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Researchers

Dr James Cameron

 
James Cameron photo

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Contact Details

Rm S1.11a
Department of War Studies
King's College London
Strand
London
WC2R 2LS
Email: james.j.cameron@kcl.ac.uk
 

Biography

James Cameron is a postdoctoral research associate in the Centre for Science and Security Studies and the Centre for Grand Strategy.

James Cameron is a postdoctoral research associate in the Centre for Science and Security Studies and the Centre for Grand Strategy. His research sheds new light on the nuclear history of the Cold War and explores its implications for current policy. He is the author of The Double Game: The Demise of America’s First Missile Defense System and the Rise of Strategic Arms Limitation (Oxford University Press, 2017).

James has previously held fellowships at Stanford and Yale, and has taught at Fundação Getulio Vargas in São Paulo, Brazil. He holds a BA and PhD from the University of Cambridge and an MPhil in Russian and East European Studies from the University of Oxford.

Publications

Book

  • The Double Game: The Demise of America’s First Missile Defense System and the Rise of Strategic Arms Limitation (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017).

Articles

  • ‘Technology, Politics, and Development: domestic criticism of the Brazilian-West German nuclear agreement’, Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional (forthcoming).
  • With Or Rabinowitz, ‘Eight Lost Years? Nixon, Ford, Kissinger and the Non-Proliferation Regime, 1969-1977’, Journal of Strategic Studies Vol. 40, No. 6 (2017), 839-66 (DOI: 10.1080/01402390.2015.1101682).
  •  ‘From the Grass Roots to the Summit: The Impact of U.S. Suburban Protest on U.S. Missile Defence Policy, 1968-72’, The International History Review Vol. 36, No. 2 (2014), 342-62 (DOI: 10.1080/07075332.2013.864693).

Chapters

  • ‘The United States in the Nixon-Ford Era: Conflict and Détente’, in Alan McPherson (ed.), SHAFR Guide Online: An Annotated Bibliography of U.S. Foreign Relations since 1600 (Leiden: Brill, 2017).
  • ‘Moscow, 1972’, in Kristina Spohr & David Reynolds (eds.), Transcending the Cold War: Summits, Statecraft, and the Dissolution of Bipolarity in Europe, 1970-1990 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 67-91.
  •  ‘Walter H. Annenberg, 1969-1974’, in J. Simon Rofe & Alison Holmes (eds.), The Embassy in Grosvenor Square: American Ambassadors to the United Kingdom, 1938-2008 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), 171-88.
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