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Biography

Wiebke Doden is a Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour at King’s Business School. She joined King’s College London in 2019. Previously, Wiebke held a postdoc position at the London School of Economics and Political Science funded by a prestigious mobility grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Wiebke obtained her Doctor of Science in Work and Organisational Psychology from ETH Zurich in Switzerland and graduated with a diploma in Psychology from Otto-von-Guericke University in Germany.

Her research in the area of human resource management and organisational behaviour focuses on psychological contracts, social exchange relationships, and careers. In her work, she tries to understand how employees form and develop psychological contracts, the interplay of psychological contracts and individual careers and the impact of higher-order systems (e.g., economic context) on social exchange relationships.

She acquired research funds from several funding bodies and collaborates closely with partners in the industry to better understand the mutuality in psychological contract development of employees and organisations during newcomer socialisation.

In her research, she uses longitudinal, multi-level, multi-source and multi-method approaches. Her research has been published in top-tier journals including Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior and Journal of Vocational Behavior.

Selected Publications

Doden, W., Grote, G., & Rigotti, T. (2018). Does leader–member exchange buffer or intensify detrimental reactions to psychological contract breach? The role of employees' career orientation. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 106, 192-208. doi:10.1016/j.jvb.2018.02.004 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879118300216

Coyle-Shapiro, J. A. M., Pereira Costa, S., Doden, W., & Chang, C. (2019). Psychological contracts: Past, present, and future. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 6(1), 1-25. doi: 10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012218-015212 https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012218-015212