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Dr Tomasz Kosmala awarded the 2020 King's Outstanding PhD Thesis Prize

Dr Tomasz Kosmala, who completed a PhD in the Department of Mathematics in February 2020 under the supervision of Professor Markus Riedle, has been awarded the 2020 King’s Outstanding PhD Thesis Prize sponsored by Elsevier.

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The external examiners of Tomasz’ thesis, Professor F. Benth (University of Oslo) and Professor Z. Brzezniak (University of York), nominated his dissertation for this prize. The prize was awarded by a judging panel consisting of Dr Nigel Eady (Director of Research Talent) and Dr Sandrine Thuret (Chair, Research Degrees Examinations Board). These prizes are awarded twice per year (in January and July), and 15 prizes are given out across the year. The prize consists of a journal subscription, a certificate and a cheque to the sum of £100.

Tomasz's thesis is a first step in the direction of the study of non-linear stochastic partial differential equations driven by cylindrical Lévy processes, and thus generalising in a natural and nontrivial way some of the existing literature on random dynamical systems driven by Poisson random measures. He studies the problem of the existence of solutions in three different settings: variational solutions, stable noise, evolution equations in Banach space. Each of these settings required Tomasz to develop novel methods and techniques by combining various tools from pure and applied mathematics in an innovative way.

The thesis by Tomasz is outstanding work since it provides novel methods and techniques to solve problems in an area of modelling dynamical systems, in which not much has been known before his work. The developed tools will play an important role in further research and applications in modelling; the achieved results significantly contribute to the understanding of this new area. The thesis opens many avenues for new research as the approach by cylindrical Lévy processes is more general and more appropriate than other approaches.

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Markus Riedle

Markus Riedle

Professor of Probability Theory


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