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jacksonl

Dr Lucy Jackson

Asisstant Professor

Contact details

Biography

I completed my undergraduate degree at University College, Oxford (2004-8) and, after an MA at the University of Exeter, returned to Oxford for my DPhil (Corpus Christi College, 2010-14). I also spent time at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Princeton University, and the University of Sydney during my graduate studies. I taught at KCL from 2014-5, and then at Balliol College, Oxford (2015-16). I (re-)joined the Classics department of KCL as Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in 2016.

Research interests and PhD supervision

  • Ancient Greek and Roman Theatre and Performance
  • Neo-Latin Translations of Greek drama and the Reception of classical theatre in the sixteenth century
  • Translation studies and theory in the ancient and modern worlds.

My doctoral thesis explored ancient Greek theatre and performance, with a specific focus on the dramatic chorus in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE.

Following my interests in the history of theatre and translation for the stage, my postdoctoral work will focus on how the language and use of Neo-Latin, and the translations of Greek tragedy into Latin, significantly affected how writers in Early Modern Europe thought about ancient Greek theatre.

I continue to be fascinated with the chorus as a phenomenon in performance and drama, and how that phenomenon reflects or challenges contemporary ideas about the individual, the collective, politics, and ritual.

Teaching

I teach ancient Greek and Latin language and literature as well as the reception of the classical world from the Renaissance onwards.

Expertise and public engagement

I have acted as a consultant for the National Theatre, London (Medea 2014), Shakespeare’s Globe (Oresteia 2015), the Royal Shakespeare Company (Cymbeline 2016), and various freelance theatre practitioners.

I have led theatre archive research days at the National Theatre Archive for FE students, created and taught a four-week course on Greek drama for the general public (2015), and collaborated with the NT Learning and Digital departments to produce a number of resources on ancient Greek drama: Google Arts & Culture Exhibition Greek Tragedy at the National Theatre 1964-2014Modern Interpretations of the Chorus and Women in Greek Theatre

    Research

    Image 24-04-2023 at 23.19_Emily Pillinger
    Penelope's Web: enhancing contemporary opera’s representation of ancient myth

    Exploring the power of ancient Greek myth through modern music composition and education, using an innovative programme of collaborative workshops.

    Project status: Ongoing

      Research

      Image 24-04-2023 at 23.19_Emily Pillinger
      Penelope's Web: enhancing contemporary opera’s representation of ancient myth

      Exploring the power of ancient Greek myth through modern music composition and education, using an innovative programme of collaborative workshops.

      Project status: Ongoing