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Rosalind Driver Memorial Funds

Rosalind Driver Research Scholarship & Memorial Fund

Rosalind Driver Scholarship Fund (RDSF) studentships: A Studentship in Science Education

 

Funding for science education researchers

In 2007 two funds were established to commemorate Professor Rosalind Driver: the Research Scholarship Fund (RDSF) and the Memorial fund (RDMF):

  • The RDSF was endowed with the purpose of supporting the advancement of research in Science Education. This predominantly takes the form of funding the fees and stipend for c. 1-2 PhD studentships per year within CRESTEM
  • The RDMF is for the support of research students in science and technology education to participate at conferences, purchase materials, and pay for travel expenses. The fund may also be used to support science education related public lectures.

If you would like to donate to the RDMF or are interested in applying for funding from either funds then contact ecs@kcl.ac.uk.  


Who was Professor Rosalind Driver?

rosalinddriverRosalind Driver (1941-97) was a science teacher and academic whose work focused on the practice of teaching and learning science in schools, and in particular on the active role of the learner. Her 1983 book “The Pupil as Scientist?”, which was written primarily for teachers, articulated her central contention that children do not enter the classroom as ‘empty vessels’ but as active thinkers with their own preconceptions about the natural and physical world. In this account, the role of the teacher is to encourage scientific enquiry and experimentation in order to engage with and challenge these preconceived ideas.

Throughout her academic career, Ros worked with practising science teachers – mainly in West Yorkshire but also in more exotic locations including Sierra Leone and Malaysia. The primary aim of this work was to influence and enhance teachers’ classroom practice; this was achieved through discussion of teaching strategies and collaborative development of learning materials. For Ros, collaboration with other researchers and practitioners was essential, and a way to ensure that her own thinking and practice remained fresh and relevant.

Profile by Robert Driver, Rosalind Driver's son

 

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