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Politics, Philosophy & Law LLB

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Overview

Our PPL LLB degree is the first course of its kind in the UK to offer a combined Politics, Philosophy and Law course with a unique opportunity to fulfil the entry requirements of a qualifying law degree. This interdisciplinary course, provides you with access to eminent academics from three outstanding faculties and challenges you to think deeply about key political, philosophical and legal issues on a global level; enabling you to develop an understanding of the concepts and to think critically about these methods and approaches of each area.

The course information sheet is a printable version of the information on this web page, which you can download here.

Key benefits

  • Recognised globally as one of the UK's premier law schools.
  • Teaching by internationally respected, leading academics and visiting lecturers and practitioners from global law firms.
  • Unrivalled location for law, based in the East Wing of Somerset House on the Strand, with the Royal Courts of Justice, Law Society and Inns of Court right on your doorstep.
  • Consistently high student satisfaction ratings in the National Student Survey.
  • Excellent legal research resources at the College's impressive Maughan Library.
  • A thriving Professional Skills portfolio including professional skills modules, a legal clinic, and mooting programme.
  • A dedicated careers team who provide tailored guidance on how to access the legal profession.
  • Active student-run societies organising social and career-oriented functions.

Key information

UCAS code LM21

Duration Four years

Study mode Full-time

Course type Single honours

Further details

Awarding institution King's College London

Faculty The Dickson Poon School of Law

Department Department of Philosophy Department of Political Economy

Locations

 

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Course detail

Description

Our course focuses on the study of Law as an intellectual discipline. It can form the first major step towards qualifying to practice as a solicitor or barrister, but also represents appropriate preliminary training for a range of other careers in which legal knowledge is an asset. It is suitable for students who have a general interest in law and want to find out more about it before deciding on a particular vocation.

The course aims at producing the most complete lawyers and legal academics; graduates who are able to confidently navigate legal and political discourse. You will graduate with a well-rounded degree and a set of skills that are highly sought-after by many employers.

Teaching at King's

We have a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, with consistently high student satisfaction ratings for Law in the National Student Survey. All required modules are taught through lectures, small group tutorials and seminars. These tutorials and seminars will give you the opportunity to apply the general legal principles you have learnt to specific problems, and allow you to engage with our academics and explore issues further in depth.

You will be assigned a personal tutor, who will provide academic and pastoral support during your studies. We attach great importance to maintaining good relations between staff and students and our Staff-Student Liaison Committee meets regularly to discuss how we can collectively enhance the student experience.

Assessment at King's

Assessment of required modules will typically consist of an examination supplemented by written coursework, such as a written essay, where applicable. Assessment in optional modules varies and may encompass, for example, examinations, essays, moots, or a negotiation exercise.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

This programme is further regulated by the:

  • Law Benchmark Statement (2015)
  • Criteria for degrees (University of London)
  • Joint Statement of the Law Society and the General Council of the Bar (1999)
  • H-level descriptors of the framework for higher education qualifications (2001)

Location

This course is primarily taught at the King's College London Strand and Waterloo campuses.

Please note that locations are determined by where each module is taught and may vary depending on the optional modules you select.

Special notes

Students can engage in real client work through the School’s Legal Clinic established in April 2017. Students who spend their final year of their degree at King's can select the Student Law Clinic module, while students of all years can apply to volunteer with the clinic during the academic year or over the summer holiday. Supervised by the Clinic's in-house solicitor as well as solicitors from high street and corporate/commercial law firms (e.g. Duncan Lewis and Farrer), students learn transferable skills such as effective communication and teamwork and see the law in a practical context. Through the Clinic students can also engage with third sector partners such as the Personal Support Unit at the Royal Courts of Justice or participate in its Mediation project or public legal education activity).

We have many highly active student-run societies as well as King's award-winning students’ union, KCLSU, who organises a wide variety of social, sporting and cultural activities.

Both the King’s College London Law Society and Bar & Mooting Society organise a number of social and career-oriented functions such as: internal and external mooting competitions; skills workshops; mock interview sessions; lecture series with prestigious barristers and other legal practitioners; as well as the Inaugural Welcome Party at the start of the academic year and the Annual Black-Tie Dinner. The KCL Law Society supports students who wish to pursue careers as solicitors while the Bar & Mooting Society help students understand the path to qualification as a barrister. 

The Pro Bono Society supports and promotes legally-related volunteer work and education to the community, and runs many exciting projects, including the Amicus Chapter, Human Rights Project, Junior Lawyers Against Poverty; Law Mentoring; and Legal Outreach. Involvement with the society is a great way to contribute to the community as well as looking great on your CV due to the skills gained in the process.

The PPL course has a very active student society which organises educational and social events throughout the year.

There are various other societies within the Law School which students can get involved in, such as Lawyers Without Borders, King’s Women in the Law, Intellectual Property and Information Law Society and Criminology Society.

 

Structure

Year 1

Currently, students study the modules shown below. King's reviews its modules on a regular basis, in order to continue to offer innovative and exciting courses this list is therefore subject to change. Please check here for updates, or contact the School for further advice.

Courses are divided into modules. Each year you will normally take modules totalling 120 credits. 

Required Modules

You are required to take the following modules:

  • Comparing Political Systems (30 credits)
  • Elements of the Law of Contract (30 credits)
  • European Law (30 credits)
  • Legal Reasoning & Legal Services (non-credit bearing)
Optional Modules

In addition, you are required to take 30 credits from a range of Philosophy options, which may typically include:

  • Elementary Logic (15 credits)
  • Epistemology 1 (15 credits)
  • Ethics 1 (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy 1 (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Philosophy (30 credits)
  • Metaphysics 1 (15 credits)
  • Methodology (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy 1 (15 credits)
  • Political Philosophy 1 (15 credits)

Year 2

Required Modules

You are required to take the following modules are for this course:

Optional Modules

In addition, you are required to take 30 credits from a range of Philosophy options which may typically include:

  • Epistemology II (15 credits)
  • Ethics II: Contemporary Ethical Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Ethics II: History of Ethical Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Plato (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Aristotle (15 credits)
  • Intermediate Logic (15 credits)
  • Metaphysics II (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Locke & Berkeley (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Spinoza & Leibniz (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Logic & Language (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Mind (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Physics I: Philosophy of Space & Time (15 credits)
  • Political Philosophy II: History of Political Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Political Philosophy II: Theories of Freedom (15 credits)

In addition, you are required to take 30 credits from a range of Political Economy options, which may typically include:

  • Ethics, Economics & Environmental Protection (15 credits)
  • Game Theory & Strategic Decision Making (15 credits)
  • Issues in International Politics (15 credits)
  • Modern Political Thought (15 credits)
  • Policy Analysis, Decision & Implementation (15 credits)
  • Political Change in Europe (15 credits)
  • Political Economy: Approaches, Concepts & Issues (15 credits)
  • Political Theory of Capitalism (15 credits)
  • Stability & Change in Post-Colonial Nations (15 credits)
  • The Economics of Politics (15 credits)
  • The International Politics of Energy (15 credits)

Year 3

Required Modules

The following modules are required and may be taken in either Year 3 or Year 4:

Optional Modules

In addition, you are required to select further modules to bring your total credits for each year to 120. The range of optional modules available from each department may typically include:

Law

  • Advanced Constitutional Law (30 credits)
  • Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property (30 credits)
  • Anti-Discrimination Law (30 credits)
  • British Legal History (30 credits)
  • Commercial Law (30 credits)
  • Company Law (30 credits)
  • Comparative Private Law (15 credits)
  • Competition Law (30 credits)
  • Consumer Protection: advising global businesses & their customers (30 credits)
  • Criminal Law Theory (15 credits)
  • Criminology & Criminal Justice (30 credits)
  • Environmental Law (30 credits)
  • Family Law (30 credits)
  • Finance, Credit & Security (15 credits)
  • French Legal System & Laws (15 credits)
  • Hot Topics in Law, Technology & Society (15 credits)
  • Human Rights Law (30 credits)
  • Intellectual Property Law (30 credits)
  • International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits)
  • Labour Law (30 credits)
  • Law & Economics (30 credits)
  • Law & Social Theory (30 credits)
  • Law of Personal Taxation (30 credits)
  • Machine Intelligence, Surveillance & Society (15 credits)
  • Medical Law (30 credits)
  • Moral Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Principles of Enterprise Governance (30 credits)
  • Private International Law (30 credits)
  • Public International Law (30 credits)
  • Russian Legal System (30 credits)
  • Student Law Clinic (15 credits)
  • Transnational Company Law (15 credits)

Philosophy

  • 19th Century Continental Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Aesthetics (15 credits)
  • Epistemology II (15 credits)
  • Foundations of Analytic Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophical Texts I: Plato (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophical Texts II: Aristotle (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Aristotle (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Plato (15 credits)
  • Hellenistic Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Indian Philosophy: the Heterodox Schools (15 credits)
  • Indian Philosophy: the Orthodox Schools (15 credits)
  • Kant’s Epistemology & Metaphysics (15 credits)
  • Kant’s Moral & Aesthetic Theory (15 credits)
  • Medieval Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Metaphysics II (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Locke & Berkeley (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Spinoza & Leibniz (15 credits)
  • Moral Normativity (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Logic & Language (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Mind (15 credits)

Year 4

Required Modules

The following modules are required and may be taken in either Year 3 or Year 4:

Optional Modules

In addition, you are required to select further modules to bring your total credits for each year to 120. The range of optional modules available from each department may typically include:

Law

  • Advanced Constitutional Law (30 credits)
  • Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property (30 credits)
  • Anti-Discrimination Law (30 credits)
  • British Legal History (30 credits)
  • Commercial Law (30 credits)
  • Company Law (30 credits)
  • Comparative Private Law (15 credits)
  • Competition Law (30 credits)
  • Consumer Protection: advising global businesses & their customers (30 credits)
  • Criminal Law Theory (15 credits)
  • Criminology & Criminal Justice (30 credits)
  • Environmental Law (30 credits)
  • Family Law (30 credits)
  • Finance, Credit & Security (15 credits)
  • French Legal System & Laws (15 credits)
  • Hot Topics in Law, Technology & Society (15 credits)
  • Human Rights Law (30 credits)
  • Intellectual Property Law (30 credits)
  • International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits)
  • Labour Law (30 credits)
  • Law & Economics (30 credits)
  • Law & Social Theory (30 credits)
  • Law of Personal Taxation (30 credits)
  • Machine Intelligence, Surveillance & Society (15 credits)
  • Medical Law (30 credits)
  • Moral Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Principles of Enterprise Governance (30 credits)
  • Private International Law (30 credits)
  • Public International Law (30 credits)
  • Russian Legal System (30 credits)
  • Student Law Clinic (15 credits)
  • Transnational Company Law (15 credits)

Philosophy

  • 19th Century Continental Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Aesthetics (15 credits)
  • Epistemology II (15 credits)
  • Foundations of Analytic Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophical Texts I: Plato (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophical Texts II: Aristotle (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Aristotle (15 credits)
  • Greek Philosophy II: Plato (15 credits)
  • Hellenistic Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Indian Philosophy: the Heterodox Schools (15 credits)
  • Indian Philosophy: the Orthodox Schools (15 credits)
  • Kant’s Epistemology & Metaphysics (15 credits)
  • Kant’s Moral & Aesthetic Theory (15 credits)
  • Medieval Philosophy (15 credits)
  • Metaphysics II (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Locke & Berkeley (15 credits)
  • Modern Philosophy II: Spinoza & Leibniz (15 credits)
  • Moral Normativity (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Logic & Language (15 credits)
  • Philosophy of Mind (15 credits)

Entry requirements

 

Required grades

A*AA

Please note that A-level General Studies, Critical Thinking, Thinking Skills and Global Perspectives are not accepted by King's as one of your A-levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer.

Required grades

35 points overall (including TOK/EE) and three Higher Level subjects at 766

Required grades

45 Level 3 credits: 39 must be from units awarded at Distinction, with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Required grades

D2 D3 D3

Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

88% overall

 

Visit our admissions webpages to view our international entry requirements and English language entry requirements.

Required subjects

No required subjects.

Preferred subjects

No preferred subjects

Further information and other requirements

Entry Requirements
A-Level A*AA Please note that A-level General Studies, Critical Thinking, Thinking Skills and Global Perspectives are not accepted by King's as one of your A-levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer. 
Access to HE Diploma

D: 39 credits

M: 6 credits

P: 0 credits

 Access to HE Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits: 39 must be from units awarded at Distinction, with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit.
Cambridge Pre-U  D2 D3 D3 Three Pre-U Principal subjects at D2 D3 D3. Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered.
BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010)   DDM with eleven Distinctions and two A levels at grades A*A or D*DD with fourteen Distinctions and two A levels at grades AA.
BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010)   DM with six Distinctions and two A levels at grades A*A or D*D with ten Distinctions and two A levels at grades AA.
BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010)   D with four modules at Distinction and two A levels at grades A*A or D* with five modules at Distinction and two A levels at grades AA.
Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers  AAA in Highers

and

AA in Advanced Highers

Must be a combination of three Scottish Highers and two Scottish Advanced Highers. We do not count the Higher and Advanced Higher in the same subject.
International Baccalaureate 35 points including 766 in three Higher Level subjects. Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE.
Other International Qualifications   Visit our admissions webpages to view our international entry requirements.
English Language Requirements Band B  Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements.

Scholastic activities (Very Desirable): We look for applicants with an enthusiasm for scholastic activities in general such as reading, debating, theological interests etc. Participation will be valued but achievement in these areas of interest will also be recognised. We are also looking for applicants with an enthusiasm to study a law degree programme and have thought through their reasons for considering this subject option. The King’s degree programme focuses on the study of law as an intellectual discipline. Law may be regarded as a social science, a branch of ethics or as part of political philosophy, and all of these perspectives are explored within the learning environment of King's. It also can form the first major step towards qualifying for practice as a solicitor or barrister. Applicants outside of the UK should indicate why they particularly wish to study English law.

Community activities: We look for applicants who have participated as fully as possible in school, college or community life, making the most of the opportunities available to them and also demonstrated some experience of society beyond their immediate environment.

General: We look for applicants who have varied extra-curricular interests and enjoy active participation in areas such as sport, music and the arts in general. Participation will be valued but any achievement in extra-curricular activities will also be recognised. King’s aspires to recruit applicants who will continue with their personal interests and contribute to the vitality of the College community. Paid or voluntary work: Although we do not require applicants to have been in paid or voluntary employment, we welcome applications from those with any experience of legal work experience.

Selection procedure

All applicants are required to take the National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT) by 20 January. Due to the competitive nature of the programme, it is unlikely we will be able to consider your application further if we have not sat your LNAT by 20 January. To facilitate the assessment of your application however, we encourage you to take the LNAT by mid-December. Your application will be considered late if we have not received your results by that date. This applies to all home/EU and overseas applicants. However, for some overseas applicants dispensations may be granted on an individual basis only where there is no LNAT centre in the candidate's country or no centre within a reasonable distance from his or her residence. Please see the LNAT website for further details.

Please note, if you are reapplying through UCAS this year you must also take the LNAT again this year. LNAT results will not be carried over from one year to the next.

Those wishing to apply for the Politics, Philosophy & Law LLB (LM21) course must apply through UCAS

If you are applying for admission for English Law & French Law LLB and Maitrise en droit (M121), English Law & German Law LLB and MLLP or Certificate in Rechtswissenschaften (M122), English Law & Hong Kong Law LLB and JD (M190) or Politics, Philosophy & Law LLB (LM21) and also wish to be considered for the Law LLB (M100) course you must make a separate entry on your UCAS form.

The standard three A-level offer for the LLB is A*AA. However, we wish to encourage applications from a wide variety of educational backgrounds and will consider candidates without the standard qualifications.

Resits

Please be aware that we do not to accept resit students for entry to any of our undergraduate Law programmes. We require all relevant qualifications to be successfully completed in the first sitting, e.g. completing an A level within two years. We will only consider resits if there are significant mitigating circumstances affecting your first ‘sitting’. In these situations we still cannot guarantee that your application will be considered, but you should make reference to these circumstances within your personal statement and academic reference. We will then request further information if necessary. Please note, we consider taking the same subject again at the same level, even within a different qualification, to be a resit.

Interviewing:

Are interviews offered? Yes

Are all applicants interviewed? No. Only candidates deemed to be borderline or from non-traditional academic backgrounds may be called for interview.

Are all those made an offer interviewed? No. The majority of admissions decisions are made on basis of information provided on UCAS application form. 

Application deadline: January 15th 2019

Fees and funding

Full time tuition fees UK:

The UK tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is currently £9,250 per year. This is based on the UK Government’s cap.

Full time tuition fees EU:

Students starting their programme in 2019/20 (September 2019) who are eligible to pay EU fees will pay the same rate of tuition fees as UK students. This will apply for the duration of their programme, but may be subject to change by the UK Government for subsequent cohorts from 2020/21.

The UK tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is currently £9,250 per year. This is based on the UK Government’s cap.

Full time tuition fees International:

The International tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is £23,490 per year.

Please note that the International tuition fee is subject to annual increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

All International applicants to Undergraduate programmes are required to pay a deposit of £2,000 against their first year’s tuition fee. This deposit is payable when you firmly accept an unconditional offer to study with us, and will be offset against your tuition fees when you join King’s.

 

Additional costs/expenses

In addition to your tuition fees, you can also expect to pay for: 

  • Books if you choose to buy your own copies 
  • Clothing for optional course related events and competitions 
  • Library fees and fines 
  • Personal photocopies 
  • Printing course handouts 
  • Transcription costs
  • Society membership fees 
  • Stationery 
  • Travel costs for travel to and around London and between campuses 
  • Graduation costs

For further information, please visit our fees and funding pages.

Financial help and support

Visit the fees and funding webpages to find out more about bursaries, scholarships, grants, tuition fees, living expenses, student loans and other financial help available at King's.

Career prospects

King’s Law graduates are popular with many employers. The majority of our students choose to become solicitors in leading law firms and specialist or niche firms. Some choose broader business roles such as financial analyst, management consultant or graduate trainee in a variety of sectors. Others find that their law degree opens up opportunities in international development, advisory work, the public sector and teaching. Although the employment market is competitive, our students have been very successful in obtaining posts with the firms or sets of chambers for which they wanted to work. Many law firms will target our students because they have come to associate King’s with very high-quality, motivated applicants comparable to those from other top law schools both in the UK and overseas. 

King’s Careers Service can provide you with all the information and support you need to make an informed career choice and to increase your chances of success.

Career destinations

Recent graduates have found employment as a:

  • Lawyer
  • Civil Servant
  • United Nations Official
  • Financial Analyst
  • Tax Advisor
  • Head of Trading
  • Management Consultant
  • Journalist 
  • Publisher
  • Paralegal
  • Entrepreneur
  • Academic

 

Testimonials

Next steps

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