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Greene, Dr Samuel

Sam-6777

Director - King's Russia Institute

Tel +44 (0)20 7848 7317

Email samuel.greene@kcl.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Address Room 1.SEB.A, South East Block

King's College London

Strand Campus

Strand

London, WC2R 2LS

King's College London Research Portal - Sam Greene


Biography

Dr. Sam Greene has been appointed as the founding Director of King’s Russia Institute. Sam joins King’s College London from the New Economic School in Moscow, where he was a visiting professor of political science and Director of the Centre for the Study of New Media and Society. He will be starting at King’s in October with a remit to coordinate Russia-related research and start new postgraduate programmes, in order to develop King’s Russia Institute into a leading international centre for the study of contemporary Russia.

An expert in Russian politics and social movements, and the link between Russian domestic and foreign policy, Sam has written extensively in policy and academic formats and is a frequent commentator in Russian and international media. His areas of research interest currently focus on understanding Russia’s shifting state-society relations and the causes and implications of the recent re-emergence of contested politics in Russia, including the social, political and economic effects of new media.

A 13-year resident of Moscow, he speaks fluent Russian and holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Sam has previously worked for six years at the Carnegie Moscow Center of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, including as deputy director.

  

Publications

Book Projects

Russia in Movement: Power and Opposition in Putin’s Russia, monograph, manuscript prepared.

Twenty Years after the Collapse of Communism in the USSR: Russia in Comparative Perspective, edited volume (with Yitzhak Brudny and Evgeny Finkel), University of Pennsylvania Press, forthcoming.

Peer-Reviewed Articles & Chapters

“Deinstitutionalization and the Authoritarian Citizen: The Politics of Uncertainty in Russia,” in Twenty Years after the Collapse of Communism in the USSR: Russia in Comparative Perspective, Yitzhak Brudny, Samuel Greene and Evgeny Finkel (eds.), University of Pennsylvania Press, forthcoming.

“20 Years Late? Citizenship and Constituency in Post-Soviet Russia” in Demokratizatsiya, forthcoming. •    “Society, Politics, and the Search for Community in Russia” in Russia in 2020: Scenarios for the Future, Maria Lipman and Nikolay Petrov (eds.), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2011.

“Politics, justice and the new Russian strike” in Journal of Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 2010, Vol. 43, No. 1 (with Graeme Robertson). 

“Freedom” in 20 Years without the Berlin Wall: A Breakthrough to Freedom, Natalia Bubnova (ed.), Carnegie Moscow Centre, 2010.

“Shifting media and the failure of political communication in Russia” in The Post-Soviet Media: Conflicting Signals, Birgit Beumers, Stephen Hutchings and Natalia Rulyova (eds.), Routledge, 2009.

Policy Papers, Working Papers, Conference Papers

“Deinstitutionalization and the Authoritarian Citizen: The Politics of Uncertainty in Russia,” presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Seattle, 2011.

“Engaging History: The Problems and Politics of Memory in Russia and the Post-Socialist Space,” Working Papers, Carnegie Moscow Centre, 2010 (with Maria Lipman and Andrey Ryabov).

“The Political Economy of Cash Flow in Russia,” presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, 2010.

“(Re)Engaging Russia in an Era of Uncertainty,” Carnegie Endowment Policy Brief, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2009 (with Dmitri Trenin).

“Eyes Wide Shut: The Social Consequences of Russia’s Economic Crisis”, Carnegie Moscow Centre Briefing, Carnegie Moscow Centre, 2008.

“The resource curse and the demand for transparency in Russia,” Working Papers, Carnegie Moscow Centre, 2007.

“Making democracy matter: addressing state-society engagement in measuring the progress of post-communist transition,” presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, 2007.

“Road Rage: Svoboda Vybora and the Russian automotive rebellion”, presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, New York, 2007.

“The resource curse and civil society: does the oil economy crowd out civil society in Russia?” presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, 2005.

Publications in Other Languages

“Russian Civil Society, 20 Years Later” in Revista CIDOB d’Afers Internacionals, forthcoming. (In Spanish)

“The Nature of Immobility in Russian Society” in Transit. Europaische Revue, forthcoming. (In German)

“The Nature of Immobility in Russian Society” in Pro et Contra, 2011, No. 1-2. (In Russian)

“The state and public sovereignty” in Pro et Contra, 2006, No. 1. (In Russian)

 

Research

My work focuses on the relationships of power in contemporary Russia, including social movements, conflict, elite-mass relations and elite strategies. Broadly, I seek to employ a variety of qualitative approaches from political science and political sociology to uncover Russians’ evolving understanding of their state, their identity as citizens and the meaning of their political community. I am also interested in bounded comparisons involving similar questions in other authoritarian contexts.
My current book project, Russia in Movement: Power and Opposition in Putin’s Russia, explores the fitful emergence of social movements in Russia, beginning in 2004 and running through the election protests of 2011 and 2012, and argues that the deinstitutionalization of power – and not the lack of trust or social capital – has been the primary obstacle to the emergence of ‘civil society’ in post-Soviet Russia. Other work has focused on patterns of elite cooperation and conflict in a deinstitutionalized political system, and on shifting conceptions of a Russian social contract in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis.
In addition, I have a particular interest in online social media, both as a factor in social mobilization and political mediation, and as a venue for conducting new kinds of research. To this end, I am a non-resident fellow at the Center for the Study of New Media & Society at the New Economic School in Moscow.

 

Teaching

Dr Greene teaches on the MSc Russian Politics & Society programme starting in September 2013 (subject to approval). The modules he has developed for this programme are as follows: 

•    Contemporary Russian Politics and Policy
•    The Practice of Policymaking in Contemporary Russia
•    Power and Social Conflict in Contemporary Russia


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