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Social Sciences BA

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Overview

The many faces of inequality. Shifting relationships between the Global North and South. War, displacement and human trafficking. Child exploitation and care scandals. Black Lives Matter, transactivism, and the #MeToo campaign against sexual harassment. Rising Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and resurgent nationalism. Green politics. Fake news... 

Questions about how we understand, structure and change society have never been more urgent. This course welcomes students from across the world to the heart of London to provide them with an internationally and practically oriented understanding of the ways in which core debates within the social sciences can shape our responses to pressing social and policy questions. 

Key benefits

  • Learn how to make a difference in the world. Our innovative curriculum, which enables students to focus on issues that matter to them, encourages and supports creativity, risk-taking and social action, teaching you the knowledge, skills and confidence to communicate, collaborate, organise and persuade.
  • Gain first-hand knowledge of the world of work. Our links with communities, organisations and institutions of the capital will provide you with an array of opportunities for learning and forging new networks. Practitioners from a range of external social and policy relevant organisations contribute to the teaching and host reciprocal visits and work placements.
  • Develop inter-disciplinary literacy. Real-world social, political and ethical questions do not fall into neat disciplinary boxes. You will learn to apply and combine perspectives from a range of social science disciplines including sociology, social policy and politics.
  • Work with academics who are world leading in their fields and committed to high quality research-led education. As well as having a proven track record of research and teaching excellence, the experience of the course team extends beyond academia to include work with a range of policy and cultural institutions.
  • Broaden your horizons by learning a language, studying abroad and/or taking advantage of the many other optional learning opportunities at King’s.
  • Study in a friendly and supportive School, located by the Thames in the heart of central London. 

Key information

UCAS code L300

Duration Three years

Study mode Full-time

Course type Single honours

Further details

Awarding institution King's College London

Faculty Faculty of Social Science & Public Policy

Department School of Education, Communication & Society

Locations

 

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Social Sciences at King's

In the heart of London

Find out how you can make a difference in the world by studying our exciting new Social Sciences BA course here at King's.

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Course detail

Description

The course is designed to connect social sciences to the lived world of policy and practice. Through studying key social and political issues of contemporary relevance you will learn about the most influential social science traditions and perspectives and the contributions they can make to understanding and shaping society. There is a strong emphasis throughout on problem solving and policy formulation, creativity, interpersonal co-operation and active citizenship.

Teaching

Teaching on the course is underpinned by a philosophy of active and collaborative learning. You will be expected, and supported, to take responsibility for your own learning and to work collectively with your teachers and peers to help co-create the curriculum. A range of learning techniques are used to offer students variety and flexibility in their study and significant scope for group work, interaction and projects aligned with participants’ own interests and commitments.

Teaching methods include: seminars, lectures and supervision; reading and extensive use of library resources; use of digital resources, including videos, annotated power point presentations and online discussion fora; policy analysis, formulation and communication tasks done individually and collaboratively; case studies; work-placement or work-related study; data collection and analysis; coursework assignments and their associated formative feedback. We will also give you a personal tutor to support you through your studies.

The following will give you an idea of what a typical academic work load might look like:

 Module

Lectures, seminars & supervision

Self and group study

Per 30-credit module

Typically four hours per week over a 10 week term. This can be split into a two-hour lecture and two-hour seminar or organised in another way. 

260 hours

Per 15-credit module

Typically two hours per week over a 10 week term. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or organised in another way.

130 hours

Dissertation module

8.5 hours of supervision (individual + group).

291.5 hours  

 

Typically 1 credit equals 10 hours of work.

Assessment 

The course uses a progressive model of assessment that helps you to build up your knowledge and skills in a systematic way as you progress through the course. A variety of modes of assessment are used to support and test academic rigour and to help you develop capabilities that are valued in work and civic life. Alongside traditional academic essays, these include report writing, podcasting, writing articles for press and media outlets, writing policy briefings, oral, video and poster presentations, personal learning diaries, project proposals and CV writing. In your final year you will write a dissertation. High quality formative assessment and feedback is used across the course to reinforce your learning and development.

Other related courses

Structure

Year 1

Courses are divided into modules. Each year you will normally take modules totalling 120 credits.

The first year offers a broad-based social sciences education after which you will follow one of two specialist pathways: ‘Sociology and Social Policy’ or ‘Children, Youth and Society’.  In the first year the curriculum is set to provide you with a strong foundation in the subject. In the second and third years you will be increasingly free to choose modules that reflect your interests.

King’s College London reviews optional modules offered on a regular basis to provide up-to-date, innovative and relevant programmes of study.  Therefore, modules offered may change.  We suggest you keep an eye on the course finder on our website for updates.

 

In Year 1 you will study 120 credits worth of required modules. In addition, there is a two-day non-credit bearing workshop designed to introduce students to the course philosophy and ways of working and help students with the transition to university study.

Required Modules

You are required to take the following modules:

  • Understanding the Social World (30 credits)
  • Introduction to Social Theory (30 credits)
  • Power, Inequality and Social Change (30 credits)
  • Social Justice and Policy Analysis (30 credits)
Optional Modules

 There are no optional modules in your first year. 

Year 2

In year 2 you will start to specialise in your chosen pathway. Students on both pathways will take 60 credits worth of required modules with the remaining 60 credits made up of optional modules, with at least 45 credits worth of modules taken from your chosen pathway.

Required Modules

You are required to take the following modules:

  • The Uses of Theory (15 credits)
  • Principles and Methods of Social Research (30 credits)
  • Work Placement (15 credits) or Social Sciences at Work (15 credits)
Optional Modules

In addition you are required to take 60 credits worth of optional modules, with at least 45 credits worth of modules taken from your chosen pathway.

 Sociology and Social Policy Pathway

  • Gender and Sexual Politics (15 credits)
  • Race, Ethnicity and Society (15 credits)
  • Culture, Media and Society (15 credits)
  • Environment, Policy and Society (15 credits)
  • A 15-credit module from the Children, Youth and Society pathway or approved module from other courses or the Modern Language Centre

 

Children, Youth and Society Pathway

  • Global Childhoods and Youth: past and present (15 credits)
  • Philosophical Perspectives on Childhood and Youth (15 credits)
  • Children, Families and the State (15 credits)
  • Children and International Development (15 credits)
  • A 15-credit module from the Sociology and Social Policy pathway or approved module from other courses or the Modern Language Centre

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad for the second semester of your second year. Our partner universities currently comprise:

  • Hong Kong University
  • National University of Singapore
  • University of California
  • George Washington University
  • University of Sydney
  • University of Auckland

 

 

Year 3

In Year 3 you will take a required 15 credit module in advanced research methods and the dissertation module which is worth 30 credits. The remaining 75 credits are taken as optional modules at least three of which must be from your chosen pathway. 

Required Modules

You are required to take the following modules:

  • Advanced Methods for Social Research (15 credits)
  • Dissertation (30 credits). This is a 6,000 word project or theoretical essay on a social science topic of your choice.
Optional Modules

In addition, you are required to take 75 credits worth of optional modules, including at least three modules from your chosen pathway.

Sociology and Social Policy Pathway

  • Work Placement (15 credits) (if not taken in year 2)
  • Social Sciences at Work (15 credits) (if not taken in year 2)
  • Education for the 21st Century: a global perspective (15 credits)
  • Analysing Health and Social Care (15 credits)
  • Civil and Political Rights (15 credits)
  • Political Activism and Social Change (15 credits)
  • Culture, Media and Society (15 credits)
  • Up to 30 credits worth of modules from the Children, Youth and Society pathway or of approved modules from other courses or the Modern Language Centre

 

 Children, Youth and Society Pathway

  • Work Placement (15 credits) (if not taken in year 2)
  • Social Sciences at Work (15 credits) (if not taken in year 2)
  • International and Comparative Youth Justice (15 credits)
  • Transition to Adulthood: a multi-disciplinary perspective (15 credits)
  • Childhood and Youth in Troubled Times (15 credits)
  • Learning Out of School: play, youth work and social pedagogy (15 credits)
  • Children, Families and the State (15 credits)
  • Up to 30 credits worth of modules from the Sociology and Social Policy pathway or of approved modules from other courses or the Modern Language Centre

 

Entry requirements

 

Required grades

AAB

Please note that A-level General Studies, Critical Thinking, Thinking Skills and Global Perspectives are not accepted by King's as one of your A-levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer.

Required grades

35 points overall (including TOK/EE) with three Higher Level subjects at 665

Required grades

45 Level 3 credits: 33 must be from units awarded at Distinction, with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit

Required grades

D3 D3 M2

Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels).

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

Further information below

If you are taking the new RQF BTEC Nationals (2016), you will not be required to fulfil the module requirement stipulated above - you will only need to get the right overall grade. If you are taking the QCF BTEC Nationals (2010), you must achieve both the required overall grade and the specified module grades. If you are unsure which BTEC you are studying, your teacher or school/college counsellor should be able to tell you.

Required grades

80% overall

Required grades

Visit our admissions webpages to view our international entry requirements and English language entry requirements.

Required subjects

None

Preferred subjects

Preferred but not required:
  • Anthropology
  • Economics
  • English Language/literature
  • Geography
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Religious studies
  • Sociology

Further information and other requirements

A-Level  AAB  Please note that A-level General Studies, Critical Thinking, Thinking Skills and Global Perspectives are not accepted by King's as one of your A levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer.
Access to HE Diploma 

D: 33 credits

M: 12 credits

P: 0 credits

Access to HE Diploma (for example, in Humanities) with 45 Level 3 credits: 33 must be from units awarded at Distinction, with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit.
Cambridge Pre-U D3 D3 M2 Combinations of Pre-U principal subjects and other qualifications (such as A-levels) considered.
BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF from 2010)  

DDM with eleven Distinctions and two A levels at grades AB

or

DDM with ten Distinctions and two A levels at grades AA

BTEC Level 3 Diploma (QCF from 2010)  

DM with six Distinctions and two A levels at grades AB

or

DM with four Distinctions and two A levels at grades AA

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (QCF from 2010)  

D with four modules at Distinction and two A levels at grades AB

or

M and two A levels at grades AA

Scottish Highers & Advanced Highers

AAB at Highers

and

AB at Advanced Highers

Must be a combination of three Scottish Highers and two Scottish Advanced Highers. We do not count the Higher and Advanced Higher in the same subject.
International Baccalaureate 35 points Including 665 at Higher Level. Note the total point score of 35 includes TOK/EE.
Other International Qualifications   Visit our admissions webpages to view our international entry requirements.
English Language requirements Band B Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements.

Selection procedure

Application deadline: January 15th 2019

Fees and funding

Full time tuition fees UK:

The UK tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is currently £9,250 per year. This is based on the UK Government’s cap.

Full time tuition fees EU:

Students starting their programme in 2019/20 (September 2019) who are eligible to pay EU fees will pay the same rate of tuition fees as UK students. This will apply for the duration of their programme, but may be subject to change by the UK Government for subsequent cohorts from 2020/21.

The UK tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is currently £9,250 per year. This is based on the UK Government’s cap.

Full time tuition fees International:

The International tuition fee for the 2019-2020 academic year is £18,900 per year.

Please note that the International tuition fee is subject to annual increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

All International applicants to Undergraduate programmes are required to pay a deposit of £2,000 against their first year’s tuition fee. This deposit is payable when you firmly accept an unconditional offer to study with us, and will be offset against your tuition fees when you join King’s.

Financial help and support

Visit the fees and funding webpages to find out more about bursaries, scholarships, grants, tuition fees, living expenses, student loans and other financial help available at King's.

Career prospects

The degree provides a rigorous intellectual grounding for careers in politics, public administration, NGOs and INGOs, charities, think tanks, and social advocacy organisations through its emphasis on generic transferable skills. The degree also provides a good basis for further training and postgraduate qualifications for a wide range of occupations including journalism, health management, social work and teaching. 

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Next steps

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