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Assessment

Assessment feedback

What is feedback?

In its simplest form feedback is a conversation between student and teacher. It aims to be insightful, critical, and enabling: feedback is an exercise in learning rather than a quantitative measure of how well you have done in your last piece of work. It is reasonable to expect that you will have received all your formal feedback before the end-of-module examination.

The feedback you receive will come in many different forms, both formal and informal, including: assessment grades; comments on work; conversations with lecturers, teaching assistants and lab demonstrators; notes to an entire class, and; discussions with other students.

Whatever form your feedback takes, it is a valuable tool in ensuring your next relevant piece of work/activity is better.

An important feature of a university education is that it should develop your ability to work independently and rely on your own judgement, therefore you will find that the nature of feedback changes from year to year.

When will I receive feedback?

It is College Policy to provide you with a deadline by which your feedback will be delivered; normally this will be no longer than four weeks from submitting a piece of work. Where this is not possible your lecturer will make clear to you the timeframe for providing feedback.

Assessed coursework feedback

The type of feedback you receive for assessed coursework will vary. Some lecturers will return work during the lecture and provide verbal comments that will be useful to the whole class. Others will return coursework with written comments and/or a formal feedback form.

How can I use feedback to help me do as well or better next time?

If you have any questions about the feedback you receive, you should make use of lecturers' office hours to seek further guidance. Whilst there is an assumption that you will take responsibility for your own learning ,and this includes feedback, learning works best as a two-way process and lecturers are there to be of assistance. Asking for clarification may seem daunting in your first year at university but if you actively request information it is likely that the feedback will enhance your learning and you will see improvements.

Examination feedback

How can I use feedback to help me do as well or better next time?

With the aim of helping you to reflect more on your examination performance, the Department has implemented an online examination feedback system, on which lecturers publish general comments and observations about the examination results for the module they teach.

Students are notified via email when generic feedback for examinations is available, usually this will be timed to ensure that students obtain helpful feedback before any reassessments. If you have questions about this feedback you should arrange to see the lecturer to understand more about how it relates to you.

To access the system, click on the Examination Feedback System icon on the top right. 

Instructions on how to use the system.

Viewing your examination scripts

You can now request scripts from all written examinations if you want to better understand your marks for a particular assessment.

Further information is available on the Exam Results page.

Assignments for Undergraduate students

In year 1 you will be set weekly assignments in each mathematics module you take; these assignments will, if completed by the deadline, be marked and returned to you with feedback from the marker who will probably be the tutor for your tutorial. Students who repeatedly fail to hand in assignments on time may be asked to discuss this with the Senior Tutor.

In year 2, again, weekly assignments will be marked for you and returned. In both Years 1 and 2 the tutor who marks your assignments will be able to help you understand points in the marked work which remain unclear.  If you need further help, please arrange to see your lecturer, for example, in their office hours.

In year 3 weekly assignments will be set; for most courses solutions will be provided, but assignments are not usually marked because by this stage you should be more self-reliant. Practice is variable at this level, and even more so in Year 4. You will see in more advanced text books that often solutions to exercises are not provided because these might give a false impression of a unique correct answer; the purpose of an exercise is to make you think in a way which will help you to understand the mathematics.

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11 May 2018
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