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Women in Science Week

Women in Science Week 2017

NMS @ the Movies
Monday 9 October 2017, 18.00-20.30
Venue: S-3.20

NMS at the Movies returns with a screening of Hidden Figures (2016), the recent US biographical drama about the female African-American mathematicians who played vital roles at NASA during the Space Race. The film stars Taraji P. Henson as Katherine Johnson, a mathematician who calculated flight trajectories for Project Mercury, the US’s first human spaceflight programme, and other missions, Octavia Spencer as NASA supervisor Dorothy Vaughan and Janelle Monáe as NASA engineer Mary Jackson.

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Ada Lovelace Day

Wednesday 11 October 2017, 14:00-16:00
Edumd J Safra Lecture Theatre, King's Building, Strand campus
Ada Lovelace Day celebrates women in science and highlights the issues faced in STEM subjects surrounding the representation of women.  Bringing together both staff and students from across the faculty, gender equality is a relevant and important topic for all.

The day will feature guest speakers from within the Faculty and externally, including Angela Saini, award-winning British science journalist, writer and broadcaster. Angela’s latest book, published earlier this year, is Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong – and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story.  Representatives from WiSTEM student society will speak on their recent experience and plans for the future and Professor Peter Main, Head of Department of Physics and Chair of the Faculty Diversity & Inclusion committee, will lead a panel discussion on the importance of gender equality in STEM and how we can strive to achieve it. 

The talks will be followed by a reception in K0.20

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Why are we having an NMS Women in Science Week?

Tuesday 11 October 2017 is Ada Lovelace Day. Born in 1815, Ada Lovelace was a mathematician and writer who has been adopted as a figurehead for an international celebration of the achievements of women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). She is often referred to as the first computer programmer for her work on Babbage's Analytical Engine.

As we see in university STEM departments across the UK, women are underrepresented in our Faculty at both the student and staff level. There is something about the way women perceive or experience studying and working in STEM disciplines that means they are less likely than men to choose this as a career path. This is a problem because it limits the pool of talent we are drawing on and because good research needs diversity of ideas and perspectives

Women in Science week aims to celebrate the women in work in science both within the faculty, the college and beyond. It hopes to highlight the issues faced in STEM subjects surrounding the representation of women, and that gender equality is a relevant and important topic for all by bringing together both staff and students from across the faculty in a number of events.

What happened last year?

Discover Science 

NMS welcomed 12 – 16  year old young women from local schools to meet some of King’s most successful researchers and students. King’s Women in Science student societies hosted a networking lunch and the students built their own Lego robots with academics from our Maker Space and Robotics Department. The students heard about how King's College London are engineering new 'metamaterials' with exciting properties. 

Women in Science Scholarship and Prize Winners Lunch

Each year the Faculty welcomes new students who have been awarded a Women in Science Scholarship by hosting a lunch. It is a time to celebrate achievements of women in the Faculty as female prize winners from the previous year are also invited.

An opportunity to meet members of the faculty, such as Heads of Departments, and those actively working on the Women in Science initiative, the lunch is a highlight of Women in Science week.

NMS @ the Movies

NMS @ The Movies presents Contact, a science fiction drama directed by Robert Zemeckis. Jodie Foster portrays Dr Eleanor Arroway, a female scientist, leading the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence, who strives to prove the existence of alien life but must work to combat the oppressive confines of institutional sexism. Introduced by Dr Jill Stuart of LSE and trustee of METI International (Messaging Extra-terrestrial Intelligence).

Ada Lovelace Day

Speakers for Ada Lovelace Day 2016 included Kate Russell, a journalist, reporter and author who speaks regularly to inspire the next generation of technologists and was voted the Computer Weekly 13th most influential woman in UK IT. 

The Department of Chemistry’s Dr Helen Coulshed has been involved in numerous outreach activities, mentoring and women in science groups, while pursuing her own research in chemistry and chemical education.

Representatives from WiSTEM student society spoke on their recent experience and plans for the future and Professor Peter Main, Head of Department of Physics and Chair of the Faculty Equality & Diversity committee, led a panel discussion on the importance of gender equality in STEM and how we can strive to achieve it.

Women in Science Week Reception

Bringing Women in Science week to a close, the reception provided an interactive opportunity to reflect on the issues discussed over the course of the week.

 

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