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Biography

Christopher Holmes joined King’s in July 2016 having previously held lectureships at the University of Warwick and the University of Southampton. He received his PhD from the University of Warwick in 2010.

Research

  • Economic ideas in contemporary and historical contexts
  • The political economy of finance and money
  • Applications of the thought of Karl Polanyi
  • Political economy in general

Christopher researches on various aspects of political economy, including particularly the politics of finance and money and the role of economic ideas in public reasoning.

He has published on various issues in the political economy of money and finance, including on financial regulatory thought in both pre- and post-2008 contexts. He has also published a variety of articles on contemporary applications of the thought of Karl Polanyi. 

Christopher’s article 'Whatever it takes: Polanyian perspectives on the eurozone crisis and the gold standard' was recently featured in an Economy and Society special virtual edition on 'Questions of Europe', which has been published in response to the British vote to leave the European Union.

He was awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship for the 2014-15 academic year, which funded the writing of a research monograph on economic reasoning through the dualism of market and state in historical and contemporary contexts.

Teaching

Christopher Holmes has taught a wide variety of modules on finance, money, economic thought and international political economy in general.  He currently leads a third year undergraduate module on the Political Economy of Money and Introduction to Economics modules for MA and 1st year undergraduate students.

Office hours

Monday: 16.30 - 17.30
Book here: https://drcholmesoffice.youcanbook.me/

PhD Supervisions

Christopher is happy to consider enquiries from PhD applicants looking to work in any areas related to his research interests.

Expertise and public engagement

Christopher is happy to discuss on issues in British and European political economy, particularly relating to finance and regulation.