Show/hide main menu

Undergraduate programmes

BSc in Physics and Philosophy

Programme Director: Prof Samjid Mannan

UCAS Code: FV35; Route Code: UBSH3CJPHPL

Programme description

Educational aims
  • To educate graduates so that they have an understanding of most fundamental laws and principles of physics, and an appreciation of the  history of philosophy, of some of the major contemporary debates in philosophy, and of the nature of philosophical problems.
  • To prepare students for a professional career either within or outside physics or philosophy.
  • To ensure that students can manage their own learning with the aid of suitable resources.
  • To develop students' ability to conduct experiments, analyse the results using various quantitative methods and draw valid conclusions.
  • To provide a supportive environment, encouraging students to be critically receptive to new ideas and to attain their full academic potential.
  • To develop habits of independent rigorous thought and skill at solving problems.
  •  To train students to think logically, and to present reasoned arguments clearly.
  • To enable students to form their own views on philosophical problems, to argue for those views and to defend or amend them in light of criticism.
  • To allow students to explore the philosophical aspects of  the foundations of Physics.
        Philosophy
  • To provide students with education in philosophy, with emphasis on contemporary analytic philosophy and the history of philosophy, suitable for a variety of levels and circumstances, on the grounds that philosophy is a subject of central intellectual importance;
  • To enable students to study a range of central philosophical debates, set against their historical background and in the context of key texts;
  • To give students the intellectual skills and attitudes generated by the practice of philosophy, and to develop and encourage independent and rigorous philosophical thinking;
  • To enable students to think, reason and communicate more effectively in a wide range of areas.
Learning outcomes

The student should acquire:

  • A sound knowledge and understanding in physics, philosophy and related disciplines.
  • Experience in the applications of physical principles in various branches of physics.
  • The ability to analyse and solve problems in physics using a wide range of quantitative methods and procedures.
  • The ability to carry out experiments/investigations, critically analyse results, draw valid conclusions and communicate findings orally and in writing.
  • A wide range of transferable skills, including problem-solving, investigative, IT and personal skills.
  • A thorough training in the ability to think logically, to cast practical problems into a philosophical framework and to present reasoned arguments clearly.
  • The ability to work independently, pursuing meaningful independent study.

An understanding of the depth of the main areas of modern philosophy and (theoretical) physics at a level comparable with that of major national philosophy and physics departments and at a standard comparable with  that of the bachelor degree in other subjects. Those students who wish to progress to more advanced study will also possess a firm foundation for doing so.

Philosophy

On completion of a programme students should be better able to:

  • assimilate complex material;
  • analyse complex thought and argument, both written and oral;
  • articulate and evaluate the specific questions underlying a more general question;
  • draw information together in both oral and written presentation
  • construct cogent arguments in the course of discussion;
  • recognise the strengths and weaknesses in opposing views, and be prepared to formulate the best arguments for those views;
  • accept the force of a conclusion warranted by a sound argument;
  • organise their time efficiently.

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding and skills in the following areas:

  • the history of philosophy, in either Greek or Modern philosophy
Reassessment and Progression Rules

There are a number of factors to consider that will determine whether you are able to progress to the next year of your studies and all students need to be aware of the college rules. 

If a student fails to meet the progression requirements they will not be allowed to progress to the next year of study until they have exhausted all their reassessment opportunities. 

Full details on the requirements and college rules can be found on the Reassessment and Progression Rules page of the handbook.

 

Programme Structure - 2018 entry

First Year - Introduced September 2018

Compulsory modules

Physics

Philosophy

Full details can be found in the Philosophy Department Handbook.

It is important that you consult these pages to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

Requirements for progression to 2nd year: 

  • You must pass all core modules
  • You must pass a total of 90 credits (including core modules)
  • You may not have any marks below 33%
Second Year - To be introduced September 2019

Compulsory modules

Physics

Philosophy 

Full details can be found in the Philosophy Department Handbook.

It is important that you consult these pages

to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

Requirements for progression to 3rd year: 

  • You must pass all core modules
  • You must pass a total of 210 credits (including core modules)
  • You may not have any marks below 33% in compulsory modules
  • Optional modules can be condoned down to 1%
Third Year - To be introduced September 2020

Physics

Compulsory modules

Physics

You can take up to 30 credits from the following modules:

Philosophy

Please note that modules offered will vary from year to year.

For full details on which modules will be running please are contained within the Philosophy Department Handbook.  It is important that you consult these pages to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

Programme Structure - 2017 entry and earlier

First year

Compulsory modules

Physics

Philosophy

Full details can be found in the Philosophy Department Handbook.

It is important that you consult these pages to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

Requirements for progression to 2nd year: 

  • You must pass all core modules
  • You must pass a total of 90 credits (including core modules)
  • You may not have any marks below 33%
Second year

Compulsory modules

Physics

Philosophy

Full details can be found in the Philosophy Department Handbook.

It is important that you consult these pages

to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

Requirements for progression to 3rd year: 

  • You must pass all core modules
  • You must pass a total of 210 credits (including core modules)
  • Optional and compulsory modules can be condoned down to 1%
Third year

Physics

You must take a minimum of one of the following:

Plus:

You can take up to 30 credits from the following modules:

Philosophy

Please note that modules offered will vary from year to year.

For full details on which modules will be running please are contained within the Philosophy Department Handbook.  It is important that you consult these pages to ensure that you understand the requirements on that side of the programme.

 

NOTE: you may not enrol on a module that you have already taken and passed at either undergraduate or postgraduate level. Nor may you enrol for a module that overlaps with another module that you have already taken and passed. Modules will be deemed to overlap if both the content and the level of complexity are similar.  

Award requirements and degree classifications:

Please see the Regulations page for the requirements for the award of degrees and how the classification of a degree is calculated.

 

Substitute and Extra Credit Modules

Students have the opportunity to take modules outside of their programme specification such as a language module or module from another department. 

Substitute modules are those which replace an optional module from the Physics options list and require both the approval of the module leader and the programme director from your home department. 

Extra credit modules are additional modules taken on top of the required credits for the academic year. These modules will contribute to a students overall c-score and should be carefully considered and discussed with your personal tutor.

All extra credit modules must keep you in line with the maximum credits you are allowed to take depending on your degree programme. Throughout your degree you may take a total of 390 credits for the BSc programme and 510 credits for the MSci programme. Please consult your relevant programme specifications in order to determine how many extra credit modules you may be permitted to take. 

Further details can be found on the Substitute & Extra Credit Page.

Important Note: There are strict withdrawal deadlines for modules, specifically language modules. If you chose to withdraw you must do so within this deadline, normally the first two weeks of term. If you do not withdraw in this time you will remain registered on the module and be expected to sit the exam. All marks received for the module will count towards your overall grade for the academic year. 

 


 

22 March 2019

 

 

Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions  Privacy policy  Accessibility  Modern slavery statement  Contact us

© 2019 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454