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Biography

Tali Artman Partock studied Hebrew Literature and Psychology at the Hebrew University before completing a Masters and a PhD in Rabbinic Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Since then Tali has won several awards and fellowships among them the Bella and Max Guggenheim Fellowship in Jewish Ethics; the Lafer centre for Gender studies (2011), The centre for the study of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Relations fellowship and research award (OU, 2012-2013), The Israel Institute Post-Doctoal Fellowship at the University of Cambridge (2014-2016).Tali came to kings after teaching at the Faculty of Divinity of the University of Cambridge, where she is still works, as well as in Leo Baeck college, London. Tali joined King’s in 2018.

Research interests and PhD supervision

  • Midrash and hermeneutics
  • Gender studies
  • Judaism and early Christianity
  • The Bible in Literature/film
  • Folktales

Teaching

Tali teaches in the topics of rabbinic literature, women and gender, literary and critical theory, Jewish-Christian dialogue.

Expertise and public engagement

Tali regularly teaches for the Open Talmud Project, Limmud and other public events. She was one of the founders of Alumot, a centre for Hebrew learning in Cambridge, and co-organized an 8 week Israeli film festival at Cambridge. Tali wrote regularly for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz, both as a book reviewer and about her own research.

Publications

  • ‘The Tale Type of the Repenting Prostitute in Rabbinic Literature and Early Christianity’, AJS Review, 42:1 (2018), pp.1-20.
  • ‘Laughing in face of Patriarchy: Genesis Rabbah 17’, (forthcoming in Melilah 13, 2018).
  • ‘Newer Kinds of Jews: on Hasamba 3G,’ Jewish Film and New Media 3 (2015), pp. 104-112.
  • ‘Literary Event and Historical Narrative: Between Rabbis and Church Fathers,’ Jerusalem Studies in Hebrew Literature 24 (2011), pp. 23-54. (Hebrew)
  • ‘Literary Event and Historical Narrative: Between Rabbis and Church Fathers,’ Jerusalem Studies in Hebrew Literature 24 (2011), pp. 23-54. (Hebrew)