Yahoo’s Cybersecurity Podcast to discuss his new book Rise of the Machines: A Cybernetic History.

Orchestras should hold blind auditions to increase diversity, says Chineke! Orchestra's Chi-chi Nwanoku

Evening Standard 10th October 2016

Orchestras should hold blind auditions to increase the number of ethnic minority players in major ensembles, according to a leading figure in the music world. An analysis last year by King's found fewer than two per cent of orchestra members in Britain were from BME backgrounds.

Queen criticised for lobbying politicians to make Prince Charles head of Commonwealth

Daily Express 10th October 2016

In 2013 the Queen's private secretary Sir Christopher Geidt flew to Adelaide to try to persuade the then Prime Minister, Visiting Professor Julia Gillard, Policy Institute, that Charles should succeed his mother as the next head of the 53-nation bloc. Speaking at an event, hosted at King’s last week, she said: ‘The upshot of our meeting, which took place in Adelaide…was a clearly worded statement for the public record about how succession works for the role of the head of Commonwealth.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

London’s black communities disproportionately exposed to air pollution – study

Guardian 10th October 2016

Black communities in London are disproportionately more likely to breathe illegal levels of air pollution than white and Asian ones, new research shows. A spokesman for the air quality unit at King’s, said: ‘We have known for some time now that poor families end up living in cheaper housing which is often in close proximity to busy roads.’

Would YOU dare find out your body's REAL AGE?

Daily Mail 10th October 2016

Research suggests that the number of candles on your birthday cake might not reflect your body’s age — with implications for your quality of life, and longevity. The GlycanAge test analyses the levels of tiny sugar molecules (called glycans) and is said to be the most accurate method yet of determining our biological age. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, who is part of the team behind the test, said: ‘People vary a lot — there can be as much as 25 years’ difference between your chronological and biological age.’

Is it safe to wash my hands, doctor?

The Conversation 10th October 2016

Article on hand-washing and hygiene, by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology. ‘If you’re healthy you don’t need to wash your hands after going on public transportation, chopping veg, gardening or a walk in the woods. But do be careful around meat, refrigerators, toilets and disease outbreaks,’ he said. This was also reported by Daily Mail and Sun. Professor Spector also wrote about this for i.

Universities told to use postcodes to pick students: Aides want institutions to use applicant’s neighbourhood and school when giving out places

Daily Mail 10th October 2016

Universities should boost numbers of disadvantaged students through more positive discrimination, government advisers have recommended. The article mentions that King's offers a medical degree for state school pupils with BBB A-level grades - much lower than the usual offer.

WikiLeaks releases second batch of 2,086 hacked emails from Clinton campaign chairman

International Business Times UK 10th October 2016

WikiLeaks released more emails reportedly hacked from the personal email account of John Podesta, the chairman of the presidential election campaign of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. Article mentions that Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, wrote on Twitter: ‘Hacked & leaked files may – or may not – be altered or forged. Note that WikiLeaks have no way of knowing individual files are doctored or not.’ He also spoke to Financial Times on this topic.

Diesel cars blamed as WHO warns about air pollution

Voice of America 10th October 2016

Dr Martin Williams, Environmental Research Group (ERG), comments on the sources of pollution pedestrians may be exposed to. ‘One of the difficulties of getting the message across to the public at large these days is that air pollution, although it’s a major public health problem, is actually invisible,’ he said.

Russian nuclear missiles

BBC World Service 10th October 2016

Russia has played down concerns over the deployment of nuclear missiles to its Kaliningrad territory. Commenting, Dr Sam Greene, Russia Institute, said: ‘I think these messages are mainly meant to resonate among his core constituencies at home who enjoy seeing this kind of relationship with the West.’

'Mental Health First Aid' for all is a goal of annual observance

VOA News 9th October 2016

Health care professionals and public health advocates worldwide are celebrating World Mental Health Day Monday with an effort to promote awareness of mental-health issues as a factor in first-aid treatment plans. Mental illness does not discriminate among ethnic, cultural or religious groups, says the president of the World Psychiatric Association and King's College London professor, Dr. Dinesh Bhugra.

Letters

Guardian 9th October 2016

Emeritus Professor Jeremy Adler, German, has written a letter on Theresa May’s recent speech. ‘In attacking world citizenship in her dictum…Theresa May is in effect repudiating Enlightenment values as a whole, for cosmopolitanism is the apex and indeed the glory of Enlightenment philosophy, encompassing liberty, equality, fraternity, and all our human rights,’ he said.

Scientists hail new artificial pancreas to treat diabetes

Daily Express 9th October 2016

Article on medical advances in treating diabetes mentions that King’s is pioneering trials on Type 1 diabetes patients to test the therapy designed to stop the body attacking cells in the pancreas that help control blood glucose levels. Professor Mark Peakman, Immunobiology, who is leading the trial, said: ‘If we get in with this early enough we can protect the beta cells in those patients.’

‘The Bitter Taste of Victory’

BBC Radio 3 Private Passions 9th October 2016

Dr Lara Feigel, English, discusses her new book The Bitter Taste of Victory. ‘I think I was drawn to the war in London as an escape from my own family background where the war was fairly unmentionable because one side of the family were Jewish and in concentration camps and the other were in Holland, starving under German occupation,’ she said.

Why lying makes us want to wash ourselves

Guardian 9th October 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery, Director, explains why we want to wash after telling a lie. ‘Recent experiments have shown a connection in the brain between being physically clean and feeling morally cleansed,’ he said.

Time to revise infant eating guidelines to tackle rise in allergies, Hong Kong experts say

South China Morning Post 9th October 2016

The Hong Kong Institute of Allergy has revised its guidelines on peanut allergies following recent research, including the Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study conducted by King’s and Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital. The article also links the LEAP study, also conducted by King’s.

Rules for Drones - Letters to the Editor

Daily Telegraph 8th October 2016

Christopher Kolenda, War Studies, has signed a letter about the arms trade. ‘Now is the time to develop a strong international framework that will leave the world more secure,’ the letter said.

Kids, you can define the space station’s next mission

Times of India 8th October 2016

Nearly 250 students from Delhi are participating in the Mission Discovery India Programme, under the guidance of retired astronaut Steve Swanson. Dr Julie Keeble, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, is reported to be involved in the programme.

After four days of Conservative conference, we still have no idea what Brexit will look like

Telegraph 7th October 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, has written a piece on Brexit. ‘For all the PM’s apparent clarity about reasserting control over immigration, foreign courts and the like, she left herself significant wiggle room with regard to the ultimate Brexit outcome,’ he said.

The Invention of Angela Carter by Edmund Gordon review — far more than magic

Financial Times 7th October 2016

Review of the biography The Invention of Angela Carter by Edmund Gordon, English. The book was also reviewed by Independent and serialised throughout the week on BBC Radio 4.

UK 'facing wave of jihadi terror even worse than attacks in Paris'

Evening Standard 6th October 2016

A new wave of jihadi terrorism has "only just begun" and risks bringing outrages worse than the attacks in Paris and Brussels, according to a book by Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, which will be published next week.

Petition calling for end to nurse pay rise cap gains 10,000 names in three days

Nursing Times 6th October 2016

A petition demanding an end to the pay rise cap imposed on nurses and other Agenda for Change NHS staff by the government has passed 10,000 signatures in just a few days. The petition was created by Danielle Tiplady, Alumna.

The truth about meritocracy: it doesn't make society fairer

The Conversation 6th October 2016

Article on the concept of meritocracy, by Dr Ye Liu, International Development. ‘Educational meritocracy is a facade that holds little promise of creating an equitable or egalitarian society,’ she said.

How long can humans live?

BBC World Service 6th October 2016

Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, talks about how long humans can live. ‘We’ve had massive increases in life expectancy because of things like cardiovascular disease being much less common.’

Legal complexities present Brexit challenge for devolved British governments

Xinhua 6th October 2016

Article mentions an event at King’s, where an expert from Cardiff University spoke on the legal complexities of carrying British exit from the EU.

King's Entrepreneurship Institute announces new accelerator participants

King's press office 5th October 2016

King’s Entrepreneurship Institute has officially launched the first 20 startups it will support as part of its new accelerator programme. Professor Edward Byrne AC, President & Principal, said: ‘King’s College London has a long history of entrepreneurship, from the discovery of the structure of DNA, to research that led to the development of radio, television, mobile phones and radar, and we continue to find, develop and support that entrepreneurial spirit today.’

King's press release related to 'King's Entrepreneurship Institute announces new accelerator participants'

Professor Sir Simon Wessely announced as Regius Professor of Psychiatry

King's press release 5th October 2016

To mark the Diamond Jubilee in 2013, 12 Regius Professorships were awarded by HM The Queen to universities across the UK for exceptionally high quality teaching and research in a particular discipline. King’s was awarded the first ever Regius Professorship of Psychiatry, with Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), taking up this role from 1 February 2017. He said: ‘I am naturally honoured and a little overawed to be the first holder of the Chair, but the facts are that the award is indeed to the whole of the institution, past and present.’

King's press release related to 'Professor Sir Simon Wessely announced as Regius Professor of Psychiatry'

Walking out of consent classes... What's wrong with 'snowflake' students these days?

Daily Telegraph 5th October 2016

Comment article discussing Freshers' week mentions an emotional intelligence workshop at King’s that took place during Welcome Week.

How to visit lost worlds: our pick of the UK's palaeontology museums

Guardian 5th October 2016

Article on the UK’s rich palaeontological heritage. The article mentions the Popularising Palaeontology workshop at King's.

‘Seeing’ pollution could save lives

Telegraph 5th October 2016

Technology that allows people to physically see pollution could help educate people about the environment and save lives, says Dr Martin Williams, Analytical & Environmental Sciences. He said: ‘If parents could see what it looks like pushing their child through a band of raw pollution, they’d take preventative action.’ This was also reported by Evening Standard.

From university clubs to World Cup 2016: The journey of England kabaddi team

Hindustan Times 5th October 2016

Article discussing the sport kabaddi, often played at London universities. The article mentions that it is played at King’s.

Keep an open mind

Nursing Standard 5th October 2016

Student Deborah Ayodele, Mental Health Nursing, has written a piece on how using an interpreter helped her to correct a medication mix-up.

India builds underground bunkers on Kashmir frontier as border clashes escalate

Telegraph 4th October 2016

Dr Rudra Chadhuri, War Studies, said: ‘The difference between this situation and peace time is, in peace time, you’d need some clearance from the top. What’s happening now is, there is clearly an order to return each bullet with ten.’ He also spoke to Sky News.

Discovery by design at London’s new science hub

Financial Times 4th October 2016

A feature of the new Francis Crick Institute. King's is one of the primary partners.

The campaigner who caused a stink over London pollution

Financial Times 4th October 2016

Article about air pollution in London mentions research from King's.

Variety adds Wellcome spice to the programme

Times 4th October 2016

Feature on the Wellcome Trust and Elena Gillies, Alumna, who now works there.

If there was a Nobel silver medal, I’d award it to Jeffrey Gordon and our gut microbes

Conversation 4th October 2016

Article on this year's Nobel Prize, by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology. ‘Although we all have a unique microbiome that is influenced by multiple factors, our diet, our environment, diseases and even our genes, Gordon’s pioneering work has ensured that despite its complexity and our incomplete understanding, humans can now harness this novel microbiome organ to improve our health,’ he said.

HIV researchers edge closer to a cure

Various media outlets 3rd October 2016

A British man could become the first person in the world to be cured of HIV using a new therapy designed by a team of scientists from five UK universities. The ongoing trial is being undertaken by researchers from the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial College London, UCL and King's. BBC News Online reported that all patients were on standard ART so could have had undetectable levels of HIV anyway. This was also reported by The Week, Evening Standard, Times, Daily Express, Independent, Daily Mail, Sun, Telegraph, New Statesman, Hindustan Times, Mashable, Times of India, Deccan Chronicle, NDTV and Indian Express.

A new study shows that the pill is linked to depression - so what should women do?

New Scientist 3rd October 2016

A new study shows that the pill is linked to depression. Researchers at King’s and UCL have banded together to begin trials for a male pill.

Theresa May flags ‘hard Brexit’ but business groups and eurosceptics demand more detail

South China Morning Post 3rd October 2016

Article commenting on the recent Conservative Party conference, and the speech made by UK Prime Minister Theresa May. Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, said: ‘The words on migration indicate that May is leaning towards a hard Brexit.’

Ukrainian rebel leaders divided by bitter purge

Washington Post 3rd October 2016

Dr Alex Clarkson, European & International Studies, comments on the ongoing conflict between Ukraine and Russia. ‘In eastern Ukraine, military power equals political power...and whoever is in control is fundamentally dependent on patronage from Moscow,’ he said.

Is despair and disbelief all we can offer to the savagery being visited on Aleppo?

Guardian 2nd October 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, has written a piece on the conflict in Aleppo. ‘Outrage is the only conceivable reaction to the devastation wrought on Aleppo,’ he said. Also mentioned on BBC Radio 4.

After article 50, Brexit will be easy. A trade deal will be anything but

Guardian 2nd October 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece on Article 50. ‘The irony is that, contrary to the hopes of many Brexiteers, leaving the EU will expose Britain to more globalisation, not less,’ he said. Meanwhile, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, spoke to BBC News about Brexit, in light of Theresa May’s first party conference speech as leader. He said: ‘There’s a long way to go before we have a clear, unified government position.’ This was also reported by BBC Radio 5 live.

How periods really affect a woman’s working life

Guardian 2nd October 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains how variations in the way women respond to hormonal changes means how ‘sharp’ they feel in relation to where they are in their monthly cycle will also vary. ‘While some might report feeling drained of energy and motivation when their period is due, others find they actually perform better at mental and physical tasks at that time of the month,’ he said.

What people swear they'll never do as parents - until they became parents

Independent 1st October 2016

Mums and dads have revealed the goals they swore they'd stick to as parents, but realised were impossible to keep - sometimes just hours after their little bundle of joy arrived. Dr Matt Woolgar of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London, recently told The Independent that parents need not worry too much about the details of their parenting, as long as they are trying their best. Also reported by Tribune India.

They're single, smart, Russian. And they party like it's 1799

Times 1st October 2016

A feature on young Russian women includes student Maria Polovtseva, Geology.

Ethical challenges of genome editing

King's press release 30th September 2016

Preventing the transmission of inherited genetic diseases, and increasing food production rates in farmed animals are two potential applications of genome editing technologies that require urgent ethical scrutiny, according to a new report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. Professor Karen Yeung, Law, who co-authored the report, said: ‘We examined the way in which these technologies are being taken up in the research community and what we found is that, because of a number of advantages which they offer in relation to existing techniques for manipulating DNA, they are having an unprecedented transformative effect on the biological sciences and for that reason they have the potential to change our expectations and ambitions about human control over the biological world.’ This was also reported by Daily Telegraph, BBC News Online, Nature, Financial Times, Guardian. She also spoke to BBC Radio 4’s Today (07:21) and BBC Radio 5 live’s Up All Night (04:07).

King's press release related to 'Ethical challenges of genome editing'

BBC’s coverage of Syrian conflict

BBC Radio 4 Feedback 30th September 2016

Dr Peter Busch, War Studies, discusses BBC media coverage of the conflict in Syria. ‘In social media and new media, everybody has an agenda,’ he said.

Scientists have found having adult kids stuck at home could create health benefits for parents

City A.M. 30th September 2016

Inter-generational living has huge benefits for mental health, according to researchers from King's, LSE and Harvard who looked at data on over 50,000 people.

Strategic restraint and surgical strikes: Modi's 'on again, off again' approach to Pakistan

Daily Mail 30th September 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the relationship between India and Pakistan. ‘There is a sense at the highest echelons of government in New Delhi that Modi’s overtures towards Pakistani civilian government have not been reciprocated,’ he said.

Gut feeling: New CEO to steer Nestle down uncharted health path

Daily Mail 30th September 2016

A pill for C. difficile containing spores from good bacteria developed by U.S. biotech firm Seres Therapeutics has failed a recent clinical trial. Commenting, Professor Tim Spector, Twin Studies and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘It shows we still don't understand enough about how the microbial community really works.’

What people swear they'll never do as parents - until they became parents

Independent 30th September 2016

Dr Matt Woolgar, IoPPN, said that parents need not worry too much about the details of their parenting, as long as they are trying their best. ‘You have to keep telling yourself as a parent you’re doing your best and there are lots of opportunities for change and nothing is definite,’ he said.

True grit: new lessons in life

i 29th September 2016

Feature piece on pesonality in children cites recent research by academics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London that found that "grit" or perseverance did little to boost students' exam results.

King's press release related to 'True grit: new lessons in life'

National Institute for Health Research: Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation programme

Times Higher Education 29th September 2016

Philippa Garety of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & neuroscience, King's College London wins award of £1,300,255 for a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the outcomes and mechanisms of a novel digital reasoning intervention for persecutory delusions

King's to reduce investments in polluting fossil fuel companies

King's press release 29th September 2016

King’s is to adopt a policy of phased fossil fuel divestment – which will see the university reducing investments in companies involved in the ‘dirtiest’ fuels like tar sands oil and thermal coal and move towards opportunities to support low carbon alternatives. Professor Ed Byrne, Principal, said: ‘King's is a force for good in the many diverse societies it serves and is committed to playing its part in aiding the vital transition to a low carbon economy.’ This was also reported by Guardian.

King's press release related to 'King's to reduce investments in polluting fossil fuel companies'

Anti-radicalisation strategy lacks evidence base in science

Guardian 29th September 2016

AbdoolKarim Vakil, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies, is among the signatories in a letter signed by several academics and others, on the Government's anti-radicalisation strategy.

True grit: new lessons in life

i 29th September 2016

Feature piece on personality in children cites recent research by academics at King's that found that "grit" or perseverance did little to boost students' exam results.

Brexit effect yet to be felt, say academics

Xinhua News 29th September 2016

The economic effect of the UK's vote to leave the European Union will not be known until the end of the year it is claimed. The article reports from an event hosted by The UK in a Changing Europe, a think-tank based at King's. Also reported by SINA.

Acne sufferers' cells may be protected against ageing

Various media outlets 28th September 2016

Scientists at King’s have found that people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres (the protective repeated nucleotides found at the end of chromosomes) in their white blood cells, meaning their cells could be better protected against ageing. Dr Simone Ribero, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres which appears to be different in acne sufferers and means their cells may be protected against ageing.’ Dr Veronique Bataille, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Longer telomeres are likely to be one factor explaining the protection against premature skin ageing in individuals who previously suffered from acne.’ This was also reported by Mirror, Daily Mail, Sun, Telegraph, BBC Newsbeat, Evening Standard, Metro, BBC World Service , Huffington Post and International Business Times.

King's press release related to 'Acne sufferers' cells may be protected against ageing'

Aleppo hospitals are latest casualty in attacks by the Syrian regime

Guardian 28th September 2016

The airstrikes on two Aleppo hospitals in the early hours of Wednesday morning were just the latest in hundreds of attacks on medical centres across Syria over the past five years, a pattern of destruction undermining international protection for doctors and their patients. Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, said: ‘If there is a total collapse of any kind of trauma care, those are the sort of things that can contribute to collapsing morale very suddenly.’ He also spoke to Al Jazeera.

Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game

BBC Radio 4 28th September 2016

Dr Peter Bush, War Studies, is on the panel discussing the reporting of terrorism. He said: ‘A response to terrorism is up to us all, it’s not just the media.’

Thought the menopause destroys libido? It can actually do the opposite

Daily Mail 28th September 2016

Feature on the menopause and women's libido. The article cites research from Dr Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology. In studying women’s responses to questions about desire, arousal, orgasm satisfaction and pain during sex over a four-year period both pre and post-menopause, researchers found the rate of sexual dysfunction barely altered. He said: ‘We were surprised by the results. They suggest that menopause has been exaggerated as an excuse for everything.’

We must let Theresa May build more houses - or the rage of the renters could tear Britain apart

Telegraph 28th September 2016

Comment piece on planning laws for residential buildings. The article mentions Mark Pennington, Political Economy, who argues that private covenants, deed restrictions and the establishment of proprietary communities are the best way to give locals control.

World Academic Summit 2017 to take place at King's College London

Times Higher Educational Supplement 28th September 2016

Times Higher Education's World Academic Summit 2017 will be held in partnership with King's next September.

Dark matter: What's the matter?

Nature 28th September 2016

Feature on the theory of dark matter. Professor John Ellis, Physics, is quoted.

World's first baby born of three-parent baby technique

Various media outlets 27th September 2016

The world's first three-parent baby has been born. Scientists revealed the birth of a baby boy, now five months old, using DNA from three parents. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘The baby is reportedly healthy. Hopefully, this will tame the more zealous critics, accelerate the field, and we will witness soon a birth of the first mitochondrial donation baby in the UK.’ Dusko also spoke to BBC News, while Professor Ivor Mason, Biosciences Education, wrote a piece for i. This was reported by Telegraph, Guardian, Daily Express, Daily Mail, ITV News, Sky News, Mirror, a separate piece for i, Times, Independent, Globo and International Business Times.

Food for London: D&D restaurant group backs our food waste fight

Evening Standard 27th September 2016

Article mentions the ‘Food Forum’, which is being held at King's. A panel of campaigners, chefs and industry leaders will seek solutions to the hot topic of wasted food and hunger in London.

Diesel scrutiny shifts to London's building sites

Reuters 27th September 2016

Volkswagen's admission it cheated pollution law has exposed a wider problem of diesel emissions from thousands of generators belching fumes across building sites and countryside. In London, where the pollution is aggravated by a construction boom, a firm that helped expose the extent of the Volkswagen scandal has shifted its attention to diesel generators and is working with city authorities and researchers from King's to analyze the problem. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Diesel scrutiny shifts to London's building sites

Reuters 27th September 2016

A piece looking at the impact on air quality of thousands of diesel generators across the country. Mentions the work of King’s Environmental Research Group. Also reported by CNBC & others.

When 'seeing snow' means your eyes are in trouble

Mail Online 26th September 2016

Article discussing eye problems featuring comment from Peter Goadsby, a professor of neurology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (King's College London). He says visual snow is a different and distinct condition to migraine aura. The cause is unclear but brain scans of those affected have found differences in the visual cortex, the area at the back of the brain that processes visual information. He said: "This area is overactive in people with visual snow and it seems to be a disorder of the way in which this part of the brain responds to the information it receives from the eyes. For those affected it can be extremely disabling and affect their work and personal lives."

Study finds link between faecal bacteria and body fat

Various media outlets 26th September 2016

Researchers at King’s have found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in human poo – known as the human faecal microbiome - and levels of abdominal body fat. Dr Michelle Beaumont, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘This study has shown a clear link between bacterial diversity in faeces and markers of obesity and cardiovascular risk, particularly for visceral fat.’ This was also reported by BBC News Online, Daily Mail, Huffington Post, Metro, Daily Express, Yahoo! News, CNN International , Reuters , Huffington Post , FoxNews , International Business Times, Deccan Chronicle and BBC World Service .

King's press release related to 'Study finds link between faecal bacteria and body fat'

£160 million Cancer Centre opens at Guy's Hospital

King's press release 26th September 2016

A new £160 million Cancer Centre at Guy’s Hospital, which has been designed by patients for patients has opened. Professor Peter Parker, Head of the Division of Cancer Studies, said: ‘Expanding our Experimental Medicine Programme will enable us to grow our capabilities in designing and conducting clinical trials for new treatments.’ Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice Principal (Health), and Executive Director of King’s Health Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre said: ‘Having clinicians and researchers working side by side will allow us to speed up the journey from discoveries in our laboratories and early clinical trials right through to innovative new treatments and therapies in our clinics.’ This was also reported by Evening Standard.

King's press release related to '£160 million Cancer Centre opens at Guy's Hospital'

Interview: former MP Ed Balls on Strictly, Theresa May and why Labour has lost the plot

Evening Standard 26th September 2016

An interview with Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute.

Turkey

BBC Radio 4 Beyond Belief 26th September 2016

Bill Park, Defence Studies, is on a panel of the expert guests discussing the religious background to recent events in Turkey. He said: ‘There’s still a lot to find out about what actually happened in the coup.

The Sunday Times University League Table

Sunday Times 25th September 2016

The Sunday Times league table of UK universities has been released. King’s is ranked 27th overall. King’s features in various accompanying pieces as being one of the best universities for research, one of the best universities in London, having the one of the highest entry requirements, being one of the best universities for jobs and one of the worst for teaching quality and student experience. This was also reported on by a separate piece for Times. A piece for Times about technologically illiterate university lecturers failing modern students also mentions Kings’s ranking.

How the brain knows where we are in bed

Guardian 25th September 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery director, explains how we are able to find what we need in the dark when we are in bed. ‘The answer lies in a part of the brain called the parietal cortex, which contains lots of different virtual maps of your current location,’ he said.

The science of…smog

Observer 25th September 2016

A piece on smog, with reference to a study conducted by King's which found that almost 9,500 early deaths every year can be traced to air pollution in London.

Now’s the time to…

Observer 25th September 2016

Article on ‘Mouthy’, a festival held by the Science Gallery.

Saker Nusseibeh: ‘Most money is indexed. That’s a disaster’

Financial Times 25th September 2016

Interview with Saker Nusseibeh, chief executive of Hermes Investment Management and alumni.

India’s Rafale deal belies strained procurement ability

Financial Times 25th September 2016

More than a decade after they first started talks, India has finally inked an €8bn agreement to buy 36 Rafale fighter jets from France's Dassault. There had been an original deal to buy 126 Rafales. Dr Walter Ladwig, War Studies, said: ‘The fact that the deal has been shrunk means the projected numbers of aircraft in each country’s air force are going to continue to tilt in Pakistan’s favour.’

Communist China Looks for Independent Thinking as Problems Loom

Bloomberg 25th September 2016

China faces unprecedented challenges as it restructures its economy away from old-line heavy manufacturing and toward consumption and services. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, is quoted on the role of think tanks in the country. Also reported in the South China Morning Post.

Releasing patient data from the PACE Trial

British Medical Journal 24th September 2016

Article on patient data in the PACE trial. One of the authors is Trudie Chalder, professor of cognitive behavioural psychotherapy at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Corbyn re-elected as UK Labour leader after bitter fight

Yahoo! News 24th September 2016

Jeremy Corbyn has been re-elected as Labour Leader. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘Labour is not going to win any elections in the near future.’

Corbyn re-elected as UK Labour leader with 62pc of votes after bitter fight

South China Morning Post 24th September 2016

Left-winger Jeremy Corbyn has been re-elected British Labour leader, seeing off a challenge from his MPs but leaving the opposition party deeply divided. Professor Anand Menon, European Studies, is quoted. Originally reported by Agence France Presse& also reported in Times of India, ABC and others.

Assisted suicide

BBC World Service 24th September 2016

Professor Penney Lewis, Law, joins the discussion on the ethics and issues.

Time for Team Kate to get busy! The Duchess of Cambridge's 12-strong staff - including a supernanny, a VERY glamorous stylist and a top hairdresser - touch down in Canada

Daily Mail 23rd September 2016

Profiles of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's entourage during their trip to Canada, including stylist Natasha Archer, alumni. This was also reported in a separate piece for Daily Mail.

The 19 best universities in Europe

Independent 23rd September 2016

King's is ranked 11th in a list of the best European universities.

How London’s Foundling Hospital defied ‘gruel stereotypes’

Financial Times 23rd September 2016

Visiting Fellow Jane Levi, History, is curating a new exhibition at the Foundling Museum called ‘Feeding the 400’. She said: ‘There were three layers of people responsible for how the foundlings were fed — the enlightened governors, the staff who controlled budgets and the servants and cooks. Not all these people had the same attitudes towards the children.’

Bombing of Aleppo

Newshour, Al Jazeera English 23rd September 2016

Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, discusses the Syrian and Russian government’s air strikes upon the rebel-held city of Aleppo and their impact.

Afghan boy's hope of new life in Europe ends in suicide

Reuters 22nd September 2016

Mustafa Ansari's journey ended one April morning in his bedroom in a quiet Swedish village. The young Afghan had committed suicide, a new kind of casualty in Europe's migration crisis. While thousands have died on the journey to Europe, Ansari made it, only to become caught up in an overloaded system. Edgar Jones, a professor of the history of medicine and psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted. Also reported by Daily Mail, CNBC, and Yahoo News.

Oxford University named best in world - while four London universities including UCL also make the grade

Various media outlets 22nd September 2016

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings have been released, with Kings ranked as 36th. This was reported by Evening Standard, BBC News Online, i, Financial Times and City A.M.

Oxford University condemns ministers' call to open schools as 'insulting' to teachers

Times Higher Education Supplement 22nd September 2016

The University of Oxford will not take part in government plans for leading higher education institutions to set up schools, its vice-chancellor has said. The government's education Green Paper set out plans to encourage high-performing schools and universities to ‘improve the quality of school places in the mainstream state sector’, citing the King's Maths School.
This was also reported by the BBC and Financial Times.

Saudi-led raids 'kill 20' civilians in Yemen port

Daily Mail 22nd September 2016

Saudi-led coalition air strikes killed 20 civilians in a rebel-held port city of western Yemen. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘In this case a misguided munition hit a neighbourhood by error, which is densely populated.’

Afghan boy’s hope of new life in Europe ends in suicide

Reuters 22nd September 2016

An asylum-seeker has committed suicide in a refugee centre in Sweden. Professor Edgar Jones, War Studies, commented. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Kenneth Rainiin Foundation

International Business Times 22nd September 2016

Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, is reported to have received a 2016 Breakthrough Award from the Kenneth Rainin Foundation.

United Kingdom

Nature 22nd September 2016

Feature on young people's career aspirations that cites research from King' which found that most 10-14 year olds find science interesting but those from working class backgrounds rarely see it as a career.

Researchers study table tennis and Alzheimer's

Sky News 21st September 2016

Interview with Dr Matthew Kempton, a senior lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (King's College London), who is conducting a study on table tennis and Alzheimer's.

World Alzheimer's Day: 3.7 mn suffer from disease in India, will double by 2030, fear experts

Indian Express 21st September 2016

The World Alzheimer Report 2015 led by the Institute of Psychiatry, PSychology & Neuroscience, King's College London found that there are currently around 46.8 million people living with dementia around the world, with numbers projected to nearly double every 20 years, increasing to 74.7 million by 2030 and 131.5 million by 2050. Also reported by NDTV and the Times of India.

King's press release related to 'World Alzheimer's Day: 3.7 mn suffer from disease in India, will double by 2030, fear experts'

Company views on tattoos 'out of date'

Various media outlets 21st September 2016

Employers have been warned they could be missing out on top staff because they are rejecting candidates with tattoos. Research commissioned by Acas from academics at King's, suggests that tattoos are still considered unacceptable in many workplaces. This was reported by BBC News Online, Sun and The Week.

Letters

Financial Times 21st September 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a letter about the EU. ‘The truth is that Switzerland has become an irritant to the EU,’ he said.

Voters showing no signs of 'buyer's remorse' over Brexit, according to top pollster

Various media outlets 21st September 2016

British voters are showing few signs of "buyer's remorse" at the decision to leave the EU made three months' ago, one of the country's leading polling experts has said. In a briefing that took place at King's, Professor John Curtice, president of the British Polling Council, said there was "not much evidence of buyer's remorse" over the vote. This was reported by Telegraph, Daily Express, i, Evening Standard and a separate piece for Daily Express.

Margaret Hodge is right - Whitehall needs reform. But will it happen?

Guardian 21st September 2016

Article on reforming civil service culture, a reform that Visiting Professor Margaret Hodge, Policy Institute, has called for. The article mentions a publicity event for her book which took place at the Policy Institute.

How to cut your chances of getting cancer: Expert reveals eight proven ways to help protect against deadly disease

Daily Mail 21st September 2016

Article on lifestyle changes that could allegedly prevent 40 per cent of cancers from ever occurring. A number of studies are now linking gut bacteria to lowered cancer risk. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: ‘Although most of the studies done on gut bacteria and cancer prevention are still on mouse models, the results are positive.’

Russian hacker threat to hit US election must be taken seriously

New Scientist 21st September 2016

Dr Tim Stevens, War Studies, has written a piece on cyberattacks and the US election. ‘It is technically feasible for foreign hackers to disrupt US electoral politics and processes, as recent events demonstrate, but vanishingly unlikely that such interference could directly engineer an election result,’ he said.

Is science only for the rich?

Nature 21st September 2016

Around the world, poverty and social background remain huge barriers in scientific careers. The article references an ongoing study from King's which found that most English 10-14 year olds find science interesting.

Syria

Sky News 21st September 2016

Interview with Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, about the ongoing crisis in Syria. She said: ‘The stakes are extremely high for the regional powers.’ (21:33). Professor John Gearson, War Studies, also spoke to Sky News.

Inside the ruined castle of a Medieval serial killer

Vice 21st September 2016

In an article looking at a historic murder trial in Slovakia, Tony Thorne, English Language Centre, is interviewed on the suspect and the language around serial killers. ‘We use forensic language and police terms. In those days they would've called her a she-demon,’ he said.

Funding for new immunotherapy company

King's press release 20th September 2016

A new immunotherapy company, founded on pioneering work by researchers at King’s and the Francis Crick Institute, has received seed funding from Abingworth, the international investment group dedicated to life sciences.

King's press release related to 'Funding for new immunotherapy company'

Dementia healthcare must adapt to tackle global dementia crisis

King's press release 20th September 2016

A new report from Alzheimer’s Disease International, authored by researchers at King’s and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), reveals that most people with dementia have yet to receive a diagnosis, let alone comprehensive and continuing healthcare. This was reported by Indian Express, NDTV and Times of India.

King's press release related to 'Dementia healthcare must adapt to tackle global dementia crisis'

New global initiative will engage 30 cities by 2030 to close the mental health gap

King's press release 20th September 2016

King’s is joining a major new initiative aiming to reduce the mental health gap by engaging global and community leaders across private, public and philanthropic organisations.

For the Kremlin, winning a supermajority in the Russian parliament was the easy part

Washington Post 20th September 2016

United Russia, the party founded by Russian President Vladimir Putin, has won a landslide constitutional majority in parliamentary elections. Commenting, Dr Sam Greene, Russian Institute, said: ‘Over the past five years there has been an effort to create an active, mobilised, pro-regime constituency. And while they’ve certainly created a constituency that is not going to vote for the opposition, they don’t seem to have generated a great degree of enthusiasm for United Russia.’

From Buddha to Bollywood

Wall Street Journal 20th September 2016

Review of a book by Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute.

Study rebuts Hunt's Claim over weekend deaths

Gaurdian 19th September 2016

Mental health patients admitted to hospital on a Saturday or Sunday are no more likely to die than those who arrive on a weekday, according to a study of how more than 45,000 patients fared in British hospitals. Dr Rashmi Patel, the SlaM psychiatrist and academic at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London who led the research, told the Guardian: "One of the problems with the way the 'weekend effect' has been portrayed is that the secretary of state has selectively chosen to present a few studies which suggest differences in mortality associated with weekend admission and he has ignored others (like our own study) which have shown no significant difference."

Hospital still the most common place of death for children with cancer

King's press release 19th September 2016

Although the number of children and young people with cancer dying in hospices has risen over the past two decades, the most common place of death remains hospitals followed by home, according to a study led by King’s.

King's press release related to 'Hospital still the most common place of death for children with cancer'

Unilever Framework Agreement

King's press release 19th September 2016

Unilever, one of the world’s largest consumer goods companies, and King’s have signed a Framework Agreement to formalise their long-term partnership.

King's press release related to 'Unilever Framework Agreement'

Can DNA tests identify litter louts?

BBC News Online 19th September 2016

Article looking at whether DNA evidence can help to identify people dropping rubbish in the UK, featuring experts from King's who attempt to extract DNA from litter to trace people dropping rubbish. Dr Denise Syndercombe-Court, Forensic Science, said: ‘I think it's crazy talking about catching somebody who has dropped litter.’ This was also reported by BBC One.

Fellowship for older person's care to continue in 2017

Nursing Times 19th September 2016

A national fellowship to advance the practice of senior nurses who work with older people is to continue for a third year, but will be expanded to allied health professionals as well. The year-long programme is run by the Florence Nightingale faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at King's and funded by Health Education England.

Debate

City A.M. 19th September 2016

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, answers ‘No’ to the question ‘Following defections to the Tories and the election of new leader Diane James, is Ukip a busted flush?’. ‘Signs of a prolonged delay in triggering Article 50 may create an opening for a group outside the Conservative Party to exercise pressure on it: in other words, Ukip,’ he said.

Smart cities

Sky News 19th September 2016

Britain’s mobile networks may be left behind in the race to build smart cities. Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, comments: ‘5G may be needing half a million base stations in London alone … we need a totally new pioneering approach of rethinking on how we do planning, regulation.’

The top 1% may benefit from a genetic advantage at birth

Mail Online 18th September 2016

Robert Plomin, a professor of genetics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, is referenced in an article about links between genetic and intelligence.

5 Live Science - GCSE scores and inherited DNA

BBC Radio 5 Live 18th September 2016

Interview with Robert Plomin, King's College London, about GSCE scores and inherited DNA. Starts at 37:00

King's press release related to '5 Live Science - GCSE scores and inherited DNA'

Millions of pounds of public money given to charities to be used to help war veterans 'has vanished or been wasted on unproven therapies'

Various media outlets 18th September 2016

Millions of pounds of public money intended to help war veterans has been 'wasted' after it disappeared into unknown charities, the article suggests. Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, commented on the piece. This was reported by Daily Mail, Sunday Times, International Business Times UK and a separate piece for Sunday Times.

What happens to your brain when you faint?

Guardian 18th September 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery Director, explains the science of fainting. ‘Weak and wobbly legs might seem to be caused by the reduction in blood pressure that often results in fainting. But, in fact, this lack of oxygen being pumped around the body does not affect the limbs directly,’ he said.

Who are the Russian-backed hackers attacking the U.S. political system?

NBC News 18th September 2016

Cybersecurity experts and intelligence officials say that the tools and methods the Russian hackers use against American targets are at times extremely sophisticated. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: ‘Russian operators are among the most impressive and disciplined operators that we know of.’ Professor Rid also commented on this for Sunday Times.

Seventeen Indian soldiers in attack on Kashmir army base

Bloomberg 18th September 2016

Seventeen Indian soldiers were killed in Kashmir, in the deadliest militant attack in the area for years. Professor Harsh V. Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The scale of the attack threatens to escalate tension between India and Pakistan.’

Mental illness and terrorism

British Medical Journal 17th September 2016

Article on the association of mental illness with acts of terrorism, co-authored by Kamaldeep Bhui and Simon Wessely, from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience.

Belgium minor first 'helped to die'

BBC News Online 17th September 2016

A terminally ill 17-year-old has become the first minor to be helped to die in Belgium since age restrictions on euthanasia requests were removed two years ago, officials say. The rate of euthanasia in the Netherlands has remained fairly stable at 2.8% of all deaths (in 2010), according to Professor Penney Lewis, Law.

Living in worlds that never were

New Scientist 17th September 2016

Review of the exhibition 'Paths to Utopia', which is curated by King's at Somerset House.

Caliphate in peril, more ISIS fighters may take mayhem to Europe

International New York Times 17th September 2016

As Islamic State loses territory in Iraq and Syria, American military officials say the battles to seize Raqqa and Mosul could be underway within the next two or three months. Commenting, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘No one wants to be the last man on the ground whenever the Kurds, Iraqis or Americans arrive.’

Pakistan suspected to be expanding uranium enrichment

Various media outlets 16th September 2016

Research conducted by IHS Jane’s, a defence and security periodical, and King’s, concluded that Pakistan may be expanding uranium enrichment capabilities. Ian J Stewart, War Studies, said: ‘It is disappointing to see Pakistan apparently expand its uranium enrichment capacity outside of safeguards whilst not engaging seriously in discussions or negotiations over a fissile material cut-off treaty.’ This was reported by Times, Daily Mail, AFP, Deccan Chronicle, Economic Times of India, Hindustan Times, Indian Express, NDTV, Times of India, Hindu, and Yahoo

The feuds, the faces and the farcical

Times 16th September 2016

Article on Visiting Professor Sir Nicholas Macpherson, Policy Institute.

Laughing off sanctions

Deccan Herald 16th September 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on North Korea’s recent nuclear tests. ‘The latest test was the country’s largest to date, sparking worries that the country is making real progress in its efforts to build a functional nuclear warhead,’ he said.

Crusoe's Island by Andrew Lambert review - Robinson Crusoe as hero to rightwing Englishmen

Guardian 16th September 2016

Review of 'Crusoe's Island' by Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies.

North Korea challenges the world with its fifth underground nuclear test

Daily Mail 16th September 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on North Korea. ‘The growing geopolitical rivalry between the US and China is manifesting itself in any lack of effective action against Pyongyang,’ he said.

How David Cameron's intervention in Libya is fuelling war and terror around the world

Independent 15th September 2016

A report released by the Foreign Affairs Committee this week held David Cameron “ultimately responsible” for failing to stabilise Libya after the death of Muammar Gaddafi. Dr Amir Kamel, Defence Studies, said: ‘The removal of Gaddafi created an environment where any actor could benefit.’

A brief history of why students go away to uni

The Conversation UK 15th September 2016

Article on students leaving home to attend university, mentions that in the second half of the 19th century, King's was geared towards students who wanted to remain at home while they studied.

Hinkley Point

BBC Radio 5 live Wake Up to Money 15th September 2016

Discussion of the decision to commission a new nuclear power plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset. Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, who originally supported Hinkley Point and has since had second thoughts, said: ‘Things have changed and in particular the price of every other form of energy is falling.’ (05:17)

EAIE conference 2016: More money needed on student mental health

Times Higher Education Supplement 15th September 2016

Article on an event which debates how counselling teams can cope with increasing mental health problems among learners. Dr Ann Conlon, Student Services, said: ‘Nowadays, students who don’t get a first are considered failures, and that can be related not only to the marketplace of getting a career; generally there is a lot of anxiety around young people.’

Sports doping

Sky Sports News Good Morning Sports Fans 15th September 2016

Professor David Cowan, Drug Control Centre, is interviewed about the hacking of British athletes’ medical records. He said: ‘I don’t think there’s a risk of someone modifying files on that database.’

Why it’s good for dictators to have dictator friends

Washington Post 15th September 2016

Dr Alexander Schmotz, War Studies, has co-written a piece on dictators. ‘Autocrats are less likely to pester other autocrats about political niceties such as human rights or due process,’ they said.

Russian elections

BBC World Global 15th September 2016

Dr Samuel Greene, Russian Institute, comments on the upcoming legislative elections in Russia. ‘The reality is that the vast majority of Russians know that things are bad…as many as 25 per cent of Russians have seen cuts to their salaries over the last year, as many as 15 per cent have lost jobs. They don’t see much in the way of making a difference in the elections,’ he said.

Shortage of organs for transplantation

Huffington Post 15th September 2016

Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, has written a piece on the announcement by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) to lift the moratorium on research involving chimeric human/non-human embryos. ‘Although it does not state it explicitly, the NIH announcement seems to have been triggered by Harvard professor George Church‘s research on growing humanised organ models in non-human animals, namely pigs,’ she said.

What are you reading?

Times Higher Education Supplement 15th September 2016

Professor Richard Howells, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, is reading Claire Fox’s ‘I Find That Offensive!’ ‘Fox’s short, sharp book makes for a white-knuckle read,’ he said.

Mums of young Muslims enlist in the fight against ISIS

Time 15th September 2016

Nico Prucha, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), commented on a new UK programme that aims to help mothers identify signs of radicalisation. ‘We need to see what resonates in which local community,’ he said.

Brexit risk to equal pay laws, MPs told

BBC News Online 14th September 2016

Equal pay laws in the UK could be put at risk by the country's exit from the European Union, MPs have heard. Asked what Brexit could mean for UK equality laws, Professor Aileen McColgan, Law, said: ‘It would depend on the government of the day.’

The genetic advantage of the (other) 1 percenters

Financial Times 14th September 2016

Article on the genetics of intelligence. Robert Plomin, a professor of genetics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted.

Brain experiments on primates are crucial, say eminent scientists

Guardian 14th September 2016

More than 400 scientists including two Nobel laureates have signed a letter stating that brain experiments on primates are crucial to medical advances, in response to claims that they are cruel and no longer useful. Scientists at King's College London estimate that around 80% of all drugs for the treatment of Parkinson's were originally tested at the marmoset laboratory there.

Study investigates effects of touchscreen use on toddlers' motor skills

Yahoo 14th September 2016

A new UK study has found that toddlers who use touchscreens may show improved fine motor control abilities. To look further into possible positive or negative effects of the touchscreen trend, researchers from the University of London and King's College London gathered data from 715 UK families with children aged 6 to 36-month-olds using an online survey. Rachel Bedford of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience is one of the researchers.

London hospitals boosted by £437m new research grants

Evening Standard 14th September 2016

London hospitals today won the lion?s share of a record £816 million government investment for pioneering new treatments for cancer, dementia and mental health. The South London and Maudsley Trust receives almost £66 million, enabling 50,000 patients to be part of clinical studies over the next five years. Scientists at its partner biomedical research centre, National Institute for Health Research’s (NIHR), at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London have learned how to detect the first signs of Alzheimer's disease, with 85 per cent accuracy, within 24 hours.

King's press release related to 'London hospitals boosted by £437m new research grants'

NIHR BRC at Guy's and St Thomas' and King's funding success

Various media outlets 14th September 2016

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has awarded Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s £64.4 million over five years so their Biomedical Research Centre can continue its groundbreaking research into innovative new treatments for patients. Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Executive Director of King’s Health Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre and Vice-Principal (Health), said: ‘The Government’s renewed commitment to funding ground-breaking mental and physical health research is extremely welcome.’ Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has also announced more than £130 million funding for pioneering mental and physical health research in South East London on a visit to South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. This was also reported by Wired-Gov and Evening Standard.

King's press release related to 'NIHR BRC at Guy's and St Thomas' and King's funding success '

RADAR-CNS website launches

King's press release 14th September 2016

RADAR-CNS has launched a new project website. RADAR-CNS (Remote assessment of disease and relapse – Central Nervous System) is a major research programme supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) and co-led by academics at King’s.

King's press release related to 'RADAR-CNS website launches'

Ten clean eating myths that you need to stop believing

Evening Standard 14th September 2016

Eve Simmons is the co-founder of Not Plant Based, which is leading the backlash against 'clean-eating'. She enlists experts - including 'Fight the Fads', a group of trainee dieticians at King's - to help bust some of the most popular myths.

The bizarre 1920s plan to merge Africa and Europe into a 'supercontinent' by draining the Mediterranean Sea

Daily Mail 14th September 2016

In 1928, a German architect proposed a plan called Atlantropa, which would involve partially draining the Mediterranean Sea and creating a 'Eurafrican supercontinent'. Dr Ricarda Vidal, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, said: ‘What made Atlantropa so attractive was its vision of world peace achieved not through politics and diplomacy, but with a simple technological solution.’

This Commonwealth visa system could save post-Brexit Britain from obscurity

Independent 14th September 2016

Visiting Professor Andrew Macleod, Policy Institute, has written an opinion piece on Brexit. ‘While some argued for a strong reconnection with the Commonwealth, Britain needs to be careful not to be perceived as trying to restore a neo-colonialist style leadership,’ he said.

London must create a new innovation cluster

Huffington Post 14th September 2016

Opinion piece on the contribution of higher education to London's economy. Four of the capital's universities, including King’s, feature prominently in the world league tables.

Misinformed debates on FGM can harm understanding

British Medical Journal 14th September 2016

A letter on FGM by Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health. ‘The febrile atmosphere in which misinformed debates about FGM take place do not aid understanding,’ she said.

An uneasy truce between church and state

New York Times 14th September 2016

Commenting on the relationship between the state and religion, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘Across the Western world, people have tried different ways of dealing with religion, from its prominent role in the United States to French laissez-faire.’

Echo

BBC World Service 14th September 2016

Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, discusses Echo- Amazon’s new voice controlled speaker and ‘smart home-hub’. ‘The UK is warming up to these devices. About 40 per cent of households have an internet of things device installed in one way or another,’ he said.

The man who gave it all away

Independent 13th September 2016

Article on theatre director Laura Farnworth's investigation into the life of scientist George Price. Isabel Valli at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, aided her research.

Legalise cannabis for pain relief, say MPs

Daily Mail 13th September 2016

Cannabis should be legalised for 'medicinal' use in the UK, a major report concludes today. The report is contradicted by a major review led by King's College London in 2014, in which academics concluded that smoking cannabis is highly addictive, can cause mental health problems and opens the door to hard drugs.

King's press release related to 'Legalise cannabis for pain relief, say MPs'

Family of teenager with aggressive cance turned to illegal drug as last resort

Mail Online 13th September 2016

Case study illustrating the use of cannabis for pain relief. Professor Wayne Hall, of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted.

Labelling terrorists as mentally ill stigmatises people with mental health problems, experts say

Independent 13th September 2016

Linking terrorist attacks to mental health problems risks stigmatising people who are ill and could dissuade some from seeking help, psychiatrists have warned. The psychiatrists, Professor Kamaldeep Bhui, of Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Dr Adrian James, a registrar at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, and Professor Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology a& Neuroscience, King's College London, added that no single diagnosis was associated with 'lone actor' terrorism.

E-Cigarettes Help Smokers Quit, Review Finds

NBC News 13th September 2016

Electronic cigarettes might help smokers kick the habit, with few side-effects, an independent review has found. "In my view, smokers struggling to stop should try all possible methods, including electronic cigarettes, to help them to do so," said Ann McNeill, professor of Tobacco Addiction at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London. Also reported by Financial Times and Yahoo News.

Legalise cannabis for pain relief, say MPs

Daily Mail 13th September 2016

Cannabis should be legalised for 'medicinal' use in the UK, a major report concludes. The report is contradicted by a major review led by King's in 2014, which concluded that smoking cannabis is highly addictive, can cause mental health problems and opens the door to hard drugs. This was also reported in a separate article for Daily Mail.

Londoners Diary: Clegg and Balls upstaged by Cameron again

Various media outlets 13th September 2016

Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute, has launched his new book with an event on the Strand campus. This was reported by Evening Standard, Independent and New Statesman.

Making connections: How Victorian artists plugged into telegraphy

Guardian 13th September 2016

A new exhibition at Guildhall art gallery celebrates telegraphy. The exhibition has been created through a collaboration of art, science and engineering, with the Guildhall gallery working with both King's and the Courtauld Institute.

HMS Terror

Sky News - Sky News with Dermot Murnaghan 13th September 2016

Researchers have discovered what they think are the remains of HMS Terror - which disappeared in 1845. Professor Andrew Lambert, War Studies, is interviewed on the discovery. ‘The ship is in very shallow water. If it was around the UK it would be very easy to dive but often the ice covers that area,’ he said. Professor Lambert also spoke to ITV News at Ten about the HMS Terror.

The new rules on what to eat in pregnancy

Telegraph 12th September 2016

Last month, scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London and the University of Bristol reported that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy could alter a growing foetus's DNA, leading to brain changes that raise the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, experts explain the latest thinking on what to eat in pregnancy.

King's press release related to 'The new rules on what to eat in pregnancy'

A dietitian put extreme 'clean eating' claims to the test

Independent 12th September 2016

An article on ‘clean eating’ by Sophie Medlin, Nutrition, that was written for Conversation UK, has been published by the Independent.

Islamic State’s most important leader is dead – what will happen now?

New Statesman 12th September 2016

Article on Islamic State by Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR). ‘Although IS has lost ground in some areas, it has gained others. Its fighters will continue to govern, establish redoubts and generate income,’ he said.

What to eat in pregnancy: The new rules according to the experts

Telegraph 12th September 2016

Experts explain the latest thinking on what to eat in pregnancy. Last month, scientists from King's and the University of Bristol reported that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy could alter a growing foetus's DNA, leading to brain changes that raise the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Meet the new Student Nursing Times Editors 2016/17

Nursing Times 12th September 2016

Undergraduate student Anna Merrick, Midwifery, will be the midwifery editor in 2016/17 for the Nursing Times. She said: ‘I am beyond privileged to become the first ever editor to represent the branch of midwifery.’ Meanwhile, undergraduate student Anthony Johnson, Nursing, will be a student affairs editor. He said: ‘I took on this role to continue the fight we began with #BursaryOrBust.’

Bullied for being boobless at twelve

Huffington Post 12th September 2016

Article on body insecurities by Larissa Scotting, Alumna, who mentions her time at King’s.

George Price: The altruistic man who died trying to prove selflessness doesn’t exist

Independent 12th September 2016

Article on theatre director Laura Farnworth's investigation into the life of scientist George Price. Dr Isabel Valli, IoPPN, is mentioned to have aided her research. This was also reported by BBC News Online.

Men are allies to the cause of equality for women, says campaigner

Various media outlets 12th September 2016

Article on Promundo, an international organisation that aims to enlist men in the struggle for gender equality. Dr Awino Okech, African Leadership Centre (ALC), said: ‘The narrative is that progress on gender equality hasn't been made because we don't engage with men. This is a flawed argument’. This was reported by Daily Mail, Reuters, New York Times.

Can London mayor’s car ban solve pollution crisis?

CNN 12th September 2016

New Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has a plan to drastically change pollution levels in London. Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, said: ‘In years to come the health benefits will be considerable.’

Modi's focus shifts from investment to foreign policy amid Kashmir, Balochistan troubles

CNBC 12th September 2016

Discussing Indian relations with China and Pakistan, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘Modi has thrown down the gauntlet on China's infrastructure plans for Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and Gilgit, areas of dispute.’

The ice bucket challenge raised more than a $100 milion

BBC Radio 5 Live 11th September 2016

The ice bucket challenge raised more than a $100 million. Interview with Ashley Jones from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London. Starts at 23:00

King's press release related to 'The ice bucket challenge raised more than a $100 milion'

Man-machine symbiosis: So who put the cyber into cybersex?

Guardian 11th September 2016

Article about cybernetics, which includes a discussion of a new book by Dr Thomas Rid, War Studies. His book was also discussed in Spectator.

Me and my motor

Sunday Times 11th September 2016

Article on Katherine Grainger, alumna.

Why is nose picking so appealing?

Guardian 11th September 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Gallery, Director, explains why nose picking is so appealing. ‘One reason humans find nose picking so rewarding is because the parts of the cortex connected to the hand and the face are so close together,’ he said.

The polluting effect of wear and tear in brakes and tyres

Guardian 11th September 2016

Article on wear-particles by Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group (ERG). ‘Increasing amounts of wear-particles have been found in new research from King's,’ he said.

Sixty seconds on... CBT

British Medical Journal 10th September 2016

"People are starting to assume you can get therapy on a smartphone and we won't need CBT to be provided by health services anymore," explained Rona Moss-Morris, who is a professor of psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Abide with Mao

Economist 10th September 2016

In an article about Mao Zedong, founding father of the People’s Republic of China, Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, discusses his rise to power. ‘It was accompanied in the turbulent China of the first half of the 20th century by a moving personal trauma: not only the deaths of so many of his chief colleagues, but also members of his family,’ he said.

Contemporary art and the Church

BBC Radio 3 Sunday Feature 10th September 2016

A discussion on contemporary art and the Church. Professor Ben Quash, Theology & Religious Studies, said: ‘Protestant churches have always been concerned with mission and that means communicating.’

Grammar School revolution to include Universities

Various sources 9th September 2016

Universities as well as grammar schools will be put at the heart of Theresa May's education changes. The article mentions that a number of top universities, including King’s, have already established new free schools or sponsored existing academies. This was reported by Huffington Post, Financial Times and Daily Express.

Candid, current, cutting

i 9th September 2016

Review of a book written by Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute, which mentions his teaching at King’s.

The man-machine myth

Wall Street Journal 9th September 2016

Review of the book Rise of the Machines by Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies. The reviewer says: ‘Mr. Rid’s fascinating survey of the oscillating hopes and fears expressed by the cybernetic mythos offers an implicit lesson.’

Theresa May: Universities must set up schools to have higher fees

Times Higher Education Supplement 9th September 2016

Universities in England will be asked to establish new schools, Theresa May has announced. The article mentions the King’s Mathematics School. This was also reported by Wired-Gov, Guardian and New Statesman.

Cumbrian lakes hold a centuries-long flood record

BBC News Online 9th September 2016

Any plan to protect homes and businesses from flooding has to understand the scale of the problem being confronted, a new review suggests. The National Flood Resilience Review wants to see greater use of "information from historic sources". Dr Daniel Schillereff, Geography, is mentioned to be part of a team studying the sediments in four lakes in Cumbria.

Samsung Galaxy Note

Sky News 9th September 2016

Passengers have been warned not to use their Samsung Galaxy Note smartphone during flights, over fears of the devices exploding. Commenting, Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, said: ‘Companies like Samsung and Apple are under massive pressure to make these batteries charge very quickly.’

Clothing trade

BBC World Service 9th September 2016

Piece discussing the second-hand clothing trade from the West to Africa and recent discussions to ban the imports. Commenting, Dr Andrew Brooks, Geography, said: ‘I think a gradual plan would be a good idea.’

Brexit doesn't deter EU students from choosing UK

Wall Street Journal 9th September 2016

Paul Teulon, Director, Admissions, commented on the possible impact of Brexit on students. ‘We’ve had no obvious indication at this stage there will be a reduction in the number of EU students,’ he said.

Flow of foreign fighters plummets as Islamic State loses its edge

Washington Post 9th September 2016

The flow of foreign fighters to Islamic State has drastically decreased. Commenting on the decline, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘It’s basically because Islamic State is a failing entity now. The appeal of Islamic State rested on its strength and its winning. Now that it’s losing, it’s no longer attractive.’

Facebook policy

BBC World Service 9th September 2016

In an interview discussing Facebook’s policies on image sharing and what is permitted on the site, Dr Martin Moore, CMCI, said: ‘What makes it particularly difficult in the case of Facebook is that it is such an enormous platform…its rules have a bearing on millions, if not billions of people.’

Trust me I'm a Doctor

BBC 2 8th September 2016

Presenter Michael Mosley explores the effectiveness of hypnosis as a therapeutic tool, in which he interviews Dr Quinton Deeley and Dr Eamonn Walsh of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) on the use of hypnosis as a n intervention for mental health conditions.

Diabulimia: Diabetes and eating disorder service launching in UK

BBC Newsbeat 8th September 2016

The UK's first ever diabetes and eating disorder service is launching at King's College in London. Professor Khalida Ismail from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, leads the largest diabetes and mental health clinic in the UK at King's College in London. She said:
"They never meet patients together and it's an inefficient use of current resources. I would argue we'd actually be saving money by joining up services."

TEF 'unlikely to boost status of teaching against research'

Times Higher Education Supplement 8th September 2016

An article on the Teaching Excellence Framework. Professor Paul Blackmore, Policy Institute, said: ‘Driving a new wedge between research and teaching, as the government is doing, sets up a contest that teaching is bound to lose.’

House of Commons restoration

BBC Radio 4 PM 8th September 2016

A feature looking at the House of Commons, and the upcoming restoration work. Professor Edith Hall, Classics, said: ‘I think it’s a huge opportunity…to actually experiment with different layouts.’

A dietitian puts extreme ‘clean eating’ claims to the test – and the results aren’t pretty

Conversation UK 8th September 2016

Sophie Medlin, Nutrition, has written a piece on ‘clean eating’. ‘When you consider the fundamentals of clean eating as being the sensationalist promotion of non-evidence based, and extremely restrictive, lifestyles that demonise everyday food essentials … you can see where the negativity from healthcare professionals stems from,’ she said. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

The American studies melting pot

Times Higher Education Supplement 8th September 2016

An article on American Studies, mentioning that studies related to the subject at King’s.

Global mental health

BBC World Service 8th September 2016

Dr Dominique Behague, Social Science, Health & Medicine, comments on the global issue of mental health. ‘I think we all have a desire to be able to find a single cause. The reality is that mental health is a complex interaction of factors.’

The debate over GM crops is making history

Nature 8th September 2016

Article on genetically modified crops, by Visiting Professor Vivian Moses, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences. ‘We cannot know in advance what aspects of GM crops will be of interest to future scholars,’ he said.

Sixty seconds on... CBT apps

British Medical Journal 7th September 2016

Professor Rona Ross-Morris of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) gives her thoughts on CBT apps.

Ugly truth

BBC News Online 7th September 2016

Article on British rule in India, by Dr Jon Wilson, History. ‘For 200 years, from the mid 18th Century to independence and partition in 1947, the British presided over a regime that was chaotic, violent, driven by uncontrolled passions and profoundly wracked by anxiety,’ he said. His recent book India Conquered, was also reviewed by Financial Times.

So, what does Brexit mean?

Conversation UK 7th September 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European and International Studies, has written a piece on Brexit. ‘Exiting the EU without a deal would mean reversion to a World Trade Organisation-type relationship that would harm both the UK and the EU. The only alternative, in my opinion, would be for the UK to negotiate some kind of transitional deal with its partners,’ he said. Work co-authored by Professor Menon was also mentioned by Wired-Gov.

The Progress 1000: London’s most influential people 2016

Evening Standard 7th September 2016

Evening Standard have revealed their list of London’s 1000 most influential people in 2016. Dina Asher-Smith, History, features in the ‘Rising Stars’ category. Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute, features in the ‘Westminster’ category, Student Naveed Khan, Medicine features in the ‘Equality Champions’ category and Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, features in the ‘Eco-Warriors’ category.

Calais migrant crisis

Sky News 7th September 2016

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, discusses the plans proposed to build a wall between the "jungle" where migrants are living and the city of Calais. He said: ‘There’s a perception among some refugees that Britain provides a better future than some other European countries so the wall will secure the road I’m sure it will but will it stop the attraction that getting to Britain represents?’

Shanghai Ranking 2016: Top universities for life and agriculture sciences

Times Higher Education Supplement 7th September 2016

Two hundred of the best universities for life sciences and agriculture sciences feature in a specific 2016 subject ranking by Shanghai Ranking Consultancy. King's is ranked 45.

The country that’s holding its own against Islamic State

Reuters 7th September 2016

Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, co-writes a piece on Islamic State and Iran. ‘Iran actively fights Islamic State – and Tehran’s counterterrorism efforts have succeeded where others have not,’ she said.

New white paper introduces comprehensive approach to managing tooth decay

International Business Times 7th September 2016

Professor Nigel Pitts, Dental Institute, has co-authored a paper about the management of tooth decay. ‘We have outlined evidence-based solutions for dental caries in this white paper. These must be urgently translated into actions at the clinical and policy levels, so that oral health professionals can provide the best possible care to their patients,’ he said.

How old is old?

BBC World Service 7th September 2016

Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, discusses a claim by an Indonesian man that he is 145 years old. ‘145 has not been previously documented. In order to live that long…you’d have to have the best luck possible,’ she said.

Top 100 world universities 2016/17 - QS World University Rankings

Various sources 6th September 2016

King’s is ranked 21 in the Top 100 world universities. This was reported by Telegraph, Guardian, Times, Evening Standard, Daily Mail, Independent, The Week and separate pieces for Independent and Guardian.

India's armed forces will benefit from 'the new bonhomie' in Indo-US relations

Daily Mail 6th September 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the 'Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Agreement' (LEMOA). ‘India is in the big league today and should start thinking big,’ he said.

Making the grade

Metro 6th September 2016

Of the 20 top-performing state schools in this year's A-level exams, all but four are in London or its surrounding counties, including King's College London Mathematics School.

Beyond the classroom: Empowering parents to help with homework

Huffington Post UK 6th September 2016

British engineer and broadcaster Kate Bellingham is partnering with E.ON to launch its new online learning resources, 'Energise Anything!' Work done by the ASPIRES group at King's shows that the 'science capital' children get from their parents can be a huge boost for their engagement and success in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects.

Chemical cosh plan for young prisoners

Scottish Daily Mail 5th September 2016

The article discusses a trial to be conducted by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which will be testing an antipsychotic drug to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in young offenders.

Prevent

BBC Radio 5 live Afternoon Edition 5th September 2016

A piece on the government's anti-radicalisation strategy Prevent makes reference to Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation.

Office for Students must promote collaboration as well as competition

Times Higher Education Supplement 5th September 2016

Article on the new Higher Education Bill. The article mentions the collaboration between King's and Portsmouth University, where student dentists and student dental nurses are brought together to practise working in real-world teams.

Are Hong Kong’s best days behind it?

CNN 5th September 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, discusses recent elections held in Hong Kong for the city’s Legislative Council. ‘The outcome so far partly confirms what was already widely suspected: Hong Kong politics has become more divided and more fractious,’ he said.

Why do many South Asians regard mental illness as taboo?

BBC 4th September 2016

England cricketer Monty Panesar has fought a public battle with mental health issues. Professor Dinesh Bhugra of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) says the South Asian population has "a bigger notion of shame" than others in the UK. Many in the community do not consider it a medical issue, but instead put mental illness down to other factors. Part of the problem, he believes, is language. "There is no word for depression in South Asian languages," he says. "The identified causes are usually [put down to] 'life's ups and downs'. So, people say 'what has it got to do with a doctor?'"

Operation lasting 60 minutes could free diabetics from injections

Daily Express 4th September 2016

A non-surgical procedure that takes only 60 minutes could do away with the need for insulin injections or surgery for diabetes sufferers, a new study suggests. Dr Francesco Rubino, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, who helped pioneer the method, said: ‘This could eventually lead us to a cure for Type 2 diabetes.’

A neuroscientist explains: Bargain hunting and how the brain understands numbers

Guardian 4th September 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery explains how the brain understands numbers and pricing. ‘Even if you think you’ve got a brilliant price, the brain can easily be influenced to pay more,’ he said.

Opera

BBC Radio 3 Proms 4th September 2016

Professor Roger Parker, Music, and Dr Flora Willson, Music, are the special guests on Proms Extra, discussing Rossini's ‘Semiramide’. (20:57)

Enlightened education policy will lift up the left behind

Financial Times 4th September 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece on why a focus on a technical education would benefit Britain. ‘We do well in educating the elite…But we do much less well, and always have done, in educating those whose skills are technical and vocational rather than academic,’ he said.

G20 summit

BBC World Service 4th September 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, comments on the G20 summit being held in China. ‘The highest pressure you can deal with as a Chinese official is the US relationship, and protocol is going to be very dense.’ Professor Brown’s comments were also reported by South China Morning Post and he was interviewed on BBC Radio 5 live Sunday Breakfast.

Letter of the week

British Medical Journal 3rd September 2016

‘Letter of the week’ is by Dr Katharina Kieslich, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences. ‘The need for policy makers’ receptiveness of new hepatitis C drugs is vital,’ she said.

Citizen Clem: A Biography of Attlee by John Bew

Times 3rd September 2016

Review of ‘Citizen Clem: A Biography of Attlee’ by Professor John Bew, War Studies. This was also discussed in a separate article for Sunday Times.

Beijing seeks to steer summit on growth and development despite gloomy IMF forecast

Daily Telegraph 3rd September 2016

Commenting on the G20 summit held in Beijing, Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, said: ‘The role that China can play in bringing together developing and developed countries is very important.’ Dr Pardo also spoke to People’s Daily.

A new home for science

British Medical Journal 3rd September 2016

The Francis Crick Institute in London, which scientists start to move into this week, is a building that was designed with collaboration in mind. The Crick is a collaboration of six founding partners: the UK Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, University College London, Imperial College London, and King's College London.

King's press release related to 'A new home for science'

London air pollution policies are starting to have impact, but more work to be done

King's press release 2nd September 2016

New research by scientists at King’s suggests that air pollution from London’s roads is improving overall but more work may be needed to tackle some sources of traffic pollution. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘It is great that evidence shows that policies are starting to have an impact, but we need to expand on these to reduce the health burden from breathing polluted air.’ This was also reported by BBC News, Evening Standard and Metro.

King's press release related to 'London air pollution policies are starting to have impact, but more work to be done '

What actually is the Mediterranean diet – and does it work?

Guardian 2nd September 2016

Article about the health benefits of a Mediterranean diet. Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Nutrition and Dietetics, said: ‘If you are trying to get people to eat a lot of vegetables and salad, it’s quite difficult to do without oil.’

Great expectations for summit

Daily Telegraph 2nd September 2016

An article about the upcoming G20 summit in China. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘The core question will be how to balance meeting people’s expectations towards their living standards, while delivering this sustainably, and sorting out the real worries over stagnant income growth.’

Is urban cycling worth the risk?

Financial Times 2nd September 2016

An article on cycling in the city. London's air pollution, which is caused primarily by traffic and diesel fumes, is responsible for upto 9,500 premature deaths each year, according to a 2015 King’s study.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

BBC Radio 5 live 2nd September 2016

The head of a leading military charity says that PTSD is being exaggerated by some charities as a way to raise money. Ed Parker of Walking with the Wounded is interviewed, and makes reference to research by King’s. This was also reported by Sky News.

'I absolutely loved uni life, and then it was gone'

i 1st September 2016

Feature piece on life after graduation. Dinesh Bhugra, professor of mental health and diversity at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, says: "When you are studying for your degree, everyone tells you that this means you will get a good job and make decent money."

Ten million more Americans smoke marijuana now than 12 years ago

Guardian 1st September 2016

About 10 million more Americans smoke marijuana now than 12 years ago, a new study in the British medical journal the Lancet has found. Amir Englund, a PhD in Cannabinoid Psychopharmacology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted: “As for the reduction in the perceived risks of cannabis, this needs to be taken into context. Some maybe have previously believed classic cannabis scaremongering such as ‘one toke and you go mad/become a heroin addict. However, it would be wrong to think that cannabis has no risks.”

Simple blood test for Alzheimer's in the offing

Deccan Chronicle 1st September 2016

In a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test for Alzheimer's, scientists have found a set of biomarkers that can predict whether or not an individual would develop the neurodegenerative disease. Researchers from Cardiff University, King's College London and University of Oxford studied blood from 292 individuals.

Trust Me, I'm a Doctor S5 Ep1

BBC 1 1st September 2016

Michael Mosley and doctors get the truth behind health claims. Dr Nick Grey from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience is interviewed.

Apple cider vinegar: The new superfood is put to the test

Times 1st September 2016

An article exploring whether apple cider vinegar is as good for you as is claimed. It is mentioned that Dr Andy Webb, Cardiovascular, and some volunteers, helped the author of the article to test claims that eating garlic, beetroot or watermelon can help to reduce blood pressure.

Meet the new generation of Middle Eastern women shaking up London's cultural agenda

Evening Standard 1st September 2016

An article about Middle Eastern women in the cultural industries, including designer Leila Maleki, Alumna.

NOSK: Could this tiny nose filter make cyclists' commutes less polluted?

Evening Standard 1st September 2016

Article on the NOSK air filter for cyclists and pedestrians. It is mentioned that a King's and Healthy Air campaign study found drivers actually breathe the worst air.

Lion of Panjshir's son ready to take up his Afghan destiny

Daily Mail 1st September 2016

An article about Ahmad Massoud, Alumna and son of Ahmad Shah Massoud. He is open to following in the footsteps of his father by taking a political role on the national stage in Afghanistan.

Fast fashion is creating an environmental crisis

Newsweek 1st September 2016

An article discussing recycling clothing mentions comment by Dr Andrew Brooks, Geography. ‘Exporting low-quality clothing that has no value in our own society forges a relationship of dependency,’ he said.

Modi makes moves in China’s backyard

Wall Street Journal 1st September 2016

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will make a stop in Vietnam on Saturday on his way to the G20 summit in China. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, writes a piece on the visit, stating: ‘Mr Modi’s visit will also remind Beijing that New Delhi is no longer hesitant to expand its presence in China’s periphery.’

Global Movement for Mental Health

BBC World Service 1st September 2016

Dr Dominique Behague, Social Science, Health & Medicine, discusses the Global Movement for Mental Health, a network of individuals and organisations that aim to improve services for people living with mental health problems and psychosocial disabilities.

How does food affect migraines?

BBC 1st September 2016

Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience gives comments on the relationship between food and migraines.

Reviving the 'double jeopardy' hypothesis: physical health inequalities, ethnicity and severe mental illness

British Journal of Psychiatry 1st September 2016

Craig Morgan, one of the co-authors of this study, is Professor of Social Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard appointed as Visiting Professor

King's press release 31st August 2016

The Hon Julia Gillard, who served as Prime Minister of Australia from June 2010 to June 2013, has joined King’s as a Visiting Professor. She will work closely with the Policy Institute and the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies. ‘I look forward with great enthusiasm to substantive academic engagement with the students and faculty at King's, and to contributing to meaningful discussion of issues of importance to society and the world,’ she said.

King's press release related to 'Former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard appointed as Visiting Professor'

Exclusive: Best and worst UK universities for nursing, as rated by students

Nursing Times 31st August 2016

Data analysis by Nursing Times has revealed the best and worst university nursing courses, based on student satisfaction levels. King’s has a satisfaction rating of 76%.

Who is on Strictly Come Dancing 2016? Full line-up as celebrity contestants compete for chance of winning the glitterball

Daily Mirror 31st August 2016

The final line up for Strictly Come Dancing includes Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute. He was also interviewed for Times.

Children as young as three have body image issues while four years olds know how to lose weight, study finds

Telegraph 31st August 2016

Children as young as three have body image issues and some four-year-olds know how to go on a diet, a survey by childcare professionals has found. It comes after research completed last year by King’s along with London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Harvard suggested children over the age of eight were displaying signs they were dissatisfied with their bodies.

Killing of Mohammad al-Adnani

BBC Radio 5 live 31st August 2016

Islamic State says one of its longest serving members and most prominent leaders has been killed in Syria. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘The most important thing about him is he was personally planning a lot of the attacks we’ve seen in the West.' He was also quoted by BBC Radio 4 News Briefing, and interviewed on a separate piece for BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight, in addition to appearing on Newsnight and quoted by Al Jazeera.

Japan buys British-made military weapons as tensions over South China Sea row escalates

Daily Express 31st August 2016

Simmering tensions in the South China Sea have led Japan to buy British-made military hardware to prepare for a potential confrontation with China. Professor John Bew, War Studies, said: ‘In undergoing its own ‘pivot to Asia,’ the UK is likely to face dilemmas, as well as great opportunities, which require careful consideration.’

More Americans getting high: Cannabis study

Daily Mail 31st August 2016

A study has found that the number of adult cannabis users in the United States increased by ten million from 2002 to 2014. Professor Sir Robin Murray, IoPPN, said: ‘Cannabis use in Britain has gone down in the last 10 years.’ PhD student Amir Englund, IoPPN, spoke to Guardian. He said: ‘As for the reduction in the perceived risks of cannabis, this needs to be taken into context.’

China’s leadership key to G20 role in boosting global growth

Sina 31st August 2016

Article discussing the upcoming G20 summit, due to be held in Beijing. Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, said: ‘The role that China can play in bringing together developing and developed countries is very important.’ This was also reported by Xinhua.

Two months after ‘Brexit’ vote, Britain’s push to leave EU is a muddle

New York Times 31st August 2016

Some analysts say that the exit negotiations for ‘Brexit’ could take decades, following uncertainty in discussions by the UK Prime Minister. Commenting on action taken by the government, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘What is interesting, is how little Theresa May has said.’ Professor Anand also spoke to NPR on Brexit.

Breakthrough blood test could predict onset of Alzheimer's disease

Express 30th August 2016

A simple blood test is being developed - and it could be the first of its kind to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease in people with poor memory. The team, including scientists from Cardiff, King's College London, and Oxford University, studied blood from 292 people with early signs of memory loss but who did not meet the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's. Also reported by the Daily Mail.

Is it a problem that I have a drink almost every day?

Vice 30th August 2016

Article on the writer's drinking habits. Dr. Sally Marlow, a Public Enagaement Fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted. She said: "There's no single trait or gene, no single answer that says whether you're addicted ...[alcohol spawns from a] complex interplay between your genetic makeup and the things that happen to you in your life."

Britain still holds the aces in battle for Chinese trade

Times 30th August 2016

An article discussing China-UK trade relations mentions Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, who said that the Chinese authorities will have been upset by Theresa May’s decision to delay the Hinkley Point plant because it was a symbolic deal.

Breakthrough blood test could predict onset of Alzheimer's disease

Daily Express 30th August 2016

A blood test being developed could be the first of its kind to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease in people with poor memory. The team, including scientists from King's, studied blood from 292 people with early signs of memory loss but who did not meet the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Who killed Mia Ayliffe-Chung and Tom Jackson? Not necessarily a terrorist - even if he did yell Allahu akhbar

Independent 30th August 2016

Visiting Professor Andrew MacLeod, Policy Institute, has written a piece on the killing of a British backpacker in Australia. ‘Not all those who claim that they kill in the name of God are terrorists,’ he said.

Brexit

Sky News 30th August 2016

The French President has made clear that it will be tough for Britain to get the deal it wants once negotiations begin over Brexit. Professor Takis Tridimas, European Law, said: ‘Article 50 does not state that the notification is not revocable. Just as I declare my sovereignty by notifying that I want to withdraw, I can again express my sovereignty by saying I no longer want to withdraw.’

From dream to nightmare: When your sperm donor has secrets

Guardian 29th August 2016

An article about a couple who had a baby by sperm donation, only to later find that the sperm donor had lied about his mental health. He had schizophrenia and a narcissistic personality disorder. Professor Cathryn Lewis, Medical & Molecular Genetics, said: ‘Testing one gene tells us nothing about an individual’s risk of developing schizophrenia.’

UN's $4bn aid effort in Syria is morally bankrupt

Various sources 29th August 2016

Dr Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, has written an article about a Guardian investigation into the UN awarding contracts to individuals associated with the Syrian regime. ‘UN officials argue that given the complex and often dangerous realities in which they are expected to provide aid, some concessions and accommodation of the government’s demands are inevitable. Yet ... the UN’s alleged pragmatism has long given way to troubling proximity to the regime,’ he said. This was also reported by Daily Mail, AFP and Deccan Chronicle and he was also quoted in a separate piece for Guardian.

What next as Dilma Rousseff makes her final stand

CNN 29th August 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, discusses the ongoing impeachment of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. ‘Her chances are pretty limited. She’s fighting for her legacy and not for her job,’ he said. Professor Pereira also spoke to BBC World Service on this topic.

Island standoff clouds China-Japan ties in run-up to G-20

Bloomberg 29th August 2016

China has sent more ships near Japanese-administered islets in the East China Sea, triggering protests from Tokyo. Dr Alessio Patalano, War Studies, said: ‘At every step they take in the elevation ladder, Japanese frustration and anxiety grows.’

As FBI warns election sites got hacked, all eyes are on Russia

WIRED US 29th August 2016

The FBI has warned of precautions to be taken against hackers, trying to hack into election board websites. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: ‘Someone is trying to hack these databases, and they succeeded in exfiltrating data, which is significant in itself.’

Stockholm Syndrome

BBC World Service 28th August 2016

Neil Greenberg, Professor of Defence Mental Health at King's College London explains the psychology behind Stockholm Syndrome. Starts at 09:30

‘I’m Muslim, Bangla, British. But most of all I’m a mum’: Great British Bake Off champion Nadiya Hussain on how life has changed since leaving the tent

Daily Mail 28th August 2016

An interview with Nadiya Hussain, winner of BBC’s Great British Bake-Off 2015. It is mentioned that Nadiya won a place to study psychology at King’s but chose not to accept the offer as her parents did not want her to leave home.

A neuroscientist explains: How video games stave off dementia

Guardian 28th August 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery explains that playing video games can help prevent dementia. ‘This is because if you continue learning to do new things…your brain seems to become better at switching to new ways of doing things and this may slightly delay the onset of some of the more distressing symptoms,’ he said.

Behind the scenes at Saracens: Premiership champions and a European superclub

Telegraph 28th August 2016

An article on the Saracens rugby team. Physics student, Ralph Adams-Hale, is in the academy squad.

Using San Francisco’s public transport to work out the value of research

Times Higher Education Supplement 28th August 2016

Professor John Grant, Policy Institute, and research fellow Alex Pollitt, Policy Institute have written a piece about the value of research, citing San Francisco’s public transport system as an example. ‘Private sector investment is valued more by the general public than researchers, and researchers prefer the training of future academics over the training of future medical professionals, in contrast to the general public,’ they said.

Shakespeare's insults put centre stage by Globe PhD student

Times Higher Education Supplement 28th August 2016

An article about the PhD of Dr Miranda Fay Thomas, Arts & Humanities Research Institute, which was co-supervised by Shakespeare's Globe and King's. Her PhD looked at shaming gestures on the Elizabethan and Jacobean stages. ‘Many of the insulting gestures I looked at are gendered in one way or another,’ she said.

Black Lives Matter

BBC Radio 4 28th August 2016

Report on death of Kingsley Burrell and other cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement in the UK. Professor Ben Bowling, Law, said: ‘[There is] a sense that those deaths have not received the degree of attention which is required.’

Shades of grey: those who confessed to a crime they don’t remember

Financial Times 26th August 2016

Article on the phenomenon of someone confessing to a crime they didn't commit, with comment from Gisli Gudjonsson, a professor of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London. She worked on a Icelandic murder case in 1974.

Surrogacy in India

BBC Radio 4 26th August 2016

The Indian government has unveiled a draft law that could ban foreigners, single parents and gay couples from being able to hire a surrogate. Professor Bronwyn Parry, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘If you outrightly ban a practice, the most likely outcome is you will drive that practice underground.’ Professor Parry also spoke to BBC World Service on this topic.

Kashmir and Palestine: The story of two occupations

Al Jazeera 26th August 2016

Article on the ongoing siege of Kashmir mentions a paper by Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, published in 2004.

King's joins Rio Olympic celebrations

King's press release 26th August 2016

King’s staff joined Olympic celebrations in Rio, taking part in events at the GB headquarters for the games - British House. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, said: ‘We were honoured and delighted to be asked to join these events and the culmination of what has been a fantastic Games both for Brazil and Team GB – including our own King’s athletes and alumni.’

King's press release related to 'King's joins Rio Olympic celebrations'

500-pound bombs struck their targets in a Syrian village. But who was killed?

Washington Post 26th August 2016

The U.S. government confirmed that 55 civilians have died in more than 11,000 U.S. strikes conducted in Iraq and Syria since 2014. Senior Military Fellow Christopher Kolenda, War Studies, said: ‘The numbers that U.S. Central Command is putting out would suggest an order of magnitude increase in effectiveness.’ This was also reported by NDTV.

Social media giants failing on extremism

Various sources 25th August 2016

Social media companies are consciously failing to combat groups using their services to promote extremism, say MPs. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), was quoted by BBC News Online and spoke to BBC Radio 4 Today. ‘We need to face the fact that you cannot eliminate everything from the internet,’ he said (08:44). Professor Neumann’s comments were also reported by Wired, New Statesman, BBC Two Victoria Derbyshire (10:20), Wall Street Journal, Associated Press and Washington Post.

Lack of Exercise Is a Serious Problem for the Severely Mentally Ill

Vice 25th August 2016

A new study conducted by King's College London and the South London and Maudsley (SLaM) NHS Foundation Trust indicated that those with a diagnosis of psychosis were more likely to get less exercise. Dr Fiona Gaughran of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience is quoted. She said: "We all find it difficult to exercise," she says. "If you have this illness, you have not just what we call 'positive incidents,' such as hallucination, but there are also negative symptoms, which can include a lack of motivation to get up and get out." Also reported by NDTV, Hindustan Times, and the Deccan Chronicle.

King's press release related to 'Lack of Exercise Is a Serious Problem for the Severely Mentally Ill'

Psychosis associated with low levels of physical activity

King's press release 25th August 2016

A King’s study, in partnership with the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, involving more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. Dr Brendon Stubbs, IoPPN, said: ‘Understanding and overcoming these barriers could be an important strategy to help people with psychosis be more active, and potentially to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.’
This was reported by Times of India, NDTV, and Hindustan Times.

King's press release related to 'Psychosis associated with low levels of physical activity'

Women's Mental Health 2016 Youth Award Winners

King's press release 25th August 2016

Reports from the winners of the Women's Mental Health (WMH) 2016 Youth Award in Health Research and Science Communication.

King's press release related to 'Women's Mental Health 2016 Youth Award Winners'

New engagement with an old neighbour

The Hindu 25th August 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, writes a piece on relations between China, India and Myanmar. ‘A consequence of India’s ideological obsession with democracy was that Myanmar drifted towards China,’ he said.

How poverty affects the brain

Newsweek 25th August 2016

Article looking at how poverty affects the brain mentions research conducted by the IoPPN on the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder in those who have been mugged.

Indian subs more vulnerable after leak, UK experts

Hindustan Times 25th August 2016

Following a leak of sensitive data related to India’s submarine project – Scorpene, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘Given India’s dismal defence procurement system, this will set India back significantly.’

New approach to treating depression, through immune system

BBC Radio 4 24th August 2016

A report focusing on Depression and the lack of new treatment for the condition. The potential of a new approach which targets the immune system is discussed. Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London comments. Starts at 45:23. Also reported by BBC World Service and BBC 2, and BBC Newsroom Live.

The Inflamed Mind

BBC Radio 4 24th August 2016

This programme explores the increasing body of evidence that a dysfunctional immune system is responsible for the depression or psychotic illness experienced by hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of people in the UK. Prof Carmine Pariente of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience is interviewed. He said: "I believe this is one of the strongest discoveries in psychiatry in the last twenty years. It allows us to understand depression no longer as just a disorder of the mind and not even a disorder of the brain, but a disorder of the whole body. It shifts conceptually what we understand about depression."

Swiss model is hardly even suitable for Switzerland

Financial Times 24th August 2016

Letter on Britain's relationship with the EU post-referendum, by Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History. ‘Many policymakers in the EU regard the Swiss model as a broken one,’ he said.

Letters

Evening Standard 24th August 2016

A letter by Sol Gamsu, Geography, on the school system in London. ‘To challenge inequalities between schools we need to end forms of selection that continue to exist, not widen this gap by building new grammar schools,’ he said.

China and the United Nations

Al Jazeera 24th August 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, comments on the relationship between China and the United Nations. ‘China is unilaterally treating every international organisation from the UN downwards pretty dismissively…It’s not going to take lectures from any organisation.’

Shirley Rodrigues and the Air Pollution Emergency

Times of India 24th August 2016

Article discussing pollution in London mentions research by King’s Environmental Research Group (ERG).

The immune system and mental health

Various sources 24th August 2016

There has been an increasing body of evidence that suggests a dysfunctional immune system is responsible for depression and psychotic illness. Professor Carmine Pariante, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), speaking to BBC Radio 4 The Inflamed Mind said: ‘I believe this is one of the strongest discoveries in psychiatry in the last twenty years.' He also spoke to BBC Radio 4 Today and was quoted on BBC News Online, BBC Radio 5 live and BBC World Service.

Rio Olympics 2016: Which universities produced the most gold medal winners?

Times 24th August 2016

A list of the Olympics gold medal table, ranked by the number of gold medals won by past and present students at each university. King’s features in the table with one gold medal, won by Paul Bennett, Alumni. Bronze medal winner Katherine Grainger, Alumna, was also the feature of a piece by Daily Mail.

Full Strictly Come Dancing 2016 line-up revealed

Daily Mirror 23rd August 2016

Article on this year's Strictly Come Dancing line-up, which includes Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute. He said: ‘Making a speech in Parliament seems a piece of cake compared to this.’ This was also reported by a separate piece in Daily Mirror.

Joe Wicks can 'barely cook' despite having the UK's fastest-selling recipe book

Daily Mail 23rd August 2016

Online fitness and diet guru Joe Wicks has revealed that he can 'barely cook' despite having one of the UK's fastest-selling recipe books. Reflecting on his career highs, he told the Radio Times: 'I feel like I've won the lottery. It's mad. I was invited to an entrepreneurship conference at King's College London the other day.'

Genes are not destiny: Environment and education still matter when it comes to intelligence

Conversation UK 23rd August 2016

Article discussing recent research that suggests academic performance, reading ability and IQ have a genetic basis. It mentions research conducted at King’s, which used genetics to explain a substantial proportion of exam score differences.

Can supplements REALLY make us more beautiful? Collagen pills are 'useless' but vitamin C does protect the skin, experts say

Daily Mail 23rd August 2016

Article on 'beauty pills', which references a study carried out by researchers at King’s that found people with higher levels of vitamin D appeared to age more slowly.

After failed coup, Turkey enjoys rare period of unity

New York Times 23rd August 2016

Following a failed coup in Turkey, the approval rating of President Erdogan has increased up to 68 per cent. Commenting, Dr Simon Waldman, Institute of Middle Eastern Studies, said: ‘Many of the political problems dividing the country before the coup are still present.’

Addressing problems of anxiety and depression in Zimbabwe

BBC World Service 23rd August 2016

Honorary Research Associate Dr Dixon Chibanda, IoPPN, comments on a research project that he has been working on as part of a collaboration with King’s and the University of Zimbabwe. ‘It’s a psychological intervention or talk therapy, which is delivered by health workers who are trained and supervised to deliver low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy,’ he said.

China’s moment in the G-20 sun overshadowed by what lies beneath

Bloomberg 23rd August 2016

The upcoming G20 summit in China will happen amidst increasing economic and political upheaval for many Western governments. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘It’s harder for the rest of the world to criticise China when they’ve got those problems.’

Mainland firms can exploit HK’s advantages for overseas acquisitions

China Daily 23rd August 2016

Dr Sam Beatson, Lau China Institute, has written a piece on Chinese and Hong Kong’s financial markets. ‘China has been emerging as a global business leader for some time now and Hong Kong is long established as a sophisticated global finance leader and international business city,’ he said.

Home Office approved controversial drug trials on children

BBC Radio 4 22nd August 2016

A report on a drug trial at Richmond Hill school for boys in the 1960s which went ahead without the boys parents being consulted. Professor Sir Simon Wessely from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London joins a discussion on the issues related to the controversial trial.

New programme set to start transforming healthcare for children and young people

King's press release 22nd August 2016

Over 190,000 young people in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark will see their local health services transformed by an innovative change programme funded by Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity in partnership with King’s. Dr Ingrid Wolfe, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences, said: ‘It is very exciting and a great privilege to be involved in this enthusiastic partnership, working together to improve child health.’

King's press release related to 'New programme set to start transforming healthcare for children and young people'

Semenya's gold is being tarnished by hormone row

Guardian 22nd August 2016

A letter on the South African athlete Caster Semenya, by Emeritus Professor Peter Sonksen, Endocrinology. ‘She is the Usain Bolt of South Africa and deserves to be respected by her fellow athletes rather than vilified,’ he said.

Drug trials on children in the 1960s

BBC Radio 4 Today 22nd August 2016

A report on a drug trial at Richmond Hill school for boys in the 1960s, which went ahead without any parents being consulted. Professor Sir Simon Wessely, IoPPN, said: ‘[In] ’67 there were no research ethic committees for them to consult…It was on the edge of acceptability at that time.’

Syria

Al Jazeera 22nd August 2016

Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, comments on the conflict in Syria. ‘Here we are entering a third phase of the conflict; ISIS has been weakened and so all the underlying tensions of other different groups are emerging,’ he said.

Forensic study of 'mutineer' pigtails

King's press release 22nd August 2016

Ten pigtails of hair thought to be from seven mutineers of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame and three of their female Polynesian companions, purportedly dating back to the pre-1800s will be analysed in a new collaboration between the Pitcairn Islands Study Centre, Pacific Union College and the forensic DNA group at King’s. Dr Denise Syndercombe-Court, Forensic Science, said: ‘The hairs, if from the mutineers, are over two hundred years old and we have no idea what environments they might have been exposed to in the intervening time.’ This was also reported by Times, Independent, BBC News Online, Guardian, Daily Mirror and BBC Radio 5 live.

King's press release related to 'Forensic study of 'mutineer' pigtails '

Environment and education still matter when it comes to intelligence

The Conversation 21st August 2016

Recent research has suggested that academic performance, reading ability and IQ have a genetic basis. Earlier this year researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kings College London, used genetics to explain a substantial proportion of exam score differences.

King's press release related to 'Environment and education still matter when it comes to intelligence'

A neuroscientist explains: How to become an Olympic athlete

Guardian 21st August 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery explains that innate ability and motivation make little difference in becoming an Olympic athlete as the hours you put in are worth more. ‘Studies show that motivation has almost no effect on how well you can learn to fence or swim… In the end, it’s all about how many training hours you put in,’ he said.

Gadgets to set your heart on

Observer 21st August 2016

An article discussing health devices that can read your heart rate. Dr Satpal Arr, Cardiovascular Clinical Academic Group, said: ‘A certain amount of variability is normal, healthy in fact.’

Baby boomer Brits battle the booze

Independent 21st August 2016

The “baby boomers” are now at risk of becoming problem drinkers in their old age according to a King’s study showing that one in five over-65s who regularly drink alcohol are doing so unsafely. Dr Tony Rao, IoPPN, said: ‘This study shows the need for greater awareness of the potential for alcohol-related harm in older people.’

Payouts to forces veterans for mental health disorders reach record levels

Independent 21st August 2016

Veterans say men and women left with the mental scars of war are left to struggle against a Government scheme determined to give them as little as possible. The article references a 2014 study on PTSD by the King's Centre for Military Health which found that PTSD rates among UK regulars returning from Iraq or Afghanistan ranged between 1.3 per cent and 4.8 per cent.

Viewpoints: Is addiction a disease?

Conversation UK 21st August 2016

Article for and against the classification of addiction as a disease. Dr Femke Buisman-Pijlman, IoPPN, argues the case for. ‘Dependence is not like a virus or infection, but more like a chronic disease. You may have a predisposition to it, but it will not manifest itself until it is triggered,’ she said.

Author Jon Wilson’s book, India Conquered, is an objective take on why the British flourished in India

India Today 21st August 2016

Review of a book by Dr Jon Wilson, History, looking at accounts of British Rule in India. The reviewer comments: ‘Wilson gives us food for real thought.’

Exclusive: Deadly elite Foreign Legion force could be about to be unleashed on ISIS

Daily Express 20th August 2016

French Foreign Legion ‘killing machines’ could be deployed in the fight against terror in the Middle East in a bid to defeat ISIS. Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘Right now the French army’s abilities are limited. They are overstretched with troops in the Middle East and on French soil and I think it is unlikely they would deploy a large Foreign Legion element.’

Child poverty continues to rise in the UK

Lancet 20th August 2016

The number of children living in poverty in the UK has risen since 2011. Dr Ingrid Wolfe, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences, said: ‘If the UK had Sweden’s child survival rate, there would be about five fewer children’s deaths each day, that is 1900 per year.’

Faster drug approval sets the bar too low

British Medical Journal 20th August 2016

Dr Courtney Davis, Social Science, Health & Medicine, has co-written an article about drug regulation. ‘Health advocacy groups are concerned that adaptive pathways advance a deregulatory agenda,’ she said.

The man helping you get about town

South China Morning Post 20th August 2016

Interview with King’s Alumni Paul Chan Mo-lim, who developed a system for a commonly used electronic card in Hong Kong: The Octopus card. Mo-lim mentioned his time at King’s in the piece.

No more serfs. So that's all right. Or perhaps it isn't.

Financial Times 19th August 2016

Professor Michael Singer, Law, has written a letter about Uber’s employment model. ‘We can expect Uber to be an early adopter of [driverless car technology] and thus, within a few years, there may no longer be Uber drivers suffering feudal employment conditions…be careful what you wish for,’ he said.

How to win the fight against air pollution

CNN 19th August 2016

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that air pollution is responsible for up to seven million deaths each year. Article mentions comments from Andrew Grieve, Environmental Research Group (ERG), and a recent report by the same group.

Top North Korean diplomat in UK defects to South Korea

Various 19th August 2016

A senior North Korean diplomat based in London has defected to South Korea. Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, said: ‘This could prove very valuable to South Korea, the US and other countries.’ Dr Pardo’s comments were also reported by Al Jazeera, Associated Press, Fox News, CBS News, The Week and Washington Post.

Is jailing Anjem Choudary the best idea?

Spectator 19th August 2016

An opinion piece on Anjem Choudary and radicalisation within jails mentions a 2010 study from the ICSR. In a separate article by the Independent, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said that putting Islamist terrorists together would give them the chance to create a military command structure that they would not be able to maintain if dispersed. He was also quoted in a separate piece for Independent.

Rio 2016 Olympics: Team GB track and field athletes in danger of missing medal target

Evening Standard 19th August 2016

Olympics coverage mentions King’s History student, Dina Asher-Smith, who said: ‘We work really hard and we know we are mentally strong so the final shouldn’t be a problem.’ She was also featured in a separate article about young Olympics athletes for i.

Night Tube: Londoners hail arrival of 24-hour Underground service launching tonight

Evening Standard 19th August 2016

Londoners have expressed their delight as the Night Tube finally launches. King’s Theology student, Victoria Clore, said: ‘I’m so excited to be getting on the Tube after a party. It’s so much quicker than the bus.’

Dirty air

BBC News Online 19th August 2016

Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, unveiled a plan to deal with London's pollution problems last month, where he mentioned research from King’s.

Top grades add up to 100% at the school for maths prodigies

Various sources 19th August 2016

Article on the first set of A-level results from King's College London Mathematics School. Headteacher, Dan Abramson, said: ‘We’ve got great teaching but the most powerful element is the community and the way in which they push each other.’ An article about apprenticeships by Times mentioned Nathalie Moore who has left the school with A*AC in her A-Levels and will be undertaking an apprenticeship with Dyson. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management and Business, has also written a piece on the school for Spectator. ‘Great teaching delivers. Our school deliberately and of necessity, hired teachers who are excellent mathematicians,’ she said.

Scientists study link between unhealthy pregnancy diet and ADHD

Guardian 18th August 2016

Experts from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (King's College London) have found that a diet high in fat and sugar during pregnancy may be linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children with behavioural problems early in life. Also reported by The Times, Yahoo news, Mail Online, KCBS-LA radio, NDTV, Hindustan Times, Indian Express, India Today, The Financial Express, The Week, CNN and the Times of India.

King's press release related to 'Scientists study link between unhealthy pregnancy diet and ADHD'

Baby boomers are 'drinking themselves into an early grave'

The Conversation 18th August 2016

Article on the drinking habits of 'baby boomers', by Tony Rao of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London. Also published on the Mail Online and the Independent.

Amy's Place opens in memory of Amy Winehouse to help women with drug and alcohol addictions.

BBC Radio 4 18th August 2016

A new centre has opened in London called Amy's Place which is for female only addicts. Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London interviewed.

Gap between graduate and non-graduate wages 'shows signs of waning'

Guardian 18th August 2016

Article mentions that King’s nearly quadrupled the number of young people with BTecs it took in between 2008 and 2015. This was also reported by Financial Times.

Are Clearing places for Medicine degrees a sign of a recruitment crisis in the NHS?

Buzzfeed 18th August 2016

Article discussing clearing places for prospective medical students and their potential tuition fees. Jack Haywood, KCLSU Vice-President for Education (Health), said: ‘The higher-education bill going through parliament at the moment indicates that if a student enters medicine paying £9,000 a year, they could end up paying £10,500 by their sixth year. This is astronomical and inaccessible for many.’

The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide rankings 2016

Times 18th August 2016

King’s is featured at number 27 in the 2016 rankings.

ONS expands its economic capability: Appointment of the new Economic Experts Working Group

Wired-Gov 18th August 2016

Professor Martin Weale, Economics, is joining the new Economic Experts Working Group at the Office for National Statistics.

Midwives win grants to further reproductive research

Nursing Times 18th August 2016

Lucy November, Nursing & Midwifery, has won an international fellowship award. The grants are funded by research charity Wellbeing of Women, Royal College of Midwives and Burdett Trust for Nursing, and offer financial support to nurse-led projects.

Jeremy Clarkson raises spirits of A-level students with inspirational tweet

Evening Standard 18th August 2016

An article mentions that actor Craig Charles posted online to say that his daughter has secured a place to study English at King’s. This was also reported by i.

Sharing genetic information

BBC Radio 4 Inside the Ethics Committee 18th August 2016

A panel of experts discuss the ethics of sharing genetic information with family members. Jonathan Roberts, Education and Professional Studies, said: ‘Experiencing challenges in communication with families is relatively common but for there to be complete non-disclosure is relatively rare.’

The land of Genghis Khan is having an epic economic meltdown

Bloomberg 18th August 2016

Mongolia is facing huge economic difficulties, with a slowdown in demand for its reserves of copper, iron, coal and gold. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘That all spells bad news for Mongolia, which doesn’t have an easy Plan B.’

King's Maths School reigns supreme

Various 18th August 2016

Students at King's College London Mathematics School (KCLMS) celebrated their A-level results with 100% receiving an A* or A grade in Mathematics, including 83% gaining an A*. Head Teacher Dan Abramson, said: ‘I’m proud to have worked with such bright young dynamic minds, who no doubt will go on to great things.’ This was also reported by Times, BBC News Online and BBC News.

King's press release related to 'King's Maths School reigns supreme'

Nobodies and their diaries

Times Higher Education Supplement 18th August 2016

Dr Rivka Isaacson, Chemistry, is featured in the 'What are you reading?' section. ‘This book [The Pattern in the Carpet: A Personal History with Jigsaws] is inadvertently full of imagery relating to my group’s research in structural biology, where we try to piece together small parts of the molecular jigsaw puzzle of life within each cell,’ she said.

Gene that helps mammals tell if they are too warm or too cold is found

Daily Mail 17th August 2016

Researchers have discovered a gene that plays a key role in the ability of mammals to determine if they are too hot or too cold. Professor Peter McNaughton, a biochemist at the Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, IoPPN, King's College London, told MailOnline: 'There are variations in heat sensation between people - most notably, women tend to prefer a warmer temperature than men, which can lead to problems in designing buildings.'

King's press release related to 'Gene that helps mammals tell if they are too warm or too cold is found'

ADHD in Women

BBC Radio 4 17th August 2016

Dr Jessica Agnew-Blais from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed on Woman's Hour about the diagnosis of ADHD in women.

Banning diesel cars is essential to tackling London’s pollution crisis

City A.M. 17th August 2016

Article discussing restricting diesel cars to limit air pollution mentions research from King’s.

There is a case for talking to Isis – but Owen Smith can't make it while running for the Labour leadership

Independent 17th August 2016

Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, has written a piece on why it was unwise for Owen Smith to suggest that we should talk to ISIS. ‘By talking about talking to terrorists in the heat of the hustings, Smith …made it too easy for his views to be caricatured, and for Corbyn supporters to call him a hypocrite,’ he said.

Counter-terrorism: How Britain is fighting terrorism

Economist 17th August 2016

An article about how Britain is fighting against terrorism. Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, said that Britain has been subject to fewer coordinated terrorist attacks than France.

Fair advice call for A-level results

BBC News Online 17th August 2016

A social mobility charity is sending volunteers to help provide advice to state school pupils receiving their A-level results this week. The charity, MyBigCareer, wants state pupils to have fair access to personal advice about their options for university places or apprenticeships. Universities including King's have helped to provide volunteers.

The Dalits of India are finding new ways to fight the caste system

The Conversation UK 17th August 2016

Dr Kriti Kapila, India Institute, has written an article on the caste system in India. ‘Dalits have felt completely alienated from most other political parties because of the fundamentally upper-caste dominance within them. Caste as an issue seems to be ignored and the upper-caste appear to be in denial about its impact,’ she said.

How the cyber age gave peace a chance

New Scientist 17th August 2016

An article about Rise of the Machines: A cybernetic history, a book by Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies.

‘Shadow Brokers’ claim to have hacked the NSA’s hackers

NPR 17th August 2016

A group has claimed to have stolen code from the Equation Group – a team of hackers who have been tied to the National Security Agency. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, commented on those responsible for acquiring and leaking the code.

Humans may not be naturally optimistic after all

Express 16th August 2016

For decades experts have believed it is normal to expect good things to happen in the future and under-estimate the possibility of bad outcomes - a trait known as "irrational optimism bias". But a new study by KCL, UCL and Birkbeck, University of London suggests this assumption may be based on flawed research. Co-author Punit Shah, from the MRC SGDP of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, is quoted. He said: "There is ample evidence for optimism bias in various real-world situations - England football fans for example - but these instances simply show that certain people might be optimistic in certain situations; not that they are generally optimistic." Also reported by the Independent, Mail Online, i, Newsweek Europe, the Sun, and LBC radio.

King's press release related to 'Humans may not be naturally optimistic after all'

Essex

BBC Radio 4 The River 16th August 2016

A documentary feature presented by Professor Alan Read, English, who talks about the time he spent growing up by the riverine estuary of Essex. ‘While we existed on dry land, and swam in the river, we lived for the sea,’ he said.

Syria

BBC Radio 4 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 16th August 2016

Discussion of the use of napalm in the war in Syria. Dr Martin Navias, Defence Studies, is interviewed. ‘There’s been reports of attacks on Aleppo…I think the general consensus is – while one can’t confirm those pictures, there seems to be some sort of incendiary device,’ he said.

Modi sends warning shots to China, Pakistan on territory spat

Bloomberg 16th August 2016

In a recent speech Indian prime minister Narendra Modi referenced disputed territories in Pakistan-controlled areas of Kashmir, a key transit point in the ‘China-Pakistan Economic Corridor’ (CPEC). Commenting, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘You may be investing a lot in Pakistan, and think that CPEC is a done deal, but without India’s approval you might find it difficult to follow through.’ Professor Pant also wrote a piece on this topic for Wall Street Journal.

Schools in the South-East of England dominate access to Oxbridge

Various 16th August 2016

Elite state schools in London and the South-East of England have become ‘feeder schools’ to Oxbridge, increasing inequality in access to England’s top universities, according to new research by Sol Gamsu, Geography. He said: ‘Not only are elite state schools contributing to inequality in access in their local areas, they show a clear geographical bias towards London and the South-East, the causes of which will not be addressed if the grammar system is expanded.’ This was also reported by BBC, City A.M., Daily Mirror, ITV Lunchtime News, Independent, and Sina.

King's press release related to 'Schools in the South-East of England dominate access to Oxbridge '

Rio Olympics - Week 2

Various 16th August 2016

Katherine Grainger, King’s Alumna, spoke to Daily Mail in light of her retirement after her success at Rio. She also featured in a separate piece for Daily Mail. History student, Dina Asher-Smith, was interviewed by BBC Two. ‘I’ve got to make sure that I do the best with my degree but at the same time I can’t not focus on my athletics either,’ she said. She was also quoted in Evening Standard, Daily Express, Telegraph, Times and a separate piece for Evening Standard. Dina was also the feature in the TV listings for Daily Mail, and a Guardian article on Rio mentioned that she had made it through to the 200 metre semi-finals. Elsewhere, it was reported in Sunday Telegraph that Zoe Lee, Alumna, won silver in the women’s eight rowing final.

Renowned Researcher, Veena Kumari, Ph.D., Named Chief Scientific Officer at Sovereign Health

International Business Times 15th August 2016

Sovereign Health has appointed Veena Kumari, Ph.D. Chief Scientific Officer. She most recently served as the Professor of Experimental Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London.

Teachers fear A-level results after year of curriculum change

Guardian 15th August 2016

Teachers awaiting A-level results on Thursday are bracing themselves for turbulence as the impact of sweeping changes to the curriculum begin to be felt. In light of Brexit, Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, said: ‘For this summer, I think we’re in a relatively sound position. I think the challenge will come when we start to see application numbers in October, November, December the following year. That will depend on what the government is able to confirm in that interim period.’

Why healthy people shouldn’t be taking vitamin D pills

Spectator 15th August 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Genetics and Epidemiology, has written a piece about why healthy people should not take Vitamin D pills. ‘Unless essential, we should avoid artificial chemicals with adverse effects — even if they come disguised under the friendly name of vitamins,’ he said.

The intellectual roots of ISIS

Wall Street Journal 15th August 2016

Article discussing elements of Salafi-jihadism reviews a book written by Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR).

Shanghai Ranking: Academic Ranking of World Universities 2016 results announced

Times Higher Education Supplement 15th August 2016

The top universities in the world featured in the Shanghai Jiao Tong University ARWU league table are listed. King’s is in 50th place.

A neuroscientist explains: How route planning boosts brain power

Guardian 14th August 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, discusses how changing our travel route can improve our brain power. ‘Scientists have found that the enlarged part of [taxi drivers] brain [are] most active when they plan their route before setting off and while on the road,’ he said.

Bitter pill: The truth about antibiotics

Daily Express 14th August 2016

Article discussing new research into antibiotics. Professor Tim Spector, Genetics and Epidemiology, said: ‘There’s enough evidence for us to think carefully before begging our GP for a prescription for a marginal case like ear infections or flu.’

ISIS forces Pakistan and Iran to forge uneasy partnership

NBC News 14th August 2016

Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, commented on mounting fears that ISIS is expanding its operational reach across the Middle East and South Asia. ‘Iran is the country in the region that feels the ISIS threat most acutely,’ she said.

Lost boys leave women to rule at university

Sunday Times 14th August 2016

Article mentions the gender ratio of students at King’s. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Mail Online and People's Daily strike up unlikely partnership

Financial Times 13th August 2016

Publications MailOnline and People’s Daily of China have agreed a content sharing deal. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘It certainly is an unholy marriage. MailOnline is full of lots of gossip and things the People’s Daily would regard as capitalist degeneracy.’

Ethical questions raised in search for Sardinian centenarians' secrets

Guardian 13th August 2016

DNA samples from residents of an area in Sardinia have been sold to research firm Tiziana. Dr Mario Falchi, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, commented on the consent issues around such samples.

Rare Shakespeare folios on display at University of London

BBC News Online 13th August 2016

A collection of 30 rare Shakespeare texts on display at University of London offer an insight into how his work has evolved in the four centuries since his death. Professor Sonia Massai, English, said that Shakespeare's plays were purged of regional accents which contributed to the establishment of a standard English accent.

A time to reassess options

Various 13th August 2016

An article on the clearing process. It is mentioned that a number of Russell Group universities accept students through clearing and King’s is one such university. A separate Guardian article stated that last year, the 19 Russell Group universities used clearing, including King’s. Daily Mail reported that 64 courses were available through clearing this year, while Telegraph and Guardian stated that Russell Group universities including King's had some 3,900 courses available for applicants starting this year.

Cambridge exam arm to develop tests for university students

Times Higher Education Supplement 12th August 2016

The University of Cambridge’s examinations arm has been tasked with developing a standard test to measure the ‘learning gain’ of students at English higher education institutions. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management and Business, has warned that standardised tests were ‘completely unable’ to measure university performance since some disciplines would be ‘far more closely related’ to what the test was measuring than others.

Are coconuts actually any good for us at all?

Metro 12th August 2016

An article on the alleged health benefits of coconuts. Dr Scott Harding, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘There is nothing special about coconut fat and it should be treated like all other saturated fats when consumed in the diet.’ This was also reported by Telegraph.

Jeremy Corbyn BBC bias concerns detailed in letter from academics

Huffington Post 12th August 2016

Fourteen academics from nine British universities have written to James Harding, the Director of BBC News, requesting a meeting with senior management over concerns about its coverage of Jeremy Corbyn. Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, has signed the letter.

Rio 2016 Olympics - Week 1

Various 12th August 2016

Katherine Grainger, a King’s Alumna, has won a silver medal in the women’s rowing at the Rio Olympics. This was reported by Sky, Daily Mail, Mirror, Metro, Sun, Daily Express, Guardian, Times, Daily Telegraph, New York Times, Washington Post and Yahoo. History student Dina Asher-Smith spoke to Sun, ahead of her competing in the Games. ‘Sometimes I’ll get feedback for an essay and a lecturer will say ‘well done or good luck in Amsterdam or Rio’. It’s really cute,’ she said. She also spoke to BBC Newsbeat, and Telegraph. Professor David Cowan, Drugs Control Centre, was quoted in CNN and interviewed for Globo. Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, wrote a piece for The Conversation UK, which was also published in Newsweek, and commented for CNN.

Russian military strikes

Al Jazeera 11th August 2016

Dr Martin Navias, Defence Studies, commented on Russia airstrikes in Syria. ‘Next month, the Russians have major military manoeuvres planned,’ he said.

Is the conflict in Ukraine about to escalate?

Al Jazeera 11th August 2016

Russian President Vladimir Putin has accused Ukraine of carrying out a border raid in Crimea that allegedly killed two Russian servicemen. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, commented: ‘I don’t think either side is really interested in a military escalation…it doesn’t really benefit either of the sides.’

Premature babies

BBC Radio 4 Inside the Ethics Committee 11th August 2016

Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, discusses the health issues faced by prematurely born babies. ‘What’s happening in growth restriction is that the baby has got a smaller waist and a bigger head because the blood is being diverted to the brain,’ she said.

Sixth formers fear losing university places after assessment error

Guardian 11th August 2016

A class of sixth formers at a school in North London fear they have lost their university places after they were taught to the wrong standard for almost two years. Many of the 20 students taking the course were expecting to start university in September after getting conditional offers to study subjects such as child nursing, psychology and biomedical science at universities including King's.

Austerity has caused young men to turn into 'spornosexuals'

Independent 11th August 2016

Dr Jamie Hakim, Digital Cultures, has written a piece about ‘spornosexuals’ - men who go to the gym in order to share eroticised images of their toned bodies on social media. ‘In an economic climate in which the opportunity for young men to become high-paid decision makers has become more out of reach, many have turned to working on their bodies in order to feel valuable,’ he said.

Plato

BBC Radio 4 Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics 11th August 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, discusses Plato on the programme. ‘Plato is the first unbelievably great prose artist in philosophical thought,’ she said.

Appointments

Times Higher Education Supplement 11th August 2016

Professor Karen O'Brien, Vice-Principal (Education), has been named Head of the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford from September 2016. Professor Ian McBride, History, has been appointed to the Foster Chair in Irish History, from 1 October 2016, also at the University of Oxford.

Your mental health is making you poor

Vice 10th August 2016

Article on the connection between mental health and personal debt. Professor Dame Til Wykes, a specialist in psychosis at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kings College London, is quoted. She said: "Chronic mental health makes people poor, because it can mean they lose their job and they're dependent on benefits. Discrimination can make it difficult to get another job."

G20 summit

Xinhua 10th August 2016

Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, commented on the upcoming G20 summit, which will be held in the city of Hangzhou, China. ‘The UN 2030 agenda marks a significant change from the previous development goals,’ he said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 Frightened of Each Other’s Shadows 10th August 2016

A programme looking at contemporary British society, asking if the threat of a terrorist attack is changing the way we relate to each other. Includes an interview with PhD student Maryyum Mehmood, War Studies, who recounts stories of people she has spoken to for her research. Speaking of one Muslim girl she spoke to, she said: ‘She would prove that she is normal by smiling excessively.’

TEF is an unreliable test for university teaching

Guardian 10th August 2016

Letter expressing the disquiet of students' unions over the proposed Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), signed by several individuals including Ben Hunt, KCLSU President, and Jack Haywood, KCLSU Vice-President for Education (Health).

Meet the speakers at this year's first WIRED Security event

WIRED 10th August 2016

Professor Sir David Omand, War Studies, will be speaking at an upcoming event on cybersecurity.

Labour leadership

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th August 2016

Jeremy Corbyn's campaign team has accused the deputy leader of the party, Tom Watson, of spreading baseless conspiracy theories, notably that the party has become infiltrated by Trotskyists. Professor Alex Callinicos, Political Theory, said: ‘The idea that this is a movement that has been manipulated by a small number of people is absurd.’

Anger at violence against women in Peru spills over into protest

The Conversation UK 10th August 2016

Dr Jelke Boesten, International Development Institute, has written a piece about violence towards women in Peru and the protests against it. ‘According to national surveys, almost 40% of Peruvian women experience physical and sexual violence in their lives. If psychological and verbal abuse is included, the number increases to 70% in both rural and urban areas, and in all social strata,’ she said.

Steel Production

BBC Radio 4 Making History 9th August 2016

Professor David Green, Geography, gives the presenter a guided tour of one of Britain's earliest and most important centres of steel production. Showing her an old map of the steel workshops, he said: ‘One really concerning thing for London, having just been burned down, was fire. So for insurance purposes it was really important to know where that kind of industry was taking place.’

The mysterious eye condition of 'visual snow'

Guardian 8th August 2016

Visual snow is a poetic name for a strange visual anomaly. An expert in migraine and a director of the Wellcome Trust's National Institute for Health Research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, Peter Goadsby became interested in the condition due to an overlap in the perception of visual snow as a form of migraine aura.

Chain reaction: Will nuclear plant decision herald tougher times for Sino-British ties?

South China Morning Post 8th August 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, commented on UK-China relations. ‘It’s clear under May that there is a cooler attitude towards China. It is no longer ‘investment at any cost’ which seemed to be the approach under Cameron and Osborne,’ he said. Professor Brown also commented for Yahoo UK.

The new Russia by the old Russia

Huffington Post 8th August 2016

King’s MA student Karlijn Jans, European & International Studies, reviews a new book by Mikhail Gorbachev.

Washington Post, 08 August 2016

Washington Post 8th August 2016

Article looking at the impact of Brexit on free movement between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Professor Ian McBride, History, commented: ‘I assume there’ll be a common sense solution to this.’

Student digs developer agrees £350m refinancing deal

Telegraph 8th August 2016

Student accommodation developer Urbanest has agreed a £350m refinancing deal as it pushes forward to almost double its London-based portfolio over the next five years. The article mentions a partnership between Urbanest and King’s.

Strictly Come Dancing confirms Ed Balls on the line-up in true Ed Balls fashion

Metro 8th August 2016

Visiting Professor Ed Balls, Policy Institute, is to appear on TV show ‘Strictly Come Dancing’. He said: ‘Making a speech in Parliament seems a piece of cake compared to this.’ This was also reported by BBC News.

NICE proposes guidance change on 'team midwifery'

Nursing Times 8th August 2016

National guidance on the care of healthy women and their babies during childbirth may be updated in favour of more midwife-led provision. The Cochrane team, led by Professor Jane Sandall, Women’s Health, said that women who received midwife-led continuity of care were less likely to have an epidural and fewer women had episiotomies or instrumental births.

Should you be brushing your teeth THREE times a day? After flossing is declared pointless, dentists reveal the dos and don'ts of oral hygiene

Daily Mail 8th August 2016

Article offering oral hygiene advice, mentioning a new treatment called Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralisation (EAER), which has been developed by researchers at King's. EAER uses a tiny electric current to push minerals present in saliva and food into the deepest layers of the tooth. This helps the tooth to heal and strengthen.

The hiccupping girls of Old Salem

Buzzfeed US 7th August 2016

American officials investigated an outbreak of chronic hiccups in 24 teenagers. Professor Simon Wessely, IoPPN, commented: ‘It’s a very difficult situation for public health officials to handle. When it is over, the students get better, and the symptoms generally don’t come back.’

A neuroscientist explains

Guardian 7th August 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, discusses hydration. ‘You might think you should avoid salty food when it’s hot. But actually, snacking on a few peanuts or pretzels in the sun can help to keep you hydrated,’ he said.

Iran executes nuclear scientist who returned to country from US

Guardian 7th August 2016

An Iranian judiciary confirmed the execution of a nuclear scientist who it claims was a spy. Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, commented: ‘Following the reported revelations in the Clinton emails, Amiri was executed for spying. In the Iranian judiciary’s mind, it’s a necessary signal to the US that Iran is aware of their activities in Iran and that this is what is done to those who help the enemy.’

Elite universities cut place offer by two grades for pupils from poorer backgrounds as they try to meet diversity targets

Daily Mail 6th August 2016

Some universities are lowering place offers by up to two grades for pupils whose parents have no degree as part of efforts to fulfil Government diversity targets. The Realising Opportunities Programme (ROP), which King’s participates in, allows pupils to receive conditional offers of two grades lower than the standard offer.

Playing us for fools: This man signed up for jihad in Syria. Yet he's free to roam the streets of Robocop UK. Why ISN'T he under arrest?

Daily Mail 6th August 2016

A British student who skipped bail while awaiting trial for rape, fled to Syria to join Islamic State, according to secret documents discovered by Mail on Sunday. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: 'The sheer size and volume of the documents are too big for them to be forged. Also, IS have executed a number of people they suspected of leaking these papers, which would suggest the documents are genuine and from IS.’

King's Maths School

Times Magazine 6th August 2016

The King’s Maths School was covered in a feature piece for Times Magazine. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management and Business, said: ‘I think it’s really disappointing how few universities are doing it.’ The piece also featured a set of Maths questions provided by the school and interviews with some of the students.

King's press release related to 'King's Maths School'

Letters to the editor: Met Police is more stretched than ever

Evening Standard 5th August 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, wrote a piece for the Evening Standard, arguing that the Olympic Games are a great opportunity for Rio.

Not so gung-ho

Economist 4th August 2016

Speaking to Economist, Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute Director, explained that the decision to delay approval of Hinkley Point, due to be part-funded by Chinese investment, means the golden era of UK-China relations could be over before it has begun. He also commented for Financial Times.

King's awarded ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership

King's press release 4th August 2016

King's, with partners Imperial College London and Queen Mary University of London, have announced a new London ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership, specialising in training the next generation of social science researchers, giving them the necessary skills, curiosity and creativity to be truly innovative. Professor Vivienne Jabri, International Relations and Director of the ESRC LISS DTP, said: 'This partnership represents a fantastic opportunity to build on the diverse strengths of our respective organisations.’

King's press release related to 'King's awarded ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership'

Steerable catheter to treat cardiac arrhythmia

King's press release 4th August 2016

King’s has worked with design and technology consultancy Cambridge Design Partnership to develop a novel steerable catheter which King’s researchers have designed. The catheter is designed to improve the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia – a range of conditions which can lead to stroke or heart failure. Professor Kawal Rhode, Biomedical Engineering, said: 'We have been delighted with the results of Cambridge Design Partnership’s work on this project.’

King's press release related to 'Steerable catheter to treat cardiac arrhythmia'

Private positives

Times Higher Education Supplement 4th August 2016

A letter on private investment in universities that mentions the prominence of King's in university league tables.

Appointments

Times Higher Education Supplement 4th August 2016

A round-up of academic appointments includes Professor Gillian Douglas who has been appointed the new dean of the Dickson Poon School of Law. She said: ‘I am delighted and honoured to be appointed as dean, and look forward to working with colleagues in such a successful and dynamic academic environment.’

Budgets and racial diversity top challenges for UCLA

Times Higher Education Supplement 4th August 2016

Worldwide higher education news that mentions that Malcolm Gillies, King's alumni, is to become temporary head of the school of Music at the Australian National University.

Top tips on how to improve your memory and train your brain

Mirror 4th August 2016

An article on how to improve your memory cites a study at King's that found that middle-aged smokers performed less well on memory tests compared with those without the tobacco habit.

Cancer Research chief urges London to draw in top worldwide scientists post-Brexit

Evening Standard 4th August 2016

Sir Harpal Kumar, chief executive of Cancer Research UK, has warned London to retain its ability to hire the world's best scientists as he hailed the completion of the Francis Crick Institute, the biggest biomedical research facility in Europe. The institute is a partnership between the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, UCL, Imperial College and King's.

Lord David Willets joins 2U as strategic advisor

International Business Times 4th August 2016

2U, a company that partners with higher education institutes to deliver online degrees, has announced that Visiting Professor David Willetts, Policy Institute, will be a strategic advisor to the CEO.

Lord David Willets joins 2U as strategic advisor

International Business Times 4th August 2016

2U, a company that partners with higher education institutes to deliver online degrees, has announced that Visiting Professor David Willetts, Policy Institute, will be a strategic advisor to the CEO.

Newsweek’s foreign service podcast: Putin the puppet-master

Newsweek 4th August 2016

Podcast looking at Russian President Vladimir Putin’s attempts to influence political processes in Europe and the U.S. Dr Heather Williams, War Studies, was a guest panellist on the show.

Meet the Team GB girls to watch as the countdown to Rio Olympics begins

Various media outlets 3rd August 2016

History student Dina Asher-Smith, who will be competing at the Games, has featured in articles about Team GB athletes for Mirror, Sun and the Spectator.

Get ready for the coming wave of technologically enhanced athletes

Guardian 3rd August 2016

Dr Silvia Camporesi, Bioethics and Society, commented in a Guardian article discussing whether it would be fair for technologically augmented athletes to compete against able-bodied athletes

Am I getting enough contact hours at university?

Huffington Post 3rd August 2016

English Language and Literature student, Jennifer Creery has written an article, arguing that less contact hours at university does not necessarily mean less work. ‘The canny student will maximise university resources by finding opportunities to learn outside of fixed hours,’ she said. History student, Amir Azam, said: ‘the money they save on my contact hours should go elsewhere to benefitting me’.

Terrorism threat

BBC Radio 4 3rd August 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, discussed plans for a more visible armed police presence in London. ‘Having armed response units like this that are spread out across the city, that are themselves moving, it shortens essentially the amount of time, that a gunman would be allowed or be capable of operating unchallenged and unchecked,’ he said.

UK desperately short of trade experts to lead Brexit talks

Associated Press 3rd August 2016

Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, commented on the challenge the UK faces following the EU referendum. ‘It is multi-dimensional chess. This will take longer, it will be less simple, and the outcome will be more clouded and politically less satisfying,’ he said.

The China-Africa honeymoon is over

Huffington Post 3rd August 2016

Article discussing Chinese-African relations, mentions Visiting Fellow Jonathan Paris, ICSR, who is carrying out research looking at the changing geopolitical landscape of the two regions.

Usain Bolt has apparently never run a mile

Washington Post 3rd August 2016

Professor Steve Harridge, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, commented on the muscle structure of athletes. ‘To be a great sprinter you need leg muscles that are dominated by fast-twitch muscle fibers because they shorten the muscle quickly and generate power,’ he said.

UK desperately short of trade experts to lead Brexit talks

Associated Press 3rd August 2016

Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, commented on the challenge the UK faces following the EU referendum. ‘It is multi-dimensional chess. This will take longer, it will be less simple, and the outcome will be more clouded and politically less satisfying,’ he said.

The China-Africa honeymoon is over

Huffington Post 3rd August 2016

Article discussing Chinese-African relations, mentions Visiting Fellow Jonathan Paris, ICSR, who is carrying out research looking at the changing geopolitical landscape of the two regions.

Usain Bolt has apparently never run a mile

Washington Post 3rd August 2016

Professor Steve Harridge, Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences, commented on the muscle structure of athletes. ‘To be a great sprinter you need leg muscles that are dominated by fast-twitch muscle fibers because they shorten the muscle quickly and generate power,’ he said.

DNA linked to depression

BBC Radio 4 2nd August 2016

Dr Gerome Breen from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) joins the show to discuss the genetic basis of depression following the discovery that DNA is linked to depression in people of European descent. Interview commences at 02:42:30.

Rio Olympics: IOC head defends decision not to ban entire Russian team

Various media outlets 2nd August 2016

Professor David Cowan, Drugs Control Centre, has commented for a number of outlets regarding anti-doping at the Olympics including: NBC, CNN and CNN.

We asked an expert if Theresa May will call a snap General Election

VICE 2nd August 2016

An interview with Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, about the possibility of Theresa May calling a snap general election. ‘She initially said she wasn't going to do it, so if she does it might look a bit opportunistic, that she is blatantly exploiting the difficulties of the Labour Party when the country has other problems to think about. On the other hand, the temptation must be enormous; Labour's not in a serious position to mount an election campaign at the moment,’ he said.

What is arthritis? Treatments, relief and how to overcome the pain

Mirror 2nd August 2016

An article on treating osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis mentions research by King’s which found that eating plenty of garlic could lower your risk of developing osteoarthritis.

How London was built: From Tower Bridge to the South Bank – in pictures

Guardian 2nd August 2016

An article of photographs showing the construction of landmark London buildings and infrastructure projects. A photo of King’s Waterloo campus, pictured in 1951, is featured.

DNA and depression

BBC Radio 4 2nd August 2016

A new US study shows a possible link between genes contributing to our risk of depression. Dr Gerome Breen, IoPPN, said: ‘It shows us that like other complex disorders, that once we can achieve a large enough sample size…that we can discover interesting things about the genetic basis… of risks for depression.’

Isis using kittens and honey bees in bid to soften image in Dabiq propaganda magazine

Independent 2nd August 2016

ISIS has attempted to show a softer side by publishing photos of its fighters cradling kittens and images of honeybees in its online magazine. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘Although we've grown accustomed to the ultra-violence of Islamic State, videos and images of that nature are only well known because their shock value makes them viral. Islamic State has actually been messaging to Muslims, and particularly Arabs, for years with softer images.’ This was also reported by Daily Express.

PARALLEL UNIVERSE THEORY: Staggering claims that there could be INFINITE versions of YOU

Daily Express 2nd August 2016

It is yet to be proven, but some scientists strongly believe that the infinite universe theory is probable. The article quotes Dr Eugene Lim, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, who has previously written that we need to be looking for cosmic signatures that are left behind if or when these universes have collided. ‘These signatures are actively being pursued by scientists. Some are looking for it directly through imprints in the cosmic microwave background…others are looking for indirect support such as gravitational waves,’ he said.

Sports Psychology

BBC Radio 4 2nd August 2016

The programme explores why spectators enjoying watching sport and includes interviews with Dr Daniel Glaser, Science Galley director and Professor David Papineau, Philosophy. Professor Papineau said: ‘We admire people who are beautiful, intelligent and we admire people who have exceptional physical skills.' Dr Glaser said: ‘Even if you’re completely stationary, you’re using the bit of the brain that would control your body if you were moving, to help you see the movements of others.’

BBC Staff Salaries

BBC Radio 5 live 2nd August 2016

A report by MPs says the public should be told which BBC stars are earning more than the Prime Minister. Includes an interview with Dr Andrew Blick, Politics and Contemporary History. He commented: ‘For me the real question here is not the exact figure, I think the question is ‘Is this an appropriate benchmark against which to measure the principle of transparency?’

Child Genius

Channel 4 2nd August 2016

A 'child genius' is quizzed by presenter Richard Osman and Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing Policy, about Florence Nightingale.

Brazil shoots for Olympian heights at a time of political lows

The Conversation 1st August 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, wrote a piece for the Conversation UK, discussing political conflict that underlines the Rio 2016 Olympics. This was also picked up by Newsweek.

Professor Janice Rymer elected a Vice President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

King's press release 1st August 2016

Professor Janice Rymer, Women's Health and Medical Education, has been elected as one of the five new Vice-Presidents of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. 'Whilst working as a clinical academic at King’s I have always tried to promote Obstetrics and Gynaecology as a career and to support our trainees,’ she said.

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New fellows of King's College London

King's press release 1st August 2016

The fellowship and honorary fellowship of King’s has been presented to 14 distinguished individuals at graduation ceremonies this summer. The fellowship of King’s dates back to 1847 and marks contributions by exceptional individuals to King’s and/or to wider society.

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Is your gut making you sick?

Guardian 1st August 2016

New research suggests that the range and quantity of microbes that live in our guts could have a powerful effect on a range of conditions including depression, MS and obesity. Professor Tim Spector, Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Variations in the gut microbiome explain why our kids are getting fatter and why some individuals gain more weight.’

Syrian Civil War

BBC News 1st August 2016

A Russian military helicopter has been shot down in Syria. Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, is interviewed about the situation in Syria. ‘The Russians have tried to take a very public role in opening humanitarian corridors out of Aleppo’, he said.

Clothes that highlight air pollution are coming to London

Time Out 1st August 2016

An article about Human Sensor, a high-tech fashion range designed by media artist and environmentalist Kasia Molga, in collaboration with academics from the Environmental Research Group (ERG) at King's. As the wearer breathes, sensors embedded in the material collect data on the quality of the air, then LED lights flash white or blue if the air is clean, and danger zone red with high levels of PM2.5, meaning that the wearer can avoid highly polluted areas.

Russian military helicopter shot down in Syria

NBC 1st August 2016

A Russian military helicopter was shot down over Syria, killing all five people on board. Article includes a tweet by Eliot Higgins, War Studies, who commented on photographs of the wreckage.

China against the world: A tale of pride and prejudice

South China Morning Post 1st August 2016

Article mentions a new book by Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, quoting his comments on Chinese politics. ‘We may live in an age of openness and information, but the inner workings of the Chinese political system…remain one of the few bastions of opacity,’ he said.

Russian military helicopter shot down in Syria

NBC 1st August 2016

A Russian military helicopter was shot down over Syria, killing all five people on board. Article includes a tweet by Eliot Higgins, War Studies, who commented on photographs of the wreckage.

China against the world: A tale of pride and prejudice

South China Morning Post 1st August 2016

Article mentions a new book by Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, quoting his comments on Chinese politics. ‘We may live in an age of openness and information, but the inner workings of the Chinese political system…remain one of the few bastions of opacity,’ he said.

Struggling to understand killers

Guardian 31st July 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Galley, explains the human desire to understand the motivations of a killer. He said: ‘Our desire to understand the motivations of a killer involves a particular part of the brain called the ‘temporo-parietal junction’.’

Gulen

BBC Radio 4 31st July 2016

An interview with Bill Park, Defence Studies, on Gulenist organisations in Turkey and Central Asia. ‘They tend to be a bit coy about their links with the Gulen movement,’ he said.

Baby Health

BBC Radio 5 live 31st July 2016

iFIND, a new method of detecting problems in the health of babies before birth, is currently being developed by researchers at King's and Guy’s and St Thomas’s hospital. Dr David Lloyd, Clinical Research Fellow, said: ‘We are essentially looking to revolutionize how we detect problems before birth.’

Graduate wages don't justify university fees, unless you're a doctor or go to Oxbridge

Daily Mail 31st July 2016

Student debt payments wipe out the benefit of higher 'premium' earnings for most graduates who don't attend top universities, according to a new report. King's is included in the article in a list of Russell Group universities.

Why women really drink

Telegraph 30th July 2016

Young women staggering out of nightclubs still clutching bottles of vodka might be the archetypal image of Broken Britain. Includes comment from Dr Sally Marlow, addiction researcher at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. She said: "Ladette culture began to emerge in the 1980s and 1990s, when today's middle-aged women were in their 20s. It coincided with women having the freedom to do what they want with their bodies, having their own careers and the financial freedom to spend on whatever they wanted, including alcohol."

Hinkley Point

Various media outlets 29th July 2016

Plans to build the UK’s first new nuclear plant in decades have been under discussion this week. The main financer, French utility company EDF signalled they would be proceeding with investment, which has since been followed by an announcement by the British Government that they are delaying the final decision. Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has been commenting on the story for Daily Mail, BBC News online and Times. He also spoke on BBC Radio 4 Today, BBC Radio 5 and BBC News.

The IVF con: Women are being pushed into clinics despite remaining fertile until they are 45 - fertility expert Lord Winston says

Various media outlets 29th July 2016

Almost a third of women who don't conceive through IVF end up becoming pregnant naturally, research shows. The research was carried out by Imperial, King’s and Greenwich NHS Trust. This was also reported by Telegraph.

A flickering flame: Is the Olympic Ideal dead?

BBC World Service 29th July 2016

In a panel discussion, Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, commented on the present and future of the Olympics. ‘I think sport reflects our society…we are going to see increasingly the kind of cases of refugees or of athletes who don’t want to compete under the banner of their own countries,’ she said.

King's hosts 10th World Shakespeare Congress

King's press release 29th July 2016

Over 800 Shakespeare scholars from almost 50 countries will gather at King’s next week as the university co-hosts the 10th World Shakespeare Congress to explore and honour the Bard’s life and work. Professor Gordon McMullan, London Shakespeare Centre Director, said: ‘At King’s we look forward to welcoming delegates from around the world to share in a range of cultural and intellectual opportunities in the places where Shakespeare was born, acted, wrote and died.’ This was also reported by Guardian.

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Women being wrongly pushed into IVF treatment by private clinics, says UK's leading fertility expert

Telegraph 29th July 2016

Britain's leading fertility expert Robert Winston has said women remain fertile until they are 45 and are being pushed into having IVF too early by private clinics. His comments come as new research finds that one in three women will still become mothers even after IVF treatment has failed them. Scientists at Greenwich NHS Trust, Imperial College and King's followed couples in the six years after they had undergone fertility treatment. This was also commented on in a separate piece for Telegraph.

Want an antidote to chaos in the world? Maybe Barack Obama has the answer

Guardian 29th July 2016

The University of Texas has devised a scale to measure the personality trait they call "the need for drama", or NFD. Research by King’s into boredom and political views is mentioned.

What drove Syria's Nusra Front to detach itself from al-Qaeda?

BBC News 29th July 2016

An article by Dr David Roberts, Defence Studies, on the Nusra Front group operating in Syria. ‘Al-Qaeda is simply evolving to a more locally-focused and decentralised modus operandi. And, ultimately, if Jabhat can use this rebranding to subsume smaller groups along with their fighters, the basic al-Qaeda tenets will stand a better chance of being propagated still further,’ he said.

Film Review

BBC Radio 5 29th July 2016

An email from Dr Simon Kaye, Political Economy, about the Bourne movies, is read out. ‘They take themselves too seriously,’ he said.

Russia has motive, capability and form for U.S. email hack

Various media outlets 29th July 2016

The Kremlin denied accusations of involvement in the hacking of U.S. Democratic Party emails. Dr Samuel Greene, King’s Russia Institute, commented on Russian international relations. ‘Clearly the Kremlin feels it should and can insert itself into domestic politics in other countries in much the same way it believes the United States and Europe insert themselves into Russian politics,’ he said. His comments were also reported by South China Morning Post, Times of India and Daily Mail. Research by King’s in cyber-attacks was also mentioned in an interview on MSNBC. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, also spoke to Times and Guardian on this topic.

Pearson

Bloomberg 29th July 2016

Pearson CEO John Fallon is interviewed on the current financial status of Pearson. He makes reference to the partnership with King’s. This was also mentioned in the Times.

Russia has motive, capability and form for U.S. email hack

Reuters 29th July 2016

The Kremlin denied accusations of involvement in the hacking of U.S. Democratic Party emails. Dr Samuel Greene, King’s Russia Institute, commented on Russian international relations. ‘Clearly the Kremlin feels it should and can insert itself into domestic politics in other countries in much the same way it believes the United States and Europe insert themselves into Russian politics,’ he said. His comments were also reported by South China Morning Post, Times of India and Daily Mail. Research by King’s in cyber-attacks was also mentioned in an interview on MSNBC. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, also spoke to Times and Guardian on this topic.

Pearson

Blooomberg 29th July 2016

Pearson CEO John Fallon is interviewed on the current financial status of Pearson. He makes reference to the partnership with King’s. This was also mentioned in the Times.

A flickering flame: Is the Olympic Ideal dead?

BBC World Service 29th July 2016

In a panel discussion, Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, commented on the present and future of the Olympics. ‘I think sport reflects our society…we are going to see increasingly the kind of cases of refugees or of athletes who don’t want to compete under the banner of their own countries,’ she said.

French attacks

Various media outlets 28th July 2016

Following recent attacks in Europe, King’s academics have been commenting in the media. Frederic Ischebeck-Baum, War Studies, commented for BBC World News. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, spoke about the attacks also for BBC World News, BBC Radio 4 World at One and three times for Sky News. Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, commented in the i and for BBC News online. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, spoke on BBC Radio 4 The World Tonight, BBC 1 Breakfast and BBC 2 Newsnight.

Such short-sightedness over apprenticeship levy

Financial Times 28th July 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management and Business, has written a letter on a recent push by employers to abandon or delay an apprenticeship levy.

Breathtaking: Air-quality indices make pollution seem less bad than it is

Economist 28th July 2016

Article discusses acute and chronic exposure to air pollution. It mentions research by the Environmental Research Group (ERG) at King’s, which suggested air pollution could shorten lives in London by up to 16 months.

Inside Science

BBC Radio 4 28th July 2016

Professor David Cowan, Analytical & Environmental Sciences discusses anti-doping tests in advance of Rio 2016. Commenting on London 2012, when King’s ran the anti-doping labs, Professor Cowan said: ‘There was no such thing as an average day, other than being extremely busy all the time.’

Universities

BBC Radio 4 28th July 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management and Business, discusses her views on whether education matters and how that affects the labour markets, as a special guest expert in this comedy lecture programme.

London overtaking Oxbridge domination

BBC News Online 28th July 2016

London universities, including King's, are breaking up the traditional dominance of Oxford and Cambridge, according to official figures on research excellence.

The 'human sensor' making Manchester's air pollution visible

Guardian 28th July 2016

Media artist Kasia Molga has joined up with researchers at King's to develop clothing that reacts to particles (PM2.5s) emitted mainly by diesel engines. Andrew Grieve, ERG, said: ‘The big challenge we have is that air pollution is mostly invisible. Art helps to makes it visible.’

Rise of China boosts emerging economies’ share of world’s top earners

China Daily 28th July 2016

Dr Paul Segal, International Development Institute, commented following a new study that showed more of the world’s top-earning 1 percent are from emerging economies than in previous decades. ‘Although China is now, roughly speaking, the joint biggest economy in the world, it still has a much smaller share of the global top 1 percent than the United States, but it's clearly increasing, and it's increasing rapidly,’ he said.

Mental health research 'being short-changed'

Times Higher Education Supplement 28th July 2016

Mental health research 'being short-changed' Times Higher Education Supplement, 28 July 2016
Universities will lose out on tens of millions of pounds as a result of a change to the way mental health research is funded, researchers have claimed. Chris Mottershead, Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation), said: ‘Our principal concern is that mental health is being treated differently from physical health.’

Climate of confusion

Times Higher Education Supplement 28th July 2016

Climate of confusion Times Higher Education Supplement, 28 July 2016
Letter on open access to data, from Professor Mike Hulme, Climate and Culture. He said: ‘This principle of openness does not “damage science”, however inconvenient it may be to act upon it.’

Despite growth, no major India rise in global rich 1%: New UK study

Hindustan Times 28th July 2016

Research conducted by King’s and the University of Oxford looked at the global distribution of income. It noted that India has made ‘no significant incursions’ in the top 1% global rich, despite rapid economic growth over the past few decades.

Despite growth, no major India rise in global rich 1%: New UK study

Hindustan Times 28th July 2016

Research conducted by King’s and the University of Oxford looked at the global distribution of income. It noted that India has made ‘no significant incursions’ in the top 1% global rich, despite rapid economic growth over the past few decades.

Rise of China boosts emerging economies’ share of world’s top earners

China Daily 28th July 2016

Dr Paul Segal, International Development Institute, commented following a new study that showed more of the world’s top-earning 1 percent are from emerging economies than in previous decades. ‘Although China is now, roughly speaking, the joint biggest economy in the world, it still has a much smaller share of the global top 1 percent than the United States, but it's clearly increasing, and it's increasing rapidly,’ he said.

The Ice Bucket Challenge has just funded an 'exciting' ALS breakthrough

Telegraph 27th July 2016

Researchers have just discovered a new gene associated with the disease and experts are hopeful it could lead to new treatments in future. The ALS Association donated $1 million of the total amount raised by the Ice Bucket Challenge to UMass Medical School's Project MinE who has just announced the findings. Prof. Ammar Al-Chalabi from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is quoted. He said: "By working together, ALS researchers across the world, patients and the public have successfully driven the discovery of these new ALS genes. This study shows that there are more ALS genes to find, and tells us they can only be discovered using the latest technology of whole genome sequencing". Also reported on BBC World News, BBC World Service Radio, Channel 5 news, ITV news, and reported in The Times.

Tube station attacker was 'clearly psychotic'

Independent 27th July 2016

An Isis sympathiser who went on a bloody rampage at a London Underground station could be given a hospital order rather than a prison sentence because of his mental health. Defence witness Dr Nigel Blackwood, a senior lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and consultant psychiatrist at HMP Wandsworth, said Mire's extremism was "intimately associated" with mental illness. Also reported by the Mirror and the Express.

The Ice Bucket Challenge has just funded an 'exciting' ALS breakthrough

Telegraph 27th July 2016

Scientists from institutions in 11 countries, including King’s, have been involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) research, funded by donations from the viral ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’.
Commenting on a recent breakthrough, Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi, IoPPN, said: ‘This study shows that there are more ALS genes to find, and tells us they can only be discovered using the latest technology of whole genome sequencing.’ This was also reported by Times and the Sun.

Leytonstone Tube stabbing sentencing: Recap as court told psychotic ISIS fanatic thought Tony Blair was 'guardian angel'

Mirror 27th July 2016

A trial is underway following a knife attack in Leytonstone Tube station. Dr Nigel Blackwood, Forensic & Neurodevelopmental Sciences, is mentioned as being interviewed as a defence witness in the case. This was also reported by Independent and Scottish Daily Express.

Should the City be worried about the EU's new Brexit negotiator?

City AM 27th July 2016

Michel Barnier has been appointed to lead the European Commission’s negotiations with the UK over the terms of Brexit. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies said: ‘It is a relatively provocative appointment.’

Play these games. Your brain will thank you

The Times 26th July 2016

Putting your brain through a daily workout can improve the fitness of your grey matter in "spectacular" fashion, according to scientists reporting on a new study this week. Just 15 minutes a day spent playing the games was shown by London Metropolitan University to prompt the growth of new brain cells, while a study last year by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, funded by the Alzheimer's Society, said that computerised games could hold "significant" benefits for older people.

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How warming yourself up could banish the blues

Daily Mail 26th July 2016

Heating the body may be a new way to treat depression. In a trial, U.S. psychiatrists found patients who spent 2.5 hours in a heated chamber experienced a significant drop in symptoms after a single session. Commenting on the research, Carmine Pariante, a professor of biological psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, said: "This is a very important study. It confirms the notion that depression is not just a disorder of the mind or, indeed, of the brain, but actually a disorder rof the whole body, which is at the core of much research on depression today."

American Psychologist and geneticist who radically changed the view of schizophenia

The Guardian 26th July 2016

Obituary of clinical psychologist and behaviour geneticist Irving Gottesman, who has died aged 85. His recent awards included honorary fellowship of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and King's College London.

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Is there such a thing as 'bore out'?

BBC 26th July 2016

A Frenchman is suing his former employer for "bore out" - boredom's equivalent of burnout - which he says turned him into a "professional zombie". But is "bore out" real? Wijnand van Tilburg, assistant professor in psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is quoted.

Statins improve birth outcomes for mothers with an autoimmune disorder

King's press release 26th July 2016

Statins could prevent a deadly complication in pregnancy that affects 50,000 women a year, according to new research from King’s. Professor Guillermina Girardi, Women's Health, said: ‘We found that a drug which has been widely used in the general population to prevent cardiovascular disease appears to help prevent pregnancy complications in women with antiphospholipid syndrome.’ This was reported by Daily Mail.

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UK response to serial drug company misdemeanour—no action, no shame

British Medical Journal 26th July 2016

Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, has co-authored a letter in the BMJ commenting on the suspension by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) of pharmaceutical company Astellas.

We're wrong to think 1980s is all about Thatcher, says TV historian

Daily Express 26th July 2016

Article mentions a new documentary series hosted by Dr Dominic Sandbrook, History, which will explore the 1980s. The series starts on Thursday August 4 on BBC 2 at 9pm.

Dolly’s clones ageing no differently to naturally-conceived sheep, study finds

Guardian 26th July 2016

Twenty years on from the birth of genetically cloned sheep Dolly, researchers have been studying other clone sheep, some of which are copies of Dolly. Commenting on the developments in technology, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said that cloning has been surpassed by iPS cell technology as a means of making stem cells.

Bank of England's Martin Weale hints at interest rate cut next week

Daily Mail 26th July 2016

Article references comments made by Martin Weale, currently a policymaker at the Bank of England. The article mentions that he will be joining King’s later in 2016 in an academic capacity. This was also reported by Financial Times.

Do so-called superfoods really work?

Various media outlets 25th July 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, discusses how some experiments have been used to evaluate the benefits of superfoods. ‘Scientists might drop large amounts of these chemicals on cancer cells in a Petri dish and if they slow the rate of cancer growing, they may say it could slow the rate of tumour growth, but you would have to eat huge amounts to get the same effects,’ he said. Professor Spector also commented on healthy eating on BBC Radio 5 live.

Comment: The Suez crisis should have taught us brutal dictators are the real threat to world peace

Telegraph 25th July 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece on lessons learned from the Suez crisis. ‘Suez…raises a large issue, one that has still not been resolved, of how international order is to be maintained in a post imperial world,’ he said.

London students pay up to twice as much in living costs as those elsewhere in the UK

Evening Standard 25th July 2016

A recent study has looked at living costs for London students compared to their counterparts elsewhere in the UK. The article mentions that the most expensive London university to study at is SOAS, with UCL second and King's third.

As Donald Trump pulls ahead in the presidential race, will 2016 be seen as the high water mark for globalisation?

CITY AM 25th July 2016

Professor John Bew, War Studies, presents the ‘yes’ side of a debate questioning whether we are seeing the last days of globalisation. ‘The world has never been more interconnected but globalisation has not been the happy process that many presumed,’ he said.

How warming yourself up could banish the blues: Two hours in a heated chamber may help reset chemicals in the brain

Daily Mail 25th July 2016

A research trial in the U.S. suggests that heating the body may be a new way to treat depression. Commenting on the research, Professor Carmine Pariante, IoPPN, said: 'This is a very important study.’

A new depression treatment shows promise

TIME 25th July 2016

A collaborative team of researchers including those from King’s have worked with clinical services to investigate the cost effectiveness of behavioural activation (BA), a possible new alternative to cognitive behavioural therapy. Researchers include Professor Sarah Byford, IoPPN.

A new depression treatment shows promise

TIME 25th July 2016

A collaborative team of researchers including those from King’s have worked with clinical services to investigate the cost effectiveness of behavioural activation (BA), a possible new alternative to cognitive behavioural therapy. Researchers include Professor Sarah Byford, IoPPN.

No NHS bed in 300 miles for our anorexic daughter

Sunday Times 24th July 2016

Article discussing access to healthcare for anorexic patients. Ulrike Schmidt, a professor of eating disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments of the allocation of funding from the government and that long waiting lists are "toxic".

What happened at Aston Hall

BBC Radio 4 24th July 2016

Prof Sir Michael Rutter of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience is interviewed in relation to Ashton Hall Hospital having experimented with the so called 'truth serum' on children. Interview starts at 17:00.

Clinton campaign – and some cyber experts – say Russia is behind email release

Various media outlets 24th July 2016

Officials in the Hilary Clinton campaign have accused the Russian government of releasing damaging information to aid the campaign of Donald Trump. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, is mentioned to have communicated with the entity that claimed to release the email cache to WikiLeaks. This was reported in Washington Post, NDTV ,Wired and Telegraph. Professor Rid also wrote a piece on the hacking for Vice Motherboard and spoke to PBS Newshour.

How to remember for the future

Observer 24th July 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, explains how we remember things for the future. ‘The way the brain works makes it much more difficult to remember to do something at a later moment, something known as prospective memory,’ he said.

No NHS bed in 300 miles for our anorexic daughter

Sunday Times 24th July 2016

A piece on the issues one family found in finding NHS treatment for their ill daughter who had battled with anorexia. Professor Ulrike Schmidt, IoPPN, described long waiting lists as ‘toxic’ for patients with anorexia, and that those above 18 could wait a significant time for treatment.

Like mother, like child: Mother’s DNA may affect ageing

Deccan Chronicle 24th July 2016

A research study suggests that a tiny repository of DNA inherited from one’s mother may be the key for healthy ageing. Commenting on the study, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said the results were ‘fascinating and mind-boggling’. This was reported by AFP and NDTV.

Hong Kong may gain from the Brexit fallout

China Daily 24th July 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, has written a piece on the impact of Brexit on Hong Kong. ‘Hong Kong is a natural partner in many areas for London...London has been positioning itself as a principle international centre for Chinese currency trading,’ he said. Professor Kerry was also quoted on this subject for the Financial Times.

Terrorist or disturbed loner? Munich attack reveals shifting labels

International New York Times 24th July 2016

Article discussing the recent shootings in Munich mentions research by Raffaello Pantucci, ICSR, who looked at the Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik who killed 77 people in 2011.

Like mother, like child: Mother’s DNA may affect ageing

Deccan Chronicle 24th July 2016

A research study suggests that a tiny repository of DNA inherited from one’s mother may be the key for healthy ageing. Commenting on the study, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said the results were ‘fascinating and mind-boggling’. This was reported by AFP and NDTV.

Hong Kong may gain from the Brexit fallout

China Daily 24th July 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, has written a piece on the impact of Brexit on Hong Kong. ‘Hong Kong is a natural partner in many areas for London...London has been positioning itself as a principle international centre for Chinese currency trading,’ he said. Professor Kerry was also quoted on this subject for the Financial Times.

Terrorist or disturbed loner? Munich attack reveals shifting labels

International New York Times 24th July 2016

Article discussing the recent shootings in Munich mentions research by Raffaello Pantucci, ICSR, who looked at the Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik who killed 77 people in 2011.

'Simple but effective' treatment for depression gets impressive results in Devon study

Plymouth Herald 23rd July 2016

A simple and inexpensive therapy is equally as effective at treating depression as the "gold standard" of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), a largescale study has concluded. Behavioural Activation (BA) is relatively simple, meaning it can be delivered by more junior staff with less training, making it a cost-effective option. A collaborative team of researchers from the Universities of Exeter, York, Kings College London and Tees Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust worked with clinical services, to investigate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of BA. Researchers include Prof Sarah Byford of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. Also reported in Time.

Should grit be taught and tested in school?

Scientific American 23rd July 2016

Article about children in gaining 'grit'. A recent study conducted by Kaili Rimfeld of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and her colleagues found that grit had only a small effect on how well 16-year-old twins performed on standardised tests given in England and Wales.

King's press release related to 'Should grit be taught and tested in school?'

What happened to the contraceptive pill for men?

Guardian 23rd July 2016

Article commenting on research into the male contraceptive pill. It mentions research by Dr Nnaemeka Amobi, Life Sciences & Medicine, who has been developing a non-hormonal ‘instant male pill.’

BHS

Sky 23rd July 2016

The remaining 114 BHS stores will close in the next four weeks, with more than 5,000 jobs expected to go. Commenting on calls to revoke former owner Sir Philip Green’s knighthood, Dr Andrew Blick, Politics and Contemporary History, said: ‘The word ‘honour’ means something, therefore the idea that it can simply be reversed on a whim is not one that is particularly palatable.

Letters to the Editor

The Times 23rd July 2016

A letter by Yacine Belhaj-Bouabdallah, President of KCLSU’s Future Society, has been published regarding a recent decision by Theresa May to abolish the Department of Energy and Climate Change. She said the decision was ‘particularly disappointing as many nations are using their climate change departments, and their growing focus on climate action, to involve millennials, those most likely to be affected by climate change.’

Some interesting facts about the average penis size

GQ 23rd July 2016

Article mentions a research collaboration between King’s and the NHS. Titled ‘Am I Normal?’, the collaboration collated the penis length and girth of 15,521 men from 20 worldwide projects.

Turkey coup attempt: Gülen's UK followers 'threatened'

BBC 23rd July 2016

Accusations have been directed towards the Gülen movement, a movement led by Turkish Islamic theologian and preacher Fethullah Gülen, following a failed military coup in Turkey. Bill Park, Defence Studies, commented on organisations who are connected. ‘They tend to be a bit coy about their links,’ he said.

Moving to No 10: What the PM should expect

BBC 23rd July 2016

Following the move of Theresa May into her new home at Number 10 Downing Street, researcher Jack Brown, Policy Institute, discussed the changes she might make to the property. His comments were also reported by BBC Radio 5 live.

Air pollution

CNN 23rd July 2016

Professor Martin Williams, ERG, discusses the global threat of pollution. ‘There are well-known studies that show that pollution can travel on high level winds, that transfer pollution across the atmosphere from China through to the US and across to Europe,’ he said.

Air pollution

CNN 23rd July 2016

Professor Martin Williams, ERG, discusses the global threat of pollution. ‘There are well-known studies that show that pollution can travel on high level winds, that transfer pollution across the atmosphere from China through to the US and across to Europe,’ he said.

Are Methylphenidate effects in children with ADHD really uncertain?

British Medical Journal 22nd July 2016

Emily Simonoff, Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry & Neuroscience is the lead author of a response letter to the editor of the British Medical Journal.

The link between weed and violence

askmen 22nd July 2016

Article highlighting the research into the relationship between smoking cannabis and violent behaviour. A study published by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN, King's College London) is mentioned.

King's press release related to 'The link between weed and violence'

When does Brexit mean Brexit - Could the UK change its mind?

Reuters 22nd July 2016

Since entering Downing Street as Britain's new prime minister last week, Theresa May has quickly dispelled hopes that the UK might change its mind about leaving the European Union." Brexit means Brexit," she said in her inaugural speech. Professor Keith Ewing, Law, believes there is no provision for revoking Article 50. Reported by Yahoo!, CNBC and others.

Dina Asher-Smith at Rio 2016

Various media outlets 22nd July 2016

King’s History undergraduate student Dina Asher-Smith, who will be competing in Rio 2016 Olympics, has been mentioned in a number of media outlets. Dina was quoted in the Evening Standard twice. Dina was also mentioned on BBC World Service, with reference to her recent achievements at the European Championships.

Blood disorders cost €23 billion to European economy

King's press release 22nd July 2016

Healthcare costs per patient with blood cancers are two times higher than average cancer costs, due to long hospital stays and complex treatment and diagnosis. This is according to two new studies conducted by a team of researchers, including those from King’s.

King's press release related to 'Blood disorders cost €23 billion to European economy'

White working-class boys in HE: No definition ‘prevents progress’

Times Higher Education Supplement 22nd July 2016

In light of a recent report by researchers at King’s and the think-and-action-tank LKMco, Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco, told a conference that universities will struggle to make significant progress on increasing the number of white working-class boys in higher education until that group is better defined. This research was also mentioned in Huffington Post.

Your genes can help predict how well you’ll do in school – here’s how we cracked it

Conversation 22nd July 2016

PhD student, Saskia Selzam, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), has written a piece following the publication of research from King’s that showed almost 10% of differences in exam results at 16 can be explained using an individual’s DNA. This research was also reported by Metro.

What are my options if I do better than expected at A-level?

Telegraph 22nd July 2016

An article discusses options for prospective university students if they receive higher than expected A Level results. It includes a case study of a current King’s student, who had approached King’s on receiving higher than expected results. King’s has also been mentioned in a Times Higher Education Supplement article discussing UCAS clearing.

When does Brexit mean Brexit: Could the UK change its mind?

Various media outlets 22nd July 2016

Since entering Downing Street as Britain's new prime minister last week, Theresa May has tried to dispel hopes that the UK might change its decision about leaving the European Union. Professor Keith Ewing, Law, commented that there is no provision for revoking Article 50. ‘It is not foreseeable that the British government will change its mind,’ he said. This was also reported in Reuters.

New Dean of Law

King's press release 21st July 2016

Professor Gillian Douglas, has been appointed as the new Dean of The Dickson Poon School of Law at King’s, replacing Professor David D. Caron who stepped down from the position earlier this year following his appointment to the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal (IUSCT). Commenting on her appointment, she said: ‘I am delighted and honoured to be appointed as Dean of the Dickson Poon School of Law, and look forward to working with colleagues in such a successful and dynamic academic environment’.

King's press release related to 'New Dean of Law'

Letters: Saluting Ed Vaizey, a true friend to the creative industries

Telegraph 21st July 2016

Letting paying tribute to Ed Vaizey, the outgoing Minister for Culture and the Digital Economy, for his service to the arts and creative industries, signed by several individuals including Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal.

The Chilcot report: the longest work of academic history ever?

Times Higher Education Supplement 21st July 2016

The Chilcot Report's deep meditation on foreign policy makes it more than an inquest into the failings of individuals and institutions in the conduct of the Iraq War, argues Glen Rangwala. The Iraq Inquiry committee consisted of five members, including Sir Lawrence Freedman, emeritus professor of war studies.

Don’t get hacked off; get your message out there

Times Higher Education Supplement 21st July 2016

An article by Fern Riddell, PhD History, that explains that talking to the media isn't a minefield, but a manageable opportunity and a civic duty

How William Burroughs's drug experiments helped neurology research

Guardian 21st July 2016

Sixty years after William S Burroughs journeyed into the South American rainforests and took the hallucinogenic infusion yagé, the respected neuroscientist Andrew Lees has written a memoir revealing how, with colleagues at King's, he began to examine whether yagé could reverse the signs of Parkinson's disease in artificially afflicted marmosets, and to plan a possible clinical trial.

What's behind the global rise in short-sightedness?

The Conversation 21st July 2016

An article on the rise of myopia, by Professor Chris Hammond, Ophthalmology and Dr Katie Williams, Clinical Research.

The UK is pursuing French-style policies on extremism – but it may lead to more frequent terror attacks

Independent 21st July 2016

An article on the French approach to counter-terrorism, by Dr Frank Foley, War Studies. ‘My research indicates that the UK’s response to jihadist terrorism has generally remained more proportionate than that of the French – and arguably with better results’, he said.

Attempted abduction of RAF serviceman

BBC Radio 5 live 21st July 2016

Professor John Gearson, War Studies, is interviewed regarding the attack on an RAF serviceman as police investigate possible terrorism links. ‘What’s interesting about this particular incident is not that it’s happened but that it doesn’t seem to have been intelligence which has warned of a particular attack.’

Can universities help make government better?

Independent 21st July 2016

An article by John Rentoul, Policy Institute, looks at the ‘Blair Years’ course taught alongside Dr Jon Davis.

Britain needs Brexit debate, says woman behind legal challenge

Reuters 21st July 2016

Many British voters were fooled into voting to quit the European Union without realising there was no credible plan for an exit, so lawmakers must decide how and whether to leave, said the investment manager behind a Brexit legal challenge. ‘What MPs are desperate to do is to avoid voting on this at all costs,’ said Professor Anand Menon, European Politics. Also reported by CNBC and others.

An epic treatise on the folly of war

Various media outlets 21st July 2016

Article discussing the recently published Report of the Iraq Inquiry (also referred to as the Chilcot Inquiry). It mentions that the Inquiry committee consisted of five members, including Emeritus Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies. Professor Freedman was also interviewed on BBC Radio 4 The Norma Percy Tapes discussing the Iraq War.

Garden Rescue

BBC2 20th July 2016

The Greenwood Theatre, features in this programme as it is now a landmark because of its vibrant exterior and urban garden. (15:25)

Appointment of Director

Financial Times 20th July 2016

The Directors of Calamos Global Funds plc wish to announce the appointment of Dr. Laura Calamos Nasir as a Director of the Company. She earned BSN and MSN degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her PhD in Health Research from King's.

From the Cockpit to the Operating Theatre

BBC Radio 4 20th July 2016

Why lessons learned from aviation psychology are starting to save lives in hospitals. Includes interview with Professor Nick Sevdalis, Professor of implementation science and patient safety at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.
Starts at 18:57.

King's College London Archives achieves national accreditation

King's press release 20th July 2016

King’s College London Archives and the Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives have been awarded Archive Service Accreditation. Robert Hall, Director of Library Services, said: ‘I am absolutely delighted that our Archives and Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives have been recognised by the National Archives through their Accreditation Award scheme.

King's press release related to 'King's College London Archives achieves national accreditation'

Bringing up Britain: Children and gender

BBC Radio 4 20th July 2016

Mariella Frostup discusses gender identity with Professor Patrick Leman, IoPPN. He said: ‘We want to distinguish sex and gender, and sexual orientation as well. So sex usually picks out those biological characteristics associated with boys and girls. Gender picks out the more social process, the things that boys and girls, men and women pick up from being part of society...’ (01:01)

From the Cockpit to the Operating Theatre

BBC Radio 4 20th July 2016

Why lessons learned from aviation psychology are starting to save lives in hospitals. Includes interview with Professor Nick Sevdalis, IoPPN. (18:57)

After Brexit, Britain's place in the world as at America's side, looking to Asia

Telegraph 20th July 2016

Comment piece by Professor John Bew, War Studies, about Britain’s place in the world in light of the EU referendum. Professor Keith Ewing, Law, also commented for Daily Mail, on Article 50. And Ian McBridge wrote about the impact on British-Irish relations for Guardian.

Rift over move to 'generic' courses

Nursing Times 20th July 2016

A rift among the mental health nursing community has emerged over education reforms that could see a move towards more generic nursing degrees, an investigation by Nursing Times can reveal. Professor Ian Norman, Mental Health Nursing, said: ‘general nursing and mental health nursing draw in rather different sorts of people and that is one of the problems with having a single portal’.

Bringing Up Britain

BBC Radio 4 20th July 2016

Programme about the issues involved in parenting today. Includes interview with Professor Patrick Leman, Psychology about gender identity. (09:00)

Is Momentum a 'Cult of Dangerous Thugs'?

Vice 20th July 2016

An article looking at campaign group Momentum. Dr Andrew Blick, Politics and Contemporary History, said: ‘It's difficult to know how it will all play out, but the way things are going, Momentum could accelerate a split in the Labour Party’.

Turkish democracy has a tough road ahead

Hindustan Times 20th July 2016

Opinion column on the current situation, post attempted coup in Turkey, by Professor Harsh Pant, Defence Studies.

See the Clothing That Shows How Bad Smog Is in Your Neighborhood

Yahoo! News 20th July 2016

Article on the Human Sensor, a set of high-tech garments that light up and change colour depending on the air quality around the person wearing them. Media artist Kasia Molga spent the past year designing the Human Sensor in collaboration with researchers at King's Environmental Research Group.

What went on at the hospital that 'experimented' on child patients?

BBC 19th July 2016

Article on the treatment of children in the 1960s and 1970s at the now-closed psychiatric hospital Aston Hall. Prof Sir Michael Rutter from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "As far as I knew nobody was using [sodium amytal] with children at that time."

Scientists pinpoint genes that could predict human intelligence

Daily Mail 19th July 2016

New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and supported by the Medical Research Council, suggests the possibility of predicting academic achievement by using a new genetic scoring technique. First author, Saskia Selzam (IoPPN) said: "We believe that, very soon, polygenic scores will be used to identify individuals who are at greater risk of having learning difficulties. Through polygenic scoring, we found that almost 10 per cent of the differences between children's achievement is due to DNA alone. Ten per cent is a long way from 100 per cent but it is a lot better than we usually do in predicting behaviour. For instance, when we think about differences between boys and girls in maths, gender explains around one per cent of the variance." Prof Robert Plomin is also quoted. He said: "We are at a tipping point for predicting individuals' educational strengths and weaknesses from their DNA. Polygenic scores could be used to give us information about whether a child may develop learning problems later on, and these details could guide additional support that is tailored to a child's individual needs. We believe personalised support of this nature could help to prevent later developmental difficulties."
Also reported by Financial Times, Metro, BT News, TES, Daily Express, Huffington Post, Deccan Chronicle, The Hindu, The Conversation, NDTV, Economic Time (India), the Sun, and the Mirror online.

King's press release related to 'Scientists pinpoint genes that could predict human intelligence'

The young men risking their health for the perfect physique: As this TV doctor finds out in a new documentary it’s not just super athletes using banned drugs...

Daily Mail 19th July 2016

An article on the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Professor David Cowan, pharmaceutical toxicology, who runs the UK Drug Control Centre laboratory said: ‘People are making injectable substances in garages. This means someone may be injecting a load of bacteria that can cause nasty infections or even kill’. Professor Cowan was featured in a BBC Horizons documentary on doping.

What went on at the hospital that 'experimented' on child patients?

BBC 19th July 2016

An article on the treatment of children in the 1960s and 1970s at the now-closed psychiatric hospital Aston Hall. Professor Michael Rutter, Child Psychiatry, said: ‘As far as I knew nobody was using [sodium amytal] with children at that time.’ Also reported by BBC Radio 4.

The Search For The Lost Manuscript: Julian Of Norwich

BBC4 19th July 2016

A programme discussing Julian of Norwich which features an interview with Dr Sarah Salih, English. (21:00)

Human skin bag is the real McQueen

Times 19th July 2016

An artist wants to make a leather handbag using the designer Alexander McQueen's skin. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘Maybe in the future we can re-synthesise the whole genome based on partial information from a degraded DNA, though not with the technology today’.

A few mouthfuls of oily fish each day 'can reduce the risk of dying from bowel cancer by 70%'

Various media outlets 19th July 2016

Eating oily fish once a week may help bowel cancer patients significantly boost their chance of survival, research suggests. Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Nutrition and Dietetics, said: ‘This study… does support the notion that eating oily fish once or twice a week is good for health especially if it replaces red and processed meat’. This was also reported by Telegraph.

Turkey coup: Erdoğan’s tightening grip will test relations with the West

The Conversation 19th July 2016

An article on the recent failed coup in Turkey looks at the impact on international relations, by Dr Bill Park, Defence Studies.

How stress can damage your body

Daily Telegraph 18th July 2016

Dr Valeria Mondelli of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the physiology of stress and it can impact our health. She said: "Cortisol and other stress hormones are important because they prime our bodies to react to threat, but when our cortisol is too high for too long, it can lead to physical and mental health problems in many areas of our bodies." She added, "High cortisol can affect the transmission of dopamine in the brain, a neurotransmitter linked to our reward system. That makes us more susceptible to seeking rewards by eating more and leads to increased cravings."

Doctor's diary: there's another side to the closure of children's heart surgery wards

Telegraph 18th July 2016

Article discussing children's heart surgery services, and the data obtained from research. Tim Rakow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is noted as a collaborator in the development of the website, 'Understanding Children's Heart Surgery Outcomes' which aims to increase understanding of how the NHS monitors children's heart surgery; survival rates; and other published data.

King's press release related to 'Doctor's diary: there's another side to the closure of children's heart surgery wards'

Representation of white working class boys in HE

Various media outlets 18th July 2016

A report by LKMco and commissioned by the Widening Participation Department, explores why so few white working class boys progress to higher education and how this can be addressed. Anne-Marie Canning, Director of Widening Participation, said: ‘This important report is essential in helping schools and universities improve the progression rates for white working class pupils to higher education’. This was reported by Times, Daily Mail, i, Times Higher Education, Independent, Huffington Post UK, Fox News and others.

King's press release related to 'Representation of white working class boys in HE'

Call for Sadiq Khan to ban all diesel cars from Londons roads

Evening Standard 18th July 2016

All diesel cars might have to be banned from London's roads to meet legal air quality obligations, a report found today. New modelling carried out by air quality experts at King's found that they would have to be phased out over the next decade if London had any chance of achieving safe and legal levels of air pollution.

London is still open for business despite Brexit: Mayor launches #LondonIsOpen campaign

Evening Standard 18th July 2016

Leading figures from the arts, business, sport and politics joined Sadiq Khan to launch a global campaign to encourage visitors and investment to London in the wake of the Brexit vote. Education leaders from a number of universities gave their backing, including King's. Also reported by the BBC.

Analysis: A Subversive History of School Reform

BBC Radio 4 18th July 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, Public Sector management, presents a programme on the story of post-war school reform in England. (20:30)

The big clean: how to protect your skin from London's air pollution

Evening Standard 18th July 2016

Fresh research says pollution is taking its toll on our skin - and our wellbeing. The article also mentions research from King's that showed Oxford Street has the worst pollution levels in the world.

The UK-EU battle over free movement and terms of trade

Guardian 18th July 2016

A letter arguing for the freedom of movement within the EU, signed by Dr Lucia Pradella, International Political Economy, among others.

Team GB athletes reveal what it takes to get an Olympic body ahead of Rio 2016

Daily Mail 17th July 2016

Profile of the UK's Olympic hopefuls, including second-year History student Dina Asher-Smith. Dina has also been interview by BBC Radio 5 Live.

Trident vote

Various media outlets 17th July 2016

Professor Andrew Dorman, Defence Studies, wrote for New Statesman, ahead of the vote on the renewal of Trident. He was also interviewed by 5 live Drive (18:43). Professor John Gearson, War studies, was also interviewed by Sky News. With reference to the fact that each submarine can carry up to 16 missiles, which can each have a number of warheads that can be fired at up to 12 different targets, Tim Collins, a doctoral candidate studying Trident, said to Mirror: ‘In practice we’ve never deployed that many’. Dr Grant Christopher, Policy Institute, joined a panel discussion on Al Jazeera English on Trident’s merits and weaknesses.

How do we judge the passing of time?

Guardian 17th July 2016

An article on how human brains judge time, by Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery.

Pienaar’s Politics

BBC Radio 5 live 17th July 2016

Dan Poulter MP says he will be doing a study with King's later this year on the mental health of MPs. (11:47)

Cancer, sea life, mental health: the UK research will be hit by Brexit

Guardian 16th July 2016

Prof Dame Til Wykes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience comments on the impact of Brexit on UK research. She said: "It is pretty straightforward. If Brexit goes ahead, then scientists here might not be able to attract European Union research grants in future. And if you are coming here to take up a professorship for the next 10 years of your life, the prospect of losing a major source of grant money in the process looks a pretty poor bet. Frankfurt or Paris suddenly look much better shots."
Also reported by The Observer.

Chilcot: physical and mental legacy of Iraq war

British Medical Journal 16th July 2016

Editorial on the psychological consequences of combat for service personnel, by Neil Greenberg (King's College London), Simon Wessely (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neruoscience, King's College London) and Anthony Bull (Imperial College London).

Powerful refugee artwork opens in Cathedral

ITV 16th July 2016

Chichester Cathedral is staging an exhibition by acclaimed sculptor and artist Ana Macheco, looking at the plight of refugees. A lecture by Christopher Wintle, Honorary Senior Research Fellow/Emeritus Senior Lecturer, Music, is being staged in support of the event.

Brexit and junior doctors' contracts: the real threats to the NHS

Lancet 16th July 2016

On July 6, junior doctors in England's National Health Service (NHS) voted 58 per cent to 42 per cent to reject the final contract offer from the UK Government. Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, nursing policy said: ‘While every other OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) country has been increasing nurse training places over the last decade or so the UK has been cutting training places’.

Irene Tracey: seeing pain for what it is

Lancet 16th July 2016

Profile of Professor Irene Tracey. Sherrington Professor Stephen McMahon, Physiology, said: ‘She’s at the forefront, both for her personal work in understanding pain and pain mechanisms and for her part in establishing an infrastructure that has enabled others to make contributions’.

Hyperfocus: The other side of adult ADHD

CNN 15th July 2016

Article discussing the phenomena of 'Hyperfocus', an aspect of ADHD. Recent research from Brazil and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is mentioned, stating that ADHD is not only a childhood problem - it occurs in adults too.

King's press release related to 'Hyperfocus: The other side of adult ADHD'

Terrorist attack in Nice

Various media outlets 15th July 2016

In response to the attack in Nice, a number of King’s experts have spoken to the media. Dr Frank Foley, International Relations, spoke to BBC World, BBC News Channel and BBC One. Professor John Gearson, National Security Studies, spoke to Sky News, BBC News Channel and BBC World. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, spoke to Today Programme and BBC News, Associated Press and others. Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation spoke to NBC, New Statesman and Daily Mirror.

What David Cameron's departure means for India and the UK

Daily Mail 15th July 2016

An article on how the result of the EU referendum may affect the UK's relationship with India, by Professor Harsh V Pant, International Relations and India Institute.

Two King's Professors Join British Academy Fellows

King's press release 15th July 2016

Professor Ewan Ferlie, Management and Business, and Professor Patrick Wright, Literature and Visual & Material Culture, are two researchers from King’s College London elected as fellows of the British Academy. Professor Ferlie said: ‘I am delighted to have been elected as a Fellow of the British Academy and I look forward to working with my colleagues and supporting other Fellows’. Professor Wright said: ‘I look forward to joining my colleagues at the British Academy in defending the cause of independent critical enquiry at this time of grave political uncertainty’.

King's press release related to 'Two King's Professors Join British Academy Fellows'

After Brexit - What next?

Prospect 15th July 2016

Prospect is organising a post-referendum debate on the future of the UK outside the European Union. Professor Anand Menon, European Studies and Foreign Affairs, will be on the panel. Professor Menon also commented in an article for Prospect on the outcome of the EU referendum. Professor Menon also commented for Daily Mail.

A modern tragedy told by the ‘Queens of Syria’

Financial Times 15th July 2016

Feature on an all-female cast of Syrian refugees performing at the Young Vic. King's provided free accommodation for the cast for 10 days.

David Cameron’s legacy: the historians’ verdict

Guardian 15th July 2016

A feature regarding the Prime Ministerial career of David Cameron discusses his effect on modern Britain, with issues including inequalities and Scottish independence discussed by academics. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History (ICBH), provides his opinion.

'GUN – GET DOWN': Petrified British schoolchildren dived to the floor in Ataturk airport after getting trapped in Turkish coup that has left thousands of holidaymakers stranded

Daily Mail 15th July 2016

British tourists in Turkey have been ordered to stay away from public places and remain vigilant after a failed military coup that left 90 dead. Research associate Eliot Higgins, War Studies, said: 'And to think, I came to Turkey on holiday to get away from all the conflict stuff I do'. He was also quoted in Daily Mail.

Antibodies may have role in preventing Type 1 diabetes

King's press release 14th July 2016

People with a rare autoimmune disorder produce autoimmune antibodies that appear to be linked to a reduced occurrence of Type 1 diabetes, King’s research has found.

Romana Kazmi is King's first woman Muslim Chaplain

King's press release 14th July 2016

Romana Kazmi joins King’s as the university’s first woman Muslim Chaplain. Romana will work closely with the Dean, Reverend Canon Professor Richard A. Burridge, and College Chaplain, Reverend Tim Ditchfield and all the other Chaplains on each of the campuses to provide pastoral and spiritual support to all King's students and staff. In particular, she will minister alongside Abdul Choudry, the university’s other Muslim Chaplain and Dr Ehsan Khan, Muslim Staff Adviser.

Oxford Street to become pedestrianised by 2020

Independent 14th July 2016

Vehicles are to be banned from the busiest shopping street in Europe in a bid to tackle air pollution and congestion, the Mayor of London has announced. In 2014, researchers from King’s found Oxford Street was ‘the most polluted place on Earth’, even exceeding pollution levels in Beijing.

Genetics: An incomplete mosaic

Nature 14th July 2016

Although genetics studies have so far failed to revolutionize pain treatments, some researchers think that a host of discoveries are just around the corner. Pain-genetics researchers have pursued two main avenues of inquiry, says neuroscientist Professor Stephen McMahon, Physiology.

FGM campaigner Fahma Mohamed awarded honorary doctorate at 19

Independent 14th July 2016

A teenager is set to become one of the youngest doctorate-holders in the UK. Nineteen-year- old Fahma Mohamed, who has yet to begin her BA in biomedicine at King's in September, will be given the Doctor of Laws on Friday by the University of Bristol in acknowledgement of her campaign work to end and assist victims of female genital mutilation.

Court Circular

Daily Telegraph 14th July 2016

The Earl of Wessex, President, Sport and Recreation Alliance, attended the Annual General Meeting at the Strand campus.

A Step Closer to 5G Technology That Evokes Connected Cars, Virtual Surgery

ABC 14th July 2016

The Federal Communications Commission Thursday carved out a chunk of the wireless spectrum for use by 5G technology, which is the next iteration of wireless broadband systems that promises to bring far quicker internet to your mobile phone and other devices. Professor Misha Dohler, Centre for Telecommunications Research, said that 5G would enable ‘the internet of skills.’

Here's How Junior Doctors Reacted To Jeremy Hunt Keeping His Job

BuzzFeed 14th July 2016

Junior doctors were left disappointed on Thursday when it was confirmed that Jeremy Hunt was keeping his job as health secretary despite early reports that he'd been sacked in Theresa May's cabinet reshuffle. Danielle Tiplady, a student nurse at King's College London, said she felt "deflated" by the news, but also hoped the new government might mark a fresh start from Hunt and nurses.

Nice terror attacks

Various media outlets 14th July 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), was quoted in Daily Express, Daily Mirror and i and said: ‘Nice, as well as other parts of southern France and Paris, have become ‘jihadist breeding grounds’. He was also quoted in Daily Mail and offered comment to BBC Radio 4 Today (07:35) World at One (13:21) the New York Times, CNN International and others. ‘The fact that this attack occurred when security measures were supposedly in place makes this very different from previous attacks,’ said Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, on the psychological impact of the attacks in the Daily Mail. His comments to Associated Press were also reported by ABC News (US), New York Times , Washington Post, and many others.
Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commented on the attacks to BBC Radio 4 (18:12) and was also interviewed for Sky News, BBC News and the World Service. Dr Frank Foley, War Studies, talked to BBC Radio 4 (17:36) about why France has had so many attacks recently and penned editorials for the Washington Post and The Independent. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, commented on Channel 4 News, MSNBC and NBC News.

Genetics: An incomplete mosaic

Nature 13th July 2016

Although genetics studies have so far failed to revolutionize pain treatments, some researchers think that a host of discoveries are just around the corner. Stephen McMahon of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: "Pain-genetics researchers have pursued two main avenues of inquiry."

Theresa May becomes Prime Minister

Various media outlets 13th July 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, joined the BBC coverage to discuss Theresa May becoming the new Prime Minister of the UK. He also appeared on BBC Radio 4,BBC Radio 5 live, BBC Two Daily Politics, and BBC World Service, commenting on David Cameron's premiership and Theresa May becoming the new Prime Minister, in the Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Daily Mail, Bloomberg, the Week and others. Professor Anand Menon, European Studies, was quoted by Fox News, Washington Post, AP, ABC, CBS, and the New York Times. Dr Andrew Blick, Contemporary History was interviewed by CNN and Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, was quoted by Associated Press, Washington Post, South China Morning Post, Fox News, Daily Mail and others.

Scotland's Einstein: James Clerk Maxwell

BBC 4 13th July 2016

A programme on James Clerk Maxwell which makes reference to his time at King's

Long Lost Family

ITV 1 13th July 2016

A programme on the search for long lost families features Dr Denise Syndercombe-Court, Forensic Science and is filmed on Waterloo campus.

Theresa May: How does the new Prime Minster vote on student and young people’s issues?

Independent 13th July 2016

Cameron's government has been committed to 'widening participation' in higher education, a scheme that aims to help those from lower socio-economic groups into universities and other higher education schemes and into placements. The scheme has been adopted by many of the UK's top universities including Edinburgh and King's.

Students with children will be hardest hit by fees

Nursing Standard 13th July 2016

Nursing students with children could lose more than £100 a month under government plans to change healthcare education funding, new research suggests. Nursing and midwifery society president Anthony Johnson said: ‘It is not surprising parents will be affected, considering the extra outgoings they have’.

NFL stars visit London to urge young players to speak out on domestic abuse

Evening Standard 13th July 2016

Top NFL players have urged young Londoners to speak out against domestic abuse in the wake of a series of allegations that have dogged American football. Harry-Jack Searle, Biomedical Science, took part in the class and said: ‘A lot of other programmes just teach that domestic violence is bad but this one opens up how you think about it’.

Towards a continental shift

Hindu 13th July 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, writes a piece about a recent trip by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to some South and East Africa states. ‘This sustained and systematic outreach to all parts of Africa is a welcome move after years of only intermittent attention to a continent where some of the world’s 10 fastest growing economies are located, and with which India shares old historical ties,’ he said.

Is it time to rethink the toys we're giving our boys and girls?

Made for Mums 13th July 2016

Professor Patrick Leman who is Dean of Education, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London is quoted in an article about children and gender tropes. He said: "Human are hard-wired to find the differences between people, because this tells us who we are. Parents naturally do this as soon as children are born and children learn from a very early age that they are a boy of a girl."

Assessing Nord Stream 2

King's press release 12th July 2016

A new natural gas pipeline from Northern Russia to Europe could strengthen European gas markets, increasing competition between suppliers and provide more choice for consumers, but only if Europe simultaneously increases its own infrastructural and regulatory capacities, a report from the European Centre for Energy and Resource Security (EUCERS) and King’s Russia Institute argues.

The management of savagery

New Statesman 12th July 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) reviews two books about Isis and the Iraq War.

The hacks that make air travel less painful

BBC 12th July 2016

An article exploring the scientific remedies that can make flying less frustrating. Professor David Gradwell, Centre for Human and Aerospace Sciences (CHAPS) said: ‘Thermal comfort on board the aircraft is generally controlled in the cabin as a whole or by zones, but some may feel it to be too warm or too cool’. If you are at risk of DVT, you should consider wearing compression stockings. It is important, though, that they are the correct size, properly fitted and put on correctly, says Michael Bagshaw, CHAPS.

To drop 1400 calories, take a hot bath

Times 12th July 2016

An article discussing how hot baths can burn calories, which mentions Professor Jamie Timmons, Precision Medicine.

An alleged victim of British colonial abuse in Kenya testifies in London — six decades later

VICE 12th July 2016

James Mugo Kibande has testified in London about the torture and mistreatment that he allegedly suffered at the hands of British colonial officers in the 1950s. ‘End of Empire is a nasty period,' Dr Nicholas Lloyd, Defence Studies, has argued. ‘Trying to judge it from a modern human rights perspective is meaningless. It doesn't tell us anything. Or, it tells us what we want to hear — that these people were evil’.

Forget single honours, forget joint honours, the liberal arts are back

Telegraph 12th July 2016

An article on the increasing popularity of liberal arts degrees, which mentions King's.

Sky News With Dermot Murnaghan

Sky News 12th July 2016

The organisers of the Rio Olympics have promised to employ much tougher anti-doping tests than were previously utilised. The Drug Control Centre at King's features as part of Sky's report. Professor David Cowan is interviewed.

Sadiq Khan should be radical to cut deadly air pollution - IPPR

Wired-GOV 12th July 2016

IPPR - in partnership with Greenpeace, ClientEarth and King’s– is undertaking a significant piece of new research to explore how the Mayor might design his new air pollution policy to save as many lives as possible.

Politicians Like Smriti Irani Use Feminism When Convenient

NDTV 12th July 2016

Dr Kriti Kapila, India Institute, writes about feminism in politics. ‘While a number of women today hold public office simply or primarily because of their gender…others…expediently use their status qua woman to fend of the opposition, and are seldom rooted in feminist politics,’ she said.

Why you shouldn’t compare Theresa May to Margaret Thatcher

Newsweek 12th July 2016

Discussing the recent news that British Home Secretary Theresa May will be the UK’s new Prime Minister, Dr Eliza Filby, History, commented on comparisons between the new leader and former PM Margaret Thatcher. ‘In times of national anxiety, Britain tends to look to strong women to steer the ship through choppy waters,’ she said.

The question about gender that science finds difficult to answer

Guardian 11th July 2016

Qazi Rahman of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the science behind gender and LGBT psychology. Rahman said: "We know much more about how nature shapes sexual orientation, and my view of the science is that nurture does very little, if any, shaping of sexual orientation. We know next to nothing about how people come to feel transgender."

Existing smoking cessation therapies are 'more effective than e-cigarettes'

Mail Online 11th July 2016

New research suggests that existing treatments for smoking cessation are more effective than e-cigarettes, and that there is no strong evidence to suggest that e-cigarettes are safe. The new commentary served as a counterpoint to a paper in the same journal issue by Professor Ann McNeill, of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, that suggests e-cigarettes are a less harmful way for smokers, including those trying to quit, to use nicotine.

South China Sea: China's charm offensive in the foreign media

BBC 11th July 2016

With a UN court set to rule on China's territorial claims in the disputed South China Sea, Chinese ambassadors have been on a flurry of charm offensives in foreign media over the last few months. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘In the past, there were such media pushes, but usually only to accompany visits of Chinese leaders to specific countries. It is rare to see this sort of global approach’.

US takes the lead for having the most top universities in the world, according to CWUR

Independent 11th July 2016

The CWUR listed King’s as one of the top 10 universities in the UK, coming in at seventh place.

Comment: Freedom of movement is a noble aspiration, but we must admit mass migration brings massive social costs

Telegraph 11th July 2016

An opinion column on immigration and the EU, by Mark Stanford, teaching fellow in the International Development Institute.

Peer criticises government on private providers after QAA report

Times Higher Education Supplement 11th July 2016

Fresh questions have been raised about the government's ability to ensure oversight of private colleges as a for-profit institution was stripped of its right to receive public funding after a damning quality watchdog report. The QAA's inquiries prompted a written question in the House of Lords from crossbench peer Professor Alison Wolf, Management.

Common medicines including cold and flu remedies, indigestion pills and ibuprofen 'make heart conditions worse'

Daily Mail 11th July 2016

Ibuprofen, cold and flu remedies and indigestion pills may worsen a heart condition which affects millions of people, experts warn. They are also urging patients with heart failure to avoid green tea, grapefruit juice, liquorice and some herbs as this may also weaken the heart. Professor Tony Fox, Pharmaceutical Science, said: ‘While heart failure patients should not be alarmed, this statement emphasises a few common sense things.’ This was also reported in the Guardian.

Doctors should NOT recommend e-cigarettes to smokers - existing treatments are more effective and safer, experts say

Daily Mail 11th July 2016

E-cigarettes should not be recommended to smokers who are trying to quit their habit, experts today said. The new commentary served as a counterpoint to a paper in the same journal issue by Professor Ann McNeill, IoPPN, that suggests e-cigarettes are a less harmful way for smokers, including those trying to quit, to use nicotine.

Seven reasons why clever people like Love Island

Telegraph 11th July 2016

An article on the ITV2 programme Love Island. King's graduate Simon, says: 'You could probably make an argument that it's all about gender/society, but personally I think people like it because it's junk TV and they're sexy.'

The BSP is showing signs of a tentative political revival in UP

Hindustan Times 11th July 2016

PhD student Ravi Jayaram, India Institute, writes a piece on the current political situation in India. ‘Uttar Pradesh exemplifies the hurdles and real challenges holding back India’s progress. India’s most populous state has been the crucible for political change over the past two decades,’ he said.

UK Anti-Doping sends investigators to Kenya in light of doping allegations

Daily Mail 10th July 2016

UK Anti-Doping has sent two investigators to Kenya following allegations of doping at a training camp that is used by British athletes. The King's Drug Control Centre, which is currently the only laboratory in the UK accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to analyse urine samples from sports competitors, will be undertaking the testing on behalf of UK Sport in the run up to the 2016 Olympic Games and the Paralympics.

Is the air ageing you?

Sunday Times 10th July 2016

An article about anti-pollution skincare ranges mentions research by King’s which found that Oxford Street had the worst nitrogen dioxide pollution in the world.

A neuroscientist explains: Daniel Glaser on how whooping increases your enjoyment

The Guardian 10th July 2016

In light of the Euro 2016 final, Dr Daniel Glaser, director of Science Gallery, has written an article explaining how shouting when watching a football match increases our enjoyment of the match.

They're tired, crying

People 10th July 2016

Danielle Tiplady, a student studying adult nursing gives her views on the scrapping of the NHS bursary. She said: ‘People who have this passion, I look and see how upset they all are, and how tired they are, and they’re crying. They feel like they can’t do their job’.

Gender identity and the big questions that have yet to be answered

Guardian 10th July 2016

Why a person feels male when they are biologically female, or vice versa, remains uncertain. Qazi Rahman, a lead investigator into LGBT mental health at IoPPN said: ‘We know much more about how nature shapes sexual orientation, and my view of the science is that nurture does very little, if any, shaping of sexual orientation. We know next to nothing about how people come to feel transgender.”

Brain inflammation may lead to depression in MS patients

Economic Times 9th July 2016

Research led by Alessandro Colasanti of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) suggests that depression in MS patients may be associated more generally with elevated inflammatory markers and hippocampal pathology. The lead author, Alessandro Colasanti said: "We also discovered that more inflammation was associated to more severe symptoms of depression. This study, combining two advanced complementary brain imaging methods, suggests that the inflammation of the hippocampus affects the brain function and causes depression."


The case for Scottish independence suddenly looks a lot stronger

Financial Times 9th July 2016

Visiting Professor, Nicholas Macpherson, Policy Institute, has written an article about Scottish independence in light of the EU referendum result. This was also commented on in the Times, Sun, Sunday Times and BBC.

Summer beauty: take your look beyond the beach

Financial Times 9th July 2016

A beauty feature which mentions a skincare range inspired by King's research.

Cannabis users who put tobacco in joints 'more likely to be addicted'

Guardian 9th July 2016

Cannabis smokers who mix tobacco in their joints are more likely to have symptoms of dependence, according to UCL research. Professor Michael T Lynskey, IoPPN, said: 'Given a changing legislative environment surrounding access to cannabis in many jurisdictions, increased research focus should be given to reducing the use of routes of administration that involve the co-administration of tobacco.’

No need for drugs

New Scientist 9th July 2016

People do not experience more serious health problems when family doctors are stricter about prescribing the drugs for conditions such as coughs, colds and sore throats - a finding that should help stop the spread of antibiotic resistance. Professor Martin Gulliford, Primary Care & Public Health Services, and his team studied 610 general practices in the UK.

Trainee nurses depend on food banks and payday loans to survive as unions warn of NHS 'timebomb'

Mirror 9th July 2016

Trainee nurses are increasingly turning to food banks and payday loans as they struggle to afford their training. Anthony Johnson, president of King's College London Nursing and Midwifery Society said: ‘We all struggle to survive. My bursary in combination with my student loan does not pay for my maintenance costs.’ This was also reported by People.

Music matters

BBC Radio 3 9th July 2016

Cole Porter was born 125 years ago last month and his works are discussed. Professor Cliff Eisen, Music, takes part in a feature discussion. Also broadcast again on Radio 3 on 11 July.

Burning mouth? You need a laser for shoulder pain: Treatment is latest weapon to tackle mystery condition

Daily Mail 9th July 2016

Medical lasers used to treat joint pain are to be used for burning mouth syndrome (BMS). King’s is providing the laser treatment for its patients for the first time. Professor Tara Renton, Dental Institute, said: ‘BMS is a difficult condition to treat…There is no cure, and patients often exist on bland diets of milk and porridge to minimise their discomfort’.

The Chilcot Inquiry

BBC Radio 4 9th July 2016

Interview with John Rentoul, chief Political Commentator for the Independent and visiting Professor at King's Policy Institute, about the Iraq war inquiry.

Exchange of the week

The Week 9th July 2016

A letter on the result of the EU referendum, from Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History.

Brain inflammation may lead to depression in MS patients

Economic Times of India 9th July 2016

Research led by Dr Alessandro Colasanti, IoPPN, suggests that depression in MS patients may be associated more generally with elevated inflammatory markers and hippocampal pathology. ‘This study… suggests that the inflammation of the hippocampus affects the brain function and causes depression,’ he said.

Gain a global understanding

Hindu 9th July 2016

Article exploring international relations and what this might look like in higher education courses. The article mentions a King’s Masters student, Devjyot Ghoshal, who explained why he chose his course. ‘I realised International Relations had the flexibility to be able to branch out to a number of career paths,’ he said.

Oxford gets into China history act

China Daily 8th July 2016

Interview with Professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom from the University of California, mentions an event he did at King’s with Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute.

NATO

CNBC 8th July 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, discussed Britain’s military relationship with Europe and NATO, particularly after the EU referendum result. ‘The British government will be under massive pressure to demonstrate commitment in the other multi-lateral forums that Britain is part of,’ he said.

A perfect feast: The healthy way to celebrate Eid

CNN 8th July 2016

Article discussing what to eat following the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Epidemiology, said: ‘A fast is a good way of regenerating your microbes, so that will increase certain beneficial species that you want to keep going through the times when you’re not fasting.’

China crackdown on lawyers

New York Times 8th July 2016

A year on from the Chinese government’s largest-ever crackdown against human rights lawyers and activists, Dr Eva Pils, Law, comments. ‘There is a new assertiveness in the Xi era with the claims that we're running the legal system our way,’ she said. This was also reported by Washington Post, Daily Mail and Associated Press.

Durham University graduate Eliza Cummings-Cove gets first-class degree with dissertation on the Kardashians

Independent 8th July 2016

A student at Durham University will be graduating with a first after completing her dissertation on the Kardashian family. In previous years, other unusual dissertation topics have included ‘the possibility of unicorns’ for which a King’s student received a 2:1.

Boredom can lead to more extreme political views

King's press release 8th July 2016

Boredom may be contributing to a widening of political views among voters, according to a new study by researchers from King’s and the University of Limerick. Dr Wijnand van Tilburg, IoPPN, said: 'Boredom puts people on edge - it makes them seek engagements that are challenging, exciting, and that offer a sense of purpose. Political ideologies can aid this existential quest.' This was also reported by CNN who asked if it has affected the Donald Trump campaign and also the Hindustan Times , Huffington Post and the Deccan Chronicle.

Scientists say tedium can lead to our views becoming extreme

Mail Online 7th July 2016

Researchers from King's College London and the University of Limerick have found evidence to suggest that boredom may be responsible for a widening of political views among voters. They carried out one experiment and two surveys in the Republic of Ireland. Wijnand van Tilburg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said: "'Boredom puts people on edge - it makes them seek engagements that are challenging, exciting, and that offer a sense of purpose. Political ideologies can aid this existential quest.’
Also reported by i, New Indian Express, Hindustan Times, Deccan Chronicle, Huffington Post, CNN, and Economic Times (India).

King's press release related to 'Scientists say tedium can lead to our views becoming extreme '

Dina Asher-Smith becomes first British woman to win 200m European title

Various media outlets 7th July 2016

King’s undergraduate history student Dina Asher-Smith has won gold in the women's 200m at the European Championships in Amsterdam, making her the first British woman to win the 200m European title. This was reported by BBC Sport, Guardian, Telegraph and Daily Mail.

King's alumni, including 92 year old Dr Francis de Marneffe, row at Henley

King's press release 7th July 2016

On Saturday 02 July, a boat with a crew comprised of current King’s students and esteemed Alumni took to the water at the Henley Royal Regatta in celebration of the 70th anniversary of the 1946 Wyfold Cup Win. Amongst this crew was alumni Francis de Marneffe (Medicine 1950), aged 92 and still rowing strong.

King's press release related to 'King's alumni, including 92 year old Dr Francis de Marneffe, row at Henley'

Bloated or suffering from IBS? New app uses life-changing diet proven to reduce symptoms to help avoid 'problem' foods

Daily Mail 7th July 2016

A new app has been designed with researchers at King’s, which aims to make it easier for people with IBS to follow restrictive diets. Dr Miranda Lomer, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: 'The app follows our three stage process to manage and track the patient’s symptoms’. Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: 'Clinical trials have shown that avoiding foods that contain FODMAPs is one of the best dietary approaches to alleviate IBS symptoms.’

Was there ever a golden age for junior doctors?

British Medical Journal 7th July 2016

Emeritus Professor Harold Ellis, Anatomy, is interviewed about what life was like as a junior doctor in the 1950s, in light of the recent changes to junior doctor contracts.

Personalised medicine: The way forward?

Huffington Post US 7th July 2016

Article on personalised medicine mentions research conducted by a team at the IoPPN, who developed a blood test to accurately and reliably predict whether depressed patients will respond to common antidepressants.

The Road to Brexit: Britain faces uncharted territory

Economic Times of India 7th July 2016

Following the EU referendum, Britain will be the first member state ever to leave the EU. The article quotes Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, who said: ‘The referendum did not give a choice on what kind of relationship with the EU Britons wanted.’ This was reported in Yahoo and Foreign Policy.

Dina Asher-Smith becomes first British woman to win 200m European title

Various media outlets 7th July 2016

Second-year History student Dina Asher-Smith has become the first British woman to win the 200m European title, after competing in the European Championships in Amsterdam. This was reported in Guardian, Daily Mail, BBC Radio 5 Live.

Chilcot inquiry published

Various media outlets 6th July 2016

King’s academics commented following the publication of the Chilcot inquiry into the Iraq War. Dr John Bew, War Studies, was interviewed by AFP, with his comments pick up in Daily Mail, Yahoo and South China Morning Post; Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, was interviewed for BBC news throughout the whole day and for BBC Radio Five Live; Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, commented on BBC Radio 4 Moral Maze; Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, was interviewed for Sky News and Financial Times; an article in the Times mentioned Emeritus Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies; Professor Christopher Dandeker, War Studies, discussed mental health implications for the Guardian; and Frederic Ischebeck-Baum, War Studies, was quoted by USA Today.

Universities move to protect academics from racist abuse

Times 6th July 2016

Vice-chancellors have expressed concern at a rise in xenophobic abuse since the vote to leave the European Union and pledged to protect their students and academic staff. Several academics have spoken about their experiences of anti-immigrant abuse triggered by the referendum. Professor Jonathan Grant, Policy Institute, is mentioned in the piece. This was also reported by Daily Express.

Electric Avenue

Times 6th July 2016

Article mentions research by King’s that found up to 10,000 deaths are caused by pollution in London each year.

Mametz Wood and the 38th: The Welsh at the Somme

BBC 6th July 2016

Visiting Professor, Lieutenant-General Jonathan Riley, War Studies, has written an article on the Battle of the Somme.

Is the LHC finally set to reveal the secrets of the universe? Dark matter breakthrough and fifth fundamental force could be revealed as researchers prepare to publish latest findings

Daily Mail 6th July 2016

Scientists at Europe's physics research centre CERN are preparing to reveal new data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Discussing the potential discovery of a whole new set of particles, Professor John Ellis, Physics, said: ‘It would be something completely beyond the Standard Model, and the tip of an iceberg of a large new set of particles if it exists!'

Mixing cannabis with tobacco 'increases risk of addiction': Smoking drug 'makes you 60% LESS likely to want to quit'

Daily Mail 6th July 2016

Smoking cannabis with tobacco increases the risk of dependence on the drug, a new study claims. Professor Michael Lynskey, IoPPN, said: 'Our results highlight the importance of routes of administration when considering the health effects of cannabis'. This was also reported by Hindustan Times and Times of India.

Mayor Sadiq Khan must act on his pledge to clean up London’s filthy air

Evening Standard 6th July 2016

Article discussing levels of NO2 in London mentions research by academics at King’s. Research from the ERG is also mentioned in the Financial Times and Bloomberg.

Why do we need a social psychiatry?

British Journal of Psychology 6th July 2016

An article on social psychiatry co-authored by Professor Dinesh Bhugra, IoPPN.

Nursing Times editorial advisory board

Nursing Times 6th July 2016

Professor Jill Maben and Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing, are listed as part of the Nursing Times editorial advisory board.

'Extreme concerns' over bursary removal risks laid out

Nursing Times 6th July 2016

Community nurses and NHS trusts are the latest groups to raise further concerns over the government’s plans to axe bursaries for student nurses and switch to a loans system next year. King’s and a group of foundation trusts had previously raised fears that the recruitment of students – in particular postgraduate – could be ‘adversely affected’ in the short term.

The health risks of butter

BBC Radio 4 6th July 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, discusses the health risks associated with butter. (06:53)

Who is on Celebrity MasterChef 2016? The full line-up and verdict so far

Telegraph 6th July 2016

Reverend Richard Coles, who studied theology at King's, is a contestant in Celebrity MasterChef 2016. This is also mentioned in Daily Express.

Mother’s DNA may affect ageing

Yahoo 6th July 2016

Researchers have suggested that a tiny repository of DNA inherited only from one’s mother may be key for health ageing. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, described the results as ‘fascinating and mind-boggling’. This was reported by the Daily Mail and New Scientist.

India seeks reserved bank

Wall Street Journal 6th July 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, commenting on the departure of India’s central-bank governor, Raghuram Rajan. ‘The government is looking at the next year, and hoping to drive growth ahead of coming elections,’ he said.

Stem cells save lives

Sun 5th July 2016

Short summary feature of how stem cells are being used in medicine, including research by scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London have found a technique that allows neural stem cells to help the brain recover after a stroke.

King's press release related to 'Stem cells save lives'

Mixing cannabis with tobacco 'increases risk of addiction'

Daily Mail 5th July 2016

Smoking cannabis with tobacco increases the risk of dependence on the drug, a new study claims. Michael Lynskey, professor of Addictions in the National Addictions Centre of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London says: 'Our results highlight the importance of routes of administration when considering the health effects of cannabis,' He added: 'Given a changing legislative environment surrounding access to cannabis in many jurisdictions, increased research focus should be given to reducing the use of routes of administration that involve the co-administration of tobacco.' Also reported by The Guardian, Times of India and Hindustan Times.

Cutting back on antibiotics 'does not put patients at risk': Surgeries that handed out the fewest pills do not have higher rates of serious illnesses

Various media outlets 5th July 2016

A new study at King’s has found that reducing antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract is not linked to an increase in the most serious bacterial complications. Professor Martin Gulliford, Primary Care & Public Health Services, said: ‘Overuse of antibiotics now may result in increasing infections by resistant bacteria in the future.’ This was reported by Sun, Daily Express, New Scientist, Daily Mail and BBC London.

King's press release related to 'Cutting back on antibiotics 'does not put patients at risk': Surgeries that handed out the fewest pills do not have higher rates of serious illnesses '

New study examines Freud's theory of Hysteria

King's press release 5th July 2016

New research from King’s has studied the Freudian theory that Hysteria, a disorder resulting in severe neurological symptoms such as paralysis or seizures, arises in response to psychological stress or trauma. Dr Tim Nicholson, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘The fact that we found more stressors in CD patients compared to controls supports their relevance to the onset of the disorder.’

King's press release related to 'New study examines Freud's theory of Hysteria'

Genetic mutations linked to cases of multiple bowel tumours

King's press release 5th July 2016

Researchers from King’s have identified genetic mutations affecting the immune system which may lead to the development of more than one bowel tumour at the same time and increase the frequency of independent cancer-initiating events. Senior author Dr Francesca Ciccarelli, Cancer Epidemiology & Population Health, said: ‘Between two and five per cent of all bowel cancer patients develop more than one primary tumour … Now we know that these tumours are as different as cancers from two different people and patients inherit mutations in genes of the immune system that potentially have damaging effect.’

King's press release related to 'Genetic mutations linked to cases of multiple bowel tumours'

Apply now to become a new world leader, all in one-year

Guardian 5th July 2016

An article about the Schwarzman Scholars programme, which selects exceptional candidates aged between 18 and 29 and provides support for them to live and study together for a year in China. The article mentions that a King’s student has successfully graduated from the programme.

Stem cells save lives

Sun 5th July 2016

An article about stem cells and how they can be used to treat various conditions mentions a technique developed by researchers at King’s that helps treat stroke victims.

A Brexit Bargain

Metro 5th July 2016

An article about a luxury apartment for sale in a building which was formerly part of King’s.

Meal portion guide reveals 80% of parents overfeed their children

Independent 5th July 2016

A meal size guide for children and toddlers has been launched to encourage parents to cut portions, as nutritionists warn more pre-school children are at risk of obesity than ever before. The article references research by researchers at King’s, which looked at timings of eating dinner and obesity in children.

Dementia research

BBC Radio 5 live 5th July 2016

Former British Formula One racing driver, Sir Jackie Stewart, has launch a charity to raise funding for dementia research. Sir Stewart mentions research by King’s into the disease.

EU fallout

Sky 5th July 2016

Interview with Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, about the political fallout following EU referendum.

Most of what we eat is ‘processed’ food. Here’s why we should be worried

Spectator 4th July 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Department of Twin Research & Epidemiology, has written an article warning of the dangers of eating processed food. ‘We should be very concerned about what food manufacturers are getting away with,’ he said.

The FT’s summer books 2016

Financial Times 4th July 2016

A book by Dr Srinath Raghavan, India Institute, is included in a list of the Financial Times’s summer books 2016.

Why so-called Islamic State chooses to bomb during Ramadan

BBC 4th July 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), has written an article about recent Islamic State bomb attacks during Ramadan. He also commented for the BBC, and was quoted in Yahoo.

The FTSE indices will respond to Brexit in good time

Prospect 4th July 2016

George Magnus writes a comment piece on the potential outcomes of the UK's vote to leave the EU. At the foot of the article a note indicated that Prospect will host a 'Brexit Debate' on Tuesday 19 of July, featuring Professor Anand Menon, European Politics.

Letters: EU citizens who have already settled in Britain must be made to feel welcome

Telegraph 3rd July 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, is among signatories on a letter discussing the impact of the EU referendum on EU citizens already living in the UK.

It was so natural to create organic remedies that Gwyneth loves

Times 3rd July 2016

Article about the company Organic Pharmacy. The founder studied at the Chelsea School of Pharmacy, which is now part of King’s.

No hiding place: players face more drug tests after Maria's downfall

Times 3rd July 2016

An article on the world of anti-doping mentions the Drug Control Centre at King’s, the UK’s only WADA accredited anti-doping laboratory.

Out of this fractious upheaval, a new Toryism will emerge

Guardian 3rd July 2016

Dr Eliza Filby, history, discusses the future of the Conservative Party in this opinion piece. ‘As Cameron and Osborne lick their wounds, they may at least reflect on how they have protected their one-nation legacy and finally closed the chapter on Thatcherite Conservatism,’ she said.

Citizen science: How the net is changing the role of amateur researchers

Observer 3rd July 2016

Article discussing how non-professional scientists are pioneering medical research. Professor David Edgerton, History, said: ‘The great bulk of scientific activity takes place in large commercial enterprises, government laboratories and universities but there have always been people who have done scientific research off their own bat.’

Sharpen your mind in the learning pit

Financial Times 3rd July 2016

Article looking at how we develop resilience and mental agility. Professor Guy Claxton, Education, discusses how understanding a period of disorientation, where we try to process conflicting ideas, can be extremely beneficial.

The benefits of planning ahead

Observer 3rd July 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, director of Science Gallery at King's has written an article about the benefits of planning in advance, in light of the UK referendum result.

Baghdad attacks

BBC News 3rd July 2016

Dr Martin Navias, War Studies, comments on a recent bomb attack in Baghdad, which killed more than 125 people. ‘The Iraqi government has been trying to create a secure perimeter around Baghdad for years, but Islamic State appears able to penetrate it with ease.’ Dr Navias was also interviewed for BBC World News, BBC London Live and BBC Radio 2.

Universities have credit ratings cut over funding fear

Times 2nd July 2016

Eight leading British universities have had their credit status downgraded as a result of the EU referendum. S&P Global Ratings agency cut its rating for King’s from AA to AA-.

UK and Greek literature

BBC World Service 2nd July 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, is interviewed about comparisons between the current political situation in the UK and classical Greek literature, comparing it to the Trojan War. ‘You’ve got an awful lot of Greeks fighting on one side but fighting each other…with the same in the Trojan camp,’ she said.

'But the patient is lost'...

The Psychologist 1st July 2016

Dr Sally Marlow, Public Engagement Fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) reviews the iconic play, Blue/Orange, which won the Olivier Award for Best New Play.

One on one... with Professor Dame Til Wykes

The Psychologist 1st July 2016

Column by Dame Til Wykes, Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Prosopagnosia: How face blindness means I can't recognise my mum

BBC 1st July 2016

The article discusses face blindness, and features a questionnaire developed by Dr Punit Shah of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Why do we need a social psychiatry?

British Journal of Psychiatry 1st July 2016

Article on social psychiatry, co-authored by Dinesh Bhugra of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Thousands march through London against Leave vote

Various media outlets 1st July 2016

Thousands of demonstrators marched through central London to protest against the referendum vote to leave the EU. The article quotes the rally organiser as King’s graduate Kieran MacDermott. This was reported in Independent, Daily Mail, Reuters, Daily Express, Evening Standard, Vice, Huffington Post, New York Times, Hindustan Times, India Today, Newsweek, Times of India, CNBC and Economic Times of India.

Who Are You Again?

BBC Radio 4 1st July 2016

This programme looks at prosopagnosia, more commonly known as face blindness. Sufferers have problems perceiving or remembering faces. Punit Shah, IoPPN, is interviewed for the programme. (11:15). A questionnaire devised by Punit, along with Dr Richard Cook, Tissue Engineering & Biophotonics, is also mentioned by BBC online.

Letters to the Editor

Daily Telegraph 1st July 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, responds to a letter directed at an opinion piece he had written for the paper. ‘Sir William Cash misunderstood my Comment piece,’ he said.

The soup kitchen putting London's air quality on the menu

Guardian 1st July 2016

A pop-up kitchen is serving free soup, which will change in colour daily according to air pollution leveIs. Information boards with data and research from air quality experts at the Environment Research Group (ERG) will also be there.

Brexit and science: Seven days later

Nature 1st July 2016

In the wake of Brexit, scientists immediately voiced fears over jobs, funding and collaborations. Comments by Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health) are included in the article.

Boris Johnson won’t run for British prime minister but may be able to run for U.S. president

Washington Post 1st July 2016

Boris Johnson has withdrawn from the campaign to become the next conservative leader – and consequently is out of the running for British prime minister. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of contemporary British History, commented on Boris’s dual U.S.-UK citizenship, stating that whilst there are no formal requirements for the position of prime minister, no former leader has held dual citizenship.

Britain can find opportunities beyond Hinkley

Financial Times 1st July 2016

Visiting Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written for Financial Times, in light of the postponed Hinkley Point power station. He said: ‘For the UK government, it is essential to ensure the electricity that Hinkley was supposed to provide can be replaced from other sources. This is not impossible, but will require a degree of planning not evident in UK energy policy in recent years.’ Professor Butler was also interviewed for BBC World Service.

You don’t have to be mad to be a comedian, but it might help

Huffington post 29th June 2016

Dr James MacCabe of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that looked at psychotic traits in comedians. He notes: “this study tells us some interesting things about the differences between comedians and actors but not about the link with psychosis”.

Parent's fear children's mental illness disgnosis

Evening Standard 28th June 2016

The article mentions a study of 2,000 adults by YouGov which found nearly one in seven thought funding should be increased to 20 per cent of the UK’s medical budget. Professor Dame Til Wykes, from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said: “The money we are spending on research is nowhere near that of other health conditions.”

We shall overcome

Independent 27th June 2016

Michael Rutter (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, IoPPN) comments on a feature article which discusses children who are victims of violence and neglect. He said: "The findings were surprises all along the line. There was no increase in the ordinary emotional and behavioural problems. Another surprise was that if the children were adopted out of care early enough - within six months - then they seemed to go on to develop well."

Superfoods: The Real Story

Channel 4 27th June 2016

Dr Sandrine Thuret from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed about how resveratrol - a substance found in red wine - could help with growing new brain cells. Begins at 19.12.

Why the depressed are more likely to develop diabetes

Daily Mail 27th June 2016

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown that depressed patients are up to 60 per cent more likely to develop diabetes. The study (the largest ever study of its kind involving 160,000 pairs) found that a genetic link existed between the two illnesses. Dr Carol Kan said: ‘These findings go some way towards explaining why diabetes and depression sometimes occur together, although further research is needed to explore the effect of gender in this interplay between genetic factors and environmental influences, such as diet and lifestyle. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these disorders and why they sometimes exist in tandem could one day provide useful biological targets for therapeutic interventions.’

Science says Wi-fi allergies are fake - but people are still sick

Newsweek 26th June 2016

James Rubin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on an article which discusses the scientific dismissal of Wi-Fi allergies. His surveys of the science led him to believe exposure to electromagnatic rays are not to blame. He said: "They have physical symptoms; the quality of life they have can be appalling sometimes; they’re in desperate need of help".

Science says wi-fi allergies are fake - but people are still sick

Newsweek 26th June 2016

Dr James Rubin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). He says about sufferers: “They have physical symptoms; the quality of life they have can be appalling sometimes; they’re in desperate need of help”. But his surveys of the science led him to believe exposure to electromagnetic rays is not to blame.

Academics fear new Brexit - a brain exit - after referendum vote

The Independent 24th June 2016

Following the referendum vote to leave the EU, universities in the UK are voicing concerns that academics from the EU may decide to leave. Professor Simon Wessely from the IoPPN says, "I fear that the consequences for both health and science will be serious over the coming year unless we take firm and decisive action now."

How to stop the Brexit Drain

Newsweek 24th June 2016

Professor Sir Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the impact of Brexit on research in the UK. He notes: "Science by its nature is about collaboration. No other EU country leads on as many collaborations as we do. I have lost count of the number of scientists this morning lining up to say strong research partnerships with EU-based scientists will be essential for the future of British science—it would be easier to list those who haven’t. At the moment we are unclear how to sustain these in the new world that we are moving to, but sustain we must."

Do prisoners without a clear release date have a higher likelihood of harming themselves while in custody?

BBC Radio 4 23rd June 2016

Prisoners who are kept in custody without a clear release date are often driven to despair; a sense of hopeless accompanies lack of a clear end in light. This leads to dramatic levels of self harm. Dr Nigel Blackwood, clinical senior lecturer at the IoPPN, says that the prisoners need to have access to mental health programmes, to help understand and manage their risks.

Some kids have all the pluck

The Independent 23rd June 2016

A team of researchers are investigating the development of "high risk" children, with aims to predict which maltreated children will go on to develop difficulties. Michael Rutter, a professor at the IoPPN who ran a study in the 1990s assessing how orphans settled into new adoptive families said "Development involves both change and challenge and also continuity, so to see the norm as stability is wrong."

Agony of trying to be Little Miss Perfect: Straight As aren't enough for today's schoolgirls - they also have to be pretty, slim and popular

The Daily Mail 22nd June 2016

Due to a fear of failure, pursuit of perfection and largely, social media - teenage girls are constantly in competition to be the smartest, the prettiest, the most popular. This behaviour fuels depression, eating disorders and self harm. Professor Janet Treasure, director of the Eating Disorder Unit at the IoPPN says "In the past it was about being morally good and religious - social media has changed that focus. Now it’s objectification of the self."

Making NHS data public is not the same as making it accessible – we can and should do better

The Guardian 21st June 2016

A team of psychologists led by Dr Tim Rakow of the IoPPN have been working with the National Institute of Health to make statistics on children's heart surgery more available and accessible to all.

King's press release related to 'Making NHS data public is not the same as making it accessible – we can and should do better'

Science superpower

The Times 20th June 2016

Sir Simon Wessely (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience) and several other academics have written a letter discussing Britain's science sector and the implications of a Brexit. Other authors include Sit Tom Blundell (University of Cambridge), Sir Paul Nurse (Francis Crisk Institute), and Sir John Ball (University of Oxford).

Tunisia-style trauma survivors 'can feel more distress on event anniversaries'

Guernsey Press 19th June 2016

Professor Neil Greenberg, president of the UK Psychology Trauma Society, and Professor of Defence Mental Health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) explains that the anniversary of a traumatic event such as the attach on UK holidaymakers in Tunisia can increase the distress for survivors. He said: "Many people who have been exposed to traumatic events find that when particular reminders of the event come up they make them feel more distressed. A year down the line, it'd really common that the first anniversary after someone had died or moved house or (gone through) a traumatic event brings up some of the distress that you might have felt when the actual incident was happening."

What science has taught me about raising girls

Motto 19th June 2016

Professor Judith Dunn of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on an article which focuses on the gender-based behavioural difference in children. She says: "Because girls know each other so well, they can be devastating teasers and bulliers. They know just what upsets the other."

The talent trap

New Statesman 18th June 2016

Review of the book 'Grit: the Power of Passion and Perseverance" by Angela Duckworth. The review mentions a study led by Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London.

It could be you

New Scientist 18th June 2016

In an article about how to improve the wrongful conviction rate, Gisli Gudjonsson, an emeritus professor at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, adds a comment. He believes that many adults simply struggle to cope with the reality of being locked up in a cell. He says: "A common feature is that they believe that everything is going to be sorted out - that no one will believe their confusion and the truth will somehow come out; unfortunately, in most cases it doesn't."

Blood test for best-fit antidepressants

The Week 18th June 2016

Scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) have devised a blood test which predicts which patients will respond to which antidepressants, personalising depression treatment for the first time.

King's press release related to 'Blood test for best-fit antidepressants '

Howard Cohen and Ian Cumming discuss Lies, Deception and Malingering ahead of conference at IoPPN

BBC Radio 4 17th June 2016

Barrister Howard Cohen (Farrar's Building) and Dr Ian Cumming (SLaM NHS Foundation Trust) discuss the sophisticated techniques used to assess lying and malingering in patients ahead of the Lies, Deception Conference taking place at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) that day. and Interview begins at 02.40.17.

A-level subject choice is strongly influenced by genes, scientists say

The Guardian 16th June 2016

A new study published in Scientific Reports suggests that up to 80% students’ choices of A-level subjects is down to genetic influence with environmental factors such as home life, accounting for 23% of the choice at most. First author of the study, Kaili Rimfeld from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London says: "We are really arguing that individuals can actively choose and create their own educational experiences partly based on their genetic propensities." Also reported in the Daily Mail and Mail Online.

King's press release related to 'A-level subject choice is strongly influenced by genes, scientists say'

How an aggressive interrogation can make you a murderer

New Scientist 15th June 2016

Gisli Gudjonsson, an emeritus professor at King’s College London who has worked on UK cases involving false confessions, believes many adults simply struggle to cope with the reality of a police interrogation or being locked up in a cell. He said: “A common feature is that they believe that everything is going to be sorted out – that no one will believe their confession and the truth will somehow come out; unfortunately, in most cases it doesn’t.”

Mother with bipolar disorder lost her entire life savings in manic spending sprees

Mail 13th June 2016

A report published by the charity Money and Mental Health Policy Institute (MMHPI) suggests that you’re up to six times more likely to have debt problems if you have a mental health issue such as depression. Dame Til Wykes, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), is advising the MMHPI and explains that people with mental health issues experience financial difficulties before, during and after an episode. She says: "People with depression may think they don’t have a future so may give away their worldly goods, or stop paying their mortgage because they can’t see past the next day or two. Those with bipolar may have different problems. They may feel so happy when they are in a manic state that they want to give their money away to make others happy. They may sign disadvantageous loan agreements or spend outrageously on goods they can’t afford. These decisions affect their whole life, their friendships and families."

Queen's Birthday Honours 2016: Full list of great and the good awarded for services to their country

Mirror 11th June 2016

Knighthoods were awarded to Richard Treisman, research director of the Francis Crick Institute, for services to biomedical science and cancer research and Professor John Strang, director of the National Addiction Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), Kings College London. Professor Peter McGuffin (MRC Centre Director and Professor of Psychiatric Genetics, IoPPN) is listed as Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for services to Biomedical Research and Psychiatric Genetics. The Honours list is also reported by BBC News, Times, and the Times Higher Education.

Profile. George Patton: global leader in adolescent health

Lancet 11th June 2016

Anthony Mann, Emeritus Professor of Epidemiological Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) recalls how he introduced George Patton (Chair of the Lancet Commission on adolescent health and wellbeing) to the epidemiological approach. He said: "I was able to introduce George to the epidemiological approach, supervising his doctorate on the outcome of abnormal eating patterns in a cohort of local schoolgirls. As a result, he learned the practical difficulties in engaging adolescents in data collection. He has obtained regular funding and provided leadership for over 20 years for this study, authoring leading publications on mood disorder and substance abuse in this age group."

Scientists at King's College are now leading research into the benefits of ping pong on Alzheimer's disease

BBC1 London 10th June 2016

Nearly a million people in the UK are suffering from various stages of Alzheimer's. Scientists at King's College are now leading research into the benefits of ping pong on the disease. Includes comment from Dr Matt Kempton (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience). Broadcast on BBC1 London Regional News and Weather at 18:34:14

Secret to a successful life is all in your polygenes

Metro 9th June 2016

Professor Robert Plomin from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN, King's College London) comments on the recent research published in Psychological Science which suggests that higher polygenic scores were more successful in later life. He said: "A low polygenic score doesn't mean a kid can't learn, but we should recognise that it might take more efforts." Also reported in New Scientist.

Cardiff University confirms race equality review after medical student 'dons blackface' in play

Independent 8th June 2016

Professor Dinesh Bhugra from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), will be leading a review into issues of racial inequality at Cardiff University after an alleged incident which involved a reportedly racist play by it's medical students. Also reported by BBC News, ITV News, The Express, Telegraph, Mail, and The Times.

Could Your Child Be a Psychopath?

Huffington Post 8th June 2016

The article reports on the correlation of childhood behavioural patterns and adult psychopathy. Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN, King's College London) found reduced amygdala activity in young boys with callous-unemotional traits compared with controls.

New Tool to Burst Twitter Rumours

Yahoo 8th June 2016

SWI swissinfo.ch is working closely with developers of the tool as part of an innovative EU-funded project, named Pheme. By tracking and verifying information in real-time, the tool will allow journalists to keep pace with the huge volume of viral stories circulating online, and separate fact from fiction. King's College London is listed as a partner in the project.

Blood test could identify patients that benefit from antidepressants

The Guardian 7th June 2016

Scientists at King’s College London have developed a blood test that accurately and reliably predicts whether depressed patients will respond to common antidepressants. Professor Carmine Pariante from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London and senior author of the study, said: ‘The identification of biomarkers that predict treatment response is crucial in reducing the social and economic burden of depression, and improving quality of life of patients. Also reported by BBC Radio 4 Today, BBC World Service, BBC News Channel, BBC Radio Five Live, BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Scotland, BBC World TV, BBC News Online, Mail Online, Times, Daily Telegraph, Independent, Reuters, Forbes, Sky News, Daily Express, Daily Mirror, inews, Al Jazeera, The Times of India, Sina, Globo, Yahoo News, Washington Post, iflscience, Wired, ABC News, Spectator, Huffington Post and Republicca.

King's press release related to 'Blood test could identify patients that benefit from antidepressants'

Genetic test predicts your success in life, but not happiness

New Scientist 7th June 2016

Robert Plomin from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on recent research in genetics, which shows that polygenic scores influence success in life. He said: "You wouldn’t have predicted social mobility based on genetics. I think it'd a heartening sign." This research builds on Robert Plomin's previous study of genetic influence on GCSE results. Also reported in the Metro.

Dinners

Daily Telegraph 7th June 2016

President & Principal, Professor Edward Byrne, is mentioned as a guest at the London Law Trust dinner.

Great news for fatties: it's really not your fault

Spectator 4th June 2016

Mary Wakefield publishes an opinion piece on the causes of obesity, discussing research carried out by King's College London, University College London, and the Medical Research Council that looks into the variations of the FTO gene and the impact on obesity.

King's press release related to 'Great news for fatties: it's really not your fault'

Guidelines cause UK health charities to be silent on Brexit

Lancet 4th June 2016

Sir Simon Wessely, speaking as a clinician and head of Psychological Medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, comments on the Charity Commission's latest guidelines of banning the political activity of UK health organisations. He said: “Medical bodies have always felt free to provide information about their areas of expertise in the run-up to a major national ballot, but this time
they have said very little since the Commission issued its new guidance in March”

Stem cell injection gives ‘jump start’ to stroke victims

The Times 3rd June 2016

Professor Jack Price from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on recent findings from a trial of stem cell therapy for stroke patients in the US.

Air raids and the crowd - citizens at war

The Psychologist 1st June 2016

Edgar Jones, Professor of the History of Medicine and Psychiatry at King's College London explores how British people responded to air raids during the Second World War, and what this tells us about coping under extreme stress.

The problem of drug driving

BBC Radio London 1st June 2016

Professor David Taylor, Professor of Psycho Pharmacology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is interviewed about the problem of drug driving. Begins at 01:22:10

Adolescent Mental Health

LBC Radio 29th May 2016

Dr Jennifer Lau of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the rise of Mental Health in young people and the barriers to getting appropriate support. Interview starts at 7.07.

British medical student who starred in ISIS video used to drink beer, smoke marijuana and was part of a banned 'Fight Club' at £18,000-a-year private school

Daily Mail 27th May 2016

An article looking at the background of a British medical student who appeared in an ISIS propaganda video urging Muslim medics to join him in Syria mentions that he was offered a place to study at King’s but chose not to accept.

Novel treatment for anorexia

BBC The One Show 26th May 2016

Angellica Bell visits the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) to find out more about brain stimulation as a potential new treatment for anorexia nervosa (begins at 3.15).

King's press release related to 'Novel treatment for anorexia'

'Make Google and Facebook pay levy to support journalism' – academic

Guardian 26th May 2016

A think tank has called for Google and Facebook to pay for the news they take from other media outlets and then promote on their own websites. It mentioned research from King’s that found that by and large, the print and broadcast media followed the same stories during last year’s general election campaign and largely on the lines put out by the parties.

Which universities would lose out from Brexit?

Times Higher Education 26th May 2016

Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s Learning Institute, comments on allegations that universities have unfairly influenced the National Student Survey. She said: ‘I still think that the sector can have confidence in the data, but I think there is a worrying trend.’

Which universities would lose out from Brexit?

Times Higher Education 26th May 2016

Eighteen UK institutions face the prospect of more than half their research funding from competitive grants being wiped out if the country votes to leave the European Union, new data show. Article highlights between 30 and 25 per cent of King’s funding comes from the EU.

Impact of global economic crisis on cancer deaths

King's Press Release 26th May 2016

Unemployment and reduced public-sector health spending following the 2008 global economic crisis were associated with increased cancer mortality, according to a new study led by academics at King’s College London and Imperial College London. Professor Richard Sullivan, Director of the Institute of Cancer Policy, King’s Health Partners Comprehensive Cancer Centre who was an author on the study, added: ‘Unemployment does not just affect lives, it also dramatically affects health.’ This was reported by the Independent.

EU Referendum

Various media outlets 26th May 2016

King’s experts have continued to comment on various issues relating to the referendum. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History (ICBH), discussed the difference between the EU referendum in 1975 and 2016 for BBC Two Daily Politics (47.00). ‘From the perspective of 1975, the European Economic Community looked more like a free market venture,’ he said. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, commented on Turkey’s membership in the EU for BBC Radio 5 Live and said: ‘We’ve pushed for Turkish membership as we think that increasing the size of the market would be good.’ Professor Menon also wrote about what happens if the vote is to leave for The Week and commented on undecided voters for CNBC. The UK in a Changing Europe project was also mentioned in the Guardian. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, ICBH, comments on learnings from the 1975 referendum for BBC Radio 2 Jeremy Vine and said: ‘The first things that we learnt is that project fear actually works. The debate wasn’t quite as rational as others suggested.’ (31.49)

Diabetes patients should be offered option of metabolic surgery

various media outlets 26th May 2016

In a joint statement endorsed by 45 international organisations, published in the journal Diabetes Care, diabetes clinicians and researchers are calling for metabolic surgery to be recommended or considered as a treatment option for some people with Type 2 diabetes. ‘Surgery represents a radical departure from conventional approaches to diabetes. The new guidelines effectively introduce one of the biggest changes for diabetes care in modern times,’ says Professor Francesco Rubino, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences. This was also reported by Daily Mail, London Evening Standard, Guardian, Daily Mail, Telegraph, BBC News Online, ITV, Times, Sun, Mirror, Daily Mail, Sky News, Huffington Post, Channel 4 News, BBC London (01.17.00) BBC Radio Scotland, Globo, CBS, Xinhua, Deccan Chronicle, Times of India, CNBC, TIME and New Scientist.

King's press release related to 'Diabetes patients should be offered option of metabolic surgery'

Why Aren't More Graduates Considering Careers With Start-Ups?

Huffington Post UK 25th May 2016

Alice and Fleurette of Attollo Lingerie are featured in a piece considering why start-ups are not a more attractive career choice for graduates. Alice and Fleurette met at King’s and co-founded Attollo lingerie to solve the problem of dowdy, uncomfortable and unflattering D+ lingerie.

The 7 diet myths YOU probably believe - and are stopping you from losing weight...

Daily Mail 25th May 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, says mixed messages by doctors and experts can be confusing for dieters and what we eat is more important to health than counting calories in a piece examining popular diets.

European Fashion

BBC Radio 4, Europeans-The Roots of Identity 24th May 2016

Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice-Principal (Arts & Sciences), discusses the history and evolution of European Fashion. ‘One of the oddest things we now take for granted is that from around the world 1600 to 1630, men across Europe started shaving their heads and wearing someone else’s hair, she said. (Interview starts at 17.30)

Bloated or suffering from IBS? Try the FODMAP diet: Revolutionary plan 'significantly reduces symptoms'

Daily Mail 24th May 2016

A study shows that the FODMAP diet can significantly reduce symptoms of IBS. Research Dietician, Lee Martin, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Reducing your intake of one or more foods could affect your nutritional balance and have an impact on the levels of beneficial bacteria in your gut.’

Research facilities at risk of shutting down if UK leaves the EU, former minister warns

Telegraph 23rd May 2016

Rt Hon David Willets, Policy Institute, warns that leaving the EU will put research and development facilities at risk of shutting down. ‘The argument has been focused too far on the financial returns…I see it above all about free movement of students and academics,’ he said. This was also reported by London Evening Standard.

Four steps to rebuild trust in biology

Guardian 23rd May 2016

Dr Filippa Lenztos, Social Science, Health & Medicine, has written a piece on why the reputation of biomedical science is at risk. ‘Scientists and innovators assure us that biological technologies will ultimately be beneficial, but trust in biologists is currently in a precarious state,’ she said.

Four steps to rebuild trust in biology

Guardian 23rd May 2016

Dr Filippa Lenztos, Social Science, Health & Medicine, has written a piece on why the reputation of biomedical science is at risk. ‘Scientists and innovators assure us that biological technologies will ultimately be beneficial, but trust in biologists is currently in a precarious state,’ she said.

University guide 2017: university profiles index

Guardian 23rd May 2016

King’s is featured in the Guardian’s University Guide 2017 for prospective students with key information including student demographics and information about fees and accommodation. The Independent reported that King’s is in the top ten for graduate career prospects.

Professor Geoffrey Waywell

Times 23rd May 2016

An obituary for Professor Geoffrey Waywell, Classics, who joined King’s in 1968 and passed away in February.

London areas with hard water linked to babies getting eczema

London Evening Standard 23rd May 2016

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King’s. Dr Carsten Flohr, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: ‘Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood.’ This was also reported by Express.

BBC Horizon: E-Cigarettes: Miracle or Menace

BBC Two 22nd May 2016

In this documentary, Michael Mosley investigates the dramatic rise in e-cigarettes and what 'vaping' really does to your health. Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience shares findings from research.

Public Health England: Advice to eat more fat 'irresponsible'

BBC News 22nd May 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, discusses a report by the National Obesity Forum, which suggests that eating fat could help cut obesity and type 2 diabetes. Professor Sanders notes: ‘The harsh criticism of current dietary guidelines meted out in this report is not justified as few people adhere to these guidelines anyway.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail, Express, Times and BBC Radio 5 Live.

How our brains tell the difference between real and fake

Guardian 22nd May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, wrote about how our brains can tell the difference between real and fake. ‘With practice, the brain can spot distinctions so subtle they’re impossible to describe.’

Heston Blumenthal: from brink of bankruptcy to giant of gastronomy

Daily Telegraph 21st May 2016

The article focuses on Heston Blumenthal’s career in gastronomy following an event at King’s at which he inspired an audience of entrepreneurs with his own experiences.

Does city life pose a risk to mental health?

Scientific American 20th May 2016

The article covers research conducted by Dr Helen Fisher of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Using 2,232 twin children in the UK, her analysis revealed that growing up in the city nearly doubled the likelihood of psychotic symptoms at age 12, and that exposure to crime along with low social cohesion (that is, a lack of closeness and supportiveness between neighbours) were the biggest risk factors.

Cardiff University dementia genes study breakthrough hope

BBC News 20th May 2016

The article mentions statistics from King’s which shows the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease in Wales.

Building a choir from scratch

BBC News 20th May 2016

The article focuses on a choir commissioned by King’s to be part of Utopia 2016: A Year of Imagination and Possibility – a programme inspired by the 500th anniversary of Sir Thomas More's book, Utopia.

Adults can get ADHD

Daily Mail 19th May 2016

People can develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as adults without having shown any signs of the condition as children. It has been thought that ADHD always develped in childhood and became more severe with age. Scientists at King's College London found however, that 67.5 per cent of those aged 18 with the disorder did not meet the diagnostic criteria for the condition as children. Also reported by Times, BBC Radio Five Live, Reuters, Wall Street Journal, Daily Beast, Hindustan Times, Times of India, O Globo, Scientific American and Quartz.

King's press release related to 'Adults can get ADHD'

Chronic fatigue may prompt you to suppress emotions

Times of India 19th May 2016

Research carried out by Dr Kate Rimes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has shown "Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome often tell us that stress worsens their symptoms, but this study demonstrates a possible biological mechanism underlying this effect". Also reported by Hindustan Times.

Mental illness blights Asian nations

The Guardian 19th May 2016

New research published in the Lancet has found that one third of the world's cases of mental illness occur in India and China, where millions of people go untreated. Less than 1% of the national health budget in either country is allocated to mental health care. Graham Thornicroft, professor of community psychiatry (Centre for Global Mental Health, King's College London) comments, "...the under-treatment of people with mental illness is a major scandal and governments must recognise not just the direct impact of mental illness, but also the indirect ways it harms people's lives."

Do our genes 'remember' pain?

The Washington Post 19th May 2016

Franziska Denk from the Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience shares findings from recent research published earlier this month in Cell Reports, “We already knew that chronic-pain patients have nerves that are more active, and we think this is probably due to various proteins and channels in those nerves having different properties. We want to know why these proteins and channels should maintain their altered function over such a long period of time.” Denk and her colleagues found that certain crucial proteins were “being replaced by malfunctioning versions of themselves.”

King's press release related to 'Do our genes 'remember' pain? '

Grant winners – 19 May 2016

Times Higher Education 19th May 2016

Dr Federico Caprotti, Geography has been awarded a grant to research urban transformation in South Africa through co-designing energy services provision pathways.

Times Higher Education pay survey 2016

Times Higher Education 19th May 2016

Times Higher Education have ranked universities by the pay of vice-chancellors and detailed any increases in pay. King’s is mentioned in the article.

There are more connections in the human brain than there are stars in our Milky Way Galaxy...

Huffington Post UK 19th May 2016

Professor Nikolas Rose, Social Science, Health & Medicine, discusses the complexity of the human brain and the historic debate on mind vs. brain. ‘The debate on mind vs. brain has figured prominently in the recent public press. But the debate is misleading: few dispute that mental life is grounded in the complex circuits of connections between neurons (brain cells) and in their constant interaction with the world outside,’ he said.

ADHD may emerge after childhood for some people

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

While it is well established that childhood ADHD may continue into adulthood, new research by King’s suggests that for some people the disorder does not emerge until after childhood.
Dr Jessica Agnew-Blais, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘We were very interested by this large ‘late-onset’ ADHD group, as ADHD is generally seen as a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder. We speculated about the nature of late-onset ADHD: the disorder could have been masked in childhood due to protective factors, such as a supportive family environment.’ This was also reported by Times, Daily Beast, Hindustan Times, Times of India, O Globo and Quartz.

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Hard water linked to risk of eczema in infants

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King’s. Eczema affects around a fifth of children in the UK. Skin barrier impairment and dry skin are thought to be triggers of eczema in early life, partly through genetic predisposition. Dr Carsten Flohr, lead author from St John’s Institute of Dermatology at King’s, said: 'Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood. This was also reported by Mirror, Hindustan Times, Times of India, Xinhua and Sina.

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Environmental Research Group (ERG)

Various media outlets 18th May 2016

Dr Ben Barratt, ERG, discussed on ITV an air pollution report that London Mayor Sadiq Khan has accused Boris Johnson of hiding. ‘Back in 2010 nitrogen dioxide levels were at their peak and certainly air pollution across the whole London Borough was well above legal standards,’ he said. Andrew Grieve, ERG, also discussed this topic on BBC Radio 4 where he used an air pollution monitor to test air pollution on a busy road in London. ‘On the day people were asking drivers to switch their cars off, peaks we saw in the data were lower and there were less levels of air pollution,’ he said. Professor Frank Kelly, ERG, discussed in the London Evening Standard Sadiq Khan’s new plans to introduce a charge for vehicles which emit the most toxic fumes. ‘The new Mayor, Sadiq Khan’s, announcement…is very welcome news,’ he said. A study by the ERG group has also been mentioned in the Guardian, which showed that a third of primary and secondary schools in London are situated in areas where nitrogen dioxide levels are above the legal limits.

Unconventional entrepreneurs inspire an audience at King's

King's Press Release 18th May 2016

Heston Blumenthal, Jo Malone MBE, Joe Wicks (‘The Body Coach’) and EatAbout Co-founders, Philip Källberg and Felix Bråberg, inspired an audience of budding entrepreneurs last night, at a panel event hosted by King’s Entrepreneurship Institute as part of their Enterprise Connect series of events for entrepreneurs. Speaking before the event about the importance of entrepreneurship at King’s, Professor Edward Byrne, President and Principal said: ‘Entrepreneurship is people having the ambition and energy to follow their dreams. To come up with something great, which is going to work in the market place and build a business that will make life better for people and hopefully be successful to those who develop it.’

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Eating too many potatoes 'raises the risk of high blood pressure'

London Evening Standard 18th May 2016

New research published in the British Medical Journal suggests that eating potatoes four times a week raises blood pressure. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, who was not involved in the study, said: ‘I don't think this study should be used to discourage people from eating potatoes. They make an important contribution to the intake of vitamin C and potassium.’ This was also reported by Independent, Mail Online, Telegraph and Sun.

World insight: Think beyond ‘narrow academic pursuits’ to tackle global problems

Times Higher Education 18th May 2016

Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University (ASU), has written a piece calling for universities to take responsibility for the betterment of society. President Crow mentions the recent collaboration, the PLuS Alliance, between King’s, ASU and University of New South Wales, as an example of a commitment to collaboration. ‘This multidisciplinary endeavour allows us to extend the range and depth of brain power by tapping into qualified learners from around the world,’ he said.

Teenage alcohol poisoning

BBC Radio 4 Today 17th May 2016

Dr Sally Marlow from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed about adolescent drinking following a sharp rise in alcohol poisoning over the past 20 years. Dr Marlow discussed the causes of excessive drinking among adolescents, saying it could be a manifestation of 'adolescent distress' and a form of self-harm. Begins at 02.48.22.

There are more connections in the human brain than there are stars in our milky way galaxy...

Huffington Post 17th May 2016

Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discussed the link between the mind and the neurons of the brain.

No link between eating dinner after 8pm and obesity in children

Various media outlets 17th May 2016

Researchers at King’s have found no significant link between eating the evening meal after 8pm and excess weight in children, according to a paper published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition. The lead author of the study, Dr Gerda Pot, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, said: ‘The findings of our study are surprising. We expected to find an association between eating later and being more likely to be overweight but actually found that this was not the case. This may be due to the limited number of children consuming their evening meal after 8pm in this cohort.’ This was also reported by Independent, CNBC, Times of India and Deccan Chronicle.

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Inaugural visiting professorship to give insight into unique UK historic archive

King's Press Release 17th May 2016

Historian and award-winning winning author Andrew O’ Shaughnessy has been appointed as the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor at King’s to contribute to the Georgian Papers Programme. Dr Joanna Newman Vice Principal (International) said: ‘We are so pleased to have Professor O’ Shaughnessy join us on this fantastic project.’

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Medieval kings were no wielders of absolute power

Guardian 17th May 2016

Professor Dame Janet Nelson, History, has written a letter on the power of medieval kings. ‘Medieval kings were constrained by formal oaths and by the need to keep the consent of aristocrats and gentry, churchmen, city councils, and defenders of local customs – all with rights and privileges, which, over time and with multiple inputs including not least those of lawyers, grew into human rights,’ she said.

Book interview

BBC Radio 4 Front Row 17th May 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, reviews an exhibition called ‘Sunken cities’ at the British Museum. ‘The exhibition brings to life extraordinary ancient culture in the Mediterranean where civilisations flourished and fed off each other to produce a new hybrid art form,’ she said.

The battle for Rio

The i paper 17th May 2016

Professor Mariano de Carvalho, Brazil Institute, discusses the consumption of crack cocaine in Rio de Janeiro. ‘It’s a very cheap drug. Dependence on crack easily moves into physical violence and addicts robbing people to buy drugs. People will see that on the streets,’ he said.

Panic Attack

Guardian 16th May 2016

Nick Grey from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the rise of anxiety and that people are more attuned to it in terms of recognising it as a problem.

South Korean author Han Kang wins Booker international book prize

Financial Times 16th May 2016

South Korean author Han Kang is the winner of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize for her novel The Vegetarian. Dr Ruth Padel, English, was one of the judges who selected the winner.

No straight people allowed: Students share views on LGBT-only halls

Guardian 16th May 2016

The article discusses homophobia in higher education and whether universities should introduce LGBT-only halls. Travis Alabanza, King’s LGBT President, said: ‘For LGBT students, particularly those on the margins of that community, LGBT-specific housing gives them an accessible way to attend university, meet other queer students, and feel like they are in a safe environment.’

Gordon Brown could knock out Boris Johnson in a Brexit bout

Guardian 15th May 2016

The article mentions an event at King’s, where the Irish ambassador, Dan Mulhall, gave a lecture. He discussed the economic impact to Northern Ireland should the UK exit the EU.

The beauty of blindsight

Guardian 15th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about a woman in America who regained her sight after she fell and hit her head. ‘Different neural pathways in the brain are responsible for our perception of what something is, and our sense of where something is. Sometimes if only one of these pathways is damaged, a rare phenomenon known as ‘blindsight’ can occur,’ he said.

Maths school has Oxbridge’s number

Times 15th May 2016

The article focuses on King’s Maths School, which has 11 students going to Oxbridge. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, said: ‘This is a place where you can bring together incredibly bright kids. Maths is like music: by the time someone’s in their early teens it’s clear if they’re going to be really good at it.’

The beauty of blindsight

Guardian 15th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about a woman in America who regained her sight after she fell and hit her head. ‘Different neural pathways in the brain are responsible for our perception of what something is, and our sense of where something is. Sometimes if only one of these pathways is damaged, a rare phenomenon known as ‘blindsight’ can occur,’ he said.

Gordon Brown could knock out Boris Johnson in a Brexit bout

Guardian 15th May 2016

The article mentions an event at King’s, where the Irish ambassador, Dan Mulhall, gave a lecture. He discussed the economic impact to Northern Ireland should the UK exit the EU.

World's last survivor from 19th century puts long life down to raw eggs

Guardian 13th May 2016

Professor Karen Glaser, Institute of Gerontology, comments on the death of Susannah Mushatt Jones, the world’s oldest person who died at the age of 116. ‘One hundred years of research shows if you’re married, you’re more likely to live longer than if you’re not married,’ she said.

China deploys amnesia on 50th anniversary of Cultural Revolution

Financial Times 13th May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution in China. ‘The Cultural Revolution has always sat uneasily in Chinese popular memory, partly because there has never really been a credible historical assessment of this bizarre period,’ he said. Professor Brown has also written a piece for the Conversation.

Why a nap is bad for you

Express 13th May 2016

Article looking at the possible health risks associated with sleeping in the day. Professor Adrian Williams, Allergy, Respiratory, Critical Care, Anaesthetics and Pain Therapies Clinical Academic Group, said: ‘Daytime napping suggests possible nocturnal sleep disruption, most commonly obstructive sleep apnea, which is known to cause hypertension.’

Gaining in confidence to boost your job chances

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Dr Jennifer Lau of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), who produced the report 'Social Intelligence and the Next Generation, says: 'online interaction is positively linked to a young person's social intelligence, but is no substitute for real life'

Why DOES chronic pain exist? Study investigates why agony persists long after the injury has gone

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Chronic pain leads to an overly sensitive nervous system which responds much more than it normally would. Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) examined immune cells in the nervous system which are known to be important for the generation of persistent pain, and found that nerve damage changes epigenetic marks on some of the genes in these immune cells. Dr Franziska Denk, lead author, said: 'Cells have housekeeping systems by which the majority of their content are replaced and renewed every few weeks and months - so why do crucial proteins keep being replaced by malfunctioning versions of themselves? Our study is the very first step towards trying to answer this question by exploring the possibility that changes in chronic pain may persist because of epigenetics. We hope that future research in this area could help in the search for novel therapeutic targets.'

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As seen on screen: Collaborative efforts

Times Higher Education 12th May 2016

Article discussing the Creativeworks London Festival, which was held at King’s in April.

Hamza bin Laden: Could Osama's son be the future leader of al-Qaeda?

Independent 12th May 2016

After months of silence, Osama bin Laden’s son has resurfaced in an audio message, urging Syrian jihadist groups to unite and liberate Palestine. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies said: ‘Although his father still has a prominent role in jihadist circles as a mastermind, godfather and inspiration, Hamza has not yet done anything of prominence.’ Dr Krieg’s comments were also reported in USA Today.

King’s College London fight for pay secrecy costs £250,000

Times Higher Education 12th May 2016

The article focuses on the disclosure of senior salaries at King’s and the cost of the three-year appeal process.

Gaining in confidence to boost your job chances

Daily Mail 12th May 2016

Social skills are considered highly important when students apply for jobs. Dr Jennifer Lau, IoPPN, said: ‘Online interaction is positively linked to a young person’s social intelligence, but is no substitute for real life.’

Science in the news

BBC Radio 4 12th May 2016

Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, discusses science events which take place in bars and pubs across the UK and other countries. ‘It is a lot of fun and a great way to meet people who you wouldn’t normally meet and are interested in science,’ he said. Interview starts at 25 minutes.

Do you inherit your parent's mental illness?

BBC News 11th May 2016

Professor Cathryn Lewis of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the genetic basis of mental health illnesses. She notes: It's really hard to identify the genetics for mental health disorders. We learn at school about simple Mendelian [relating to the laws of Gregor Mendel] diseases - like Huntington's or cystic fibrosis - where there is the gene, a single gene that contributes to it. Mental health disorders are not about a single gene but about a collection of genes. We need to start thinking about this as a cumulative loading of genetics."

Link between weekend hospital staffing and patient deaths represents 'major oversimplification'

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

The ‘weekend effect’ – that patients admitted to hospital over the weekend are at an increased risk of death – overshadows a much more complex pattern of weekly changes in quality of care, which are unlikely to be addressed by simply increasing the availability of hospital doctors on Saturdays and Sundays, according a study led by King’s and University College London. Lead author Dr Benjamin Bray, Health & Social Care Research, said: ‘Much of the current discourse on reducing the weekend mortality effect has occurred in the absence of a detailed understanding of why changes in quality of care occur.’ This was reported by Buzzfeed, Telegraph, Independent, Mirror, ITV Online and i Paper.

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Top 10 universities for getting a job

Telegraph 11th May 2016

King’s is named as one of the top universities with a high employment rate for graduates.

The Rev Prof Dennis Nineham, scholar – obituary

Telegraph 11th May 2016

Article notes that Reverend Professor Dennis Nineham, formerly the chair of Biblical and Historical Theology at King’s, has passed away.

The Queen's China comments: Unanswered questions

BBC News 11th May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses recent comments made by the Queen about visiting Chinese officials. ‘In terms of the atmospherics between diplomats in China and the UK, it is not an easy relationship and that comes through in the emotion that was in her comment,’ he said. This was also reported by Financial Times, BBC Radio 4 Today, Sky News, Daily Mail, BBC, Huffington Post, Washington Post and Sina.

Historical perspective on EU Referendum

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke to an audience at King’s, considering the historical context of the EU referendum in comparison to 1975. This was reported by Times.

King's Open Doors project launched

King's Press Release 11th May 2016

King’s has launched its new Open Doors Project, a visual display of some of the university’s Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) staff and students and their achievements on door panels across King’s campuses. The project is led by the Diversity and Inclusion team. Debbie Epstein, Diversity & Inclusion Manager said: ‘We hope that public recognition of the achievements of those featured will inspire both existing and future staff and students as well as allowing us all to benefit from an insight in to their contributions and experiences.’

Pacific Islands disappeared

Sky News 10th May 2016

Dr Helen Adams, Geography, comments on five Pacific Islands which have disappeared due to rising sea levels. ‘I think it is important to look at it in the bigger context. Although you have lost five islands and one is rapidly eroding, there are actually 33 islands and so only a third of it is eroding,’ she said.

The best ways to stop a wildfire

Guardian 10th May 2016

Professor Bruce Malamud, Geography, suggests the best way to stop wildfires. ‘You need to remove one of the following: the heat of the fire, the fuel that feeds the fire or the oxygen that allows combustion to take place,’ he said.

Damaged Environment

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th May 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, discusses the effects that wildfires in Alberta, Canada will have on the environment. ‘Fires when they move through forests, consume lots of biomass in the trees or in the forest floors. Half of that biomass is made up of carbon. Rough calculations suggest that this fire is two thousand squares kilometres and might have burnt 10 million tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere,’ he said. Interview starts at 02:49:00.

Royal Ballet

BBC Radio 4 Today 10th May 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (London), comments on an article by a Principal dancer of the Royal Ballet, who received negative comments on his appearance. ‘If you read the article, what he is talking about is what happens to an artist as you grow up and start to accept who you are. So the dancer is saying that he has put to bed his own concerns about being different and that it is a shame other people have not,’ she said. Interview starts at 02:55:14.

King's Historian receives prestigious A.H. Heineken Prize

King's Press Release 10th May 2016

Professor Judith Herrin, Arts & Humanities Research Institute, has received the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History awarded by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences for her outstanding contribution to historical research. Professor Herrin received the prize in recognition for her research into Medieval cultures in Mediterranean civilisations and for establishing the crucial significance of the Byzantine Empire in history.

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What you need to know about vaping

Buzzfeed 9th May 2016

Professor Ann McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses vaping, following the Cochrane Review which found that there was evidence to say that e-cigarettes help people stop smoking. Professor McNeill's research found that vaping was much less harmful than smoking tobacco. Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 constituents and about 70 are known to cause cancer,” said McNeill. “E-cigarettes have a much smaller number of constituents – it’s largely glycerin, propylene glycol, nicotine, and flavourings".

Impeachment in Brazil

Various media outlets 9th May 2016

Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff will face trial after senators voted to impeach and suspend her. Academics from King’s have been discussing the issue. Speaking to Al Jazeera, researcher Diogo Costa, Political Economy, said: ‘To restore economic trust is the main challenge for this government. The big challenge is to boost productivity, restore growth and also to fight unemployment,’ he said. He also spoke to BBC Mundo. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, commented in US news. ‘I don’t think the grounds for impeachment are very robust. That worries me. The bar is too low and may subject future presidents to impeachment for similar reasons,’ he said. Professor Pereira also spoke to Globo about the relationship between the US and Brazil.

Environmental Research Group

Various media outlets 9th May 2016

Academics from the Environmental Research Group (ERG) have commented widely in the media this week. Dr Gary Fuller, discussed diesel car emissions for the Guardian. ‘Compared with stricter standards applied to petrol cars, the average diesel sold between 2009 and 2015 emitted 19 times more nitrogen oxides,’ he said. Dr Fuller also commented for the Guardian in another article about particulate matter (PM). ‘A lot of PM2.5s has a long residence time in the air, a week or more, therefore it’s not just what you generate locally, it’s all the other cities around you,’ he said. This was also reported by Times. Professor Frank Kelly, spoke to the Independent about harmful microplastics in the environment. ‘There’s a real possibility that some of those microparticles will be entrained into the air and they will be carried around and we will end up breathing them,’ he said. Professor Kelly also commented in Express on whether eco-cars produce as much air pollution as diesel cars, which was also reported by Guardian and London Evening Standard. An article in the Guardian mentions a study carried out by a number of universities, including academics from ERG, which looked at the impact of a type of paint on the reduction of nitrogen dioxide. London Mayor Sadiq Khan cited research by the ERG, which was reported by Bloomberg.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/kellyoakes/what-we-know-about-e-cigarettes?utm_ter&utm_term=.ilMve95Xza#.exYv6YqjK5

Buzzfeed 9th May 2016

A recent review has suggested that e-cigarettes help people stop smoking. Comparing e-cigarettes versus cigarettes, Professor Ann McNeill, IoPPN, said: ‘Cigarette smoke contains about 7,000 constituents and about 70 are known to cause cancer. E-cigarettes have a much smaller number of constituents – it’s largely glycerin, propylene glycol, nicotine, and flavourings.’

Eight proven ways to prevent cancer

Telegraph 9th May 2016

Research suggests that small lifestyle changes can lower the risk of cancer by up to 40 per cent. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments on the role bacteria plays in lowering the risk of cancer: ‘Microbes help break down some of the toxins in the gut that might normally cause cancer, and they keep the immune system in great shape generally so it beats off cancer cells,’ he said.

Asia business leaders in fundraiser celebrations

King's Press Release 9th May 2016

A series of exclusive events across the Asia Pacific region are being held to celebrate an illustrious group of Hong Kong and Asia business leaders who have helped fund a ground-breaking fundraising campaign for King’s. The global campaign has enabled the university to achieve some significant milestones in neuroscience and mental health, cancer, child health, society and international relations. The group of major donors has helped King’s to substantially surpass its original £500million target. This was reported by South China Morning Post.

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Prof. Greenberg speaks at Invictus Games 2016

King's Press Release 9th May 2016

Professor Neil Greenberg, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), joined figures from the worlds of royalty, sports, entertainment and politics, to speak at an international Invictus Games symposium hosted by the Bush Institute in Orlando, Florida. ‘The biggest challenge facing our communities is finding ways to encourage those affected by mental health problems to take the courageous step to seek treatment in the first place,’ he said. This was reported by Fox.

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Mixed response as university declares Wednesdays 'lecture-free'

Independent 9th May 2016

Goldsmiths University of London’s students’ union announced that there will be no lectures between 12-5pm on a Wednesday at the university. The article mentions King’s as being one of the universities which does not have Wednesday afternoon lectures.

Why picturing yourself winning is important in sport

Guardian 8th May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery discusses the importance of imagining yourself winning in order to succeed. ‘Neuroscientists and sports psychologists agree that the way a team imagines itself performing is just as important as the strength of the players,’ he said.

Juicing is a health risk, say experts

Daily Mail 6th May 2016

Experts warn that there are risks associated with juicing. Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘There are many juicing books and it is widely promoted on social media as an approach to promote health, induce weight loss and flush 'toxins' from the body. Clearly removing food from the diet can potentially help with weight loss, but juicing is not a sustainable and sensible approach to doing so,’ he said.

'Guys and gals: The European dating market will still be open post-Brexit'

Telegraph 6th May 2016

First year Politics student, Jack Elsom, has written a piece on the uncertainty surrounding the EU referendum. ‘Nobody really knows what Britain’s future would be like… and trying to conjure up an exact model of what a Brexit would look like is pointless, in the same way one can’t predict the future,’ he said.

Robotics at King’s

Various media outlets 6th May 2016

There have been a number of pieces about robotics research conducted at King’s. Dr Thrish Nanayakkara, Informatics, spoke to the Financial Times about how industries can benefit from a robot assisted workforce. BBC Breakfast and BBC Radio London also reported on the robotics training centre at King’s, where urologists, along with some help from robots, can treat patients with severe bladder conditions and prostate cancer.

London’s new mayor needs to lobby for more powers – or risk being left behind

The Conversation 6th May 2016

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece about the mayoral elections. ‘Whoever has won will gain command of a budget worth £17 billion to be spent mainly on fire services, transport and policing. They will also take on responsibilities for culture and the environment, addressing health inequalities, urban regeneration and development,’ he said.

Islamic students hid guests’ radical links

Times 6th May 2016

The article mentions comments made by David Cameron about controversial speakers on university campuses. King's is mentioned.

Air pollution warnings issued as UK temperatures set to soar

Guardian 6th May 2016

Air pollution warnings have been issued with temperatures forecast to climb towards 27C (80F) in south-east England and the Midlands this weekend. Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘As spring is moving towards summer the sun is getting stronger, and able to drive chemical reactions between pollutants that cause ozone to be formed, along with the particles [of unburned fuel].’

Ketamine could hold key to side-effect free antidepressant, scientists reveal

Independent 5th May 2016

Dr James Stone of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on new research showing that ketamine can relieve the symptoms of depression faster than commonly prescribed drugs. He notes: "This paper predicts that it would have a similar very rapid onset of action and efficacy against treatment resistant depression to ketamine, but that it would lack some of the undesirable side effects such as perceptual distortion and addiction potential. Although these findings are very promising, clinical trials in patients with depression are required".

Weight loss happens in your head, not your stomach

Huffington Post UK 5th May 2016

The article mentions a study by Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, which showed that the key to losing weight is to keep the microbes in our gut healthy.

'Perfect storm' of El Niño and warming boosted Alberta fires

BBC News 5th May 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, comments on El Nino not being the only factor increasing the likelihood of fire in Alberta. ‘Some of the changes can be ascribed to improvements in reporting but there are datasets which show the fire season has lengthened,’ he said.

The week in higher education

Times Higher Education 5th May 2016

The article discusses an invitation sent from a student society to Boris Johnson, but since purportedly rescinded. This was also reported by Huffington Post UK , Times Higher Education Supplement and Guardian.

Why Brexit would make the UK less secure

Telegraph 5th May 2016

Professor Christoph Meyer, European & International Studies, discusses the implications for the UK’s security and foreign policy if it leaves the EU. ‘Outside of the EU, the UK would still bear the consequences of EU policies without being at the table when they are formulated,’ he said.

UK universities slip in world rankings - is your old uni in the top 100?

Mirror 5th May 2016

King’s is ranked in the top 100 in the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rakings. This was also reported by BBC Online, Independent, Times Higher Education Supplement, Huffington Post UK, Times, Telegraph, Times Higher Education, London Evening Standard, Express, Times Higher Education, Xinhua and People’s Daily.

Having an overactive immune system may prime you for depression

New Scientist 4th May 2016

A new King’s College London study reveals why some - but not all - people have depression that appears to be caused by blood inflammation.
These insights could help researchers to develop novel treatment strategies for the many depressed patients who do not get better using current antidepressants. Professor Carmine Pariante from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience was interviewed by New Scientist and Metro.

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Care discussion

BBC Radio 4 Woman's Hour 4th May 2016

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Nursing, discusses the role of nurses within the NHS and the role played by nurses from overseas. ‘Nurses from overseas were needed before the 60’s because the viability of the NHS was threatened by the shortage of nurses. Therefore, the officials from the National Labour Service recruited from abroad,’ she said.

Celia Coburn interview

BBC Radio 2 4th May 2016

Former King’s staff, Celia Coburn, discusses her life and employment at King’s after 25 years. ‘I spent 25 years at King’s because I liked working with students and enjoyed it,’ she said.

Scientists make test tube embryo breakthrough

Financial Times 4th May 2016

New research has found a technique that scientists say may allow the study of human embryos for 14 days instead of seven. Professor Peter Braude, Women’s Health, said: ‘The research demonstrated that good science still can be achieved within the limits set by the UK parliament.’

Guidelines cause UK health charities to be silent on Brexit

Lancet 4th May 2016

Sir Simon Wesseley, speaking as a clinician and head of psychological medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, makes a comment about the impact of the Charity Commission's latest guidelines in banning political activity of UK health organisations. “Medical bodies have always felt free to provide information about their areas of expertise in the run-up to a major national ballot, but this time they have said very little since the Commission issued its new guidance
in March”

Shockwave therapy to stop mouth pain spoiling your meals

Daily Mail 3rd May 2016

Many people in Britain suffer from salivary stones, which cause painful facial swelling when eating. Professor Mark McGurk, Tissue Engineering & Biophotonics, comments: ‘Around one in 100 people has salivary stones. No one knows exactly why they occur, but we think minerals and calcium found naturally in saliva build up around tiny bits of debris in the glands.’

Air pollution has been lost in the murk of the London mayoral campaign

Guardian 3rd May 2016

Research by King’s is mentioned in this article that shows the health impacts of air pollution, including diseases such as asthma and bronchitis.

Shockwave therapy to stop mouth pain spoiling your meals

Daily Mail 3rd May 2016

Many people in Britain suffer from salivary stones, which cause painful facial swelling when eating. Professor Mark McGurk, Tissue Engineering & Biophotonics, comments: ‘Around one in 100 people has salivary stones. No one knows exactly why they occur, but we think minerals and calcium found naturally in saliva build up around tiny bits of debris in the glands.’

Baby-faced rapper who fled Britain to join ISIS 'killed in Syria'

Mirror 2nd May 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, comments on the death of Raphael Hostey who fled the UK to join the Islamic State (IS). ‘Raphael was the last remaining member of a cluster of fighters to join ISIS from Manchester and Portsmouth in 2013,’ he said. This was also reported by Independent and Sun.

Gummy Gripes

Daily Mail 2nd May 2016

Dr Mark Ide, Mucosal & Salivary Biology, discusses why having sore, sensitive gums can be a sign of the skin condition lichen planus. ‘It mostly appears in middle age and affects more women than men. There is some speculation that it may be down to hormone changes,’ he said.

Kidman & Co and Huawei decisions mean mixed messages for Chinese investors The

The Conversation 2nd May 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses Australian and China business relations. ‘Turning its back on investment from a source with the potential and importance of China would be a huge strategic decision for Australia,’ he said.

Heartburn meds alter the gut

Scientific American 1st May 2016

In 2014 more than 170 million prescriptions in the US were completed for acid blockers, known as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat gastric conditions. Research from King’s is mentioned, which looked at individuals’ gut bacteria before and after patients took PPIs for four to eight weeks.

What's your booze binge trigger?

Sun 1st May 2016

Professor Colin Drummond of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) features in an article on alcohol consumption. He notes: 'It only takes two units of alcohol to start impairing your judgement in a process called the priming effect, triggering your desire for more.'

How drawing focuses the mind

Guardian 1st May 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on a museum not allowing visitors to take photographs or sketch. ‘Sketching something close up and looking at it from afar are approached in quite different ways by the brain. However, it’s easy to miss details this way, because the brain is already satisfied that it knows what it has seen, and so doesn’t look any closer to find out,’ he said.

Europe is moving ever closer to Britain

Financial Times 1st May 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece on what will happen if Britain votes to remain in the EU. ‘With the EU moving in a “British” direction, the UK is in a strong position to help shape its future — unless, of course, it decides on June 23 to cut itself off from the continent,’ he said.

Who knew HRT could give you such saucy dreams?

Daily Mail 1st May 2016

Professor Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, discusses the stigma attached to women who take drug hormones during menopause to help with symptoms such as hot flushes and mood swings. ‘If your status was raised by menopause, if you were treated as a wise woman and older men still found you attractive, what would be the problem?’ she said.

Ditch tobacco sponsors, health experts warn institutions

Guardian 30th April 2016

More than 1,000 health experts have signed an open letter to London’s leading cultural institutions to abandon their financial links with the tobacco industry. Professor John Moxham, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, comments: ‘Tobacco advertising has now been banned along with sponsorship of sport. However, tobacco companies continue to use sponsorship of some high-profile arts organisations to promote the spurious idea that they are responsible corporate citizens.’ Also reported in the Observer.

Leadership research in HE is ‘theoretically weak’

Times Higher Education 30th April 2016

A new study has revealed that current literature on how to improve leadership in higher education is ‘small scale, fragmented and often theoretically weak.’ Professor Ewan Ferlie, School of Management & Business, said: ‘A lot of the research is very weak, very small-scale, local and theoretical. You could track the case of a university going through major change and see how leadership factors compared to other factors at play.’ This was also reported by Times Higher Education Supplement.

Universities borrow £3bn for new boom

Times 29th April 2016

Leading universities such as University College London, Edinburgh University and King’s are set to borrow more than £3 billion to fund expansion and meet demands of the increasing student population. It also mentions King’s acquiring the Bush House building at the Strand.

Universities are booming but there are warning signs

Financial Times 29th April 2016

The article mentions that King’s is ranked in The Times Higher Education and QS rankings 2016 as one of the top 20 global institutions.

Revealed: The 20 blackspots for toxic air in London

Evening Standard 29th April 2016

Campaign group ClientEarth has published a list of 20 pollution blackspots where air pollution exceeds EU limits. Data captured by King’s monitoring equipment found that air pollution levels on Putney High Street were beyond EU regulations. This was also reported by Guardian.

‘Science, the State, and the City: Britain’s Struggle to Succeed in Biotechnology’, by Geoffrey Owen and Michael Hopkins

Financial Times 29th April 2016

Professor David Edgerton, History, reviews ‘Science, the State, and the City: Britain’s Struggle to Succeed in Biotechnology’ by Geoffrey Owen and Michael Hopkins. ‘This book asks why it was that, despite everything being in place…Britain has not produced any large new biotechnological enterprise,’ he said.

Boom time for UK universities as fee income encourages expansion

Financial Times 28th April 2016

The article mentions that King’s is ranked in The Times Higher Education and QS rankings 2016 as one of the top 20 global institutions.

Writing letters for free isn’t a Capital idea

Guardian 28th April 2016

Professor Clive Coen, Women’s Health, discusses letter writing and capitalism. ‘Promote accountability by rejecting pseudonymous contributions. Only whistleblowers merit anonymity,’ he said.

First non-STEM Athena SWAN winners named

Times Higher Education 28th April 2016

King’s is named as one of the institutions to win an Athena SWAN award for its work on equality in the workplace.

What is Ed Balls doing now? Life after parliament for the self tweeting ex-MP

Mirror 28th April 2016

The article focuses on Ed Balls’ post-political career and his role as a Visiting Professor at the Policy Institute.

How Brazil hurtled into a preordained political tragedy

The Conversation 28th April 2016

PhD student, Geraldo Canterino, Brazil Institute, has written a piece on the impeachment of Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff. ‘If found guilty of the crimes of which she’s accused, Rousseff will be permanently removed from the presidency. If acquitted, she will return as president to finish her mandate – but with more than two thirds of the lower house having voted to investigate her, her position would be untenable,’ he said.

We are all farcically in the dark about what would happen after a vote for Brexit

Telegraph 28th April 2016

In the run up to the EU referendum Bernard Jenkin speaks at an event at King’s about the uncertainty on what will happen if Britain leaves the EU.

The Evening Standard speaks for the Conservatives

Huffington Post UK 28th April 2016

The article argues that the Evening Standard newspaper has produced pro-Conservative bias in its coverage of the London mayoral election. The article mentions recent research by King’s that looked at monopoly news providers, and found that this was not confined to London.

Mindfulness can control depression as well as drugs, study shows

Telegraph 27th April 2016

Professor Sir Simon Wessley of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research from the University of Oxford co-authored by Professor Sarah Byford of the IoPPN. The meta-analysis found that across the nine trials, 38 per cent of those who received MBCT had a depressive relapse within 60 weeks’ follow-up, in contrast to 49 per cent of those who did not receive MBCT. Taking the time to relapse into account, people who received MBCT were 31 per cent less likely to relapse during the 60-week follow-up compared with those who did not receive MBCT. Sir Simon Wessley said: “ this study confirms that mindfulness is an effective talking therapy, probably about the same as antidepressants, and that both together reduces relapse.“ Professor Byford notes: 'The results of this meta-analysis add to the growing body of evidence supporting the value of MBCT in preventing depression relapse, not just in comparison to usual care but also when compared to other active treatments.’ Also reported in Evening Standard.

King's press release related to 'Mindfulness can control depression as well as drugs, study shows'

MPs: UK air pollution is a 'public health emergency'

Guardian 27th April 2016

A new scrappage scheme has been introduced for diesel vehicles which will allow only the cleanest buses to drive on key polluted roads. This scheme is also being supported by the Environmental Research Group at King’s.

Environment discussion

BBC Radio 4 27th April 2016

Dr Heather Walton, Environmental Research Group, discusses measures which can be taken to reduce air pollution and the risks of air pollution. ‘There are significant health impacts and figures show that 29,000 deaths were as a result of air pollution. Recently there has been research showing that the level of nitrogen dioxide has increased and this may have an impact on the number of deaths caused by air pollution,’ she said.

Why you should be worried about the trade union bill

Huffington Post UK 27th April 2016

The trade union bill proposed by the government has faced harsh criticism. Professor Keith Ewing, Law, describes it as: ‘A living death by a thousand cuts to trade unions, only stopping short of banning them altogether.’

Doctors look after our mental health but who looks after theirs?

Independent 26th April 2016

The article mentions a meta-analysis of 144 studies involving more than 90,000 people conducted by Sarah Clement and Professor Graham Thornicroft of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Their resulting global report showed that although one in four people – both inside and outside the healthcare profession – in Europe and the USA have a mental health problem, as many as 75% of people do not receive treatment.

Award for SlowMo at AXA PPP Health Tech & You Awards

Evening Standard 26th April 2016

The article mentions the AXA Health Tech & You Awards in which Winner of the One To Watch section was the SlowMo app developed by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). SlowMo is a “friend in your pocket” that can help some sufferers of mental illness who often experience paranoid thoughts about others wanting to harm them. SloMo was created by Amy Hardy from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Anna Wojdecka of the Royal College of Art, and mental health service users.

Mozart's Requiem

BBC Radio 4 26th April 2016

Professor Cliff Eisen, Music, explores how Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives. Professor Eisen said: ‘I think that the Requiem is one of the greatest pieces written. Mozart’s command of how to express something is extraordinary; I always find and learn something new when I listen to it.’

EU referendum

Various media outlets 25th April 2016

A number of King’s academics have been commenting in the run up to the European Union (EU) referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies spoke to Bloomberg about the EU in general. On CBC Dr Walter Ladwig III, War Studies, discusses Barack Obama urging Britain to remain in the EU, during a three-day state visit to the UK. King’s student Vageesh Jain has written a piece for Independent on the impact Britain leaving the EU will have on the NHS. Professor David Jones and Professor Michael Rainsborough, War Studies, have written a piece for Telegraph on the political and economic impact leaving the EU will have on Britain.

Barack Obama issues Brexit trade warning

Guardian 25th April 2016

The article highlights the withdrawn invitation issued from a student society to Boris Johnson. This was also reported by Times, Telegraph, Independent, Huffington Post UK, Sky News, Victoria Derbyshire Show, BBC Radio London, Reuters and Daily Mail.

How women can deal with periods in space

The Conversation 25th April 2016

Dr Varsha Jain, CHAPS, has written a piece on the female physiology in space. ‘The fact that women can get periods in space was once used as an argument that women shouldn’t be astronauts. However, we now know that periods don’t impair an astronaut’s ability,’ she said. This was also reported by BBC World and Globo.

Junk food not harmful to heart when eaten with Mediterranean diet, study finds

Telegraph 25th April 2016

New research shows that eating a Mediterranean diet of fresh fish, fruit and vegetables lowers the risk of a heart attack and stroke and that eating a Western diet did not increase the risk. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘The study found no relationship between deep-fried foods, refined carbohydrates and sugar sweetened beverages (characteristic of a Western dietary pattern) and risk; this is of note given the recent furore over sugar but is hardly surprising as older people are not major consumers of pop.’ This was also reported by Guardian.

Depleted local media threatens ability to hold those in power to account

The Conversation 25th April 2016

Dr Martin Moore and Dr Gordon Ramsay, Policy Institute, discuss their study which focuses on the increasing dominance of local news. ‘The findings show how strong publishing monopolies may be emerging in local news, leading to a dearth of plurality in many UK regions,’ they said.

Rise in dangerous 'smog fever' damaging city dwellers' health

Express 25th April 2016

Health experts give their advice on how people can reduce the risk of being affected by ‘smog fever’. The article mentions a study by King’s which showed that 9,500 people died in London due to air pollution.

St George’s, Imperial and Cambridge have the highest graduate prospects

Independent 25th April 2016

King’s has been ranked as one of the universities with the highest graduate prospects when they finish university.

Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved

BBC News 24th April 2016

A new study reveals areas that the immune system attacks which cause type 1 diabetes. This research is being used in a trial at King’s which aims to slow down the progression of type 1 diabetes.

Barack Obama: ‘He has such power … yet such humility’

Guardian 24th April 2016

King’s student, Khadija Najefi comments on introducing Barrack Obama at an event during his visit in London. ‘My dad came with me and was in the audience but I was terrified. I met him and the ambassador backstage. I asked how he was and he did the same,’ she said. This was also reported by Daily Mail, Express and Scottish Daily Mail.

Trying to tame our imaginations

Guardian 24th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why our imagination is very powerful. Dr Glaser comments: ‘Our brains have to construct a virtual machine to think logically, which is easily undermined by our more basic processes to which “elephant” and “not elephant” look roughly the same.’

Why is Shakespeare more popular than ever?

BBC News 23rd April 2016

Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of London Shakespeare Centre, discusses Shakespeare’s plays and why he describes him as an adapter. ‘Romeo and Juliet is a centuries-old story Shakespeare took and rewrote. I'm not saying he was a plagiarist, but he did rely heavily on pre-existing works,’ he said. This was also reported by Sky News.

Students threaten to split from union over anti-Israeli president

Daily Express 23rd April 2016

Students from various universities including Oxford University and King’s have said that they want to cut ties with the National Union of Students after it elected a woman accused of anti-Semitism as president. This was also reported by Daily Mail, London Evening Standard, Telegraph, Times, Guardian and Times Higher Education Supplement.

Impeachment in Brazil

Prospect 22nd April 2016

The lower house of Congress in Brazil has voted to impeach its president, Dilma Rousseff. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, provided comment for USA Today twice: USA Today1; USA Today2 and O Globo. He also wrote opinion pieces for Fortune and Prospect. Dr Sónia Gonçalves, Brazil Institute, spoke on BBC World Service; Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, provided comment for BBC Brazil; and research student, Diogo Costa, Political Economy, wrote a piece for the Telegraph.

Menstruation in spaceflight: Options for astronauts

New York Times 22nd April 2016

A new paper in the journal npj Microgravity explores the options for astronauts who want to prevent menstrual bleeding during their space missions. The paper, written by authors at King’s and Baylor College of Medicine, reviews contraceptive devices available including those already used by military and aviation personnel, and calls for more research into the effect of hormone treatments on bone mineral loss in space. This was reported by The Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, NBC Today, VICE Motherboard, Mail Online and the International Business Times.

Earth Day 2016: Five simple things you can do to help the environment

Independent 22nd April 2016

The article focuses on Earth Day and how we can protect the environment. It also highlights research by King’s which revealed that in 2009, almost 10,000 people died as a result of air pollution.

Oxford University students seek to cut ties with NUS after 'anti-Semitism' row

Telegraph 22nd April 2016

Oxford University students have said that they want to cut ties with the National Union of Students after it elected a woman accused of anti-Semitism as president. Students at King’s are mentioned to be considering disaffiliation. This was also reported by Times and Daily Mail.

Don’t blame young voters for not bothering about the EU referendum

The Conversation 22nd April 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, explores some of the reasons why young people are not interested in the EU referendum. ‘Young people in particular, who have more at stake than anyone else, have the least interest in, and least knowledge about, the EU,’ he said.

IS-inspired terror plotters had police station and army barracks as targets

Daily Mail 22nd April 2016

The article mentions former King’s student, Suhaib Majeed, who was found guilty of offences under the Terrorism Act.

Middle-class IS recruits in moped plot to kill troops are jailed for life

Daily Mail 22nd April 2016

Former King’s Physics student Suhaib Majeed has been sentenced to life in prison for an attempted terrorist attack. This was also reported by The Sun, Express, Telegraph, Times, Independent and Guardian.

Will real-world emissions tests clean up diesel cars?

Guardian 22nd April 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on whether new world emissions tests will help reduce diesel emissions. ‘These standards came in in 2010 [but were enforced by laboratory tests]. Finally when it’s been recognised by governments and the EU, the industry has been given another four and a half years before it really needs to comply. In my mind, that’s too long,’ he said.

Will power

London Evening Standard 22nd April 2016

The article focuses on events happening in London to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. It also mentions the London Shakespeare Centre at King’s holding events and exhibitions.

Mental health goals may not be met, audit office warns

Guardian 21st April 2016

The article discusses research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), showing no association between weekend admission to psychiatric hospital and increased risk of death. Also reported by Press Association.

King's press release related to 'Mental health goals may not be met, audit office warns'

Smartphone app to help Londoners cope with paranoia

Evening Standard 21st April 2016

The article refers to research led by Professor Philippa Garety and Dr Amy Hardy of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which investigated the use of an app called SlowMo which provides a 'digital therapy platform'. It helps people visualise troubles using on-screen thought bubbles and slows their thinking to ease distress. The app offers tips for coping, encourages people to come up with their own reassuring alternatives and keeps a record of what has been helpful during times of stress.

Eat right to save your eyesight

Deccan Herald 21st April 2016

Article that discusses recent research by King’s that looked at the impact of vitamin C on the development of cataracts. The study found that those who had reported consuming more vitamin C in their diet had a 33% lower risk of their cataracts progressing that those who consumed less vitamin C. This was also reported by Huffington Post US.

India responds to a changing West Asia

Hindustan Times 21st April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece on India’s Middle East policy. ‘The certainties of the past with which New Delhi has lived so far are coming to an end and a new uncertain landscape will challenge Indian foreign policy in the coming years. New Delhi will have to move away from the ideological trappings of the past where domestic political imperatives continue to constrain India’s options,’ he said.

Smartphone app to help Londoners cope with paranoia

London Evening Standard 21st April 2016

A new app has been developed to help people who fear that others want to do them harm. A separate study by King’s found that one in three Londoners often experienced such thoughts.

What would Brexit mean for European security?

Telegraph 21st April 2016

PhD student, Alexander Clarke, War Studies, discusses the impact Britain leaving the EU will have on European security. ‘If the UK leaves the EU, Nato will not fall apart, Russia will not magically become stronger and neither would Isil, al-Qaeda or the myriad of other terrorist organisations that seek to threaten our way of life,’ he said

How much water should you drink during a marathon?

Express 21st April 2016

In the run up to the London Marathon, Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, advises that staying well hydrated throughout training is important. ‘If you sweat more than you drink while exercising, you can start to become dehydrated, which can affect performance and can also have negative effects on the body,’ he said.

Sleeping away from home? Half your brain is still awake

New Scientist 21st April 2016

The article highlights research which found that people find it difficult to sleep in unfamiliar surroundings due to the left brain refusing to switch off. King’s researcher Adrian Williams, Allergy, Respiratory, Critical Care, Anaesthetics and Pain Therapies Clinical Academic Group, said: ‘The first night effect contrasts with the experience of my patients with insomnia, who often sleep better away from home since they associate their own bedroom with not sleeping. But the results are convincing and intriguing.’

Ancient Greek

BBC Radio 4 Borders 21st April 2016

Professor Edith Hall, Classics, discusses the qualifications that were required to compete in the Olympic games in ancient Greece. ‘People from everywhere came to Olympia for the games every four years, but when they wanted to compete with each other they had to prove that they had taken a Greek language test before they were allowed to take part,’ she said.

Menstruation in spaceflight: Options for astronauts

King's Press Release 21st April 2016

A new paper in the journal npj Microgravity explores the options for astronauts who want to prevent menstrual bleeding during their space missions. The paper, written by authors at King’s and Baylor College of Medicine, reviews contraceptive devices available including those already used by military and aviation personnel, and calls for more research into the effect of hormone treatments on bone mineral loss in space. This was reported by The Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, NBC Today, VICE Motherboard, Mail Online and the International Business Times.

Britain wants the Queen to continue her long reign over us

Independent 21st April 2016

A poll conducted by King’s and Ipsos MORI shows that support for the monarchy is higher than it was two decades ago. The survey reveals that 75 per cent of people think the monarchy plays an important role in Britain, up from 66 per cent at the beginning of the 21st century. This was reported by Telegraph, Times, Independent, Yahoo news, Newsweek, Sina, Globo, Deccan Chronicle, The New Indian Express, Economic Times of India, Folha de S.Paulo and Estadao.

What is it like to be a child with depression?

BBC Radio 4 Today 20th April 2016

Professor Emily Simonoff from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) was interviewed about autism and depression in childhood. She discussed symptoms of depression that parents should look out for and some of the treatments and therapies available to children (begins at 02:10).

Reacting to a terrorist attack

BBC Radio 4 Today 20th April 2016

Police are aiming to get public limited companies which operate in busy areas such as city centres and sports and entertainment venues to teach their staff how to react in the case of a terror attack. Professor Neil Greenberg from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said that plans to train decisiveness and communication skills in the event of an attack are 'good news.' He said there is good evidence regarding how people respond to attacks - a few people take decisive action, some show high anxiety and the majority are 'befuddled' and 'don't know what to do.' Begins at 02.50.

Climate change: Is the 1.5C target a mirage

Times of India 20th April 2016

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a report in 2018 to evaluate efforts set at a recent summit to cap global warming at 1.5 degrees. Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, commented that two years may not be enough for new data to emerge.

Obama in Saudi Arabia: Chilly reception likely as old allies face new pressures

CNBC 20th April 2016

Barack Obama’s visit to Saudi Arabia comes in the midst of disagreements between the two countries over US policies in the Middle East. Commenting on the relationship, student Manal Faisal, War Studies, said: ‘I think that he [Obama] is coming to salvage a relationship that he has spent most of his time as president neglecting.’

Demystifying the harmony test for Down's syndrome

Huffington Post UK 20th April 2016

New research by academics at King’s has led to the development of a new simple blood test, which screens for Down’s syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities such as Edwards syndrome and Patau syndrome.

NUS to encourage students to ‘wreck’ the TEF with NSS boycott

Times Higher Education 20th April 2016

The National Union of Students (NUS) is encouraging students not to complete the National Student Survey unless the government drops its plans for the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF). The article includes comments from KCSLU Vice President for activities and development. This was also reported by Guardian.

Cameron says Britain owes 'debt of gratitude' to retiring Help For Heroes founders who raised £280 million

Sun 20th April 2016

The article mentions a study by King’s which shows that 83,000 former servicemen and women are still suffering from physical and mental injuries upon their return from war.

90 stunning photographs marking the Queen's 90th birthday

Mirror 20th April 2016

To mark Queen Elizabeth’s 90th birthday the article has selected a variety of photographs, one of which shows the Queen attending an official function at King’s in 2012.

'We are now caught in a classic stand-off over bursaries'

Nursing Times 20th April 2016

The article discusses a debate held at King’s over nursing bursaries, attended by more than 100 students.

Identity and migration

BBC World Service 19th April 2016

Baptist Coelho, Leverhulme Artist-in-Residence, War Studies, spoke on a panel discussing identity, migration, and his current work at King’s. ‘With the projects I’m doing at the moment at the department of War Studies, looking at soldiers and the identities…behind the uniform they wear, there is also a human being,’ he said.

Tribal living cured my self-obsession

Times 19th April 2016

The article mentioned research carried out by King’s that polled more than 1000 12 to 17-year-olds, and found that six out of ten said they were lonely.

Shakespeare’s Will

BBC One The One show 19th April 2016

One Show presenter David Olusoga visited the exhibition: By me, William Shakespeare: A life in writing, hosted at King’s, to discover new clues to Shakespeare’s life. Segment is at 11 mins 25 secs.

Boots revelations are a bitter pill to swallow

Guardian 19th April 2016

Professor Kennedy Cruickshank, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on an investigation which revealed that the retailer Boots is forcing its staff to overuse an NHS scheme intended to help sick people. ‘Less obvious profiteering by Boots is the instruction of their pharmacists on private prescriptions,’ he said.

Impeachment in Brazil

Prospect Magazine 19th April 2016

The lower house of Congress in Brazil has voted to impeach its president, Dilma Rousseff. Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, provided comment for USA Today twice: USA Today1; USA Today2 and O Globo. He also wrote opinion pieces for Fortune and Prospect. Dr Sónia Gonçalves, Brazil Institute, spoke on BBC World Service; Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, provided comment for BBC Brazil; and research student, Diogo Costa, Political Economy, wrote a piece for the Telegraph.

The limits of US engagement

Wall Street Journal 18th April 2016

US Defence Secretary Ashton Carton visited India for a three-day trip, meeting with Indian prime minister Narendra Modi. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, wrote an opinion piece on the visit. ‘The visit to India made great strides in bilateral cooperation but remained underwhelming,’ he said.

Woman fights Russian law on organ removal without consent

Fox news 18th April 2016

Russian law states that doctors are allowed to take organs from deceased patients without informing their families. Commenting on the controversial ruling, Professor Robert Wintermute, Law, said: ‘My sympathies lie more with the governments that are trying to save lives through transplantation of healthy organs that are absolutely of no use to the deceased or their families.’

Anti-pollution groups cover London statues with masks

Deccan Chronicle 18th April 2016

Greenpeace campaigners put pollution face masks on the faces of famous statues in London to draw attention to the problem of air pollution. The article mentions recent research from King’s, which found nearly 10,000 Londoners die prematurely every year as a result of air pollution. Also reported in NDTV and AFP.

A cold-eyed view of allies has left Obama with few overseas friends

Washington Post 18th April 2016

As part of a series of overseas visits, US president Barack Obama visited Saudi Arabia, to be followed by trips to Britain and Germany. Discussing the US-UK relationship, Dr Walter Ladwig III, War Studies, said: ‘When you get under the hood of intelligence networks, for instance, in some respects the British and American operations are inseparable. And that kind of cooperation continues irrespective of whether Barack and Dave are grilling hot dogs together.’ This was also reported by NDTV.

How the World Health Organization's cancer agency confuses consumer

Economic Times of India 18th April 2016

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has come under criticism for its rankings of carcinogenic substances. Professor Richard Sullivan, Cancer Epidemiology & Population Health, said: ‘IARC is purely there to do the science. And the science is absolutely fine. But there is a disjunction between the pure science and the policy and public health messaging.’ This was also reported by Reuters

Practical Focus

Times of India 18th April 2016

Paul Spence, Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities, discussed the topic of digital humanities in higher education. ‘Digital humanities is a transdisciplinary field that looks at how we create and disseminate knowledge in an age where much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology. It provides us with the critical and practical tools to assess and, if appropriate, integrate new innovations into our analytical toolkit.’

Is war with China inevitable?

Telegraph 18th April 2016

War Studies student, Riccardo Cociani, explores the relationship that China has with other countries such as Japan. ‘Since 2010, tensions between China and Japan have risen like dragons to fight against each other. The reason? Territory. The dragons have clashed repeatedly, diplomatically and politically, ever since a Chinese fishing trawler rammed two Japanese coast guard vessels near the disputed islands, known as ‘Diaoyu’ in China, and ‘Senkaku’ in Japan,’ he said.

Will new university admissions procedures boost social mobility?

Guardian 18th April 2016

The article highlights that universities are seeking fairer ways to select students from different socio-economic backgrounds. Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, discusses why GCSE results and AS -levels are important and that it can be a good alternative for students to find out where their strengths and interests lie.

Philosophy: Understanding personal identity with Professor Bill Brewer

Guardian 18th April 2016

On Tuesday 14 June, Professor Bill Brewer, Philosophy, will host an event exploring the topic of personal identity. The seminar will seek to help people gain a fresh perspective of who they are and enable them to have complex philosophical discussions with more confidence.

7 steps to student safety

Independent 18th April 2016

The article discusses how students can stay safe at university. It mentions that King’s advises its students to inform their friends or flatmates when they are going out and where they are going.

Call of duty: The war that made a country

Deccan Chronicle 17th April 2016

Review of India’s War: The Making of Modern South Asia, a new book by Dr Srinath Raghavan, India Institute. Discussing the book, Dr Raghavan said: ‘The most difficult part was to capture the voices and feelings of Indian soldiers. So few letters have survived.’

Slain newsagent 'not real Muslim', claims academic

Sunday Times 17th April 2016

The article mentions comments made by Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), regarding the Islamic sect Ahmadiyya. This was also reported by Express and Daily Mail.

Karen Brady: Why does success spark envy in some when it should inspire us all to better things?

The Sun 17th April 2016

The article mentions a King’s student who had been part of the West Ham Community Programme, and is now studying medicine.

Feminists mock Green Party young women's group for invite to 'non-men'

Independent 17th April 2016

The Green Party has been criticised for use of the term ‘non-men’ on an invitation to an event. PhD researcher, Scarlett Brown, Management, comments: ‘They are emphasising, without even realising it, that we live in a society that defines by not being a man. That's been a big feminist critique for a long time.’

Are we getting too used to seeing thin women?

Guardian 17th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on whether we have become used to seeing underweight women in the media. ‘In the brain, visual detectors often come in pairs, such as clockwise and anticlockwise motion. When one of these receptors is ‘saturated’, our perception can be distorted,’ he said.

Is intelligence hereditary?

Scientific American 15th April 2016

Professor Robert Plomin, IoPPN, discusses the role that genetics plays in intelligence. ‘Researchers are now looking for the genes that contribute to intelligence. In the past few years we have learned that many, perhaps thousands, of genes of small effect are involved,’ he said.

Not one, but thousands of body clocks make us tick. Can we take control of them?

New Scientist 15th April 2016

The article looks at research by Dr Gerda Pot, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, in the field of chrononutrition, and the relationship between our body clock, diet and health. Dr Pot said: ‘Even though it’s individual, I think consuming regular meals is beneficial for everyone.’

Hedge fund boss in £1bn inquiry

Times 15th April 2016

A former King’s alumnus is at the centre of an investigation for an alleged £1 billion tax fraud in Denmark.

Birthday present for the Queen in new poll

Times 15th April 2016

A poll conducted by King’s and Ipsos MORI shows that support for the monarchy is higher than it was two decades ago. The survey reveals that 75 per cent of people think the monarchy plays an important role in Britain, up from 66 per cent at the beginning of the 21st century. This was reported by Telegraph, Times, Independent, Yahoo news, Newsweek, Sina, Globo, Deccan Chronicle, The New Indian Express, Economic Times of India, Folha de S.Paulo and Estadao.

ALS researcher wins Sheila Essey award

CNBC 15th April 2016

The American Academy of Neurology and The ALS Association will be awarding the 2016 Sheila Essey Award to PhD student Ammar Al-Chalabi, IoPPN. The award recognises significant contributions in the search for the causes, prevention and cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This was also reported by Reuters.

The China-Pakistan axis gains momentum and could pull India into a war on two fronts

Daily Mail 15th April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discusses China-Pakistan relations and a new port built in Pakistan, which is part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC). ‘The port will process about one million tonnes of cargo next year, most of which will be incoming construction materials to be used in projects related to CPEC,’ he said.

Human trafficking report: Victims reveal devastating impact of abuse with 80 per cent suffering mental health problems

Independent 14th April 2016

The study, led by Dr Siân Oram of the Institute of Psychiatry (IoPPN), found that of 150 people trafficked to the UK from more than 30 different countries, nearly 80 per cent of women and 40 per cent of men reported high levels of depression, anxiety or PTSD. Dr Oram said: "Because of the clear evidence that human trafficking has devastating and long-lasting effects on mental health, there is an urgent need for evidence on the effectiveness of psychological therapies and treatments to support this highly vulnerable population.” Also reported by Daily Mail and Reuters.

King's press release related to 'Human trafficking report: Victims reveal devastating impact of abuse with 80 per cent suffering mental health problems'

How to stay young

BBC 14th April 2016

The programme follows an experiment conducted by Matthew Kempton of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which explores the effects of two different types of exercise (walking and table tennis) on cognitive functioning and wellbeing in elderly adults.

What exactly is going on in Brazil? Take your choice

Newsweek 14th April 2016

Research student Diogo Costa, Political Economy, has written an article on the current political and economic crisis in Brazil. ‘An unpopular government fighting for survival against impeachment. The worst recession in a century. And the largest corruption scandal in its modern democracy,’ he summarised.

High levels of mental illness reported by victims of human trafficking in the UK

King's Press Release 14th April 2016

New research reveals the severe mental health problems experienced by men and women trafficked to the UK for sexual exploitation, domestic servitude and forced labour, including high levels of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr Siân Oram, lead author of the study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) said: ‘Although it is very difficult to estimate the true scale of human trafficking, we know that it is a huge global problem.’ This was also reported by Independent, Reuters and Daily Mail.

King's press release related to 'High levels of mental illness reported by victims of human trafficking in the UK '

Want to slim? Get stuck into the chocolate and red wine: Key to weight loss is the bugs in YOUR gut rather than counting calories

Daily Mail 14th April 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that the key to losing weight is to eat cheese, chocolate and drink wine in moderation. ‘Avoid processed foods. They are limited in microbe levels because they are mainly made up of chemicals,’ he said. This was reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Telegraph, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio 2 and Express.

The week in higher education

Times Higher Education Supplement 14th April 2016

Looking at issues faced by Higher Education institutions, the article mentions the attempted rebrand of King’s in 2014.

How LSD helped us probe what the ‘sense of self’ looks like in the brain

The Conversation 14th April 2016

Dr Nicholas Crossley, IoPPN, discusses how a person’s sense of self is expressed in the brain. ‘Our sense of self is something so natural that we are not always fully aware of it. In fact, it is when it is disturbed that it becomes the most noticeable,’ he said.

Top 100 universities 2016 – as rated by students

Telegraph 14th April 2016

King’s has been ranked as one of the top 100 universities in the world in a new league table.

Face of the day

Metro 14th April 2016

The article focuses on British actress and King’s alumna Ayisha Hart, who is currently acting in the police drama Line of Duty on BBC Two.

Books interview: Deirdre N. McCloskey

Times Higher Education 14th April 2016

The distinguished American professor, Deirdre N. McCloskey, revealed that a book by PhD student, Anton Howes, Political Economy, is one of her favourite books to read.

Grant winners

Times Higher Education 14th April 2016

Dr Edina Rosta, Chemistry, has received a research grant for her study on energy calculations for biomolecular catalysis of electron transfer.

Pollution ‘has created no-go areas in capital for lung disease sufferers’

London Evening Standard 14th April 2016

Research by King’s argues that Londoners could live at least a month longer if air pollution measures are introduced. The article also interviews a Londoner who receives daily emails on air quality from academics at King’s. This was also reported by LBC Radio and BBC Radio London.

Who are the candidates for next UN secretary-general?

Xinhua 13th April 2016

Article profiling the eight candidates for the position of the next secretary-general of the United Nations. One of the candidates, Natalia Gherman, completed an MA at King’s in the war studies department. This was also reported by People’s Daily.

Get in on the ground at Canada Water

London Evening Standard 13th April 2016

More people are investing in properties in Canada Water. The article mentions that King’s may build a campus in the area.

Songs in the key of Shakespeare

Financial Times 13th April 2016

As part of Shakespeare 400 celebrations, there will be a conference called ‘Shakespeare’s Musical Brain’ at King’s on Saturday 16 April 2016.

Alan Moses launches defence of Ipso in a trenchant and witty lecture

Guardian 13th April 2016

The chairman of the Independent Press Standards Organisation, Sir Alan Moses, spoke at King’s on effective regulation. ‘Effective regulation requires enforceable powers. Enforceable powers require a legally binding contract enforceable in court...an agreement between the regulated and the regulator,’ he said.

London School of Economics graduates are earning more than those from any other UK university

Independent 13th April 2016

According to recent research, graduates from London School of Economics, Imperial College and King’s earn significantly more than other graduates when they go into employment. This was also reported by BBC Online and Sky News. According to recent research, graduates from London School of Economics, Imperial College and King’s earn significantly more than other graduates when they go into employment. This was also reported by BBC Online and Sky News.

'Flaws' on dementia

Sun 12th April 2016

Professor Dag Aarsland of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) highlights two common dementia types that are frequently misdiagnosed, patients with Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's. He calls for more research and a specific strategy to tackle them. Also reported by Yahoo.

How a Japanese pinball maker helped the FBI crack the San Bernardino iPhone

Bloomberg 12th April 2016

The forensics unit of a Japanese pinball company, Cellebrite Mobile Synchronization Ltd, is said to have worked with the FBI to hack an iPhone connected with a terrorist attack in California. Commenting on the company, Dr Richard Overill, Informatics, said: ‘The general opinion is that Cellebrite’s digital forensics products for mobile devices are leading edge state-of-the-art. They have put more effort, experience and expertise into studying the potentially exploitable vulnerabilities in these systems than other companies, and as a result have been able to produce superior products.’

Ways to engage employers amid a corporate crisis

Wall Street Journal 12th April 2016

29.8 per cent of respondents in a recent poll believe that employees may be the most overlooked stakeholder when their organisation is dealing with a crisis. The article mentions a study by King’s, Deloitte UK and Public Health England, which looked at the challenge of how people are able to work when faced with a significant threat during a major crisis.

Want to slim? Get stuck into the chocolate and red wine: Key to weight loss is the bugs in YOUR gut rather than counting calories

Daily Mail 12th April 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that the key to losing weight is to eat cheese, chocolate and drink wine in moderation. ‘Avoid processed foods. They are limited in microbe levels because they are mainly made up of chemicals,’ he said. This was reported by Daily Mail, Independent, Telegraph, BBC Radio London, BBC Radio 2 and Express.

Putting names to your phone numbers

BBC News online 12th April 2016

Dr Nishanth Sastry, Informatics, comments on the privacy issues of a newly developed app called Truecaller, which can tell people who they are receiving a call from if it is an unfamiliar number. ‘If a phone user shares the names and numbers in their contact book with an app, that then relays those details to the world,’ he said.

War crime

BBC Radio 4 Justice Across Borders 12th April 2016

Dr Rachel Kerr, War Studies, discussed the history of the International Criminal Tribunal. ‘It was established by the security council as a measure for the restoration and maintenance of international peace and security,’ she said.

'Flaws' on dementia

The Sun 12th April 2016

Professor Dag Aarsland, IoPPN, highlights two common dementia types that are frequently misdiagnosed: Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's. He calls for more research and a specific strategy to tackle them.

EU referendum

Various media outlets 11th April 2016

A number of King’s academics have been commenting in the run up to the European Union (EU) referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, spoke to BBC Radio 4 The World at One a number of times: about the EU in general; about the EU budget; and about the importance of economic trade. Professor Christoph Meyer, European & International Studies, wrote a piece for the Conversation on media coverage around the vote. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, has written a piece for the Conversation about the Vote Leave campaign. Comments by Dr Ramon Pacheco Pardo, European & International Studies, about the impact of the recent tax avoidance scandal and steel crisis on David Cameron’s reputation ahead of the referendum were reported by AFP, Yahoo News and New Indian Express.

Genetics breakthrough helps to predict whether breast cancer will spread

London Evening Standard 11th April 2016

Researchers at King’s have found that a family history of cancer could be important to assess whether it is likely to develop into an invasive cancer. Dr Elinor Sawyer, Research Oncology, said: ‘We now hope to carry out a larger study assessing more genetic changes.’

Our obsession with Trident is blinding us to the real nuclear danger

Telegraph 11th April 2016

Senior Research Fellow, Ian Stewart, War Studies, has written a piece about the nuclear dangers facing the UK. ‘The risk that terrorists might seek to acquire nuclear materials cannot be discounted. Acquiring materials that could be used in nuclear weapons would be catastrophic,’ he said.

Eastern Ukraine

Al Jazeera 10th April 2016

The Ukrainian Prime Minister announced this week that he will be resigning. Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, said: ‘I think this resignation is symptomatic of many of the problems that Ukraine is facing. I think that part of the problem is that he’s not being able to move ahead with the reforms as fast as people had expected to.’

Why drink driving is so dangerous

Guardian 10th April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on the dangers of drink driving. ‘Alcohol is a depressant which slows down the reactions of cells in the brain. It affects a whole slew of neurochemical pathways, but some of the first neurons to be affected control judgment,’ he said.

Wake up to campus jihadists

Times 10th April 2016

The article discusses extremism at universities and mentions former King’s student, Suhaib Majeed, who was found guilty of offences under the Terrorism Act.

Why cultural institutions should accept oil money

Financial Times 10th April 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece on whether oil companies should fund cultural institutes. ‘In my view, business sponsorship of the arts, culture and academic work is a good thing and I am proud that when I worked for John Browne — when he was both chief executive of BP and a trustee of the museum — I helped in a small way to build the link between the two institutions,’ he said.

Week ahead

Financial Times 10th April 2016

The Financial Times, Centre for European Reform and King’s are hosting a high-profile conference on the refugee crisis and EU referendum. The FT Future of Europe Summit will debate Europe’s choices in the face of challenges.

The rites and wrongs of spring

Guardian 10th April 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group, discusses why spring is the most polluted time of the year in the UK. ‘Traffic in our cities is much the same each week, but in the countryside, spring is very different to autumn. Crops are planted, fields are fertilised, farm animals are let out of their barns and their manure, stored over the winter, is spread on the land,’ he said.

Incompetent bosses wrecking NHS, says trouble-shooter

Times 9th April 2016

Dame Julie Moore, a senior figure in the NHS, has discussed why she believes the NHS to be failing. A comment from Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health) is included in the article. ‘We have an unsustainable healthcare system and just doing more of the same is not going to deliver solutions,’ he said.

It’s in their genes

Deccan Herald 8th April 2016

Researchers at the German Research Centre for Environmental Health have provided evidence that the health effects of a bad diet can carry over to offspring. Commenting on the study, Professor Tim Spector, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, said: ‘Their design means that previous possible confounders like maternal bonding, feeding and the microbiome are ruled out.’

Vaginal seeding: Could this birthing trend protect your baby from disease?

Telegraph 8th April 2016

A new book highlights a new technique in which mothers use swabs to help their babies come into contact with essential bacteria. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments: ‘Babies are born with no microbes. The first seeds that colonise the gut with bacteria are important because they set the scene for those that follow.’

Kevin Patrick Dawes: Missing American photographer released by Syrian authorities 'after three years of torture'

Independent 8th April 2016

American photographer Kevin Dawes who was held hostage in Syria for three years has been released by Syrian authorities. Visiting Research Associate, Eliot Higgins, War Studies, said: ‘I really hope he gets the serious mental health help he needs, especially after two years in an Assad torture site.’

NHS to recruit Indian doctors to plug gaps in GP services

Telegraph 7th April 2016

Health Education England (HEE) has signed a contract with Apollo Hospitals in India to recruit more Indian doctors in the NHS. The article also highlights that in a separate study conducted by King’s, patients showed a high level of dissatisfaction when treated in hospitals with high numbers of foreign nurses and doctors.

Looking beyond the labels

Times Higher Education 7th April 2016

A study published by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education highlights the role ‘prestige’ plays in higher education. Professor Paul Blackmore, Policy Institute, said: ‘What happens when the demand for global players in the world knowledge economy meets the need to support access for white working-class boys and the reduction of drop-out rates for black students?’

Mike Hulme: New Head of Geography

Times Higher Education 7th April 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, has been appointed Head of Geography at King’s.

Despite crackdown, Chinese news outlet looks for more readers abroad

International New York Times 6th April 2016

The Paper, a publication overseen by the Chinese Communist Party, has prospered at a time when China’s leaders are increasingly restricting the media on what it can say about China’s environmental and economic problems. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘There’s this very modern infrastructure, all these apps and very modernised packages that they’re disseminating, and it’s like a beautiful house where the electrical wiring is missing.’

Combat stress report

BBC News 24 6th April 2016

The Victoria Derbyshire programme explores post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in British military veterans, and speaks to Professor Neil Greenberg, former MoD psychiatry specialist and expert in PTSD at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

The shortage of robust research into mental health issues could be addressed by nurses contributing their unique views

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

Professor Dame Til Wykes, IoPPN, encourages more nurses to consider a career in mental health research. ‘It is important that nurses are involved because they have a different view of the kind of research that needs to be carried out,’ she said.

Combat stress report

BBC Victoria Derbyshire Show 6th April 2016

Professor Neil Greenberg, IoPPN, discusses post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in British military veterans.

Focus on research

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

Professor Ruth Harris, Nursing, comments on the importance of funding for researchers. ‘You have to understand that one can only fund so many applications that come in. You have to keep on trying,’ she said.

Warwick business students give London learners a run for their money at SWIFT's Institute Challenge

City AM 6th April 2016

Students from King’s took part in the SWIFT Institute Challenge, a competition open for students who are interested in banking. Winners of the challenge will win £15,000 and will be announced at an event later this month.

Two UK schools of nursing are world-beaters

Nursing Standard 6th April 2016

King’s Nursing has been named by QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016 as the best institution at which to study the subject. Professor Ian Norman, Executive Dean of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, said: ‘This achievement recognises the major contribution of the faculty to the research base of nursing and midwifery, and the high quality of education and career preparation.’ This was also reported by Nursing Times.

A desperate search for the jihadi profile

Financial Times 6th April 2016

A study by the ICSR found that around 70 per cent of people who joined the Islamic State (IS) had real-world connections to Salafis -proponents of an ultra-conservative form of Sunni Islam - and were not radicalised online.

Maths, a Merc and the import-export business

Financial Times 6th April 2016

Professor Michael Singer, Law, has written a piece about his career as a lawyer and now law Professor. ‘Many years ago, before I trained as a lawyer and became a law professor, I was a mathematics professor,’ he said.

Chemist who enhanced understanding of the properties of molecules

Guardian 6th April 2016

The article focuses on the work of Chemist Professor John Murrell whose research focused on methods to understand the wavelengths of molecules. Professor Murrell started his research at King’s.

Muslim women much less likely to be employed than non-Muslim women with same qualifications, research suggests

Independent 6th April 2016

Research by Dr Shereen Hussein, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, suggests that Muslim women are less likely to be employed compared to non-Muslim women even if they have the same qualifications. The study found out that the unemployment rate for Muslim women is between 5.9 per cent and 27 per cent depending on the woman’s ethnic background in contrast to white non-Muslim which is 3.5 per cent.

Why do many of us develop a fear of heights as we age?

Daily Mail 5th April 2016

Kevin Gournay, emeritus professor at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), and author of The Sheldon Short Guide To Phobias And Panic discusses acrophobia - a fear of heights. He notes that it often develops in later life, which is largely due to our sense of balance. 'As you get older, your organ of balance tends to deteriorate and you're likely to feel more physically vulnerable.' Older adults also tend to have people who depend on them, and this can make them more troubled by the possibility of falling.

The jab that could end the misery of migraines: New 'holy grail' drug slashes the number of attacks by up to 75%

Daily Mail 5th April 2016

Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on a new drug to treat migraines. The drug tackles a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which triggers pain and nausea by causing the swelling of blood vessels intertwined with nerve endings on both sides of the head. Researchers have found that monoclonal blood proteins – antibodies specifically engineered to bind to CGRP – were able to ‘mop up’ the chemical, meaning it did not trigger a migraine. Professor Peter Goadsby says: ‘This is a huge development for migraine sufferers. There is no current specific treatment that has been developed for migraine.'

Can electric shocks really make you fitter?

BBC News 5th April 2016

The article investigates whether wearing a padded suit with electrodes can stimulate muscles during exercise. The article highlights that Professor James Timmons, Medical & Molecular Genetics, took part in the BBC show The about truth about exercise, which focused on high intensity interval training (HIIT) and its impact.

Menopause

BBC Radio 4 5th April 2016

Dr Susan Bewley, Women’s Health, discusses menopause in women and why it is a natural process requiring minimum intervention. ‘Why are scientists, mainly male scientists, trying to cure us from being women? I think the menopause is a natural life event just like adolescence,’ she said.

Wellcome Image Awards 2016 winners

Huffington Post UK 5th April 2016

Among the two winning pictures from King’s in the Wellcome Image Awards is one of a human stem cell by Dr Sílvia A Ferreira, Genetics & Molecular Medicine, Cristina Lopo and Dr Eileen Gentleman, Dental Institute.

Night of Errors

BBC Online Shakespeare on tour 5th April 2016

Dr Hannah Crawforth, English, comments on Shakespeare’s acting company which performed plays including the ‘Night of Errors’. ‘Shakespeare and his company were invited to perform their play at the Gray’s Inn Hall on numerous occasions, particularly during the annual Christmas festivities. It was a prestigious gig for Shakespeare and his company and a lucrative thing for them to do,’ she said.

Welsh rugby player Joseph Phelps banned for four years for steroid use

BBC News 5th April 2016

Welsh Rugby player Joseph Phelps has been banned from playing rugby after testing positive for steroids. A report by Professor David Cowan, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, used at the tribunal suggests that ‘the human body does not naturally produce nandrolone in measurable quantities and that nandrolone is a drug administered via deep intra-muscular injection.

Stem cell injections could be used to mend broken bones and bad backs

Sun 5th April 2016

New research suggests that stem cells injections could be used to heal bones, cartilage and muscle. Commenting on the study, Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘Only time and more effort would show whether we could apply a similar strategy in humans.’ This was also reported by Telegraph.

Manifesto causes rift between Brazilian experts

Folha (Brazil) 4th April 2016

A manifesto that suggests Brazilian democracy is threatened by the current political crisis has generated a rift between experts. Commenting on the manifesto, which was presented at the conference of the Brazilian Studies Association, Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, said: ‘It is interesting that the same conflicts that divide Brazil now also divide the community of researchers studying Brazil.’

Tissue-damaging fungal toxin discovered in pioneering study

Bloomberg 4th April 2016

Scientists have discovered a toxin in the fungus Candida albicans, which plays a crucial role during human mucosal infection. The article mentions that the discovery started from a research group at King’s, who were looking at how human oral cells respond to fungal infections.

Is food the cure for food allergy?

CNN 4th April 2016

Recent studies by researchers at King’s looked at how to prevent food allergies in young children. Professor Gideon Lack, Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, said: ‘For decades we have been focusing on avoidance and that didn’t seem to work. Active avoidance of food allergens in baby's diets did not protect them from developing food allergies, and may even have contributed to the large increase we've seen.’

Meningitis

The Sun 4th April 2016

A new study reveals that people who regularly take antibiotics are more likely to suffer from meningitis. Professor David Armstrong, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘A strong association was observed between meningitis and antimicrobial prescribing in the previous year.’ This was also reported by Times.

Doctors and nurses do not need more stress

Guardian 4th April 2016

Professor Jill Maben, Nursing, has contributed to a piece which states that budget cuts in the health sector will not only put patients at risk but also nurses and doctors. ‘Acknowledging that many health professionals have been engaged in political action already, we propose “Action Nursing” which should encourage the wider body of nurses, and their health colleagues, into organised, confident civic and political action on their own working lives and the lives of the people they work with and for,’ she said.

Revealed: From ping pong to taking your dog to work, these are the weirdest and wackiest ways to stay young

Daily Mail 4th April 2016

The BBC show How to stay young suggests that playing ping pong regularly can improve co-ordination, muscle strength and can make your brain grow. In the TV show Dr Matthew Kempton, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), performs brain scans to evaluate the impact playing ping pong has on the brain.

Why did European intelligence agencies fail to stop the Brussels attacks?

New Statesman 4th April 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), has written an article on security in Europe after the Brussels attacks. ‘In the UK, intelligence officers have long grumbled about the incompetence of their Belgian counterparts, complaining about a lack of sophistication to their tradecraft and approach,’ he said.

Security breaches uncovered at European bases storing US nuclear warheads

Express 4th April 2016

Dr Robert Downes, War Studies, discusses security breaches at a number of airbases where nuclear weapons are stored. ‘It is fair to say that if environmental activists could gain access to the area of the site where nuclear weapons were being stored then security was indeed compromised at that time despite protestations from the Belgian military,’ he said. Dr Downes also wrote on this topic for The Conversation.

How we see words

Guardian 3rd April 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, discusses how we read signs. ‘When we read, the eyes don’t focus on individual letters in turn - this would take far too long. Instead we learn to recognise the general shape of words, or familiar phrases, allowing us to speed through texts and understand church signs at a glance,’ he said.

Ericsson's Hans Vestberg: The clean-cut Swede with a need for mobile speed

Telegraph 3rd April 2016

CEO of Sony Ericsson, Hans Vestberg, argues that in the next 10 years we are more likely to have chips in our body which will connect to our homes and mobile phone. The article also mentions the possibility of Ericsson working in partnership with King’s to develop a surgical glove for keyhole operations.

British Museum must sever its links with BP

Guardian 3rd April 2016

Dr Kate McMillan, Culture, Media and Creative Industries, along with various academics and celebrities, has written a letter to the British Museum asking that it does not renew its sponsorship contract with BP.

Book review: From Aryabhata to Vivekananda

Indian Express 2nd April 2016

The article reviews a recent book written by Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute: Incarnations: India in 50 Lives. The reviewer said: ‘Khilnani, rather admirably, is able to do justice to his subjects in comparatively short but crisp essays.’

Russia vs the West: The information war over Palmyra

Al Jazeera 2nd April 2016

Media coverage of the Syrian conflict differs between the West and Russia. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘Russian media does tend to get better access from the Assad regime to some of the frontline, and that allows them to show sides of the conflict that others aren’t able to.’

Universities 'fail to ban radicals': 27 lectures featuring guests with extremist views take place in London in just five months

Daily Mail 2nd April 2016

The article reports that universities are failing to combat extremism on campus. It mentioned a recent speaker at King’s. This was also reported by Express.

Researchers build software that can predict your lifespan

CNN 1st April 2016

Researchers from the University of East Anglia have started creating a piece of software that will be able to predict a person’s lifespan. Commenting on the vast amounts of information required for the project, known as Big Data, Dr Richard Siow, Cardiovascular, said: ‘Big Data is great…to try and get an overall trend. But to apply Big Data to an individual is unrealistic…you may get overgeneralisations.’

Where the vocabulary of autism is failing

The Atlantic 1st April 2016

Often, labels used to describe children with autism: low-functioning or high-functioning, can be misleading. Professor Tony Charman, IoPPN, said: ‘Parents often ask around the time of diagnosis, ‘where on the spectrum is my child; is he at the high or low end?’

Europe’s growing challenge

Deccan Herald 1st April 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, has written a piece about the growing challenge of terrorism in Europe. ‘The carnage and the chaos have exposed Belgium as the hub of Islamist extremism in Europe, and have raised troubling questions over the competence of the country’s police and intelligence services,’ he said.

Discovery, settlement or invasion? The power of language in historical narratives

The Conversation 1st April 2016

Dr Peter Kilroy, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, has written a piece in reaction to the backlash against guidelines written by University of New South Wales on appropriate terminology. ‘Language matters, and emphasising a change of terminology – or, more importantly, emphasising that there is more than one position and term – demonstrates how much language is implicated in structures of power,’ he said.

Kinba the robot lands job on reception at King's College

Independent 1st April 2016

Kinba, a new robot receptionist for the Strand Campus was unveiled last week. Dr Matthew Howard, Informatics, who is leading the project with Dr Hongbin Liu, also Informatics, said: ‘This gives us a unique platform where a robot can interact with ordinary people. We can find out what things make them comfortable and uncomfortable and – with a human receptionist sitting by – will they always choose the human over the robot?’ Also reported by Gulf Today.

Thames cruise ships will push pollution levels over EU limits, say campaigners

Newsweek 31st March 2016

Campaigners have warned that cruise ships planned for the River Thames will make air pollution in London so high it will exceed the EU’s legal limits on deadly emissions. Research from King’s is mentioned, which stated that approximately 10,000 deaths a year are attributed to air pollution in London.

Here’s what led to the Lahore terrorist bombing — and what to do next

Washington Post 31st March 2016

Dr Adnan Naseemullah, India Institute, discusses the recent terror bombings in Lahore, Pakistan. ‘Sunday’s attack reveals the sectarian, religious and, above all, class fractures that led members of one of Pakistan’s most marginal groups to be targeted so viciously and effectively,’ he said.

Modern humanities teaching: Brought on by the chicken or the egg?

Times Higher Education 31st March 2016

Dr Lucy Munro, English, discusses changes to degree courses, and if these shifts are a reflection of motivations in our society. ‘We do still teach the big canonical texts, but alongside that we’ve become interested in how they relate to alternative voices,’ she said.

A disarming approach

Economist 31st March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, discusses three requirements in the process of deradicalisation, or prevention of radicalisation. ‘He must already have inner doubts; trusted people, whether imams, friends or relatives, must be involved; and he must be offered an alternative peer group. He may also be more concerned with personal problems or geopolitical grievances than matters of theology,’ he said.

Imagine if Google or Facebook took a line on the EU referendum

The Conversation 31st March 2016

Dr Martin Moore, Policy Institute, has written a piece on the impact Google, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter would have if they had a stance on the EU referendum. ‘But tech giants are not neutral, nor are they simply conduits. My new study suggests they are increasingly taking on civic roles, raising questions about their societal responsibilities – responsibilities beyond those to their customers or shareholders,’ he said.

Engineers are telling the truth about Hinkley Point

Financial Times 30th March 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece about the nuclear project Hinkley Point. ‘Hinkley has never had the support of a majority of the EDF board. The difference now is that the doubts are out in public and can hardly be dismissed as coming from anti-nuclear campaigners or people hostile to all things French,’ he said.’

Is Belgium’s nuclear security up to scratch?

The Conversation 30th March 2016

Robert Downes, War Studies, and Daniel Salisbury, War Studies, have written a piece on whether Belgium’s counter-terrorism efforts are good enough. ‘The US repeatedly has voiced concerns about Belgium’s nuclear security arrangements since 2003. That year, Nizar Trabelsi, a Tunisian national and former professional footballer, planned to bomb the Belgian Kleine-Brogel airbase under the aegis of Al-Qaeda,’ they said.

East Africa’s used-clothes trade comes under fire

The Economist 30th March 2016

By 2019, governments of the East African Community want to outlaw imports of second-hand clothes. The hope is that this will help boost local manufacturing. Dr Andrew Brooks, Geography, argues that it would not be implausible for better jobs to be created in a new textile industry.

Anonymous call for Xi to quit rattles party leaders in China

New York Times 29th March 2016

An anonymous letter calling on President Xi Jinping to resign appeared briefly on Chinese news and social media websites, before being removed by censors. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, said: ‘The response has shown how jittery they are.’ Also reported in Economic Times of India

Universities vie for the metric that cannot be measured: Prestige

Guardian 29th March 2016

The article focuses on how universities set about building prestige and mentions a research report about higher education, that will be published on Tuesday 5 April after a seminar at King’s.

1594 Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors turns into ‘A Night of Errors’

BBC London 29th March 2016

Dr Hannah Crawforth, English, discusses the importance of the Inner Temple Hall as a 'club' and then about the tradition of seeing plays at Christmas, particularly Shakespeare.

Terror networks crisscrossing Europe shock officials

Foreign Policy 28th March 2016

Security services in Europe continue in their efforts to expose the complex web of Islamic State networks. Research by Professor Thomas Rid and Daniel Moore, War Studies, is mentioned, which looked at possible links between the terrorist network and the ‘dark web’.

Controversial religious comments

NPR 28th March 2016

Dr Marat Shterin, Theology & Religious Studies, comments on the controversial comments made by Viktor Krasnov who claims that the Bible is a ‘collection of Jewish fairy tales’. This case is very random and does not happen very often in Russia but this didn’t come out of anywhere. It is as a result of the cold relationship between the leader of the Russian orthodox church and the state,’ he said.

Scientists should not take sides in political debates

Financial Times 28th March 2016

Professor Robert Picciotto, Political Economy, has written a piece on why scientists should not get involved in political debates. ‘In order to remain rigorous and objective the scientific endeavor should be shielded from politics. Nor are value-free scientists best placed to interpret evidence for use by policymakers,’ he said.

Defence groups take aim at cyber security

Financial Times 28th March 2016

The article focuses on growing cyber-attacks on corporate companies including BAE Systems. Professor Thomas Rid, War Studies, said: ‘They have a proven record in being able to handle confidential information. The trust advantage they get is higher than other companies.’

Could pills for heartburn give you kidney problems?

Daily Mail 28th March 2016

New research suggests that taking heartburn pills can have negative health effects. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘These microbes have a much more important role in human health than previously thought.’

Archbishop warns of campus anti-Semites

Sunday Times 27th March 2016

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has voiced his concern on the increase of anti-Semitism on British campuses. The article mentions incidents at King’s, Oxford, and Cambridge University.

Diesel fumes poison babies in the womb

Sunday Times 27th March 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, comments on research which claims that diesel fumes damage the brains of inner-city children. ‘The ever-accumulating evidence that so many components of air pollution contribute to a diverse set of diseases confirms the urgent need to manage air quality,’ he said.

EU-India summit to give ‘political impetus’ to stalled FTA talks

Hindustan Times 27th March 2016

A key deliverable of the 13th EU-India summit is the resumption of stalled talks on Bilateral Trade and Investment Agreement (BTIA). Commenting on the talks, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘There are too many outstanding issues to allow for a full deal to be struck. Whilst the EU is in favour of a comprehensive agreement, New Delhi prefers signing even an imperfect accord and amending it as relations progress.’

A new king of weather: Tracking protest movements

The Economist 26th March 2016

Academics in the ICSR are carrying out research to find out if British IS followers who left for Syria use social media differently from those who stayed at home. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, discussed the project, which recorded, analyses and categorises social media conversations by followers of Islamic State. ‘If we can find patterns, we can perhaps predict when somebody is about to go,’ he said.

Disgrace: Fury as work-shy MPs skip debate about veterans' care to slope off on holiday

Express 26th March 2016

MPs have been criticised for missing a crucial debate about long-term care for wounded veterans. The article mentions a study by King’s which showed that that there are 83,000 veterans still suffering from physical or mental injuries in the last 25 years.

A new kind of weather

The Economist 26th March 2016

The article focuses on social media posts by active followers of the Islamic State (IS). Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘It took months to classify each of the 50,000-odd messages and posts under headings such as “yearning for the afterlife”, “religiosity” and “desire to migrate”. If we can find patterns, we can perhaps predict when somebody is about to go.’

Why is it so hard to quit smoking?

Guardian 26th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article about why people find it difficult to stop smoking. ‘Over time, smokers adapt to the presence of nicotine and develop a tolerance, leading to cravings,’ he said.

What do Islamist extremists believe? Salafi-Jihadism by Shiraz Maher and Crusade and Jihad by Malcolm Lambert – review

Guardian 26th March 2016

The article reviews a book written by Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR: Salafi – Jihadism: The History of an Idea. The reviewer describes the book as ‘fascinating.’

The Bard, fact or fiction: That is the question

Times 26th March 2016

The article highlights a number of events happening to mark 400 since Shakespeare’s death, and mentions ‘Shakespeare and the Law’ moot competition organised by the Dickson Poon School of Law and the English department.

Prairie style: Queens of the wild frontier

Telegraph 26th March 2016

Dr Janet Floyd, English, discussed the meaning behind the term pioneer woman. ‘The pioneer woman is a real cultural icon in America. All kinds of feminist arguments have focused on her. She doesn’t just sit around doing bloody embroidery all day. She gets out there and has a physical life,’ she said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 25th March 2016

Dr Martin Navias, War Studies, discussed terrorists gaining access to nuclear facilities. ‘Terrorists for years have made efforts to acquire radiological items. What they want to do with this is to set up a radiological dispersal,’ he said.

Fuelling terror: How extremists are made

Scientific American 25th March 2016

The psychology of group dynamic could explain what drives people towards radicalisation. Commenting on the actions by terror group ISIS, Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, said: ‘ISIS actively seeks to incite Western countries to react in ways that make it harder for Muslims to feel that they belong in those communities.’

Zapping the brain with magnets may ease anorexia

Daily Mail 24th March 2016

Core symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including the urge to restrict food intake and feeling fat, are reduced after just one session of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, according to King’s College London research published today in PLOS ONE. Dr Jessica McClelland said: 'We found that one session of rTMS reduced the urge to restrict food intake, levels of feeling full and levels of feeling fat, as well as encouraging more prudent decision-making. Taken together, these findings suggest that brain stimulation may reduce symptoms of anorexia by improving cognitive control over compulsive features of the disorder.’ Also reported by the Conversation, Independent, Yahoo News, Deccan Chronicle and U.S. News & World Report.

King's press release related to 'Zapping the brain with magnets may ease anorexia'

Increased vitamin C in the diet could help protect against cataracts

King's Press Release 24th March 2016

In a study led by King’s, higher dietary intake of vitamin C has been found to have a potentially preventative effect on cataract progression, in the first twin study of cataracts to examine to what degree genetic and environmental factors influence their progression with age. This was reported by Metro, Telegraph, Express, Sun and CNBC.

King's press release related to 'Increased vitamin C in the diet could help protect against cataracts'

King’s College London: Reaching out to the cultural sector

Times Higher Education 24th March 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), spoke to the Times Higher Education magazine about her role at King’s, and the Cultural Institute. Discussing institutions King’s has worked with, she said: ‘They are more 21st Century, more fleet of foot and, perhaps, project based.’

Distance learning bridges gap

Independent 24th March 2016

The delivery of postgraduate degrees has been significantly impacted by digital technology, online content and distance learning. A recent partnership between King’s and Pearson Online Learning is mentioned, where a range of online Masters degrees have been launched intended to provide more flexible study options.

Two students guilty of London shooting plot

Guardian 24th March 2016

A former King’s student has been convicted of planning a terror attack in London. This was also reported in the Metro, Evening Standard, BBC News, Yahoo UK, ITV, Press Association, Times, Sun, Mirror, Independent, Daily Mail, Newsweek and Xinhua.

Aurora Leigh

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time 24th March 2016

Professor Karen O’Brien, English and Vice Principal (Education), discusses Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s epic ‘Aurora Leigh’, published in 1856. The poem was celebrated by other poets and was Browning's most commercially successful. Professor O’Brien said: ‘Aurora Leigh is an extraordinary compendium of cultural and textual references. It draws on a huge range of ancient biblical and modern literature.'

Geography in the World

Times Higher Education 24th March 2016

Professor Nick Clifford, Geography, has written a piece on the importance of geography in society and higher education. ‘The ultimate fate of geography over the next decade may rest on it having the confidence and the means to take ownership of some of the big issues of the day,’ he said.

Bank refunding

Sky News 24th March 2016

The decision by banks to refund cyber-crime victims has recently come under debate. Commenting on the topic, Professor Mischa Dohler, Informatics, said: ‘The police are fighting a crime which has become a worldwide issue…The question is: Who has it the easiest to track these criminals?’

Radovan Karadzic

Sky News 24th March 2016

Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, War Studies, discussed the news that former Bosnia Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has been sentenced to 40 years in jail. ‘I think this is very significant as it will not only help the victims but will also serve as a process of cleansing,’ she said.

Antioxidants that your body needs - and the 'myth' of supplements

Globo 24th March 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, is mentioned in an article discussing the value of antioxidants. The article questions the effect that antioxidants can have on prevent disease, and also the ‘myth’ of supplements.

New Zealand flag

BBC World Service 24th March 2016

New Zealand has voted to keep its original flag, with results showing 56.6% of voters wanted to keep the Union flag-centred emblem. Professor Carl Bridge, Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, said: ‘I think the New Zealanders and the Australians have had unique identities for a long time.’

Cannabis smokers end up in worse jobs and have less money than average, study finds

Mirror 23rd March 2016

Professor Avshalom Capsi of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on a report that links cannabis use to economic and social problems in middle age. He notes from his own research: "These findings did not arise because cannabis users were prosecuted and had a criminal record. Even among cannabis users who were never convicted for a cannabis offence, we found that persistent and regular cannabis use was linked to economic and social problems."

Brussels attacks

BBC Newsnight + others 23rd March 2016

Following tragic events in Brussels this week, various academics from departments across King's have commented for a wide range of global media. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) appeared on BBC 2 Newsnight, CNN, National Public Radio and BBC Radio 4 Today. Dr Shiraz Maher, also ICSR, has commented widely for BBC Radio 4 , Hindustan Times, New Statesman and Daily Mail among others. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commented on security issues relating to the attacks for Daily Mail, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sky News and ITV. Professor Andrew MacLeod, Policy Institute, wrote a piece for Independent; Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, was also mentioned in Independent.

The future of Europe after the Brussels attacks

Al Jazeera 23rd March 2016

Dr Emmanuel Karagiannis, Defence Studies, discussed the future of Europe following terror attacks in Brussels. ‘It may be too early to draw conclusions about how the Brussels attacks were organised by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), but it is more than obvious that they were highly coordinated,’ he said.

Cannabis smokers end up in worse jobs and have less money than average, study finds

Mirror 23rd March 2016

Professor Avshalom Capsi, IoPPN, comments on a report that links cannabis use to economic and social problems in middle age. He notes from his own research: ‘These findings did not arise because cannabis users were prosecuted and had a criminal record. Even among cannabis users who were never convicted for a cannabis offence, we found that persistent and regular cannabis use was linked to economic and social problems.’

Palmyra and the logic of loss

BBC News 23rd March 2016

Dr David R Roberts, Defence Studies, has written a piece on the destruction of historical sites as a result of conflict in the Middle East. ‘Sites can act as potent symbols of a united past that may cross ethnic, tribal, linguistic, or cultural lines. In essence, their importance can be seen and used as a low common denominator to promote reconciliation in a post-conflict environment,’ he said.

‘Londoners would live a month longer with cleaner air’

Evening Standard 23rd March 2016

A study by King’s and the think tank Policy Exchange has called for more to be done in the way of air ‘pollution-busting measures’. These include ‘Clean Bus Corridors’ for Oxford Street, Brixton Road and Knightsbridge.

A quandary for Europe: Fighting a war on ISIS within its borders

New York Times 23rd March 2016

Commenting on the rise of radicalisation in Europe, Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, said: ‘There are parts of Europe, especially in France and Belgium, where over the past two decades you’ve seen the emergence of essentially ungoverned spaces, nearly akin to Yemen or Libya.’

Brussels attacks

Various media outlets 22nd March 2016

Following tragic events in Brussels this week, various academics from departments across King's have commented for a wide range of global media. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) appeared on BBC 2 Newsnight, CNN, National Public Radio and BBC Radio 4 Today. Dr Shiraz Maher, also ICSR, has commented widely for BBC Radio 4 , Hindustan Times, New Statesman and Daily Mail among others. Professor John Gearson, War Studies, commented on security issues relating to the attacks for Daily Mail, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sky News and ITV. Professor Andrew MacLeod, Policy Institute, wrote a piece for Independent; Dr Hugo Rosemont, War Studies, was also mentioned in Independent.

UK universities top for maths and English in world rankings by subject

Guardian 22nd March 2016

King’s has come fourth in dentistry, pharmacy and pharmacology in a recent international league table for Mathematics and English.

Andrew Adonis on the evolution of Blairism Independent

Independent 22nd March 2016

Lord Adonis gave a talk to students at King’s about his political career with the Labour Party. Discussing the talk, Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, said: ‘It was a fascinating dissection of radicalism versus caution and a fitting way to bring the course to an end.’

Why giving up bread is half baked: Many shun bread in the belief it makes you fat and bloated. But experts insist it's a health food that’s wrongly demonised

Daily Mail 22nd March 2016

Research has found whilst sales of white bread have fallen, sales of artisan loaves such as sourdough have increased. The article mentions research by King’s which found that slow-fermented bread produced ‘significantly lower cumulative gas.’

Brussels attack

CNN 22nd March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, commented following the terror attacks in Brussels. ‘I don’t think that the Belgium authorities are incompetent…I think for a number of years they have been overwhelmed.’

Report highlights loneliness and lack of social integration amongst young people

King's Press Release 21st March 2016

A new report into social intelligence by King’s and National Citizen Service (NCS) identifies a gap in young people’s ability to interact with people from different backgrounds. Dr Jennifer Lau, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘It is surprising to see that online interaction is positively linked to a young person’s social intelligence levels.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail, Guardian, Scottish Daily Mail, Independent, LBC Radio, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sunday Times and the Sun.

Too good to be forgotten - why institutional memory matters

BBC News 21st March 2016

Dr Jon Davis, Policy Institute, and a team at King’s have started working with the government to conduct a unique study of the Treasury under Alistair Darling. This was also reported by BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 5 Live.

Could eating nuts and vegetable oil help slow progress of type 2 diabetes?

Express 21st March 2016

A new study by King’s shows that replacing saturated fat with the polyunsaturated fat may slow the progression of diabetes, in those with pre-diabetes. Dr Nicola Guess, Nutrition, said: ‘The findings suggest that increasing dietary intake of polyunsaturated fats may have a beneficial effect for patients with a certain type of pre-diabetes.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Scots seek to join university tables

Times 21st March 2016

King’s, along with other London universities including University College London, has received a low student satisfaction rate in a recent analysis by The Times/ Sunday Times.

Isis claims dozens of Iraqi troops killed by British suicide bomber

Guardian 21st March 2016

Research by King’s shows that over 50 British people have died fighting for militant groups in Iraq and Syria in the past three years. Dr Shiraz Maher, ICSR, commented that the total number of British fighters killed so far is 62. This was also reported by Times and Daily Mail.

Wanted: More universities to sponsor free schools in England

Guardian 21st March 2016

The government wants to open 500 new schools by 2020, and has urged universities to help build the new institutions. The article mentions successful specialist schools such as the King’s Mathematics school.

Lonely teenagers 'too scared to answer the door'

Sunday Times 20th March 2016

A report led by Jennifer Lau at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) indicates that teenager loneliness means that they are not developing the social skills needed for the workplace. She says: 'Loneliness in teenagers is an issue because they are starting out towards independence. It affects how much you interact with and it is associated with anxiety and depression.... There can be lifelong repercussions. Social skills are crucial in the workplace.' Also reported by Independent, Guardian, Mirror and Yahoo.

King's press release related to 'Lonely teenagers 'too scared to answer the door''

New private universities risk a ‘catastrophe’

Guardian 20th March 2016

Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, comments on government plans to expand opportunities for private providers to become universities. ‘Sweeping general legislation might make it easier to set up a really small, innovative, educationally wonderful institution, but it’s much more likely to mean we end up with the American-style catastrophe,’ she said.

The benefits of distraction

Guardian 20th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why distractions can be beneficial. ‘Research shows that being distracted can improve creativity, memory and, paradoxically, focus. This is because when you concentrate, your brain ignores all irrelevant stimuli to narrow its attention,’ he said.

India’s genuine concerns

Deccan Herald 19th March 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, discussed the recent sale of eight fighter jets to Pakistan by the USA. ‘India’s reaction was strong. It disagreed with the US stand that this sale would help in the fight against terrorism and instead has argued that it would be used against India,’ he said. This was also reported in Telegraph of India.

Towards the decisive fight

Estadao 19th March 2016

Brazilian Supreme Court Justice Rosa Weber upheld a decision barring former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva from taking a ministry post. Commenting on the current political situation, Professor Anthony Pereira, Brazil Institute, said: ‘It’s a showdown.’

Terrorist captured

BBC Radio 5 Up All Night, 19th March 2016

Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, comments on the arrest of Salah Abdul Salam by Belgian authorities. ‘His brother died in the attacks and one of his school friends was the mastermind of the attacks,’ he said.

People with autism die 16 years earlier than expected, study finds

Telegraph 18th March 2016

Professor Patrick Bolton, who is head of Autism and Related Disorders (ARD) at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that links autism with early death. One cause of this is that 40% of those with autism have epilepsy. He notes the reasons for this could be that people with autism are predisposed to getting it or it may be a side effect of their medication, but says more research is needed to understand why.

Molecule found that helps the spinal cord heal

Independent 18th March 2016

Professor Elizabeth Bradbury of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has co-led research with Oxford University uncovering a molecule that could potentially restore movement and sensation to people paralysed with spinal injuries. Professor Bradbury said: 'Existing treatments are largely ineffective, so there is a pressing need for new regenerative therapies to repair tissue damage and restore function after spinal cord injury. These new findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which may orchestrate the body's remarkable capacity for natural repair. By enhancing this spontaneous response, we may be able to significantly improve spinal cord function after injury.' Also reported in Sun, Metro and Yahoo.

King's press release related to 'Molecule found that helps the spinal cord heal'

American IS fighter: I made a bad decision

Deccan Chronicle 18th March 2016

The article mentions a report by the ICSR which showed that there are 3,300 western Europeans and Americans fighting with the Islamic State. This was also reported by India Today and ABC News

The Club

BBC World TV Impact Asia 18th March 2016

A new film will be released about four ex-priests who are trying to purge their sins. Dr Christopher Hamilton, Theology & Religious Studies, commented on the film. ‘I think one of the things that is so interesting about the film, is that the expressed intent is to try to understand but without imposing any type of moral judgement.’

Excitement grows as Large Hadron Collider hints at new particle

Guardian 18th March 2016

Professor John Ellis, Physics, comments on brief flashes of light found in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ‘I would love for it to persist, but I’ve seen so many effects come and go that I have to say in my heart of hearts I’m not very optimistic,’ he said. This was also reported by Globo and BBC Mundo.

Dina Asher-Smith can take Britain to new heights, says Asha Philip

Telegraph 18th March 2016

Athletic sprinter Asha Phillip, has praised the success of King’s undergraduate History student and athlete Dina Asher-Smith. Asha Philip said that Dina’s success in athletics will inspire and motivate other female sprinters to do well.

Student law societies are much more than fancy balls and networking

Guardian 18th March 2016

King’s Law society has won the award for ‘best society for non-law students’ at the 2016 LawCareers.Net student law society awards.

How social workers and carers can make foster placements more stable

Guardian 17th March 2016

The article refers to a systematic review of research on foster care instability carried out by Daniel Michelson of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). The evidence showed a good long-term relationship with a social worker is vital for managing the transition to, and placement in, a new family.

In sweet-toothed Britain, sugary soda levy may have limited impact

Fox news 17th March 2016

British Chancellor George Osborne announced an increased tax on sugary drinks in his recent budget, however experts are sceptical about its likely real-life effect. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Whether it will have any impact on sugar intake is uncertain.’ Also reported by Reuters.

Refugees suffer a higher rate of psychotic disorders

Scientific American 16th March 2016

Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on research that links refuges to psychotic disorders. He emphasises that although trauma has been shown to increase the risk of psychosis, so have discrimination and racism. “Is it because these refugees are coming from somewhere where they’ve seen their families butchered and suffered some kind of trauma?” he asks. “Or is it because as refugees they had to wander across half of Africa for a couple years before they ever got to Europe? Or is it because that when they got to Europe and eventually Sweden, they lived in fear of being kicked out of the country?”

Visual Snow

BBC Radio 4 15th March 2016

Interview begins at 21.19. Headache expert and Psychiatrist, Professor Peter Goadsby of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses the phenomenon of visual snow. Patients describe a constant visual disturbance of moving dots resembling an old, un-tuned analogue television. It is a condition experiences globally across all ages, but the eye and brain are normal. Being accustomed to migraine aura, Professor Goadsby has seen over 1000 patients experiencing this vision issue, and is seeking to determine a common biological pathway that can account for the condition.

Researchers operate on human body with soft robot for first time

Xinhua 15th March 2016

A team from King’s operated for the first time on a human cadaver using a soft surgical robot. Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Informatics, lead researcher of the project, said: ‘We look forward to taking soft robotics beyond surgical robotics into other areas such as repairing underwater pipelines or search and rescue operations.’

Peering into war’s foggy future

Huffington Post 15th March 2016

CNN and Defense One co-hosted a conference looking at the future of war. Speaking at the conference, Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman, War Studies, said: ‘The best guide to future wars is past wars.’

Turkey launches airstrikes at Kurds after deadly blast

The Hindu 15th March 2016

The Kurdish militant group TAK has taken responsibility for an attack in Ankara, Turkey, which killed 37 people. Bill Park, Defence Studies, said: ‘Bombings in Turkey now look like a campaign and we have to assume that there will be more.’

Anorexia and depression

LBC 14th March 2016

A PhD Student from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) speaks about the causes and differing experiences of eating disorders.

Xi makes party faithful toe line as China nears key juncture

Bloomberg 14th March 2016

China’s annual legislative meetings have placed even more emphasis on conformity. Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, explained: ‘The leadership is beset by challenges. The greatest asset their predecessors had was good growth. This is now no longer the case. So the tactical tightening is as much a sign of nerves as strength.’ Professor Brown was also quoted in China Daily.

Immorality and inequality

Folha (Brazil) 13th March 2016

Dr Octavio Luiz Motta Ferraz, Law, discusses the ethics of inequality. ‘What level of inequality would be right…and what makes inequality an evil are questions that do not achieve the same degree of consensus,’ he said.

India and the US must collaborate on South China Sea

Hindustan Times 13th March 2016

Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, looks at the evolving position of India in the South China Sea dispute. ‘Last month, it was reported that the US and India held talks about conducting joint naval patrols that could include the disputed South China Sea. The US and India were quick to dismiss the report,’ he said.

Cannabis and psychosis

BBC Radio 4 12th March 2016

Interview begins at 5.45. Professor Sir Robin Murray of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses research into the link between cannabis use and Psychotic illness. He explains the effects of the cannabis substance THC on normal volunteers, who develop a transient psychosis and paranoia. He discusses whether it can help to treat schizophrenia, and if it's less dangerous than alcohol and smoking.

A new momentum sets in

Telegraph of India 12th March 2016

Following a visit to India by Nepalese prime minister K.P. Sharma Oli, Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, says that the trip highlights the importance Kathmandu attaches to restoring normalcy in its ties with India. ‘Indo-Nepal ties had been strained in the wake of the agitation by communities who were opposing Nepal's Constitution for failing to address their concerns over representation and homeland,’ he said.

Jewish students subjected to increasing anti-Semitic incidents at universities

Huffington Post UK 11th March 2016

The article focuses on anti-Semitic attacks on Jewish students at universities such as Oxford University. The article mentions that on a King’s society Facebook page, a post complained of British politicians being on a ‘Jewish payroll’.

Gum disease in elderly linked to dementia

Times 11th March 2016

A new study jointly led by King’s College London and the University of Southampton has found a link between gum disease and greater rates of cognitive decline in people with early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease. First author Dr Mark Ide, Dental Institute, said: ‘If someone with early Alzheimer’s has an infection, there are elevations in certain circulating molecules indicating inflammation, and that is followed by an acceleration in that person’s cognitive decline.’ This was reported by Times, Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Sun, Independent and BBC News.

Trace of Paris attackers to be found in IS data leak

Telegraph of India 11th March 2016

Debate has arisen over the authenticity of leaked documents from the terror group Islamic State. Professor Peter Neumann, ICSR, is mentioned to have believed the authenticity of the documents.

ISIS is the real winner in Libya

Newsweek 11th March 2016

Dr Amir Kamel, Defence Studies, argues in this opinion piece that recent comments made by Barack Obama on failures in Libya show a broader misunderstanding of the region. ‘If not enough credence is given to the complexity of Libyan society…then it may ultimately continue to be a hindrance rather than assistance to any form of peace in the country,’ he said.

Banned research on deadly disease MERS, bird flu, and SARS could be making a comeback

IBT 11th March 2016

Academics will debate how to proceed with research into deadly diseases, such as anthrax, bird flu, smallpox, MERS and SARS, where investigation with live pathogens of the diseases has been banned after a series of accidents. Dr Filippa Lentzos, Social Science, Health & Medicine, said: ‘Following this meeting, a final set of recommendations will be drawn up for the US government on how to proceed.’ Dr Lentzos also spoke on the subject for BBC World Service Science Hour, BBC Mundo and BBC News.

Death of Mikhail Lesin

BBC World Service 11th March 2016

The announcement that a former advisor to Vladimir Putin, Mikhail Lesin, was bludgeoned to death in his hotel room in Washington, has been followed by a number of hypotheses and conspiracy theories. Describing the former advisor, Dr Sam Greene, Russia Institute, said: ‘He was…an extremely important media magnate…He was very important in helping Putin take control over state television.’

EU debate

BBC 2, Newsnight 10th March 2016

Dr Khuloud Al- Jamal, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, discusses the advantages and disadvantages that leaving the EU will have on science. ‘Being in the EU enriches medicine because we no longer have borders, we can send and receive students around the continent,’ she said.

Daily catch-up: What do you want to be when you graduate? A suicide bomber

Independent 10th March 2016

In his daily article, Visiting Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, discusses what attracts people to violent jihadism, and the role of education and career frustration.

Terrorism threat

Sky News 10th March 2016

Dr Shiraz Maher, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, commented on the leak of documents identifying members of terror group Islamic State. ‘One of the most important things coming out of this is that some of the information doesn’t hold much value, such as blood type. However the significant information on the document is the people who gave them references or vouched them in,’ he said.

Children on happy pills up 50%

Daily Mail 10th March 2016

According to research the number of children prescribed to antidepressants in the UK has risen by more than 50 per cent. The research was led by scientists at King’s and University College London.

Number of kidney stone cases increases by 115% in 10 years

Guardian 10th March 2016

Figures show that the number of emergency hospital admissions for kidney stones have risen by 115 per cent in 10 years. Emeritus Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments: ‘The increased prevalence of obesity ¬probably explains why kidney stones and chronic kidney disease are increasing.’ This was also reported by Express, Huffington Post UK, NPR and Independent.

Stanford president skeptical on global university partnerships

Times Higher Education 10th March 2016

The President of Stanford University, John Hennessy, discussed challenges universities face in creating effective global alliances with other institutions. The article mentions King’s recent partnership with Arizona State University and University of New South Wales.

Reality Check: Did the UK lose its sovereignty in 1972?

BBC News 10th March 2016

Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, discusses British sovereignty within the context of the Brexit debate. ‘What is not on offer is selective compliance with EU law, i.e. a situation where Parliament picks and chooses which provisions of EU law to follow and which not to follow on a case-by-case basis. This is not on offer under any international agreement,’ he said.

UK leads European university rankings – Top 100 list

Telegraph 10th March 2016

King’s ranks eighth in new European university rankings by the Times Higher Education and nearly a quarter of universities in the UK are also on the list. This was also reported by Times higher Education, Telegraph, Independent, London Evening Standard, BBC 1 and Huffington Post UK.

Fats

BBC World Health Check 10th March 2016

Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional sciences, has outlined the ‘classical’ understanding of saturated fats, suggesting we should eat only small amounts. ‘If you swap from a high saturated fat to a low saturated fat diet…you would lower your blood cholesterol levels by up to 10%,’ he said.

Welfare dependency can be bred out

Guardian 9th March 2016

The article comments on the controversy surrounding a cancelled lecture on the book 'The Welfare Trait' by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). It critiques his data and the argument that there are problematic links between the state, personality and employment. Also reported by Independent.

Sexual harassment

LBC Radio 9th March 2016

In the aftermath of sexual attacks in Germany on New Year’s Eve, Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, discusses what could be done to prevent sexual harassment. ‘There should be some preventive education among young male refugees who are coming from countries where it may be uncommon for women to leave their home at night without a male relative’, he said

Look south-east for a new urban centre

London Evening Standard 9th March 2016

The article focuses on new building plans being made in Canada Water and reports that King’s may be building student flats and teaching facilities in the area.

Medicine story

BBC Radio4, Thinking Allowed 9th March 2016

Dr Nicola Mackintosh, Women’s Health, discusses how hospitals deal with acutely ill patients. ‘There is a system of regular monitoring of patients and that is determined on how stable they are and this is what I was interested in when I was doing my research,’ she said.

'Ban' on most hazardous virus experiments could be lifted this week

Guardian 9th March 2016

A ban on experiments that make viruses more dangerous than natural strains could be lifted if experts in the US reach an agreement. Dr Filippa Lentzos, Social Science, Health and Medicine, said: ‘There will definitely be cases where the risks outweigh the benefits, and there are some experiments which simply should not be done. An example would be making Ebola airborne. There needs to be recognition that certain experiments should not be done.’ This was also reported by BBC Radio 4.

EU referendum: Palace complains over Queen 'Brexit' story

BBC News 9th March 2016

Buckingham Palace has complained to the press watchdog over the Sun newspaper's article claiming the Queen backed ‘Brexit’ from the European Union. Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Contemporary British History, told the Press Association it was "absurd" that the Queen would break from her tradition of political impartiality after decades as monarch. Dr Andrew Blick, Contemporary British History, was also interviewed on BBC News about the newspaper article.

Welfare dependency can be bred out

Guardian 9th March 2016

The article comments on the controversy surrounding a cancelled lecture on the book 'The Welfare Trait' by Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN. It critiques his data and the argument that there are problematic links between the state, personality and employment.

Roy Greenslade: Baffled by Brexit? Here’s where to get facts ahead of the EU referendum London

London Evening Standard 9th March 2016

Looking at where the public can get impartial information about ‘Brexit’, the article references ‘UK in a Changing Europe’, a group based at King’s and led by Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies. The article said: ‘The group boasts an impressive list of “explainers” who provide unbiased insights and analysis about UK-EU relations.’ This was also reported in the Guardian.

New mothers in Britain are being 'pushed out of hospital too early': Only 7 countries in the world - including Uganda and Zambia - have shorter stays

Daily Mail 9th March 2016

Research suggests that mothers in the UK are sent home from hospital quicker after giving birth compared to other countries. Professor Debra Bick, Nursing & Midwifery, comments: ‘Traditionally Britain was able to discharge new mothers more quickly than its continental counterparts because it ensured they had frequent visits from midwives.’

'Stunning' operation regenerates eye's lens

BBC News 9th March 2016

A procedure to regenerate the eye has successfully treated children with cataracts. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women's Health, said: ‘The study is one of the finest achievements in the field of regenerative medicine until now.’ His comments were reported by BBC News, Mirror, Telegraph, Guardian, Daily Mail, The Sun, Independent and Globo

Boldly going where few have gone before: Meet space gynaecologist Dr Varsha Jain

Huffington Post 9th March 2016

The work of Dr Varsha Jain, Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences (CHAPS), has been profiled in this article. Commenting on her career and work, Dr Jain said: ‘Within a month of starting ob/gyn training, I found out about a Master's degree in space physiology and health at King's College London. Undertaking that MSc was one of the best decisions I have ever made. My thesis project saw me return to NASA Johnson Space Center to investigate the health systems on board the international space station.’

Psychosis statistics

Radio 5 Live 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 17.45. The programme looks at research carried out by academics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) which found that 1/4 of psychosis cases were linked to cannabis. It discusses whether regulating the cannabis market would have a positive effect.

King's press release related to 'Psychosis statistics'

Alcohol discussion

BBC Radio 4 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 12.53. Dr Sally Marlow of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the effects of drugs on the brain and how to communicate with the public about drug-taking.

Psychosis statistics

BBC 5 Live 8th March 2016

Interview begins at 17.45. The programme looks at research carried out by academics at the IoPPN, which found that 1/4 of psychosis cases were linked to cannabis. It discusses whether regulating the cannabis market would have a positive effect.

Alcohol discussion

BBC Radio 4 8th March 2016

Dr Sally Marlow, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), discusses the effects of drugs on the brain and how to communicate with the public about drug-taking.

Brazil looks almost ungovernable – but it’s more robust than it seems

The Conversation 8th March 2016

Professor Anthony Pereira, Director, Brazil Institute, has written a piece about the current political state of Brazil. 'Rousseff is now dealing with five major problems: Brazil’s worst economic recession in over a century; a congressional push to impeach her; a review of her campaign finances by the Federal Electoral Court (which could see the annulment of her electoral victory); the Car Wash investigation, and the spread of the Zika virus,’ he said.

International Women's Day - universities' pay gaps highlighted

Times Higher Education 8th March 2016

King’s and other institutions such as University of Leicester have been criticised by the University and College Union for having one the largest gender pay gaps in higher education.

History in the making for Dina Asher-Smith

BBC News 8th March 2016

The article focuses on History student, Dina Asher-Smith who is training to compete in this year’s Rio Olympics whilst balancing her degree at King’s. ‘At times it is about balancing both my career and education simply because they’re both so demanding and I really want to do well in both,’ she said.

Public Health campaign

BBC Radio 4, You and Yours 8th March 2016

Honorary Professor Alan Maryon Davis, Primary Care & Public Health Sciences, comments on public health campaigns to help people stop smoking and drink less. ‘The whole point of a campaign is about getting the right tone, not being nagging. The campaigns we found nowadays are all about getting people to think about their lives,’ he said.

International Women’s Day 2016: The pioneering feminists you might not have heard of

Independent 8th March 2016

Dr Red Chidgey, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discusses on International Women’s Day some feminists who the public may not be familiar with. ‘Helen Brook was a pioneer in the field of sexual health advice for young people – something that is evident by the Brook sexual health charity centres, founded by Brook, which still exist today,’ she said, of one of the women discussed in the article.

Can you really trust a robot surgeon? With worrying malfunctions and scant evidence that they're better for patients

Daily Mail 8th March 2016

The number of robots in UK hospitals has increased since 2000. Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Informatics, who has been part of the team developing a robot at King’s for surgical operations said: ‘We have taken inspiration from the octopus, which has very flexible arms that can be squeezed into tight spaces.'

Indian soldiers in World War One

Telegraph of India 8th March 2016

The 1.5 million Indians who fought for Allied forces in World War One were the subject of a talk in Kolkata. Speaking at the session, Dr Santanu Das, English, said: ‘In accordance with a British theory of martial races, soldiers were chosen from Punjab and the Northwest Frontier provinces where people were depoliticised and the poorest. Bengalis were deemed effeminate and unfit to fight, which possibly also had to do with the fact that they were so politicised.’

Feminism

BBC World Service 8th March 2016

Dr Christina Scharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries (CMCI), discussed her previous research investigating perceptions of the term ‘feminism’, and how attitudes have changed since. ‘Since the 70s the media’s relationship with feminism has always changed. Currently we definitely see a moment where some parts are being endorsed.’

Medical marvels among the winning

Times 7th March 2016

Among the two winning pictures from King’s in the Wellcome Image Awards is a human stem cell by Sílvia A Ferreira, Cristina Lopo and Eileen Gentleman, which is a representation of the back of a human eye in 3-D. This was also reported by Financial Times and BBC News.

U.N. panel: North Korea used Chinese bank to evade nuclear sanctions

Foreign Policy 7th March 2016

Researcher Nick Gillard, War Studies, argues that China is growing serious about needing to ‘rein in’ North Korea with regards to its nuclear proliferation efforts. ‘I think there is certainly political will at the central level. The open question is whether Beijing can compel its banks and rural ports to vigorously enforce the sanctions,’ he said.

The mystery of when to stop antidepressants

Wall Street Journal 7th March 2016

A study conducted by researchers at the IoPPN scanned the brains of patients who had been in remission from major depressive disorders for 14 months, looking at different regions of the brain responsible for certain behaviours. Lead author, Dr Roland Zahn, IoPPN, said: ‘The right superior anterior temporal cortex is believed to be involved in representing social meaning and may be at the root of depressed people’s tendency to overgeneralize the interpretation of [their] behaviour.’

Diesel pollution warning

BBC Radio 4 6th March 2016

Dr Benjamin Barratt, ERG, explains the new devices which can measure how much diesel pollution a person is exposed to. ‘A pump takes in air from the side of the tube through a white filter, a laser then measures the rate at which carbon particles in the air turn the filter black,’ he said.

May we have fresh air to breathe – please

Guardian 6th March 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, Environmental Research Group (ERG), has written a piece on air pollution and the effect it has on a city and its people. ‘Having allowed for smoking and other factors, people lived shorter lives in the most polluted cities, showing, for the first time, that the particle pollution that we experience every day affects our health,’ he said.

Does our social behaviour hold us back?

Guardian 6th March 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece on why our responses to situations are often influenced by the actions of others. ‘In fact, humans are so attuned to social behaviour that we are the species with the largest whites around our irises, so that we can see where others are looking,’ he said.

Hassan al-Turabi, Sudan's Islamist idealogue, dies at 84

Telegraph 5th March 2016

King’s alumni Hassan al-Turabi has died at the age of 84 in Sudan. He completed his Masters degree at King’s.

Leading social scientists honoured

Times Higher Education 5th March 2016

Professor Richard Laughlin, School of Management & Business, has been recognised by the Academy of Social Sciences for his work on accounting and behaviour responses to societal controls.

After two black holes collide, a puzzling flash

Wired 5th March 2016

After two black holes collided, a burst of gamma rays – a high-energy form of light – was logged 500 kilometres above the surface of the earth. Professor John Ellis, Physics, said: ‘To produce a gamma-ray burst you need some conventional matter like an accretion disk around the merging object.’ Also in the Daily Mail.

Psychosis plus pot could mean more hospital time

Fox News 4th March 2016

Marijuana users who were diagnosed with a psychotic illness for the first time were 50 percent more likely to be admitted to the hospital and also had longer hospital stays compared with people who suffered a first episode of psychosis and did not use weed, according to research by Dr Rashmi Patel of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). "For this reason, people with an established psychotic disorder should avoid cannabis use," he said.

King's press release related to 'Psychosis plus pot could mean more hospital time'

Film directors taken for a ride

Times 4th March 2016

Dame Margaret Hodge, the first woman to chair the public accounts committee, spoke at King’s about her five years in charge of parliament’s spending watchdog.

King's College London to sell Strand building

Telegraph 4th March 2016

The article focuses on King’s selling the Macadam Building on Surrey Street. According to the article the building has already received interest from developers wanting to turn it into a hotel, flats, offices or a cultural centre.

How much diesel pollution am I breathing in?

BBC News 4th March 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, discusses how much air pollution people are exposed to. ‘For all sources of air pollution the value which we believe is associated with early mortality is the equivalent of 29,000 deaths per year in the UK. And diesel tends to produce more pollutants than, say, petrol would. So it is quite a sizeable public health challenge,’ he said.

EU Referendum

Various media outlets 4th March 2016

King’s academics have commented on a variety of topics relating to the recently announced EU referendum. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, was quoted by the Guardian, Daily Telegraph, AFP, Economic Times of India, NDTV, The Hindu and Xinhua. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke on BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC World News. Comments from Dr Eliza Filby, History, were reported in the Sun. Academics have also commented on the legal disagreement between Cabinet Minister Michael Gove and Prime Minister David Cameron. Professor Alexander Türk, Law, was reported in the Independent, and Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, spoke to BBC News.

'Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World’, by Leif Wenar

Financial Times 4th March 2016

The article focuses on a book authored by Professor Leif Wenar, Law, called ‘Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World’ which focuses on the global trade in natural resources.

Eating peanut early reduces risk of allergy even with later abstinence

King's Press Release 4th March 2016

The early introduction of peanut to the diets of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy significantly reduces the risk of peanut allergy until 6 years of age, even if they stop eating peanut around the age of five, according to a new study led by King’s. Professor Gideon Lack, Head of Department of Paediatric Allergy and lead author, said: ‘The longer term effects of stopping eating peanut following introduction early in life are not known, and further studies are needed.’ This was also reported by Reuters, Associated Press, Agence France-Presse, BBC News, Guardian, Independent, Telegraph, Times, New York Times, TIME, CBS, Washington Post, Daily Express, Daily Mail, Hindustan Times, NPR, US News, Fox News, ABC News, Yahoo UK, Huffington Post and Sina.

King's press release related to 'Eating peanut early reduces risk of allergy even with later abstinence'

Let's think the unthinkable on the welfare trap

Times 3rd March 2016

The article comments on the cancellation of an LSE lecture by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) where he was to talk about his book 'The Welfare Trait'. This proposed that unemployed people, through a mixture of genetics and upbringing, tend to be more antisocial than the general population, which in turn affects their children. As result the welfare state has become a production line for personality traits that reduce the motivation to work. In the face of a 'savage' response to this, the columnist argues that Dr Perkins' aim is for the welfare system to support the unemployed without reducing incentives to work and to increase the chances of a satisfying life. 'Perkins is at least daring to think the unthinkable, pointing out that good intentions don't necessarily lead to good outcomes... his critics should challenge his arguments rather than seek to silence him'.

Access all areas: the push to show outreach efforts pay off

Times Higher Education 3rd March 2016

Anne-Marie Cunning, Director of Widening Participation, discusses widening participation at King’s and at other institutions. ‘Widening participation practitioners were in the past seen as people who ran summer schools; now we are seen as a core part of the policy environment and we know that means being evidence-led,’ she said.

Couples choose to keep it all in the family

Financial Times 3rd March 2016

Professor Sabine Rau, School of Management & Business, comments on why family members choose to set-up businesses together. ‘We are going back to the way we used to live and spend time together. Corporate jobs don’t allow as much flexibility to juggle life and work.’

Dina Asher-Smith: 'I work hard balancing uni, training five times a week, going through so much pain...' Britain's fastest ever woman on her remarkable rise to the top of athletics

Daily Mail 3rd March 2016

King’s History student, Dina Asher-Smith, talks about balancing her studies and her athletics career. Dina said: ‘I work hard balancing uni, training five times a week, going through so much pain and I want to be able to go out there and perform to the best of my ability and finish in the place I deserve.’

Identical but not the same: the usefulness of twins

Independent 3rd March 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, discusses some of the research done so far about identical twins. ‘Twins are a ‘unique natural experiment’, which allow scientists to study nature versus nurture. There's no other way of getting this information, identical twins can have the same DNA and the same genes but in one twin a gene might be switched off.’

Let's think the unthinkable on the welfare trap

Times 3rd March 2016

The article comments on the cancellation of an LSE lecture by Dr Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) where he was to talk about his book 'The Welfare Trait'.

China, gateway to the world for future leaders

Times Higher Education 3rd March 2016

The article mentions President & Principal Professor Edward Byrne setting up international partnerships at the University of New South Wales and Arizona State University.

The dilemmas of the diplomats tasked with saving the European Union

Guardian 3rd March 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, comments on the role European diplomats and other politicians will play in the European referendum. ‘Brussels, senior figures in all the institutions have been told not to denigrate Cameron’s deal, or suggest it is not binding in law. There was a bit of that after the summit, but it has now stopped,’ he said. This was also reported by The Economist.

The Great Land Rush: China’s Pengxin hits overseas hurdles

Financial Times 3rd March 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Director, Lau China Institute, discusses Pengxin, a little-known Shanghai real estate developer who want to gain control of the lands of the S Kidman & Co cattle empire. Professor Brown said: ‘China is a real problem for Australia and New Zealand — the perfect partner on the surface with huge markets, huge growth potential and very clear needs from these countries.’

Spice history

BBC Radio4, In Our Time 3rd March 2016

Dr Anne Goldgar, History, discusses the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie who dominated the spice trade between Asia and Europe for two hundred years. ‘In the 16th century the Portuguese were dominant in the spice trade, they started in the late 15th century by discovering a route around Africa.’

Experimental vaccine raises hopes of a cure for cancer

Times 2nd March 2016

British cancer patients have received the world’s first dose of experimental vaccine which could cure the disease. The vaccine was developed by a team of scientists from King’s and the Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust.

Refugee crisis

LBC Radio 2nd March 2016

Research fellow Thomas Withington, Defence Studies, discusses Vladimir Putin's stance on the refugee crisis. ‘The issue with migration presently as it affects Europe really chimes with Putin’s strategy quite closely as it benefits his administration. It is a benefit to Putin because the more migrants arrive the more fears are stoked amongst portions of the population.’

Changing how economics is taught

BBC News 2nd March 2016

The article focuses on how Economics is taught at universities and mentions King’s as one of the universities which teaches the course.

Anti-inflammatory drugs can fix some signs of depression in mice

New Scientist 2nd March 2016

The article discusses the link between depression and inflammation. Professor Carmine Pariante of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) thinks inflammation could be responsible for the lack of new neurons. Pariante and his colleagues have just started a trial using both standard antidepressants and anti-inflammatory drugs to treat people with depression and raised levels of inflammation. He cautions against people taking both types of drug together at this stage. In the meantime, there are other ways to reduce inflammation, such as eating healthily and exercise.

The judges' decision: shortlist for the Guardian University Awards

Guardian 1st March 2016

King’s has been shortlisted in the Student diversity and widening participation category for the Guardian University Awards. The Awards will take place on Wednesday 16 March.

Classical music

BBC Radio4, Black, White and Beethoven 1st March 2016

Dr Christina Sharff, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, discusses the relationship between race and classical music in Britain. ‘Classical music is a modern day thing and the world is changing as our country is more diverse. I think that we should be actively seeking to engage all the people in our society to enjoy and appreciate classical music,’ she said.

Reading

BBC Radio4, A Good Read 1st March 2016

Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), discusses some of the favourite books she likes to read such as ‘Mr Pye’ by Mervyn Peake. ‘I think this is one of his not so well-known books but I read this book in my early 20s and I thought that it was brilliantly funny,’ she said.

NATO commander: Isis ‘spreading like cancer’ among refugees

Guardian 1st March 2016

According to NATO’s top commander refugees from the Middle East and North Africa are masking the movement of terrorists and criminals. Counter-terror experts argue that most terror suspects and perpetrators have been homegrown radicals and sympathisers. Professor Reinoud Leenders, War Studies, said: ‘There is a huge reservoir of sympathizers who all have western or European passports and who were born or raised there.’

Daily catch-up: Ministry of Defence mandarin on liberal interventionism

Independent 1st March 2016

The article focuses on the course ‘Blair Years’ at the Policy Institute and the guest speaker Sir Kevin Tebbit, former Permanent Under Secretary at the Ministry of Defence and Visiting Professor at King’s.

Cyber criminals from across the world target UK victims

Telegraph 1st March 2016

According to cyber security researchers cyber criminals are targeting UK victims' financial and personal information. The article also mentions a different research by King’s which found that 47 per cent of hidden Tor sites facilitate criminal activity.

The Myth of the Neurotic Creative

Atlantic 29th March 2016

The article comments on a paper produced by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), which suggested that there is a link between neuroticism and creativity.

All in the genes

Guardian 29th March 2016

Professor Kevin Whelan, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on nutrigenetics services offering dietary advice tailored to an individual’s DNA. Professor Whelan explains: ‘Some people who don’t produce lactase can consume milk because their gut bacteria will ferment lactose.’

Young Jews reject top universities over antisemitism

Times 29th March 2016

According to reports more Jewish students are concerned about the growing antisemitism on campus. The article mentions the protest at the joint event hosted by King’s and LSE Israel societies. This was also reported by Telegraph and BBC News 24.

Shakespeare's grave scanned in 400th anniversary

BBC News 29th March 2016

To mark 400 years since Shakespeare’s death, his grave will be scanned and excavated. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of London Shakespeare Centre, said: ‘There are also excavations this year in London, which would reveal more about Elizabethan theatre.’

EU debate

BBC Radio 5 29th March 2016

Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, comments on the government’s decision to not allow civil servants to help ministers who want Britain to leave the EU. ‘This arrangement may seem peculiar to the outsider but it arises from an unusual position that normally all cabinet and ministers are required to unite behind all government policy,’ he said.

Nursing recruitment crisis

BBC Radio 5, 5 Live Breakfast 29th March 2016

Professor Anne Marie Rafferty, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery, discusses the current recruitment crisis in Nursing across the UK. ‘We haven’t been training and educating sufficient numbers of nurses to secure the supply and demand,’ she said.

'Britain is peddling a broken exam system'

Telegraph 29th March 2016

First year Politics student, Jack Elsom, has written an article about the British education system and how students are examined. ‘What are exams actually for? Are they simply an instrument to transpose a student’s intellectual capability into a meaningful value?’ he asked.

Which way will you be voting on Europe?

Observer 28th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article on whether Britain will vote to leave the EU. ‘Will you vote to remain in the EU on 23 June, or could you be convinced by Boris Johnson and his posse that Britain should leave,’ he said.

Geeks, gurus, saints and cut-throat tycoons

Times 27th February 2016

The article focuses on a book written by Dr Sunil Khilnani, Director of India Institute, called ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on the top leading figures in Indian history. This was also reported by Telegraph, Times Higher Education, and Outlook India, amongst others.

Referendum contagion that threatens to paralyse Europe

Telegraph 27th February 2016

The article focuses on the EU Referendum and other European countries such as Finland and Greece who want to have more say in their terms of EU membership. Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘It’s a function of the EU getting more intimately involved in areas of national life that are considered hugely salient and important, such as budgets, the composition of your society through migration.’

Bit of a dimwit? You can't blame your genes

Daily Mail 26th February 2016

The article suggests that it has been established that character and mentality is not caused by genes, but due to nurture. It quotes Professor Robert Plomin of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN): 'I’ve been looking for these genes for 15 years and I don’t have any.’ It also suggests that the 2013 IoPPN study of the genes of twins found: ‘No genetic influence for childhood behaviour problems from DNA analysis’.

‘History’s People’, by Margaret MacMillan

Financial Times 26th February 2016

Dr Eliza Filby, History, reviews Margaret MacMillan’s book ‘In History’s People: Personalities and the Past’. Dr Filby said: ‘The book collects her five Massey Lectures broadcast last year (the Canadian equivalent of the BBC’s Reith Lectures), in which she arranges history’s characters into some more recognisably modern types: persuaders, darers and observers.’

Sperm grown in lab could allow infertile men to have children

Daily Telegraph 26th February 2016

Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said that a new study that has created sperm in the lab for the first time is a ‘great step forward’, as the study could lead to new infertility treatments. This comment was also picked up by the Sun.

Anger as Christian lawyer paraded on Chinese state TV for 'confession'

Guardian 26th February 2016

Supporters of a prominent Christian lawyer, who was taken into secret detention after opposing a Communist party cross-removal campaign, are demanding his release after he became the latest Chinese human rights defender to be shown on television for an alleged ‘confession’. In a recent online essay, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said China’s Communist party leaders were deliberately parading distraught prisoners on television so as to spread fear among potential opponents.

Sperm grown in lab could allow infertile men to have children

Daily Telegraph 26th February 2016

Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said that a new study that has created sperm in the lab for the first time is a ‘great step forward’, as the study could lead to new infertility treatments. This comment was also picked up by the Sun.

Anger as Christian lawyer paraded on Chinese state TV for 'confession'

Guardian 26th February 2016

Supporters of a prominent Christian lawyer, who was taken into secret detention after opposing a Communist party cross-removal campaign, are demanding his release after he became the latest Chinese human rights defender to be shown on television for an alleged ‘confession’. In a recent online essay, Dr Eva Pils, Law, said China’s Communist party leaders were deliberately parading distraught prisoners on television so as to spread fear among potential opponents.

Bit of a dimwit? You can't blame your genes

Daily Mail 26th February 2016

The article suggests that character and mentality is not caused by genes, but due to nurture. It quotes Professor Robert Plomin, IoPPN, who said he had been researching these genes for 15 years, but ‘had not yet found one.’ It also mentions a 2013 IoPPN study looking at the genes of twins, which found ‘no genetic influence for childhood behaviour problems from DNA analysis.’

Mary Magdalene

BBC Radio4, In Our Time 25th February 2016

Professor Joan Taylor, Theology & Religious Studies, discusses the religious and historic aspect of Mary Magdalene. ‘We first meet Mary Magdalene in the Gospel of Mark which is the first Gospel to be written. At the end of the gospel of Mark there is a reference to a group of women who are looking at Jesus’s crucifixion from a far and she is mentioned first.’

EU debate

BBC Radio4, BBC Inside Science, 25th February 2016

Professor Sir Robert Lechler, Vice-Principal (Health), discusses the impact that Britain leaving the EU will have on Science. ‘The UK does very well on the research funding allocation, we’ve focused on the structural funds and in terms of the research funding we put in 11 per cent of the budget and get back 16 per cent.’

Processed meat

BBC 1, Food: Truth or Scare 25th February 2016

According to the World Health Organisation 50g of processed meat a day could increase cancer risk. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, comments: ‘We have to distinguish between red meat and processed meat. So red meat is fresh meat and processed meat is of similar origin but has been preserved.’

Air pollution: How strong is the link to cancer?

Independent 25th February 2016

Discussions about the role that air pollution plays in causing cancer have increased over the last few years. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘As other health hazards like smoking come under control, urban air pollution becomes more of a problem.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBc Radio 4 24th February 2016

Interview begins at 15:35. Dominic Ffytche of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Organic industry funded studies claim healthier milk and meat – independent scientists say no evidence

Huffington Post 24th February 2016

Academics have criticised media coverage of recent research that claims organic milk and meat are healthier food choices. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘In my opinion, the press release contains headline-grabbing speculative health claims that stretch credibility to the limit.’

Will a ceasefire in Syria hold?

Al Jazeera 24th February 2016

The United States and Russia have agreed to a ‘cessation of hostilities’ in Syria. Commenting on the ceasefire, Dr Jean-Marc Rickli, Defence Studies, said: ‘There are lots of loopholes in this agreement…you have a problem of definition – who are the parties on the ground that are willing to comply?’

Sedition arrests in India inflame old free-speech tensions

International New York Times 24th February 2016

The BJP party in India has criticised protestors at Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi, who traditionally are politically ‘left’, giving rise to a broader debate over freedom of speech in the country. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘It was hard for leftist opponents of the BJP to aggressively defend freedom of speech because past governments, including those led by the Congress party, had undermined it before to further their own agendas.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBC Radio 4 24th February 2016

Dr Dominic Ffytche, IoPPN, discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Air pollution: How strong is the link to cancer?

Independent 24th February 2016

Discussions about the role that air pollution plays in causing cancer have increased over the last few years. Professor David Phillips, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, said: ‘As other health hazards like smoking come under control, urban air pollution becomes more of a problem.’

Defence Intelligence and imagining the 'unlikely but disastrous'

Independent 24th February 2016

The new Chief of Defence Intelligence, Air Marshal Phil Osborn, spoke at the ninth meeting of the Strand Group, the public seminar series of the Policy Institute at King’s. He discussed 'the mysteries of personality-based grand strategic decision-making.’

Charles Bonnet Syndrome - hallucinations

BBC Radio 4 24th February 2016

Dr Dominic Ffytche, IoPPN, discusses Charles Bonnet Syndrome, a condition in which the brain adapts to a moderate loss of vision by filling in gaps and excitability, resulting in visual hallucinations.

Defence Intelligence and imagining the 'unlikely but disastrous'

Independent 24th February 2016

The new Chief of Defence Intelligence, Air Marshal Phil Osborn, spoke at the ninth meeting of the Strand Group, the public seminar series of the Policy Institute at King’s. He discussed 'the mysteries of personality-based grand strategic decision-making.’

Britain's 'first black and white twins' born from same egg

Daily Telegraph 24th February 2016

A pair of twin sisters born in the UK are thought to be the first ever genetically identical twins born with different skin tones, eyes and hair colour. Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, said: ‘Multiple genes control skin colour and while identical twins are very likely to share them completely, it is not definite.’ Also reported by FOX and Globo

Disease linked to smoking causes 25 Brits a day to have legs amputated

Mirror 24th February 2016

According to figures, 25 British people have their legs amputated every day due to diseases linked to smoking. Researchers from King’s and St Thomas’ Hospital are developing new scanning techniques to predict whether limbs affected by peripheral arterial disease could be saved through surgery. This was also reported by Express.

Weather Eye

Times 23rd February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution in the UK and the number of deaths causes by pollution. The article mentions a study by King’s that shows that up to 9 per cent of winter pollution is caused by the smoke from wood-burning stoves.

Super slim 'Bloom' inhaler will fit inside your wallet

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

A new compact inhaler that has been designed to fit inside a wallet could help people with asthma. Professor Chris Corrigan, Respiratory Medicine & Allergy, comments: 'It would be necessary to be certain that the device reproduced the dosage and delivery of the original medication precisely, not only in terms of the total amount of the drug delivered but also the particle size distribution.’

Syria conflict: Truce, cessation or ceasefire?

BBC News 23rd February 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, has written an article about the conflict in Syria, and the recent announcement by the US and Russia of a ceasefire. ‘The cessation of hostilities faces the task of pulling apart combatants that have been at each other's throats in years of bitter war,’ he said.

Why skipping breakfast may be GOOD for you! 'Grazing' to avoid spikes in blood sugar which lead to over-eating is a myth

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that not eating breakfast does not have a negative impact on health. ‘Part of the same dogma is that we should eat smaller amounts of food at regular intervals - 'grazing' - to avoid spikes in blood sugar and the subsequent lows, which lead to over-eating and weight gain. But these are nutritional myths unsubstantiated by any good trials. The fact is: skipping breakfast is perfectly fine,’ he said.

Why walking by a main road is as bad for you as smoking. And beware of your air freshener, too

Daily Mail 23rd February 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Environmental Research Group, discusses increasing levels of air pollution and how this can affect health. ‘Chemical toxins dissolve within the lungs or pass through the lungs into the blood. These chemicals interact with blood vessel walls and cause damage that can lead to heart attacks,’ he said. This was also reported by Guardian.

The scale of the UK’s mental health challenge has been underestimated

Guardian 22nd February 2016

Paul McCrone, Professor of health economics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) writes an open letter about the report of the mental health taskforce.

Living in cities

BBC World Health Check 22nd February 2016

Professor Frank Kelly, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, discussed the impact that pollution has on people who live in cities. ‘We’re getting that repeated exposure to pollution on a daily basis. There are two pollutants that we really worry about. The first is tiny particles…the second is a gas called nitrogen dioxide,’ he said.

Haryana State in India proposes new caste status in bid to quell protests

International New York Times 22nd February 2016

A government in India has promised to introduce a bill to grant a ‘backward status’ to the Jat caste group, following protests lasting four days in the country. Being granted such a status makes members of the group eligible for quotas in some job sectors. Professor Harsh V Pant, Defence studies, commented on why the group have asked for this. ‘There’s a disillusionment…the private sector is now passing them by,’ he said.

Play nice! How the internet is trying to design out toxic behaviour

Guardian 22nd February 2016

The article focuses on online-abuse and whether Facebook can use behavioural psychology and persuasive design to control cyber bullies. Facebook has begun working with academics at King’s to tackle extremism online.

Can you eat to beat arthritis and ditch the medication for good?

Mirror 22nd February 2016

According to researchers at King’s, eating a lot of garlic can lower the risk of osteoarthritis. Arthritis affects 10 million people in the UK. Researchers found that allium vegetables – a group that also includes leeks and onions – appear to have a protective effect by limiting the amount of cartilage-damaging enzymes.

The scale of the UK’s mental health challenge has been underestimated

Guardian 22nd February 2016

Professor Paul McCrone, IoPPN, has written an open letter about a recent report on mental health and care in the UK. ‘Surely the major issues uncovered by this report necessitate funds in addition to those already pledged,’ he said.

Moderates shut out as Iran’s hardliners await poll victory

Sunday Times 21st February 2016

MacArthur Fellow and Research Associate, Dina Esfandiary, War Studies, discusses Iran’s nationwide election and current attitudes of the conservatives towards President Rouhani. ‘For them this is a wonderful opportunity to create a barrier against Rouhani’s reforms and make it difficult for him to achieve his goals,’ she said.

Referendum in Britain carries risk of exit from EU

Xinhua 21st February 2016

A referendum to decide whether the UK remains in the EU will be held on 23 June. Discussing the lead-up to the vote, Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, said: ‘The referendum is going to be a depressingly negative campaign.’

The left's problem with Jews has a long and miserable history

Financial Times 20th February 2016

The article discusses anti-Israel demonstrations, and mentions recent protests at a King’s and LSE Israel society event. This was also reported by BBC Radio 4.

Speech on benefits by expert is cancelled over fears of offence

Telegraph 19th February 2016

The article refers to a talk scheduled at LSE by Adam Perkins of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), where he was to discuss his book 'The Welfare Trait'.

State of minds

The Economist 19th February 2016

The article focuses on China’s ageing population and the increasing rate of dementia. According to a study led by Dr Ruoling Chen, IoPPN, many cases of dementia are undetected because many families do not have a full understanding of the condition.

Speech on benefits by expert is cancelled over fears of offence

Telegraph 19th February 2016

The article refers to a talk scheduled at LSE by Adam Perkins, IoPPN, where he was to discuss his controversial book The Welfare Trait, was cancelled over fears of protests. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Terror case

ITV News 19th February 2016

A former King’s undergraduate student is on trial at the Old Bailey accused of plotting a terror attack.

What is gluten and is it bad for you?

Express 19th February 2016

Article looking at the health benefits of gluten. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Gluten-free has become very fashionable, but gluten is a protein naturally found in bread. The question you have got to ask yourself is, why have people eaten bread for thousands of years and why has it sustained generations?’

‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, by Sunil Khilnani

Financial Times 19th February 2016

The article reviews the new book by Professor Sunil Khilnani’s, India Institute: ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on 50 significant figures from Indian history. The review said: ‘Khilnani’s aim in Incarnations is not to construct a celebratory national pantheon…rather, he hopes to illuminate, in some way or another, pressing contemporary questions.’

Is there a link between autism and anorexia?

Atlantic 18th February 2016

Professor Janet Treasure of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)comments on the theory that links autism and anorexia: “I must admit I was sceptical at first when I read about the links, but when we were looking at various aspects of vulnerability to anorexia, such as thinking styles and emotional styles, they were actually very similar.” Emerging research shows that people with either condition have difficulties understanding and interpreting social cues, and tend to fixate on tiny details that make it difficult to see the big picture. What’s more, both groups of people often crave rules, routines, and rituals. Genetic studies also suggest overlaps between autism and anorexia.

Elite universities 'going backwards' on widening access

Times Higher Education 18th February 2016

Figures show that Oxford, Cambridge, and Russell Group universities have a lower proportion of students from poorer background compared to 10 years ago. However, the number of students from poorer backgrounds at King’s has increased by 5.7 per cent. This was also reported by Guardian, Huffington Post and Times.

Calorie counting won’t solve the obesity crisis

Times 18th February 2016

The article focuses on negative effects of obesity and how it can be reduced. Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, comments: ‘The solution is simple: replace processed food with the natural foods we used to eat, particularly spices, herbs, fermented foods and fibre-rich plants.’

Are treatment guidelines on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder just plain wrong?

The Conversation 18th February 2016

Dr Sameer Jauhar, IoPPN, has written an article on whether the treatment guidelines on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are effective. ‘The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has become a byword for unbiased, evidence-based healthcare advice. Its recommendations strongly influence which treatments are made available on the NHS,’ he said.

UCL Institute of Education names Becky Francis new director

Times Higher Education 18th February 2016

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, is the first woman to be appointed as the next director of the UCL Institute of Education. ‘The merger with University College London has enhanced the Institute’s already world-leading reputation, and I look forward to working with staff and students to deliver on the next stage of our ambitious plans,’ she said.

Social discussion

Sky News 18th February 2016

Jacob Diamond, former President of King’s Conservative Society, discusses some of the barriers students face from disadvantaged backgrounds. ‘There a lot of factors and problems that affect poorer students being able to access a fair education and I believe that everyone deserves an equal education,’ he said.

Cannabis use linked to higher risk for substance use disorders

Telegraph 17th February 2016

The article highlights an American study that linked cannabis use with later substance misuse. Amir Englund of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)comments: "They found that use of cannabis was related to increased risk of later addiction to alcohol, cannabis and other drugs. Cannabis was not related to anxiety or depression at follow-up. Of course a study such as this is unable to ascertain causality between cannabis use and later drug addiction, merely that a relationship exists." Also reported by Press Association.

What does progress in resolving Syria’s war look like?

Telegraph 17th February 2016

Dr Samir Puri, War Studies, has written an article on the current state of the Syrian war. ‘Last week the 17-member International Syria Support Group (ISSG) announced that a “nationwide cessation of hostilities” would soon commence to allow humanitarian aid access to several war-ravaged Syrian cities,’ he said.

Poems found

BBC Radio London 17th February 2016

Dr Jon Day, English, comments on unpublished poems by J.R.R. Tolkien, which have recently been discovered. ‘I haven’t read the poems themselves but I think that there is a romantic investment in the idea of rediscovering a lost classic that is often a real interest to people,’ he said.

Cannabis use linked to higher risk for substance use disorders

Telegraph 17th February 2016

The article highlights an American study that linked cannabis use with later substance misuse. Amir Englund, IoPPN, comments: ‘They found that use of cannabis was related to increased risk of later addiction to alcohol, cannabis and other drugs. Cannabis was not related to anxiety or depression at follow-up. Of course, a study such as this is unable to ascertain causality between cannabis use and later drug addiction, merely that a relationship exists.’ This was also reported by Press Association.

Why brains are beautiful

BBC News 16th February 2016

As part of the "In the Mind" series, Professor Shitij Kapur, Executive Dean of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) is interviewed about advances in Neuroscience: "The brain used to be like a black box. Now we can explain why treatments work, and when you know that you can begin to design better ones." Although many genes are known to increase a person's vulnerability to mental illness, what actually causes it is everything else - the experiences of life. Prof Kapur put it like this: "It is humbling to know that genetics do not determine the outcome. You can have many of the genes of risk and not get the disorder and have none of them yet succumb to it."

Why brains are beautiful

BBC News 16th February 2016

Why brains are beautiful 16 February 2016
As part of the BBC ‘In the Mind’ series, Professor Shitij Kapur, Executive Dean of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discusses the advances in neuroscience. ‘The brain used to be like a black box. Now we can explain why treatments work, and when you know that you can begin to design better ones,’ he said. This was also reported by BBC News Online, BBC Radio 4, BBC News at Six, BBC World Service and BBC World News.

Daily catch-up: 'The whole point of setting a target is to distort activity' – Sir Michael Barber

Independent 16th February 2016

Former head of the Governmental Delivery Unit, Sir Michael Barber, visited King’s students studying the ‘Blair Years’ at the Policy Institute, to discuss public service reform. ‘Tony Blair wanted public services to be so good that people who could afford to go private would choose to use them,’ he said.

Organic food healthier than farmed products, says new research

Independent 16th February 2016

According to a new study, organic farmed meat and milk is healthier than non-organic food as it contains more omega-3 fatty acids. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Meat and milk remain poor sources of polyunsaturated fatty acid and contain large amounts of potentially harmful saturated and trans fats.’ This was also reported by Telegraph, BBC Radio 5 and Times.

Oxford University's Labour club embroiled in anti-Semitism row

Telegraph 16th February 2016

Oxford University’s student society, the Labour club, has been accused of anti- Semitism and sympathising with terrorist groups. The article also mentions the protest that took place at King’s following the event organised by King’s and LSE Israel Societies. This was also reported by Daily Mail.

Dirty habits that do you good!

Mirror 15th February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, argues that not washing your hands and biting your nails can be good for your health. ‘We’re all far too scared of bacteria, but actually bacteria are our friend. The more you come into contact with it, the more your body builds up an immunity to it, allowing it to protect you against the odd bad bacteria,’ he said.

Mothers warned eating too much fish 'can increase chances of obesity-prone baby'

Independent 15th February 2016

According to recent research, eating too much fish during pregnancy can increase a mother’s chance of giving birth to an obesity-prone baby. Professor Tom Sanders, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, said: ‘Breastfed infants grow more slowly than bottle-fed infants, who are more likely to show accelerated growth because they are overfed. This analysis did not adjust for infant feeding practice, which is likely to be serious confounding factor.’ This was also reported by the Mirror.

Drivers 'exposed to highest levels of pollution'

BBC News 15th February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution and how people can decrease the amount of toxic air to which they are exposed. Dr Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group, said: ‘There is a growing awareness of the dangers of air pollution. As well as respiratory problems, it can have effects on mental health, cardiovascular conditions and child development. So the urgency behind this issue is becoming much greater.’

UK's first pollution cameras trialled in Birmingham and London

BBC News 15th February 2016

Britain’s first pollution cameras are being trialled on roads in Birmingham and London as part of a trial by the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds and King's, and funded by the Department for Transport. This was also reported by London Evening Standard, BBC News, ITV, LBC Radio and BBC Radio London.

Brussels summit

Fox News 14th February 2016

King’s academics comment on the summit in Brussels, where European Union leaders have met to try to reach a deal on EU membership. Professor Anand Menon, European & International relations, spoke to the Associated Press. ‘The European project is probably in trouble. The EU is where it's been for the last few years; very big crises without the tools to address them,’ he said. His comments also appeared in ABC and Fox. Dr Andrew Blick, Institute of Contemporary British History, spoke to BBC World News. ‘I think a very important part of the European Issue is are we a European country, or are we something different? There’s often been a tension in British culture as to what we actually are; are we a global player in our own right or part of a bigger continental body,’ he said. Professor Takis Tridimas, Law, discusses the UK’s EU membership renegotiations on BBC News. ‘At the moment we have a draft agreement which needs to be approved by the representative of the other members of state,’ he said.

How to overcome your inhibitions

Guardian 14th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written an article on how a magnetic brain-stimulating device can temporarily ‘zap’ the cells responsible for inhibition. ‘While some may choose to turn to alcohol to lower their inhibitions, disruptions from the norm, like Valentine’s Day, can offer the perfect opportunity for your subliminal desires to make themselves known,’ he said

Coconut...is it all it's cracked up to be?

Telegraph 13th February 2016

According to latest figures in the past three years the annual spending on coconut water has increased from 3.9 million to almost 33 million due to reported health benefits. Dr Scott Harding, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences, comments on whether there are any health benefits of using coconut oil. ‘From a strictly cooking perspective, as long as total calorie intake is healthy and people are eating a balanced diet with good variety, there is no reason to fear any cooking fat or oil,’ he said.

Keep convicted Islamist terrorists in one prison, says review

Telegraph 13th February 2016

According to a prison review, convicted terrorists could be placed in a top security prison in an attempt to stop them from radicalising or recruiting inmates. Professor Peter Neumann, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), said: ‘A policy of concentration may inadvertently help to create the kind of hierarchical organisation that the terrorists found it impossible to create outside.’

Street Triage reduces police detentions at no additional cost

London Live 12th February 2016

The Government’s ‘street triage’initiative - which sees mental health nurses accompany police officers to incidents where people need mental health support - could reduce police detentions without increasing cost to the public purse, suggests a new study by researchers from King’s College London. They found that the total number of Section 136 detentions to either hospital or police custody fell by 39 per cent (from 194 to 118 detentions). Looking just at detentions in police custody, there was a fall of 53 per cent (from 119 to 56 detentions).

King's press release related to 'Street Triage reduces police detentions at no additional cost'

Bernie Sanders’s ill-defined foreign policy

Huffington Post 12th February 2016

King’s undergraduate student James Resnick, War Studies, critiques US presidential candidate Bernie Sander’s foreign policy. ‘Bernie Sanders has built a campaign primarily on a single-minded focus of economic inequality. It may be able to sustain him for now, but if Sanders does become the eventual Democratic nominee, he won't attract independent voters with evident foreign policy ambiguity,’ he said.

Why are men less happy than women?

Telegraph 12th February 2016

The article investigates recent neuroimaging evidence that men may be led happy than women, and quotes Dr Michael Craig, a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN). Michael believes that it might be a mistake to simply look at the brain's mechanisms to pinpoint the reason behind the happiness gap: "From my research, I have found that men are predisposed to neurodevelopmental problems, such as autism, ADHD and addiction, and women tend to be more susceptible to affective disorders, such as Alzheimer’s or depression. But socially it would seem that women are more likely to present these symptoms to their doctors. herefore, although it seems that more women suffer from depression, the ‘stiff upper lip’ male mentality may be skewing these statistics. Rather than seeking help, men deal with their emotional pain through drug use and addiction – which can then exacerbate the issue further."

LSE talk on welfare state postponed over disruption fears

Times Higher Education 12th February 2016

A controversial event hosted by London School of Economics (LSE) has been postponed over concerns that left-wing activists were threatening to disrupt the event. Dr Adam Perkins, IoPPN, who was due to speak at the event said: ‘It is difficult to judge whether such threats would be carried out, hence the organisers decided more time would be needed to manage the event properly than was available.

‘Realpolitik: A History’, by John Bew

Financial Times 12th February 2016

In a review of a book by Dr John Bew, War Studies, ‘Realpolitik: A History’, the author says: ‘To understand Realpolitik is simply to understand politics, no more, no less. Are we all clear now then?’

Medical student plotted drive-by terror

Times 12th February 2016

Terror suspect Tarik Hassane who was accused of plotting a terror attack has pleaded guilty halfway during his trial. Hassane and former King’s undergraduate student Suhaib Majeed are both on trial at the Old Bailey on conspiracy to murder.

Why teaching pupils grit and determination is a waste of time: Ability to persevere accounts for less than 1% of exam success

Mail Online 11th February 2016

Personality characteristics have previously been shown to have a significant but moderate influence on academic achievement. However, a new study by researchers at King’s suggests that ‘grit’, defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals, adds little to the prediction of school achievement. Kaili Rimfeld from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said: ‘This does not mean that teaching children to be grittier cannot be done or that it is not beneficial. Clearly children will face challenges where qualities of perseverance are likely to be advantageous. However, more research into intervention and training programmes is warranted before concluding that such training increases educational achievement and life outcomes.’ Also reported by The Conversation and Times of India.

King's press release related to 'Why teaching pupils grit and determination is a waste of time: Ability to persevere accounts for less than 1% of exam success'

Incarnations by Sunil Khilnani, book review: The history of a subcontinent in 50 people

ndependent 11th February 2016

The article discusses a new book by Professor Sunil Khilnani, India Institute, called ‘Incarnations: India in 50 Lives’, which focuses on 50 key historical figures in India.

Gravitational waves

Sky News 11th February 2016

Professor Bobby Acharya, Physics, comments on a breakthrough discovery proving the gravitational waves theorised by Einstein. ‘It was exactly 100 years ago that Einstein proposed the existence of gravitational waves. Gravity is all about the bending and stretching of time and gravitational waves is a ripple which goes out through space and time,’ he said.

Big Question: What does the Julian Assange case have to do with human rights?

Telegraph 11th February 2016

Professor David Martin Jones, War Studies, has written an article on the trial of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. ‘On February 5 2016 the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) found that the UK and Swedish governments had ‘arbitrarily deprived’ WikiLeaks founder, and alleged rapist, Julian Assange, of his liberty,’ he said.

It's no wonder universities want to curb freedom law! Dozens of vice chancellors' pay packets soar by 10% in past year while they also spend thousands on flights and hotels

Daily Mail 11th February 2016

The article focuses on latest figures which show that many Vice-Chancellors have had a 10 per cent pay increase in the past year. The article mentions the salary of President & Principal Professor Ed Byrne.

Chevening Gurukul Fellowships

Hindustan Times 10th February 2016

Applications are being invited for the Chevening Gurukul Fellowship Programme hosted at King’s by the King’s India Institute. The fellowship aims to provide fellows the opportunity to engage with policy makes, academics and opinion leaders in the UK.

How the hell of chronic fatigue drives sufferers to suicide

Daily Mail 9th February 2016

People suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome are six times more likely to commit suicide than those unaffected by the condition, a major study from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) has concluded. Professor Matthew Hotopf said: ‘Chronic fatigue syndrome can be a debilitating disorder, which impacts patients’ lives substantially, so we need to ensure that patients are being offered the correct assessment and treatment." Also reported by Daily Telegraph.

King's press release related to 'How the hell of chronic fatigue drives sufferers to suicide'

Child abuse has damaging effects on bipolar patients

Times of India 9th February 2016

Child maltreatment could predict a range of negative outcomes in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), according to new King’s College London research, which adds to growing evidence on the enduring mental health impact of childhood abuse and neglect. Also reported by USN.

King's press release related to 'Child abuse has damaging effects on bipolar patients'

Indonesian Fires

BBC World Service 9th February 2016

Professor Martin Wooster, Geography, flew to Indonesia in October 2015 to verify data on Indonesian wildfires he’s received from satellites. ‘I think the worst danger is breathing in the stuff being produced by the fires…so we took full face gas marks as we were right at the source of these fires. We were trying to obtain data to calculate fire emissions,’ he said. This was also reported in NPR.

Air pollution raises risk of death 'for decades after exposure'

Guardian 9th February 2016

A recent study suggests that air pollution increases the risk of death for many years after people have been exposed to it. Dr Gary Fuller, ERG, comments: ‘It feeds into the developing body of evidence about air pollution affecting us throughout the course of our lives. It increases the imperative for action to reduce the way in which the air that we breathe today can compromise our health and our children’s health later in life.’

Shakespeare may have stolen an entire theatre

Xinhua 8th February 2016

A new exhibition at King’s College London reveals the life of William Shakespeare. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director, London Shakespeare Centre, said: ‘We have a number of documents that show Shakespeare's day-to-day life in London and particularly his day-to-day life as a sharer in the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the King's Company (both are troupes of actors).’

Business and education experts questioned on careers advice

Bloomberg Business 8th February 2016

A governmental sub-committee, Education, Skills and the Economy, has heard from experts as part of its inquiry into careers advice, information and guidance. Professor Louise Archer, Education & Professional Studies, was called upon to provide expertise to the committee.

Innovative wound-healing technique could save limb

Fox news 8th February 2016

Experts from King’s have reviewed the use of medical products made from human amniotic membrane tissue to treat chronic wounds. Dr Dusko Ilic, Women’s Health, said: ‘When you put membrane on the wound, the wound starts to heal faster…What actually helps the healing is that intricate network of the proteins.’

Anti-terror laws risk 'chilling effect' on academic debate – Oxford College head

Guardian 8th February 2016

According to Kerry McDonald, former Director of Public Prosecutions, the government’s anti-terrorism laws aimed at universities such as King’s will have a negative impact on academic debate and research. ‘The government’s decision to pick out universities such as University College London and King’s College, London, was unfair, ignorant and philistine,’ he said.

An unethical, imprecise, potentially illegal x-ray practice

The Hindu 7th February 2016

A number of children were reported to have received certificates of age determined by dental x-ray methods. The article mentions upcoming work by Professor Graham Roberts, Paediatric Dentistry, which will provide an up-to-date and comprehensive report on the applicability of Dental Age Estimation.

North Korea

BBC World News 7th February 2016

Defying warnings of sanctions by the West, North Korea launched a long-range rocket on Sunday that experts believe is part of a programme to develop missile technologies. Dr Martin Navias, War Studies, said: ‘North Korea is a threat to its neighbours and to peace and stability internationally. It has a nuclear programme, which is steadily gaining pace and we do expect a new nuclear test in the next few months.’ Dr Navias also commented on BBC Radio 2.

Pillow talk: Waking up with Wogan

Guardian 7th February 2016

Dr Daniel Glaser, Director, Science Gallery, has written a piece about the death of Terry Wogan and the effect his death will have on people who listened to his radio show. ‘As the day went on, listeners may have found Wogan’s words returning to them, subconsciously triggered by other thoughts or spontaneously arising, without quite remembering having heard them earlier,’ he said.

Want a degree? You won't need to sit exams to get one

Daily Mail 7th February 2016

The article highlights that more students are being awarded degrees without having to sit exams, as assessment through examination has increasingly been replaced with coursework. Professor Alison Wolf, School of Management & Business, comments: ‘It is very bad practice to have degrees which only use one sort of assessment. But many universities and colleagues believe coursework is a better way of judging students.’

The deadly toll of city smog

Guardian 7th February 2016

Dr Gary Fuller, ERG, has written a piece on the negative effect smog has on a city. ‘January used to be a peak month for smog. Between 1952 and 1962 this killed nearly 15,000 Londoners and many people in other cities including Glasgow and Manchester,’ he said.

Pollution cameras to snap toxic cars

Sunday Times 7th February 2016

A new device which measures the toxins emitted by cars to see if they breach legal limits will be introduced in the UK. The cameras will be placed near Oxford Circus and Blackheath. The trials will be sponsored by King’s, Department of Transport, Leeds and Birmingham University.

As Syria rebels face rout, Saudi Arabia and Turkey may send troops

NDTV 6th February 2016

Analysts have said that Saudi Arabia and Turkey may send a limited number of ground troops to Syria to support opposition forces, which are facing the prospect of defeat. Dr Andreas Krieg, Defence Studies, said: ‘I think Saudi Arabia is desperate to do something in Syria…Turkey and Saudi need to turn this war around. So any Saudi engagement would be in cooperation with Doha and Ankara.’

Israel society protest

Times 6th February 2016

Article comments on the findings of a report into the Israel society event hosted at King’s. President and Principal of King’s, Professor Ed Byrne said: ‘Intimidating behaviour is completely unacceptable and goes against everything that we stand for at King’s.’ This was also reported by Independent.

e-cigarettes: can they help people quit?

BBC Radio 4 5th February 2016

Discussion at 16:31 about the safety of e-cigarettes where there is mention of research carried out by Anne McNeill of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Also reported in BBC World Service and NPR.

UK scientists get green light to genetically modify human embryos

Independent 5th February 2016

Scientists from the Francis Crick Institute have been given permission to begin research altering the DNA of embryos in the first seven days after fertilisation. Professor Peter Braude, Women’s Health, commented on the announcement in the Independent. ‘I am delighted to hear that the HFEA have had the good sense to approve this important project. Gene editing tools will allow fresh insights into the basic genetic mechanisms that control cell allocation in the early embryo,’ he said. His comments were also reported by London Evening Standard, Mirror, BBC Radio 4, Economic Times of India and BBC World News. Dr Silvia Camporesi, Social Science, Health & Medicine, also commented for Al Jazeera. ‘It’s very important that this research goes ahead,’ she said.

William Shakespeare's will featuring his last signatures goes on show

Guardian 5th February 2016

To mark 400 years since his death, Shakespeare’s will and other documents are on display at an exhibition held at King’s for the first time. The exhibition entitled ‘By me: William Shakespeare’, is currently on at the Indigo Rooms, Somerset House East Wing, until May 29 2016. This was reported by the Guardian, Financial Times, London Evening Standard, Times Higher Education, Independent, Express, BBC London and People’s Daily.

Julian Assange

BBC World News 5th February 2016

A United Nations report has said that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arbitrarily detained by the UK and Sweden and should be released immediately. Considering whether legally this is a case of arbitrary detention, Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, said: ‘I think the working group got it wrong. I would describe his stay as self-inflicted.’

Invisible menace in cities threatens thousands of lives say campaigners

Guardian 5th February 2016

The article focuses on air pollution in London and the health risks it poses to Londoners. Professor Ben Barratt, Environmental Research Group (ERG), said: ‘The public health message is that you can’t hide from air pollution inside a car. We advise the public to leave the car at home whenever possible. This exposes you and your family to lower levels of air pollution, you’re not contributing to the problem, and you’re also getting the benefits of exercise.’ This was also reported by LBC Radio and Huffington Post.

Kids don't like physics and maths: Study finds out why

Telegraph 5th February 2016

According to a study conducted by King’s, University College London and AT Kearney, the consultancy firm, more young people are dropping out of subjects such as Maths, Physics and other STEM subjects. The study suggest that falling popularity is caused by inadequate advice from careers experts to explain the range of jobs for which science subjects are relevant.

King’s College head: Ignoring online education is big danger

Times Higher Education 5th February 2016

The article focuses on the launch of Pearson and King’s new online learning platform. President & Principal of King’s, Professor Ed Byrne said: ‘If I look ahead and think of the range of things universities do, we’re going to have to have superb technological environments everywhere – whether it’s in education or on campus.’

Protesters silencing speakers like me won’t solve the Israeli-Palestinian problem

Guardian 5th February 2016

Former Israeli security Chief Ami Aylon commented on the impact that violent protesting has on speakers. He discusses the event jointly hosted by King’s and LSE Israel Society at King’s where students protested.

Tomb Raider creator to open two free schools with digital focus

Guardian 5th February 2016

Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, argues that there should be more research into free schools. ‘Given the government’s commitment to expanding the free school programme we need urgently to explore their quality and outcomes for pupils, and, given changes in the programme over time, whether indeed free schools are distinctive from other schools in either content or origin,’ she said.

Oil companies need to tailor strategies to claw back lost profits

Financial Times 5th February 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, has written a piece on how oil companies need fresh ideas to increase profit. ‘The real disappointment, however, lies in the poverty of the strategic thinking in such companies. Forward thinking appears to be limited to the view that prices must rise again,’ he said.

Global mental health illness widespread, undercounted

Voice of America 5th February 2016

The article comments on research carried out by Graham Thornicroft at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). This found that the number of people living with mental illness worldwide is underestimated by more than a third, and that mental illness accounts for 32 percent of all disability worldwide.

America wages war-by-bureaucracy, and it is killing our chances to win

Foreign Policy 4th February 2016

Christopher D. Kolenda, War studies, commented on the effectiveness of American military strategy and the lack of attention given to it by candidates in the 2016 Presidential campaign. ‘War-by-bureaucracy is undermining America’s ability to wage war. National security reform has not yet been a major topic in the 2016 Presidential campaign. It is time to put it on the agenda,’ he said.

Chromatography

BBC Radio 4 In Our Time 4th February 2016

Dr Leon Barron, Forensic Science, discusses the origins, development and use of chromatography. ‘Almost everyone has had chromatography affect their lives. Here in front of me, I have a bottle of drinking water and if you look at the labels of the bottle, you generally see a list of compounds in there,’ he said.

Zac Goldsmith and Sadiq Khan unite to commit to pedestrianisation of Oxford Street

London Evening Standard 4th February 2016

London 2016 Mayoral candidates Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith have committed to the pedestrianisation of Oxford Street in order to reduce pollution and congestion. A study by Dr David Carslaw, Analytical & Environmental Sciences, is mentioned, which looked at levels of pollution on Oxford Street.

Even Greeks can get more medicines than Britons, Pfizer boss claims

Guardian 4th February 2016

According to the owner of the world’s biggest drug company, Pfizer, Greece has more access to a variety of medicines than the UK. Professor Richard Sullivan, Director of the Institute of Cancer Policy, commented on the issue of access to healthcare. ‘Indeed any country wishing to deliver affordable and equitable cancer care needs health technology assessment procedures make rational decisions,’ he said.

Demonising Russia won’t give us security

Guardian 4th February 2016

Dr Anna Matveeva, War Studies, has written an article on how Russia is negatively portrayed in the media. ‘The country’s portrayal as an aggressive power increases its perception of threat, accelerating a military and ideological escalation. Irresponsible talk of conflict is risky and mistaken,’ she said.

Oneline therapy better than face-to-face for body issues

Times 3rd February 2016

In the largest clinical study of body dysmorphia, and first to investigate internet-based CBT, researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN)found that 12 weeks of regular online sessions can eliminate symptoms.

Body Dysmorphia

Times 3rd February 2016

In the largest clinical study of body dysmorphia, and first to investigate internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) found that 12 weeks of regular online CBT sessions can eliminate symptoms.

Syria

Al Jazeera 2nd February 2016

The UN held talks in Geneva to discuss the current situation in Syria. James Denselow, Geography, described progress in the area as ‘slow’. ‘I don’t think we have a peace process yet; we have a peace plan. A very ambitious one,’ he said.

The Dark Web

BBC World Service 2nd February 2016

A new study at King’s has examined the ‘Tor Browser’ – a web browser also known as the dark web – which aims to masks the identity of who is browsing on the internet and what they’re looking at. PhD student Daniel Moore, War Studies, who was involved in the study said: ‘We were looking to integrate ourselves into the large encryption debate…The debate around the ‘snoopers charter’ is quite polarised at this point.’ Professor Thomas Rid, War studies, co-author of the paper, also spoke to the Independent. ‘The Tor Browser is used for criminal services, fraud, extreme, illegal pornography, cyber-attacks and computer crime,’ he said. Also reported by VICE Motherboard.

EU debate

BBC News 2nd February 2016

Professor Anand Menon, European & International Studies, commented on the topic of migration in the UK, a topic that has come under scrutiny during recent negotiations of Britain’s EU membership. ‘Many of the economic studies I’ve seen have argued that even if you stop migrants in the EU getting benefits, the overall impact of the number of people coming to the UK will be minimal,’ he said.

Labour figures swap politics for prominent business roles

Financial Times 2nd February 2016

The article focuses on the careers of former Labour politicians such as Ed Balls, who is now a Visiting Professor at the Policy Institute.

Student grants were my lifeline; How the Tories are punishing working-class kids

Mirror 2nd February 2016

The article focuses on the government’s plans to get rid of maintenance grants and the impact it will have on students who come from low-income households. One of the professions with high educational and economic barriers is classical music. A report by King’s is quoted, which showed that only 55 per cent of children from the poorest families receive a musical education.

For NREGA, Tamil Nadu is the only hope

NDTV 1st February 2016

On its 10th anniversary, the NREGA (National Rural Employment Guarantee Act 2005) in India has been criticised by members of government. Commenting on these criticisms, Professor Reetika Khera, Visiting Fellow in the India Institute, said: ‘The Rajasthan Chief Minister questioning the need for a law, the then Rural Development minister's suggestion to limit NREGA to a few districts, and the Prime Minister's speech in Parliament in 2015 reveal the BJP's hostility.’

Law student demands lifetime supply of KitKats over waferless multipack

Independent 1st February 2016

Second-year Law student, Saima Ahmad, is demanding a lifetime supply of KitKat after she bought a pack of the chocolate bars without any wafer. She wrote a letter to the company saying: ‘Clearly, if I wanted to purchase a confectionery item that is purely chocolate, I would have purchased a bar of Galaxy. I wouldn't rule out taking this further if Nestlé do not apologise or compensate me adequately.’ This was also reported by Mirror, Daily Mail, Express, ITV Online, Huffington Post and Time.

Drive for more women in medical research

London Evening Standard 1st February 2016

A new initiative to get more women into medical research has been launched by King’s and Oxford University. The biomedical research centres run by Guy’s and St Thomas’ have pledged to help women get into senior positions.

Drive for more women in medical research

London Evening Standard 1st February 2016

A new initiative to get more women into medical research has been launched by King’s and Oxford University. The biomedical research centres run by Guy’s and St Thomas’ have pledged to help women get into senior positions.

Science and Stalin’s crap grab: Can excrement reveal the secrets of our personalities?

The Conversation 1st February 2016

Professor Tim Spector, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, has written an article on whether excrement gives insight into a person’s personality. ‘The researchers, tasked with analysing stool samples from a number of foreign leaders, believed that high levels of brain chemicals such as the amino acid tryptophan were a sign of someone likely to be calm and easy to deal with,’ he said.

Oxford University tops list for animal testing

Independent 1st February 2016

Figures show that Oxford University and other institutions such as Edinburgh and King’s use the most animals to conduct tests in its laboratories. A spokesperson from King’s said: ‘Animal research at King’s is ethically reviewed and we only use animal models where there is no other viable alternative.’ This was also reported by Mirror, Metro and Times of India.

Hair dryer science

Channel 4 Supershoppers 1st February 2016

Professor Bobby Acharya, Physics, takes part in an experiment which looks at the ‘science of hot hair’. ‘Inside the hair dryer there is an ionic generator and a fan which blows the air through. In the centre are capacitors that create ions which help generate hot air,’ he said.

The route to West Asia

Telegraph of India 30th January 2016

The Indian president, Pranab Mukherjee, visited Israel and Palestine in 2015, followed by a visit to West Asia by Indian external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj. Professor Harsh Pant, Defence Studies, said: ‘The visit has paved the way for a possible visit by the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, to India later this year and it is also likely that the Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, would pay a return visit to Tel Aviv.’

Why state schools should stream their pupils

Telegraph 30th January 2016

The article argues that students in streamed schools are more likely to perform better and excel in school. In order to find out more on the effectiveness of streaming, the Sutton Trust has commissioned Professor Becky Francis, Education & Professional Studies, to research the impact streamed schools have on students.

How autism changes the brain

Mail Online 29th January 2016

Research at King’s College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder.

King's press release related to 'How autism changes the brain'

Study reveals subtle brain differences in men with autism

King's Press Release 29th January 2016

Research at King’s has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. Dr Marco Catani from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), said: ‘White matter provides key insights which allow us to paint a precise picture of how different parts of the brain develop during critical periods in childhood.’ This was also reported by Daily Mail and Hindustan Times.

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Translated: The baffling world of business jargon

The Conversation 29th January 2016

Tony Thorne, Director of Slang and New Language Archive, has written an article on the jargon used in business and in various jobs. ‘Most often labelled ‘jargon’, this language category includes the management buzzwords uttered above: blamestorming is a free-for-all discussion which identifies scapegoats; the more familiar blue-sky thinking means going beyond the obvious in the search for solutions,’ he said.

China

Valor Economico 29th January 2016

Professor Kerry Brown, Lau China Institute, discussed the importance of China in the global economy. He commented that whilst the policies of the government have aroused criticism, countries in the West are increasingly dependent on China.

Keen to be healthier in old age? Tend your inner garden

The Conversation 29th January 2016

Following the death of the world’s oldest man, Professor Tim Spector and Dr Claire Steves, Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, have written an article on how people can live for a long time. ‘Many previous attempts have approached this question by looking for differences between young and old people, but this approach is often biased by the many social and cultural developments that happen between generations, including diet changes,’ they said.

Civil Partnership

BBC Radio London 29th January 2016

Professor Robert Wintemute, Law, comments on the case of a heterosexual couple not being allowed to have a civil partnership. The current legislation only allows same sex couples to have a civil partnership. ‘The UK is the only country in the world where the legislators have not allowed different sex couples to have a civil partnership,’ he said.

Diplomatic immunity hearings in London courts on the rise

Financial Times 29th January 2016

The article focuses on the increasing number of people claiming diplomatic immunity in London. Dr Philippa Webb, Law, comments: ‘In the past, most cases where diplomatic immunity has been said to have been abused have been settled behind closed doors. What is unusual about these cases is they are coming to court and the UK is clarifying the law in this area.’

Principal's inaugural lecture

King's Press Rlease 28th January 2016

President & Principal Professor Ed Byrne AC, revived King's near century old Commemoration Oration address on 27th January to deliver his Inaugural Lecture. The lecture, entitled ‘Learning to thrive: How can leading universities make a greater contribution to society and the economy in an increasingly connected world?’, was introduced by the Chairman of the College Council, The Duke of Wellington.

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Daily catch-up: Labour diverts attention from a pro-Labour story

Independent 28th January 2016

Professor John Rentoul, Policy Institute, has written an article on the current landscape of UK politics, mentioning a lecture at King’s by Visiting Professor, Ed Balls, Policy Institute.

Post-colonial studies: Time to step out of the comfort zone?

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

Professor Ziad Elmarsafy, Comparative Literature, discusses how post-colonial studies may have to change its research agenda. ‘The default position seems to be that the state is there to oppress and exploit, which is sadly true in a lot of cases; but it does not explain the persistence of the state and the insistence with which people, post-colonial or not, adhere to it,’ he said.

Role models pave the way for women to build STEM careers

London Evening Standard 28th January 2016

Dr Filippa Lentzos, Policy Institute, discusses how to recruit young people, particularly women into STEM careers. ‘I followed what I was interested in. I did a degree in human sciences, which covers all aspects of biology,’ she said.

Priced out: Housing cost headaches for universities and staff

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

The article focuses on the effects rising housing costs has for academics and students. Professor Evelyn Welch, Vice-Principal (Arts & Sciences), said: ‘We welcome any opportunity and government support that will ensure we are able to attract and retain world-class academic talent in a city like London.’

Parents don’t understand A-levels ‘are not the only route into university’, Ucas says

Metro 28th January 2016

The article highlights that alternative qualifications such as the International Baccalaureate and Btec can be used to get into university. Paul Teulon, Director of Admissions, said: ‘It is crucial that universities have a good understanding of the structure, content, examination method, grades and grading distributions for all qualifications which they accept.’

It’s 2016, and no time to rest on our laurels

Times Higher Education 28th January 2016

President & Principal Ed Byrne has an opinion piece on how universities have evolved over time to meet the needs of students and society. ‘Universities must be more attuned and responsive in real time to challenges facing their communities, countries and planet. They must be bridge-builders between cultures, governments and key institutions and opinion-formers of global civil society. And they must be more ambitious in fostering an entrepreneurial, change-making spirit in students and staff,’ he said.

Overactive brain pruning in teens could cause schizophrenia

New Scientist 27th January 2016

Dr Oliver Howes of the Institute of Psychiatry, Pscyhology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) comments on the theory that schizophrenia can result from a normal stage of teenage brain maturation gone wrong. “It’s really exciting because it could lead to new ways of treating the disorder,” he says. Research suggests that there are genomes that lead to higher levels of a component called C4, which binds to neurons at the points they connect to other neurons and signals that they should be engulfed by immune cells. As teenagers go through a developmental stage called pruning, in which they lose synapses, overactivity in C4 caused by these genes could lead to schizophrenia, as post-mortem examinations have shown fewer synapses in patients experiencing this disorder. Professor Robin Murray, also of the IoPPN, comments that this may explain why, for some people, the first signs appear in adolescence, when pruning peaks.

Zika virus

BBC News 27th January 2016

Women in countries affected by the Zika virus in South America have been advised against getting pregnant, as the virus is believed to be linked to birth defects. Dr Eduardo J. Gómez, International Development Institute, commented on the response of officials in the affected countries. ‘I really don’t think Brazil was entirely ready; they’ve been having problems with their public health system for a while,’ he said. Dr Gómez commented for CNN, BBC Brazil and O Globo. Professor Stuart Neil, Infectious Diseases, also spoke on the Zika virus outbreak for Channel 5 News. ‘It’s a very concerning situation, this virus seems to have appeared under the radar and now we are looking at millions of cases,’ he said.

Angelo Ogbonna: Life at West Ham is so much more relaxed than at Juventus

London Evening Standard 27th January 2016

Italian football player Angelo Ogbonna talks to King’s Italian society on his move from Juventus to West Ham. ‘Here it is more relaxed. We worked more with sessions every day and double [sessions] once a week, while here we sometimes get Wednesdays off,’ he said.

Implications of another delay to Hinkley nuclear reactor project

Financial Times 27th January 2016

Professor Nick Butler, Policy Institute, discusses the postponement of the Hinkley Point nuclear reactor project. ‘The Chinese have not formally signed up to the financing agreement and now it has become clear that the EDF board is unwilling to go ahead with a decision that would add to its financial problems by adding debt and risk to its already shaky balance sheet,’ he said.

The time has come for a new party

New Statesman 27th January 2016

Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Institute of Contemporary British History, discusses the Labour party and whether there should be a new political party. ‘The Labour Party is composed of three main elements – the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP), the trade unions and the members. But the PLP is the most important, given that it represents the nine million people who voted Labour in 2015,’ he said.

Overactive brain pruning in teens could cause schizophrenia

New Scientist 27th January 2016

Dr Oliver Howes, IoPPN, comments on the theory that schizophrenia can result from a normal stage of teenage brain maturation gone wrong. ‘This could lead to new ways of treating the disorder,’ he said.

Terrorism

BBC Radio 4 The Best of Four Thought 27th January 2016

Dr Benedict Wilkinson, Policy Institute, discussed the impact of 19th Century German-American philosopher Johann Most on society. ‘He moved away from communism and as he did, he became an impassioned, fiery anarchist,’ he said.

New particle

BBC Radio 4 Science Stories 27th January 2016

Dr Malcolm Fairbairn, Physics, comments on the experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which took place at the end of last year. According to the LHC the experiments showed that there is a new particle, one not predicated by any previous theory. Over 100 research papers have been published since then, proposing new theories about the discovery. Dr Fairbairn said: ‘I think right now there is a fairly well established scientific method which is that you make observation, you get data then you come up with a theory that fits that data.’

How your smartphone is changing cinema

The Conversation 27th January 2016

Dr Sarah Atkinson, Culture, Media & Creative Industries, has written an article about how smartphone technology is changing cinema. ‘Smartphone technologies are increasingly playing a major part in film production, distribution and reception. This month sees the launch of what is being billed as the world’s first selfie movie,’ she said.

Varoufakis warns that Britain should remain in EU

King's Press Release 26th January 2016

Professor Yanis Varoufakis, the former Greek Finance Minister who earned notoriety when negotiating with the International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank to prevent his country becoming bankrupt, warned at an event at King’s that despite the financial breakup of Europe, Britain should remain part of the EU.

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King's kicks off Shakespeare celebrations

King's Press release 26th January 2016

King’s Shakespeare Festival, a year-long celebration of the life and work of William Shakespeare, kicks off with a special weekend of free events in February. Professor Gordon McMullan, Director of the London Shakespeare Centre and academic director, Shakespeare400, said: ‘The Shakespeare Festival weekend of exciting events marks the start of our Shakespeare Festival, which runs throughout the year.’

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Medical Miscellany

Daily Mail 26th January 2016

Dr Laura Andreae, IoPPN, comments on facial features and the role they play in shaping our choice of ‘mate’. ‘Humans naturally focus on other people’s facial features – even as babies we respond to shapes that look like faces,’ she said.

Environmental campaigners to face jail

LBC 26th January 2016

Professor Mike Hulme, Geography, discusses whether environmental campaigners should go to prison if protests turn violent. ‘A protest is entirely appropriate and legitimate in an open society, but they do have to realise the consequences of protests,’ he said.

James Clerk

BBC 4 James Clerk Maxwell: The Man Who Changed the World, 26th January 2016

A documentary focusing on James Clerk Maxwell looks at his life and work at King’s which led to the discovery of the theory of electromagnetism.

Mother’s ruin? New guidelines for alcohol consumption during pregnancy

British Medical Journal 25th January 2016

Dr Sally Marlow and Dr Sadie Boniface of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) discuss recent proposed alcohol guidelines relating to pregnancy. These recommend abstinence during pregnancy, in contrast to conflicting and confusing previous advice that said small amounts have not been shown to be harmful. They argue: "as the saying goes, absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Taking all of this into account, we would argue that when the stakes are high, and in a context where conclusive evidence may always be elusive, taking a cautious approach is the right thing to do."

Mother’s ruin? New guidelines for alcohol consumption during pregnancy

British Medical Journal 25th January 2016

Dr Sally Marlow and Dr Sadie Boniface, IoPPN, discuss recent proposed alcohol guidelines relating to pregnancy. They recommend abstinence during pregnancy, in contrast to conflicting and confusing previous advice that said small amounts have not been shown to be harmful.

Losing weight

Channel 4 How to Lose Weight Well 25th January 2016

Dr Jayne Lawrence, Biophysical Pharmaceutics, tested the number of potentially deadly chemicals present in diet pills. ‘It’s really shocking to learn that the amount of one chemical - DNP - varied from about 90 to up to 150 per cent and