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Intelligence & International Security MA

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Our Intelligence & International Security MA examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and international security developments in the 21st century. Intelligence, today, is central to our security. It is crucial for managing the key national and international security threats that societies and individuals face, ranging from the threat of domestic and transnational terrorism, to digital espionage and attacks, to pandemics, to renewed inter-state, and great power rivalries. Understanding intelligence is also crucial if we are to understand the balance of power between the citizen and the state, particularly given the potential of digital surveillance. This course grapples with these issues, and many others. It offers students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the nature and mechanics of intelligence, from a global perspective. It delves into the practical matters that concern intelligence officers and organisations as they go about their business, and the challenges national governments face in utilising intelligence and in managing their intelligence machineries. Students will also consider the ethical issues that concern all aspects of intelligence operations.

Key benefits

  • The opportunity to explore a wide variety of perspectives and experiences through a diverse range of teaching approaches, including lectures, workshops, games and exercises.
  • Development of core transferable skills, including the study of effective intelligence analysis, as well as communication, evaluation and analytical skills, interpersonal cooperation and writing opportunities, bias identification, and critical reading and thinking.
  • You will gain an in-depth understanding of the nature of intelligence, intelligence processes, case studies of systems, success, and failure, and examine how intelligence has and continued to impact on national and international security.
  • The Department hosts one of the largest groups of academics focused on intelligence and security anywhere in the world. You will be taught by world-leading experts in their fields –who not only engage in academic work and research, but also undertake a wide variety of advisory roles to national governments and non-governmental organisations.
  • Supplementing the academic programme are lectures and masterclasses given by our Visiting Professors, senior practitioners and leaders in the field, who share with students their unique experiences and perspectives on intelligence and its role in statecraft.
  • This MA is excellent preparation for employment in government service or in commercial risk management and open-source intelligence providers.
  • Students from this course have gone on to work in a very wide variety of roles, with an international scope. Many of our alumni have entered government, NATO or the EU, others have entered the armed forces, gone on to work as investigative journalists, think tank researchers, UN officials, and security consultants for international NGOs. Many of them return to join us on the course to offer current students an insight into their career paths.
  • You have the advantage of attending masterclasses, workshops and roundtables run by the King's Intelligence and Security Group which alongside a vibrant events programme, provides a platform and hub for bring intelligence scholars together to share ideas.

Our course offers students an in-depth, unique perspective on intelligence and its role in statecraft. Students will examine the nature of intelligence, the practice and process of intelligence agencies, and the interaction between intelligence agencies, the wider machinery of government, and society. Building upon a foundation of historical research and practical experience, the course examines from a multidisciplinary perspective the issues and trends that continue to shape intelligence and international security in the 21st century. Students on our MA experience an exceptionally stimulating environment. The core module, Intelligence in Peace and War, offers a broad, authoritative perspective on the evolution and practice of intelligence, and it is complemented by a number of more specialised optional modules. This offers students the opportunity to study both the general contours of intelligence and its role in domestic and international security, and more specific elements of intelligence and security operations. The academic contents of both the core and optional modules is supplemented by the perspective of practitioners. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security. This includes developing an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; knowledge of the problems connected with intelligence collection, assessment and the ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical and political concerns generated by intelligence. This MA is based in the Department of War Studies, one of the only academic departments in the world to focus solely on the complexities of conflict and security. War Studies is a multidisciplinary department and all War Studies students benefit from research-led teaching in such subjects as the history and evolution of war and grand strategy, arms control and non-proliferation, migration, strategic thought, cyber, conflict and the environment, the influence of science and technology on international security, along with regional specialisms covering Africa, Asia (East and South), Russia and elsewhere.

Base campuses

strand-quad
Strand Campus

Located on the north bank of the River Thames, the Strand Campus houses King's College London's arts and sciences faculties.

waterloo-banner
Waterloo Campus

Waterloo campus is home of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery and facilities for other faculties

Regulating bodies

King's is regulated by the Office for Students

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Teaching methods - what to expect

The following table will give you an idea of what a typical academic workload might look like as you progress through your studies:

Module Lectures, seminars and feedback Self-study
Per 30-credit module

40 hours of teaching. Typically, 2 hours per week over two 10 week terms. This can be split into lectures and seminars and flexible delivery options available. A 15 credit module will be half of this.

260 hours.
Dissertation module (60 credits) Up to 12 hours of online guidance, training workshops and personal supervision. 588 hours for dissertation.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours work.

Assessment

  • Exercises
  • Exams
  • Seminar participation
  • Individual & Group Presentations
  • Dissertation

The primary methods of assessment for this course are assessed essays, individual and group presentations, seminar participation, exercises, and/or exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 12,000 words).

Structure

Required modules

You are required to take the following modules:

Intelligence in Peace & War (30 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules

In addition, you are required to take 90 credits from a range of optional modules if a full-time student. If you are a part-time student you will typically take 30 credits (or up to 60 credits) from a range of optional modules in your first year that may include the below:

Diplomacy & Foreign Policy (30 credits)
National Security Studies (30 credits)
Technology, Security and Global Politics (15 credits)
Cybersecurity: Comparative Policy and Strategy (15 credits)
Armchair Intelligence: Open Sources & Online Investigation (15 credits)
Homegrown Radicalisation (30 credits)
Political Violence, Counterterrorism and Human Rights ( 30 credits)
Understanding Political Islam ( 30 credits)

Or choose from a range of optional modules available within the Department of War Studies. Please Note: the optional modules available change each year and are therefore only made accessible to enrolled students during the module allocation process.

King’s College London reviews the modules offered on a regular basis to provide up-to-date, innovative and relevant programmes of study. Therefore, modules offered may change. We suggest you keep an eye on the course finder on our website for updates.

Please note that modules with a practical component will be capped due to educational requirements, which may mean that we cannot guarantee a place to all students who elect to study this module.

Employability

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, many British governmental departments, including the FCO, the MOD, and the Home Office. Many Graduates also go on to work for the equivalent institutions in their home governments. More generally, many Graduates go on to work for NATO, and the UN, or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

Tuition Fees

UK:

Full time: £16,200 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £8,100 per year (2022/23)

International:

Full time: £29,310 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £14,655 per year (2022/23)

These tuition fees may be subject to additional increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

Deposit

When you receive an offer for this course you will be required to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure your place. The deposit will be credited towards your total fee payment.

The UK deposit is £500.

The INTERNATIONAL deposit is £2,000.

  • If you receive an offer on or before 31 March, payment is due by 25 April 2022.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 April and 30 June, payment is due within one month of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 July and 31 July, payment is due within two weeks of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 August and 21 August, payment is due within one week of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer from 22 August onwards, payment is due within three days of receiving the offer.

If you are a current King’s student in receipt of the King's Living Bursary you are not required to pay a deposit to secure your place on the programme. Please note, this will not change the total fees payable for your chosen programme.

Please visit our web pages on fees and funding for more information.

Additional Costs

In addition to your tuition costs, you can also expect to pay for:

  • Books if you choose to buy your own copies
  • Library fees and fines 
  • Personal photocopies
  • Printing course handouts
  • Stationery 
  • Travel costs for travel around London and between campuses
  • Graduation costs 

Funding

Our course offers students an in-depth, unique perspective on intelligence and its role in statecraft. Students will examine the nature of intelligence, the practice and process of intelligence agencies, and the interaction between intelligence agencies, the wider machinery of government, and society. Building upon a foundation of historical research and practical experience, the course examines from a multidisciplinary perspective the issues and trends that continue to shape intelligence and international security in the 21st century. Students on our MA experience an exceptionally stimulating environment. The core module, Intelligence in Peace and War, offers a broad, authoritative perspective on the evolution and practice of intelligence, and it is complemented by a number of more specialised optional modules. This offers students the opportunity to study both the general contours of intelligence and its role in domestic and international security, and more specific elements of intelligence and security operations. The academic contents of both the core and optional modules is supplemented by the perspective of practitioners. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security. This includes developing an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; knowledge of the problems connected with intelligence collection, assessment and the ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical and political concerns generated by intelligence. This MA is based in the Department of War Studies, one of the only academic departments in the world to focus solely on the complexities of conflict and security. War Studies is a multidisciplinary department and all War Studies students benefit from research-led teaching in such subjects as the history and evolution of war and grand strategy, arms control and non-proliferation, migration, strategic thought, cyber, conflict and the environment, the influence of science and technology on international security, along with regional specialisms covering Africa, Asia (East and South), Russia and elsewhere.

Base campuses

strand-quad
Strand Campus

Located on the north bank of the River Thames, the Strand Campus houses King's College London's arts and sciences faculties.

waterloo-banner
Waterloo Campus

Waterloo campus is home of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery and facilities for other faculties

Regulating bodies

King's is regulated by the Office for Students

Loading...

Teaching methods - what to expect

The following table will give you an idea of what a typical academic workload might look like as you progress through your studies:

Module Lectures, seminars and feedback Self-study
Per 30-credit module

40 hours of teaching. Typically, 2 hours per week over two 10 week terms. This can be split into lectures and seminars and flexible delivery options available. A 15 credit module will be half of this.

260 hours.
Dissertation module (60 credits) Up to 12 hours of online guidance, training workshops and personal supervision. 588 hours for dissertation.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours work.

Assessment

  • Exercises
  • Exams
  • Seminar participation
  • Individual & Group Presentations
  • Dissertation

The primary methods of assessment for this course are assessed essays, individual and group presentations, seminar participation, exercises, and/or exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 12,000 words).

Structure

Required modules

You are required to take the following modules:

Intelligence in Peace & War (30 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules

In addition, you are required to take 90 credits from a range of optional modules if a full-time student. If you are a part-time student you will typically take 30 credits (or up to 60 credits) from a range of optional modules in your first year that may include the below:

Diplomacy & Foreign Policy (30 credits)
National Security Studies (30 credits)
Technology, Security and Global Politics (15 credits)
Cybersecurity: Comparative Policy and Strategy (15 credits)
Armchair Intelligence: Open Sources & Online Investigation (15 credits)
Homegrown Radicalisation (30 credits)
Political Violence, Counterterrorism and Human Rights ( 30 credits)
Understanding Political Islam ( 30 credits)

Or choose from a range of optional modules available within the Department of War Studies. Please Note: the optional modules available change each year and are therefore only made accessible to enrolled students during the module allocation process.

King’s College London reviews the modules offered on a regular basis to provide up-to-date, innovative and relevant programmes of study. Therefore, modules offered may change. We suggest you keep an eye on the course finder on our website for updates.

Please note that modules with a practical component will be capped due to educational requirements, which may mean that we cannot guarantee a place to all students who elect to study this module.

Employability

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, many British governmental departments, including the FCO, the MOD, and the Home Office. Many Graduates also go on to work for the equivalent institutions in their home governments. More generally, many Graduates go on to work for NATO, and the UN, or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

Tuition Fees

UK:

Full time: £16,200 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £8,100 per year (2022/23)

International:

Full time: £29,310 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £14,655 per year (2022/23)

These tuition fees may be subject to additional increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

Deposit

When you receive an offer for this course you will be required to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure your place. The deposit will be credited towards your total fee payment.

The UK deposit is £500.

The INTERNATIONAL deposit is £2,000.

  • If you receive an offer on or before 31 March, payment is due by 25 April 2022.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 April and 30 June, payment is due within one month of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 July and 31 July, payment is due within two weeks of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer between 1 August and 21 August, payment is due within one week of receiving the offer.
  • If you receive an offer from 22 August onwards, payment is due within three days of receiving the offer.

If you are a current King’s student in receipt of the King's Living Bursary you are not required to pay a deposit to secure your place on the programme. Please note, this will not change the total fees payable for your chosen programme.

Please visit our web pages on fees and funding for more information.

Additional Costs

In addition to your tuition costs, you can also expect to pay for:

  • Books if you choose to buy your own copies
  • Library fees and fines 
  • Personal photocopies
  • Printing course handouts
  • Stationery 
  • Travel costs for travel around London and between campuses
  • Graduation costs 

Funding

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