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Jobs First evaluation

Jobs-First-Final-Report-2013

Final report

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Final Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Summary Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Easy Read Summary Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Research Tools', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

For further output from this study see below

Purpose of the study

Jobs First was announced within the New Opportunities white paper (HM Government, 2009) and was a key commitment within the Valuing Employment Now strategy (HM Government, 2009). The evaluation aimed to: compare employment outcomes for the cohort of Jobs First participants with a matched comparison group; identify factors and approaches that facilitate and hinder employment of people with learning disabilities; and explore the processes involved in implementing the focus on employment for people with learning disabilities, particularly the challenges in ‘braiding’ funding from different streams.

Timescale

2010 - 2013 

Research team

Martin Stevens, Jess Harris (SCWRU)

Funding

Department of Health, Policy Research Programme

Methods

The evaluation involved two distinct strands. 1) A comparison study, in which the employment status and support needs of people with learning disabilities using Jobs First will be compared over time against a group of people who receive standard services. 2) Interviews with a wide range of stakeholders including: people with learning disabilities; their carers; social care professionals; school and employment service staff; Jobs First leads; job coaches and employers. 

Findings

Jobs First was consistently described as a spur for sites to progress efforts to change attitudes and to promote employment. The availability of supported employment services and changes in public and employer attitudes were seen as the most important factors in encouraging more people with learning disabilities to seek and get paid jobs. Ensuring that enough money was allocated to supported employment, whether from social care or other funding streams, was a key challenge. It was hard to draw multiple funding streams into a single individual budget to pay for supported employment.

All output from the study

Final report

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Final Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London. 

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Summary Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London. 

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Easy Read Summary Report', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London. 

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First Evaluation: Research Tools', London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

Article

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2016) 'Social work support for employment of people with learning disabilities: Findings from the English Jobs First demonstration sites', Journal of Social Work. 10.1177/1468017316637224

Interim report

Stevens, M. & Harris, J., (2011), 'Jobs First Evaluation: Interim Report' [pdf, 924 KB], London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J., (2011), 'Jobs First Evaluation: Interim Report SUMMARY' [pdf, 249 KB], London: Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London. 

Conference papers / presentations

Stevens, M. (2015) 'Jobs First for people with learning disabilities?', Making Research Count, London, 14 April.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2014) 'Social work support for employment of people with learning disabilities', Joint Social Work Education Conference, London, 24 July.

Stevens, M. (2014) 'Personalised employment support for people with intellectual disabilities', International Association of Social Services for Intellectual Disabilities Annual Congress, Vienna, 15 July.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First for people with learning disabilities? Emerging evaluation findings', Personalised support services for disabled people: What can we learn?, London, 25 September. And see news item.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Jobs First for people with learning disabilities? Emerging evaluation findings', NIHR School for Social Care Research Annual Conference, London, 27 March.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2013) 'Exploring organisational approaches to develop personalised employment support for people with Intellectual Disabilities', 7th Annual International Conference on Sociology, Athens, 6-9 May.

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2012) 'Jobs First - findings from the evaluation of a Department of Health programme assisting adults with learning disabilities to gain paid employment', SCWRU / Department of Sociology, University of Bergen Seminar, London, 26 September.

Stevens, M. (2012) 'Jobs First for people with learning disabilities? Exploring the boundary between support and activation' [abstract: pdf, 91 KB], Conference on integrated employment and activation policies in a multilevel welfare system. (Part of EU Seventh Framework programme project LOCALISE), Milan, 30 August. Associated presentation (pdf, 189 KB).

Stevens, M. & Harris, J. (2012) 'Jobs First - what works and doesn't work', Working Together: using personal budgets for employment support, Birmingham, 23 March.

Impact

The evaluation will inform local authorities developing approaches to refocus adult social care on employment for people with learning disabilities and the development of supported employment services.

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